History Series / SteptoeAndSon

12th Feb '18 11:30:42 AM eroock
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!!Provides Examples Of:

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!!Provides Examples Of:examples of:
12th Feb '18 11:30:24 AM eroock
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* HomeEarlySurprise: Used as the punchline to a rather [[ValuesDissonance values-dissonant]] episode. Harold strikes up a friendship with a man he doesn't realise is gay, which was criminalised in the UK at the time. When Harold is visiting, the friend tries to seduce him. Harold makes his excuses and, as he leaves, finds a policeman at the door. He gives a hasty excuse and runs away. The episode ends with the friend telling the policeman: "Hello Edgar. You're home early."
22nd Nov '17 2:37:29 PM Kitchen90
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A classic BritCom of the 1960s and '70s, written by famed British comedy writers Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, focusing on the perennial conflicts between a pair of rag-and-bone men, Harold Steptoe (Harry H. Corbett) and his elderly father Albert (Wilfrid Brambell). Airy, pretentious snob Harold has finer aspirations than riding the horse-and-cart for the rest of his life and is determined to improve himself, whilst wily, sneaky Albert is equally determined to sabotage his every effort and keep him in the family home for a good while yet.

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A classic BritCom of the 1960s and '70s, written by famed British comedy writers Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, focusing on the perennial conflicts between a pair of rag-and-bone men, Harold Steptoe (Harry H. Corbett) and his elderly father Albert (Wilfrid Brambell).(Creator/WilfridBrambell). Airy, pretentious snob Harold has finer aspirations than riding the horse-and-cart for the rest of his life and is determined to improve himself, whilst wily, sneaky Albert is equally determined to sabotage his every effort and keep him in the family home for a good while yet.
12th Aug '17 10:21:40 AM ClintEastwood
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* CatchPhrase: "You ''dirty'' old man!" Parodied with Brambell's appearance as Paul [=McCartney=]'s grandfather in ''Film/AHardDaysNight'', where people keep saying he's a ''clean'' old man.

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* CatchPhrase: "You ''dirty'' old man!" Parodied with Brambell's appearance as Paul [=McCartney=]'s Music/PaulMcCartney's grandfather in ''Film/AHardDaysNight'', where people keep saying he's a ''clean'' old man.
16th Apr '17 2:45:58 PM mlsmithca
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* DeadGuyJunior: "A Death in the Family" features an animal example. After the Steptoes' horse, Hercules, dies of a heart attack at the ripe old age of 39, Harold purchases a replacement whom he names Samson... unaware that the horse is a mare, and [[YourTomcatIsPregnant a pregnant mare]] at that. Albert delivers the newly renamed Delilah's foal, and, at Harold's invitation, names him Hercules II.



* OOCIsSeriousBusiness: Albert takes Hercules the horse's death in "A Death in the Family" especially hard, losing all interest in even getting out of bed each morning. Harold tries to rouse him by suggesting they go to the cinema to see ''I Am Curious (Yellow)'', but when even the promise of seeing uncensored Swedish sexual intercourse does not snap Albert out of his funk, Harold realises just how serious his depression is. (Fortunately, when Albert delivers the new horse's foal and names him Hercules II, he is soon back to normal - and very keen to see ''I Am Curious (Yellow)''.)



* YourTomcatIsPregnant: After the Steptoes' horse, Hercules, dies of a heart attack at the age of 39 in "A Death in the Family", they buy a new horse whom they name Samson. Samson has to be re-named Delilah after ''her'' foal is delivered by the Steptoes.

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* YourTomcatIsPregnant: After the Steptoes' horse, Hercules, dies of a heart attack at the age of 39 in "A Death in the Family", they buy Harold buys a new horse whom they name he names Samson. Samson has to be re-named Delilah after ''her'' foal is delivered by Albert (who berates Harold for not noticing that the Steptoes.horse was female ''and'' heavily pregnant).
15th Apr '17 12:32:11 PM mlsmithca
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* OhCrap: Albert gets this look in "Porn Yesterday" when Harold notes that the scene in the ''What the Butler Saw'' machine he picked up on his rounds has changed to a woman in a bath, with the milkman at the door with a crate of milk and no clothes... as he knows it's only a matter of time before Harold realises that the milkman in the film is Albert himself.
15th Apr '17 11:59:19 AM mlsmithca
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** In "A Star is Born", Harold hopes that his landing the lead role in a local amateur dramatics production will be his ticket to stardom, but after Albert is drafted to replace an unavailable cast member, he shocks Harold by affecting a flawless RP accent.[[note]] Wilfrid Brambell achieved this by ''dropping'' the accent he used to play Albert and speaking in his normal voice.[[/note]] Judging from the audience and cast reactions on the night, Albert's performance was dazzling while Harold's was disastrous.

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** In "A Star is Born", Harold hopes that his landing the lead role in a local amateur dramatics production will be his ticket to stardom, but after Albert is drafted to replace an unavailable cast member, he shocks Harold by affecting a flawless RP accent.[[note]] accent[[note]] Wilfrid Brambell achieved this by ''dropping'' the accent he used to play Albert and speaking in his normal voice.[[/note]] and revealing that he made stage appearances during his service in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Judging from the audience and cast reactions on the night, Albert's performance was dazzling while Harold's was disastrous.


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* OohMeAccentsSlipping: Harold affects a very dodgy Received Pronunciation accent when he is putting on airs, whether to Albert or to someone whom he is trying to impress. When Albert inevitably gets on Harold's nerves during such scenes, Harold's anger causes him to revert to his normal accent.
15th Apr '17 11:55:36 AM mlsmithca
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** In "Loathe Story", Harold has spent considerable money on badminton equipment and joined a local tennis and badminton club as a means of socialising with the upwardly mobile. He plays a game against Albert in front of their house... and discovers the difficult way that Albert was champion of his regiment when he was in the Army, and can still play a mean game. To compound Harold's embarrassment at getting thrashed, Albert goes down to the tennis and badminton club and becomes a member - and even schedules a game against an attractive female member whom Harold was hoping to woo.
15th Apr '17 2:01:05 AM mlsmithca
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* FailureIsTheOnlyOption: Harold's attempts at upward mobility.

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* FailureIsTheOnlyOption: Harold's attempts at upward mobility.mobility are invariably doomed from the start, either because he isn't as clever or as savvy as he believes himself to be or because Albert sabotages his plans (usually deliberately).



* HiddenDepths: A constant source of frustration for Harold is Albert's tendency to reveal himself as being skilled at something Harold himself aspires to do.
** In "The Diploma", Harold is studying to be a TV engineer but struggles to make sense of the engineering schematics he is using to practice assembling a set; Albert looks over Harold's work and calmly explains that he has several pieces in the wrong place, and gets the set working within seconds.
** In "A Star is Born", Harold hopes that his landing the lead role in a local amateur dramatics production will be his ticket to stardom, but after Albert is drafted to replace an unavailable cast member, he shocks Harold by affecting a flawless RP accent.[[note]] Wilfrid Brambell achieved this by ''dropping'' the accent he used to play Albert and speaking in his normal voice.[[/note]] Judging from the audience and cast reactions on the night, Albert's performance was dazzling while Harold's was disastrous.



* SlobsVersusSnobs: "Without Prejudice" sees Harold and Albert looking to buy a suburban semi-detached house. However, the local residents are horrified at the effect rag and bone men setting up shop in their neighbourhood might have on their property prices, and try bribing them not to buy the house.

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* SlobsVersusSnobs: SlobsVersusSnobs:
** One of the main conflicts of the series pits Harold's snobbish aspirations of upward mobility against Albert's slobbish acceptance of the life of dirt and poverty they already lead. Albert usually emerges victorious when the two philosophies clash.
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"Without Prejudice" sees Harold and Albert looking to buy a suburban semi-detached house. However, the local residents are horrified at the effect rag and bone men setting up shop in their neighbourhood might have on their property prices, and try bribing them not to buy the house.
13th Apr '17 5:54:24 PM mlsmithca
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* SirSwearsAlot: At the rate of 10p per swear, the contents of the swear—box, amounting to the sum of ₤80·³⁰ᵖ, the vast majority of which were contributed by Albert. More than eight times what they have in they have in their bank & building society accounts combined!
* SlobsVersusSnobs

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* SirSwearsAlot: SirSwearsALot: At the rate of 10p per swear, the contents of the swear—box, amounting to the sum of ₤80·³⁰ᵖ, the vast majority of which were contributed by Albert. More than eight times what they have in they have in their bank & building society accounts combined!
* SlobsVersusSnobsSlobsVersusSnobs: "Without Prejudice" sees Harold and Albert looking to buy a suburban semi-detached house. However, the local residents are horrified at the effect rag and bone men setting up shop in their neighbourhood might have on their property prices, and try bribing them not to buy the house.
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