History Series / StartrekTheNextGeneration

14th Aug '17 3:11:03 PM Ambaryerno
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A future depicted in the TNG GrandFinale "All Good Things..." said that the Romulan Empire was overthrown by the Klingons, rendering the original treaty obsolete and the Enterprise had a cloak.
** In Deep Space Nine, every local Alpha Quadrant superpower had a vested interest in the discovery of the Dominion in the Gamma Quadrant and the Romulans loaned a cloak to the Starfleet ship the Defiant with a dedicated Romulan operator and with the caveat the cloak could not be used in the Alpha Quadrant.

to:

** A future depicted in the TNG GrandFinale "All Good Things..." said that the Romulan Empire was overthrown by the Klingons, rendering the original treaty obsolete and the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' had a cloak.
** In Deep Space Nine, every local Alpha Quadrant superpower had a vested interest in the discovery of the Dominion in the Gamma Quadrant and the Romulans loaned a cloak to the Starfleet ship the Defiant ''Defiant'' with a dedicated Romulan operator and with the caveat the cloak could not be used in the Alpha Quadrant.[[note]]Both provisions of which eventually fell by the wayside, with ''Defiant'' first losing her Romulan officer, and later the restriction on cloaking in the Alpha Quadrant being abandoned entirely.[[/note]]
14th Aug '17 2:06:11 PM KJMackley
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WatsonianVsDoylist: Early in the shows' development, people were talking about whether the Enterprise should have a cloaking device (being a well established piece of technology with the Romulans and Klingons, as well as several instances of acquiring such an item they could study) and Roddenberry was against it, saying that Starfleet are scientists and explorers, they don't go sneaking around. In part because of all the fan questions, it wasn't until the seventh season episode "The Pegasus" where an InUniverse explanation was given; a treaty between the Romulans and the Federation decades prior banned the Federation from using or developing cloaking technology. When illegal development of Federation cloaking technology was discovered, Picard affirmed that the treaty kept them in peace. In later episodes, various circumstances permitted the use of cloaks on Federation ships:
** A future depicted in the TNG GrandFinale "All Good Things..." said that the Romulan Empire was overthrown by the Klingons, rendering the original treaty obsolete and the Enterprise had a cloak.
** In Deep Space Nine, every local Alpha Quadrant superpower had a vested interest in the discovery of the Dominion in the Gamma Quadrant and the Romulans loaned a cloak to the Starfleet ship the Defiant with a dedicated Romulan operator and with the caveat the cloak could not be used in the Alpha Quadrant.
11th Aug '17 6:43:54 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CaughtInTheRipple:
** The episode "Yesterday's Enterprise" opens with the Enterprise-D coming upon a time rip with the Enterprise-C (lost decades earlier) emerging. Suddenly, reality is changed and the Federation is now involved in a war with the Klingons. On top of that, Tasha Yar (killed in season one) is still on the bridge crew. No one notices anything is different, although Guinan suspects something is wrong.
** The episode "Conundrum" has an unknown alien ship cause a bit of LaserGuidedAmnesia on the crew and alter the computer records of the ship to make the crew think they are at war with another alien race called the Lysians, who are enemies of the race that screwed with their minds. For good measure, they also have a member of their race infiltrate the crew and pretend to be the NumberTwo. Everyone is initially caught in the ripple, but Picard eventually does some SpottingTheThread.
4th Aug '17 3:05:01 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Picard was firmly established as MarriedToTheJob early on, despite harboring intense feelings for Beverly. "Lessons" showed us why he must never act on those impulses: He attempted a relationship with one astrophysicist, only to order her to her death. Just as he had with Jack Crusher, Beverly's late husband. As a Captain, he cannot fraternize too closely with people whose lives he might one day forfeit.

to:

** Picard was firmly established as MarriedToTheJob early on, despite harboring intense feelings for Beverly. "Lessons" showed us why he must never act on those impulses: He attempted a relationship with one astrophysicist, only to order her to what could have been her death. Just as he had with Jack Crusher, Beverly's late husband. As a Captain, captain, he cannot fraternize too closely with people whose lives he might one day forfeit.



'''Data:''' Then I will [[NeverBeHurtAgain delete the appropriate programme]].

to:

'''Data:''' Then I will [[NeverBeHurtAgain delete the appropriate programme]].program]].



* HyperAwareness: Data, due to being an android would see more into events then was actually relevant.

to:

* HyperAwareness: Data, due to being an android android, would see more into events then was actually relevant.



** The USS Voyager had "variable warp field geometry" to minimize damage to space/time. This is why the nacelles moved before it jumped into warp, but it was stated in later episodes of Voyager and Deep Space Nine that the technology was being retrofitted to older ships with fixed-mounted nacelles. Medical ships travelling at warp 13 are still probably a writer memory lapse, considering that it was stated many times that warp 10 represents infinite speed and requires infinite energy to attain. The only possible explanation for warp 13 would be that they switch to a different speed scale in the future.
** WordOfGod says that Warp 13 was used intentionally as a hint of new developments in warp technology in the alternate future.

to:

** The USS Voyager had "variable warp field geometry" to minimize damage to space/time. This is why the nacelles moved before it jumped into warp, but it was stated in later episodes of Voyager and Deep Space Nine that the technology was being retrofitted to older ships with fixed-mounted nacelles. Medical ships travelling traveling at warp 13 are still probably a writer memory lapse, considering that it was stated many times that warp 10 represents infinite speed and requires infinite energy to attain. The only possible explanation for warp 13 would be that they switch to a different speed scale in the future.
future.[[note]]This would make sense, assuming they never figure out how to break the warp 10 barrier. A ship's velocity increases asymptotically after warp 9, so there's a major difference between warp 9.999 and warp 9.9999. At some point, they would naturally gain the ability to travel at such high velocities. Restructuring the warp scale by, say, setting warp 20 as infinite speed with an asymptotic increase after 19 would make intuitive sense.
** WordOfGod says that Warp warp 13 was used intentionally as a hint of new developments in warp technology in the alternate future.



** In "Ethics" Dr. Crusher turns on another doctor for trying unconventional techniques to save someone's life, accusing her of choosing which treatments to give based on her own bias. When she questions this doctor's judgement she says "I made the choice that I thought gave him the best chance of surviving, isn't that what you would have done?" Meanwhile Crusher is doing the exact same thing in Worf's case: picking and choosing which options to give him... except Worf isn't unconscious, and Crusher is ignoring his opinions and patient autonomy nonetheless. This is the only "nod" to Crusher's hypocrisy when it comes to medical ethics.

to:

** In "Ethics" "Ethics", Dr. Crusher turns on another doctor for trying unconventional techniques to save someone's life, accusing her of choosing which treatments to give based on her own bias. When she questions this doctor's judgement judgement, she says "I made the choice that I thought gave him the best chance of surviving, isn't that what you would have done?" Meanwhile Meanwhile, Crusher is doing the exact same thing in Worf's case: picking and choosing which options to give him... except Worf isn't unconscious, and Crusher is ignoring his opinions and patient autonomy nonetheless. This is the only "nod" to Crusher's hypocrisy when it comes to medical ethics.
4th Aug '17 2:49:38 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Any number of women seen on screen, however briefly, in the early seasons.



** Dr. Pulaski is bigoted and condescending towards Data purely because he is a mechanic life-form, and it's clear from the beginning that she believes he's nothing more than a very advanced computer, even calling him a "device." She continues to act in a manner that would be considered reprehensible from a starfleet officer considering the social mores of the show.

to:

** Dr. Pulaski is bigoted and condescending towards Data purely because he is a mechanic mechanical life-form, and it's clear from the beginning that she believes he's nothing more than a very advanced computer, even calling him a "device." She continues to act in a manner that would be considered reprehensible from a starfleet Starfleet officer considering the social mores of the show.



* TheFarmerAndTheViper: Q actually uses this ''against'' the crew when he's turned mortal by the continuum, choosing a human form and going to them for help, assuming that their values and willingness to forgive "almost any offense" will mean they are willing to protect him from the variety of less-moral creatures he has tormented in the past, and who are willing to take advantage of his newfound humanity. [[SubvertedTrope He's not entirely right in this assumption]], but right enough for subverting this trope in "Viper part" too, when [[spoiler:Data's sacrifice moved Q into an attempt to save the ship at the cost of his own life]].

to:

* TheFarmerAndTheViper: Q actually uses this ''against'' the crew when he's turned mortal by the continuum, choosing a human form and going to them for help, assuming that their values and willingness to forgive "almost any offense" will mean they are willing to protect him from the variety of less-moral creatures he has tormented in the past, and who are willing to take advantage of his newfound humanity. [[SubvertedTrope He's not entirely right in this assumption]], but right enough for subverting this trope in "Viper part" too, when [[spoiler:Data's sacrifice moved Q into to an attempt to save the ship at the cost of his own life]].



* FatherIDontWantToFight: Worf's son Alexander is adamant on not embracing the Klingon culture, having grown up in the peaceful, functional Federation one. This causes Worf much consternation, because he knows that Alexander will be eaten alive by Klingon politics the minute he inevitably tries to initiate reform. [[spoiler:A time-traveling future Alexander indicates that this is exactly what happens and Worf was killed by a rival house as a result. In the present Worf consoles him that the time-traveler's presence has already begun to change their timeline.]]

to:

** Being assimilated by the Borg.
* FatherIDontWantToFight: Worf's son Alexander is adamant on not embracing the Klingon culture, having grown up in the peaceful, functional Federation one. This causes Worf much consternation, because he knows that Alexander will be eaten alive by Klingon politics the minute he inevitably tries to initiate reform. [[spoiler:A time-traveling future Alexander indicates that this is exactly what happens and Worf was killed by a rival house as a result. In the present present, Worf consoles him that the time-traveler's presence has already begun to change their timeline.]]



** In the SeriesFinale "All Good Things...", Picard asks Q what he's ''really'' saying about humanity. Q begins to whisper something in his ear, then changes his mind, smiling broadly, bidding farewell, "In any case, I'll be watching. And if you're very lucky, I'll drop by to say hello from time to time. See you... out there!"
* FireForgedFriends: "Darmok".

to:

** In the SeriesFinale "All Good Things...", Picard asks Q what he's ''really'' saying about humanity. Q begins to whisper something in his ear, then changes his mind, smiling broadly, bidding farewell, "In any case, I'll be watching. And if you're very lucky, I'll drop by to say hello from time to time. See you... out there!"
* FireForgedFriends: "Darmok". This is the entire point of beaming Picard and the alien captain to the planet, for them to bond through fighting an energy being together.



** The [[TearJerker tearjerkingly brilliant]] "The Inner Light", commonly seen as one of the best, tells the story of an alien race doomed by instability in their sun who send out a space probe that finds Picard and [[MindRape forces]] him to hallucinate living a lifetime among their final generations before the end, and thus ensures that their species will at least be remembered. It affected ''Picard'' and no other crew member. The life he lived involved getting married, having a family, and other things he's never made time for - taking it from a disturbing experience to something he sees as a gift.

to:

** The [[TearJerker tearjerkingly brilliant]] "The Inner Light", commonly seen as one of the best, tells the story of an alien race doomed by instability in their sun who send out a space probe that finds Picard and [[MindRape forces]] him to hallucinate living a lifetime among their final generations before the end, and thus ensures that their species will at least be remembered. It affected ''Picard'' and no other crew member. The life he lived involved getting being married, having a family, and other things he's never made time for - taking it from a disturbing experience to something he sees as a gift.



* FountainOfYouth: "Rascals", in which a transporter malfunction turns Picard, Keiko, Ro and Guinan into children, during which time the ''Enterprise'' is captured by hostile aliens. Despite the fact that they clearly keep their adult minds, they still have to save the day using childlike cleverness rather than their usual methods. As children, they would lack the strength and speed to do many of the physical actions an adult could perform.

to:

* FountainOfYouth: "Rascals", in which a transporter malfunction turns Picard, Keiko, Ro and Guinan into children, during which time the ''Enterprise'' is captured by hostile aliens. Despite the fact that they clearly keep their adult minds, they still have to save the day using childlike cleverness rather than their usual methods. As children, they would lack the strength and speed to do many of the physical actions an adult could perform. It's established that as far as Crusher can tell, the four would develop normally with no ill effects, but this is never explored as a means of extending people's lives.



* FreudWasRight: [[invoked]] Inverted in "Phantasms", when Data recreates Dr. Freud in the holodeck with the hope of interpreting the disturbing images generated by his dream program. Freud, of course, proceeds to assume it's all about Data's issues with his mother and his sexuality, neither of which he has, because he's an android.

to:

* FreudWasRight: [[invoked]] Inverted in "Phantasms", when Data recreates Dr. Freud in the holodeck with the hope of interpreting the disturbing images generated by his dream program. Freud, of course, proceeds to assume it's all about Data's issues with his mother and his sexuality, neither of which he has, ''has'', because he's an android.



** "Frame of Mind" is all about aliens attempting to convince Riker he's crazy.



** And in the episode "Genesis", Neanderthal Riker can be seen flipping the bird for about 2 seconds.

to:

** And in the episode "Genesis", Neanderthal Cro-Magnon Riker can be seen flipping the bird for about 2 seconds.



* AGodAmI: Q plays with this in "Tapestry". Picard dies and enters the "afterlife", where he finds Q awaiting him, who informs him that he's dead and that Q himself is {{God}}. Picard rejects this, because he doesn't think that "the Universe is so badly designed". Q snarks that Picard is lucky Q doesn't smite him for his blasphemy.

to:

* AGodAmI: Q plays with this in "Tapestry". Picard dies and enters the "afterlife", where he finds Q awaiting him, who informs him that he's dead and that Q himself is {{God}}. Picard rejects this, because he doesn't think that "the Universe universe is so badly designed". Q snarks that Picard is lucky Q doesn't smite him for his blasphemy.
4th Aug '17 1:10:30 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CasinoEpisode: In ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E12TheRoyale The Royale]]'', the crew discover a replica of a 20th-century earth casino on an alien planet. Turns out the aliens modeled it after a badly-written novel.

to:

* CasinoEpisode: In ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E12TheRoyale The Royale]]'', the crew discover a replica of a 20th-century earth Earth casino on an alien planet. Turns out the aliens modeled it after a badly-written novel.



* CommunicationsOfficer: This was the original duty for Worf, perhaps owing to his bicultural background.



-->'''Picard''': There was no opportunity. There was no pause. He just kept talking in one long incredibly unbroken sentence, moving from topic to topic so that no one had a chance to interrupt. It was really quite hypnotic.

to:

-->'''Picard''': There was no opportunity. There was no pause. ''[monotone]'' He just kept talking in one long incredibly unbroken sentence, sentence moving from topic to topic so that no one had a chance to interrupt. It interrupt it was really quite hypnotic.



** This is one interpretation of Worf's decision to spare Toral at end of the Klingon civil war. He let's Toral live, but Toral receives discommendation instead, the same FateWorseThanDeath that Worf had received from Toral's father.

to:

** This is one interpretation of Worf's decision to spare Toral at end of the Klingon civil war. He let's lets Toral live, but Toral receives discommendation instead, the same FateWorseThanDeath that Worf had received from Toral's father.



* CulturedWarrior: Picard is usually the example, but TNG basically made ''everyone'' in Starfleet this to some degree. (It's from [=DS9=], but Worf's comment that "I am a Starfleet officer. I know many things," seems pertinent, especially as he was commenting on Ferengi culture.) Though it also made Starfleet [[MildlyMilitary less militaristic...]]
* CurbStompBattle: The Battle of Wolf 359, in which a fleet of forty Federation starships faced off against a single Borg cube; given such a wide disparity of forces, the outcome was never in doubt. ''Enterprise'' was too far away to join the fleet, but not too far for a pre-battle conversation between the senior staff and the admiral commanding. [[spoiler:When ''Enterprise'' finally reaches the battle site, all that's left is the shattered remains of the fleet, and the exhaust trail of the Borg cube, which shows no sign of scathe once it's finally caught up with, well within the Sol system.]]

to:

* CulturedWarrior: Picard is usually the example, but TNG basically made ''everyone'' in Starfleet this to some degree. (It's from [=DS9=], but Worf's comment that "I am a graduate of Starfleet officer.Academy. I know many things," seems pertinent, especially as he was commenting on Ferengi culture.) Though it also made Starfleet [[MildlyMilitary less militaristic...]]
** Worf also shows off his education in "The Next Phase", when he points out that the Bajoran Death Chant is over two hours long.
* CurbStompBattle: The Battle of Wolf 359, in which a fleet of forty Federation starships faced off against a single Borg cube; given such a wide disparity of forces, the outcome was never in doubt. ''Enterprise'' was too far away to join the fleet, but not too far for a pre-battle conversation between the senior staff and the admiral commanding. [[spoiler:When ''Enterprise'' finally reaches the battle site, all that's left is the shattered remains of the fleet, and the exhaust trail of the Borg cube, which shows no sign of scathe damage once it's finally caught up with, well within the Sol system.]]



* CyborgHelmsman: Geordi was the Helmsman in the first season.

to:

* CyborgHelmsman: Geordi was the Helmsman helmsman in the first season.



** In the second part of "Gambit", Troi declares Riker dead after being shot by [[spoiler: an undercover Picard]]

to:

** In the second part of "Gambit", Troi declares Riker dead after being shot by [[spoiler: an undercover Picard]]Picard]].



* DeusExMachina

to:

* DeusExMachina%%* DeusExMachina ZERO CONTEXT



* DieHardOnAnX: "Power Play" and "Starship Mine". The latter moreso than the former: it takes precisely 15 fifteen minutes for Picard to turn into Bruce Willis, and even the "Who said we were terrorists?" line is uttered.

to:

* DieHardOnAnX: "Power Play" and "Starship Mine". The latter moreso than the former: it takes precisely 15 fifteen minutes for Picard to turn into Bruce Willis, and even the "Who said we were terrorists?" line is uttered.



%%* DoAndroidsDream: "I, Borg"

to:

%%* * DoAndroidsDream: "I, Borg"Turns out they do, in "Birthright".



* DroppedABridgeOnHim: [[spoiler:Tasha Yar]] in "Skin of Evil" gets unceremoniously killed by Armus.

to:

* DroppedABridgeOnHim: DroppedABridgeOnHim:
**
[[spoiler:Tasha Yar]] in "Skin of Evil" gets unceremoniously killed by Armus.


Added DiffLines:

** This is very nearly how Worf goes out; a cargo container crushes his spine, and he seeks to commit suicide.
4th Aug '17 12:32:45 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "Timescape", said by Picard while suffering in temporal narcosis.

to:

** "Timescape", said by Picard while suffering in from temporal narcosis.



* BuryYourDisabled: Subverted in "Ethics". Worf becomes paraplegic after an accident. By Klingon tradition, he can commit ritualistic suicide (and he comes close to it). However, he takes another presented option when a research doctor wants to test her theory that she can create a new spinal cord for him.

to:

* BuryYourDisabled: Subverted in "Ethics". Worf becomes paraplegic after an accident. By Klingon tradition, he can must commit ritualistic suicide (and he comes close to it). However, he takes another presented option when a research doctor wants to test her theory that she can create a new spinal cord for him.



** Geordi who gets pwned nearly as much as Worf (suffering from TheWorfEffect). He's even hopeless with women. One particularly cruel episode had an alien taunt his blindness by moving his visor around, just because. The series seems to never let us go on the fact that he's blind (until the movies, well actually he gets taunted again in ''Series/{{Generations}}'', which may or may not have led him to go get cybernetic replacements by ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''.). And apparently his mom disappears as some plot of the week. Worst yet is that nobody gives a damn about his mom afterwards. And to add insult to injury, in Voyager's "Timeless" he tries to stop ''Harry Kim'' and fails. Ouch. In one episode, he's heading on his merry way to Risa for some rest, relaxation and poontang. He gets kidnapped by Romulans and gets a MindRape from them. See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwKl33uFQ2E here]] for further proof of his incredibly poor luck.

to:

** Geordi Geordi, who gets pwned nearly as much as Worf (suffering from TheWorfEffect). He's even hopeless with women. One particularly cruel episode had an alien taunt his blindness by moving his visor around, just because. The series seems to never let us go on the fact that he's blind (until the movies, well actually he gets taunted again in ''Series/{{Generations}}'', which may or may not have led him to go get cybernetic replacements by ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''.). And apparently his mom disappears as some plot of the week. Worst yet is that nobody gives a damn about his mom afterwards. And to add insult to injury, in Voyager's "Timeless" he tries to stop ''Harry Kim'' and fails. Ouch. In one episode, he's heading on his merry way to Risa for some rest, relaxation and poontang. He gets kidnapped by Romulans and gets a MindRape from them. See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwKl33uFQ2E here]] for further proof of his incredibly poor luck.
23rd Jul '17 3:43:20 PM Jayseki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GemTissue: The Crystalline Entity, a massive snowflake-like creature that absorbed organic matter, converting it into energy in order to grow. Although the entity was shattered in its debut episiode, it (or another) would later appear in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' novels and ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline''.

to:

* GemTissue: The Crystalline Entity, a massive snowflake-like creature that absorbed organic matter, converting it into energy in order to grow. Although the entity was shattered in its debut episiode, second appearance, it (or another) would later appear in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' novels and ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline''.
23rd Jul '17 3:28:38 PM Jayseki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--->'''Data:''' At lest '''we're''' acquainted with the judge.

to:

--->'''Data:''' At lest least '''we're''' acquainted with the judge.
23rd Jul '17 3:27:16 PM Jayseki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DreamApocalypse: In the season 1 episode "The Big Goodbye," Picard is on the holodeck when one of the characters asks him: "When you're gone, will this world still exist? Will my wife and kids still be waiting for me at home?"

to:

* DreamApocalypse: In the season Season 1 episode "The Big Goodbye," Picard is on the holodeck when one of the characters asks him: "When you're gone, will this world still exist? Will my wife and kids still be waiting for me at home?"
This list shows the last 10 events of 974. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.StartrekTheNextGeneration