History Series / StarTrekEnterprise

30th May '16 11:10:20 AM DrRomoray
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During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, to stop further attacks against Earth. This season dealt with the moral compromises the crew had to make, as well as coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.

to:

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome [[DarkerAndEdgier heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, to stop further attacks against Earth. This season dealt with the moral compromises the crew had to make, as well as coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.
30th May '16 11:01:05 AM DrRomoray
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ENT is a prequel series set in the 22nd century, about 100 years before ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''--though in practice, it worked better as a [[{{Interquel}} semi-sequel]] to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', as hinted by the early appearances of Creator/JamesCromwell and ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' aliens like the Nausicaans, Borg and Ferengi. 46 years after Dr. Cochrane's historic warp flight, Captain Jonathan Archer is put in command of the ''Enterprise'' (NX-01), a bleeding-edge warp-5 starship. The key selling point of this series was that space travel was not as casual as it became later in the chronology; most ships hadn't even left Earth's solar system. Unlike the previous ''Trek'' series, these crewmembers were also prone to swear and [[{{Fanservice}} walk around in their underwear]]. The series only lasted four seasons, making it the shortest-lived ''Star Trek'' since the [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries animated series]], and the shortest-lived live-action series in the franchise other than [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original]].

The first and second seasons dealt with exploration. The ''Enterprise'' is the first ship designed for exploration, and thus the first to visit many of the worlds explored in these seasons. The Temporal Cold War arc was also introduced during this time, which tied into the "[[TimePolice Department of Temporal Investigations]]" introduced in previous ''Star Treks'': Factions in the future were using time travel to manipulate [[SpaceColdWar space politics]] in their favour. This plot was forced on the writers through [[ExecutiveMeddling the network]]--presumably so as to avoid the [[ForegoneConclusion lack of suspense]] expected from a prequel series. Still, even the showrunners didn't care for it, so it unfortunately just pops up from time to time before being [[AbortedArc terminated]] the ''second'' the executives lost interest.

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, stop further attacks against Earth. This season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.

At the start of Season 4, most of the writing staff was replaced and a new head writer, Manny Coto, was put in charge. This resulted in significant changes. Instead of a season-long arc, most stories were spread over [[ContinuityCreep 2 or 3 episodes at a time]]. Standalone stories were dropped, more or less entirely. This season dealt with the fallout of the Xindi attack, with many humans becoming violently xenophobic, and a brewing war with the as-yet-unseen Romulan Star Empire. But the most popular arc dealt with social reform on Vulcan--a piercing look into their culture which hadn't been done since The Original Series.

to:

ENT is a prequel series set in the 22nd century, about around 100 years before ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''--though in practice, it worked better as a [[{{Interquel}} semi-sequel]] to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', as hinted by the early appearances of Creator/JamesCromwell and ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' aliens like the Nausicaans, Borg and Ferengi. 46 years after Dr. Cochrane's historic warp flight, Captain Jonathan Archer is put in command of the ''Enterprise'' (NX-01), a bleeding-edge warp-5 cutting-edge warp 5 starship. The key selling point of this series was that space travel was not as casual as it became later in the chronology; most ships hadn't even left Earth's solar system. Unlike the previous ''Trek'' series, these crewmembers were also prone to swear and [[{{Fanservice}} walk around in their underwear]]. The series only lasted four seasons, making it the shortest-lived ''Star Trek'' since the [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries animated series]], and the shortest-lived live-action series in the franchise other than [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original]].

The first and second seasons dealt with exploration. The ''Enterprise'' is the first ship designed for exploration, and thus the first to visit many of the worlds explored in these seasons. Seasons 1 and 2. The Temporal Cold War arc was also introduced during this time, which tied back into the "[[TimePolice Department of Temporal Investigations]]" introduced in previous ''Star Treks'': Factions in the future were using time travel to manipulate [[SpaceColdWar space [[MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight shift politics]] in their favour. This plot was forced on the writers through by [[ExecutiveMeddling the network]]--presumably so as to avoid the [[ForegoneConclusion lack of suspense]] expected from a prequel series. Still, even the showrunners didn't care for it, so it unfortunately just pops up from time to time before being [[AbortedArc terminated]] the ''second'' moment the executives lost interest.

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, to stop further attacks against Earth. This season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while as well as coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.

At the start of Season 4, most of the writing staff was replaced and a new head writer, Manny Coto, was put in charge. This resulted in significant changes. Instead of a season-long arc, most stories were spread over [[ContinuityCreep 2 or 3 episodes at a time]]. time. Standalone stories were dropped, more or less entirely. [[ContinuityCreep entirely]]. This season dealt with the fallout of the Xindi attack, with many humans becoming violently xenophobic, and a brewing war with the as-yet-unseen Romulan Star Empire. Empire (which is a well-established part of ''Trek'' canon). But the most popular arc dealt with social reform on Vulcan--a piercing look into their culture culture, the likes of which hadn't been done since The Original Series.



Ironically, ''Enterprise'' is, by all indications, the only ''Star Trek'' series to take place in both the "old" timeline -- comprising the prior shows and movies -- and the "new" timeline subsequently created by ''Film/StarTrek (2009)'' and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', with its presence in the former timeline being confirmed by the series finale, and mentions of the now-Admiral Archer and a model NX-01 establishing its presence in the latter. Though creators Rick Berman and Brannon Braga suggested early in the show's run that it took place in an entirely separate timeline from the events of ''First Contact'', later episodes disregarded it and slotted in perfectly with the series continuity, to the point that the DistantFinale took place on Jean-Luc Picard's ''Enterprise.''

to:

Ironically, ''Enterprise'' is, by all indications, the only ''Star Trek'' series to take place in both the "old" timeline -- comprising the prior shows and movies -- and the "new" timeline subsequently created by ''Film/StarTrek (2009)'' and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', with its presence in the former timeline being confirmed by the series finale, and mentions of the now-Admiral Archer and a model NX-01 establishing its presence in the latter. Though creators Rick Berman and Brannon Braga suggested early in the show's run that it took place in an entirely separate timeline alternate universe from the events of ''First Contact'', later episodes [[FlipFlopOfGod disregarded it it]] and slotted in perfectly with the series series' continuity, to the point that where the DistantFinale took place on Jean-Luc Picard's ''Enterprise.''
29th May '16 3:00:20 PM DrRomoray
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During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, stop further attack against Earth. This season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.

to:

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewership which led to a {{retool}} in season three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth under the guidance of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to enter negotiations or, failing that, stop further attack attacks against Earth. This season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while coming to terms with the [[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.
29th May '16 2:55:31 PM DrRomoray
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'''''Star Trek: Enterprise''''' is the fourth SpinOff of the long-running ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise, and the first of the spinoffs not to go seven seasons. It ran from 2001-2005.

A prequel series set in the 22nd century, about 100 years before ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. [[TheCaptain Captain Jonathan Archer]] commands a new warp-5 starship, ''Enterprise'' (NX-01), seeking out new life and new civilizations. The key selling point of this series was that space travel was not as casual as it became later in the chronology. Most humans have never even left Earth and those who have rarely made it out of Earth's solar system. Unlike the other modern ''Trek'' series, these characters were prone to swear and [[{{Fanservice}} walk around in their underwear]]. The series only lasted four seasons, making it the shortest lived ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series since the [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries animated series]], and the shortest-lived live-action series in the franchise other than [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original]].

The first and second seasons dealt with exploration. The Enterprise was the first human ship to reach warp 5, and was therefore the first ship to visit many of the worlds explored in these seasons. Some episodes featured the crew encountering phenomena that Franchise/StarTrek fans would be familiar with, but the characters wouldn't. The temporal cold war arc was also introduced during this time. Factions in the future were using time travel technology to manipulate the time stream in their favour. This plot was forced on the writers through ExecutiveMeddling from the network--presumably so as to avoid the lack of suspense expected from a prequel typically having a ForegoneConclusion. Still, even the show creators didn't care for being forced into adding that kind of twist, so it unfortunately just pops up from time to time before finally being terminated the second the executives let them in season four.

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewer-ship which led to a retool for season three. To lead into the third season, an alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth because of an unknown element of the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a more efficient battleship and sent to a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to either stop further attacks against Earth or enter negotiations. The entire season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while ignoring the original arc featuring the Suliban.

At the start of Season 4 most of the writing staff was replaced and a new head writer, Manny Coto, was put in charge. This resulted in significant changes. Instead of a season-long {{Arc}}, most stories were spread over 2 or 3 episodes at a time. Sometimes these mini-arcs would carry over to a later mini-arc. First and foremost, the season dealt with the ramifications of the Xindi attack, with many humans becoming violently xenophobic. But likely the most popular arc was one dealing with social reform on Vulcan, which was a piercing look into their culture that hadn't been done since the original series.

Sadly, Creator/{{Paramount}} had no serious intention of renewing the series after season four. The writers had been batting around ideas for where things would have gone in season five (including [[WhatCouldHaveBeen the Romulan War]] which is a well-established part of Trek canon), and they do sound like they would have continued improving.

We do have a novel continuation. See: ''Literature/StarTrekEnterpriseRelaunch''.

''Enterprise'' is, by all indications, the only ''Star Trek'' series to take place in both the "old" timeline -- comprising the prior shows and movies -- and the "new" timeline subsequently created by ''Film/StarTrek (2009)'' and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', with its presence in the former timeline being confirmed by the series finale, and mentions of the now-Admiral Archer and a model NX-01 establishing its presence in the latter. Though creators Rick Berman and Brannon Braga suggested early in the show's run that it occurred in an entirely separate timeline created by the events of ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', latter episodes of the show disregarded this explanation and depicted the series as being fully in continuity with the prior ones.

to:

'''''Star Trek: Enterprise''''' is the fourth and final SpinOff of the long-running ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise, and the first of the spinoffs not to go seven seasons.franchise. It ran from 2001-2005.

A ENT is a prequel series set in the 22nd century, about 100 years before ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. [[TheCaptain ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''--though in practice, it worked better as a [[{{Interquel}} semi-sequel]] to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', as hinted by the early appearances of Creator/JamesCromwell and ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' aliens like the Nausicaans, Borg and Ferengi. 46 years after Dr. Cochrane's historic warp flight, Captain Jonathan Archer]] commands a new warp-5 starship, Archer is put in command of the ''Enterprise'' (NX-01), seeking out new life and new civilizations. a bleeding-edge warp-5 starship. The key selling point of this series was that space travel was not as casual as it became later in the chronology. Most humans have never chronology; most ships hadn't even left Earth and those who have rarely made it out of Earth's solar system. system. Unlike the other modern previous ''Trek'' series, these characters crewmembers were also prone to swear and [[{{Fanservice}} walk around in their underwear]]. The series only lasted four seasons, making it the shortest lived ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series shortest-lived ''Star Trek'' since the [[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries animated series]], and the shortest-lived live-action series in the franchise other than [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original]].

The first and second seasons dealt with exploration. The Enterprise was the first human ship to reach warp 5, and was therefore ''Enterprise'' is the first ship designed for exploration, and thus the first to visit many of the worlds explored in these seasons. Some episodes featured the crew encountering phenomena that Franchise/StarTrek fans would be familiar with, but the characters wouldn't. The temporal cold war Temporal Cold War arc was also introduced during this time. time, which tied into the "[[TimePolice Department of Temporal Investigations]]" introduced in previous ''Star Treks'': Factions in the future were using time travel technology to manipulate the time stream [[SpaceColdWar space politics]] in their favour. This plot was forced on the writers through ExecutiveMeddling from [[ExecutiveMeddling the network--presumably network]]--presumably so as to avoid the [[ForegoneConclusion lack of suspense suspense]] expected from a prequel typically having a ForegoneConclusion. series. Still, even the show creators showrunners didn't care for being forced into adding that kind of twist, it, so it unfortunately just pops up from time to time before finally being terminated [[AbortedArc terminated]] the second ''second'' the executives let them in season four.

lost interest.

During season two, there was a sharp decline in viewer-ship viewership which led to a retool for {{retool}} in season three. To lead into the third season, an three: An alien race called the Xindi attacked Earth because under the guidance of an unknown element of a [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness rogue element]] from the Temporal Cold War arc. ''Enterprise'' was refitted into a more efficient battleship [[CerebusSyndrome heavy-duty battleship]] and sent to into a chaotic region of space called the Expanse to either enter negotiations or, failing that, stop further attacks attack against Earth or enter negotiations. The entire Earth. This season dealt with the imminent war and moral compromises the crew had to make, while ignoring coming to terms with the original arc featuring the Suliban.

[[TheWarOnTerror post-September 11th]] realities of network television.

At the start of Season 4 4, most of the writing staff was replaced and a new head writer, Manny Coto, was put in charge. This resulted in significant changes. Instead of a season-long {{Arc}}, arc, most stories were spread over [[ContinuityCreep 2 or 3 episodes at a time. Sometimes these mini-arcs would carry over to a later mini-arc. First and foremost, the time]]. Standalone stories were dropped, more or less entirely. This season dealt with the ramifications fallout of the Xindi attack, with many humans becoming violently xenophobic. xenophobic, and a brewing war with the as-yet-unseen Romulan Star Empire. But likely the most popular arc was one dealing dealt with social reform on Vulcan, which was a Vulcan--a piercing look into their culture that which hadn't been done since the original series.

The Original Series.

Sadly, Creator/{{Paramount}} had no serious intention of renewing the series after season four. Season Four. The writers had been batting around ideas for where things would have gone in season five (including [[WhatCouldHaveBeen the Romulan War]] Season Five, some of which is a well-established part of Trek canon), and they do sound like they would have continued improving.

We do have a
are realized in the novel continuation. See: {{continuation}}: ''Literature/StarTrekEnterpriseRelaunch''.

Ironically, ''Enterprise'' is, by all indications, the only ''Star Trek'' series to take place in both the "old" timeline -- comprising the prior shows and movies -- and the "new" timeline subsequently created by ''Film/StarTrek (2009)'' and ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', with its presence in the former timeline being confirmed by the series finale, and mentions of the now-Admiral Archer and a model NX-01 establishing its presence in the latter. Though creators Rick Berman and Brannon Braga suggested early in the show's run that it occurred took place in an entirely separate timeline created by from the events of ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', latter ''First Contact'', later episodes of the show disregarded this explanation it and depicted slotted in perfectly with the series as being fully in continuity with continuity, to the prior ones.
point that the DistantFinale took place on Jean-Luc Picard's ''Enterprise.''
28th May '16 8:02:47 PM Mitchz95
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28th May '16 8:02:30 PM Mitchz95
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* AcceptableTargets: The crew sometimes goes way out of their way to avoid killing or even save the lives of Suliban and Xindi, but in "Storm Front" no one has any qualms about murdering fully-human [[spoiler: Nazi soldiers.]]
19th May '16 6:18:08 PM jckgat
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Added DiffLines:

** Played straight in S3's "Twilight," but it doesn't take away from the episode the way it often did in Voyager.
23rd Apr '16 3:28:36 AM JackG
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* StrawVulcan: Over the course of four years, T'Pol undergoes a MindRape that brings up traumatic memories of losing her emotional control in a jazz nightclub, remembers repressed memories of a line-of-duty killing (that also led to a loss of emotional control), suffers from Pa'nar Syndrome that degrades her neural pathways (leading to loss of emotional control), becomes addicted to Trellium-D (which causes loss of emotional control), and is infected by a microbe that makes her undergo a premature ''pon farr'' (leading to loss of emotional control and clothing). It seems the writers believed that the only way T'Pol's character could develop was to take away the characteristics that made her different from humans.
27th Feb '16 11:18:12 AM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* NotReallyABirthScene: In an episode, Dr. Phlox is putting Malcolm through some physical therapy for a leg injury, and it looks a lot like a birth scene, including Dr. Phlox telling Malcolm to push.
29th Dec '15 2:18:00 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* Biodata: In the pilot episode, the Klingon courier Klaang carried [[ArtisticLicenseBiology information injected directly into his DNA]], concerning the Suliban's attempts to destabilize the Empire.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.StarTrekEnterprise