History Series / RumpoleOfTheBailey

3rd Sep '17 7:44:10 PM PaulA
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* [[ReferencedBy/WilliamShakespeare Referenced By: William Shakespeare]]: Several references, and hardly surprising given Rumpole's love of English literature.
** Some are built into the stories. In "The Dear Departed," Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from ''Richard II'' ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs...") The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.


Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: "The Dear Departed" contains several shout-outs to ''Theatre/RichardII''. Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from the play ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs..."). The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.
1st Sep '17 8:15:44 AM hullflyer
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* HangoverSensitivity: here's at least one episode of wherein Rumpole, after a night of "carousing" with Henry the clerk, has to come in to court shading his eyes.

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* HangoverSensitivity: here's There's at least one episode of wherein Rumpole, after a night of "carousing" with Henry the clerk, has to come in to court shading his eyes.
1st Sep '17 8:14:39 AM hullflyer
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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got them off that they wre in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.

to:

* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got them off that they wre were in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.
30th Jul '17 8:57:57 PM Angeldeb82
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* ADayInTheLimelight: "Hilda's Story," collected in ''Rumpole and the Angel of Death.''



* ArtisticLicenseLaw: Averted. This is noted as one of the most realistic legal dramas ever producd. The writer and creator John Mortimer, QC was an actual practing barrister in addition to being a writer, and thus knew legal life, extremely well. He would get up at 4:00 in the morning to write the scripts and then go to work at court. He eventually retired from the Bar to focus on writing full time.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseLaw: Averted. This is noted as one of the most realistic legal dramas ever producd. produced. The writer and creator John Mortimer, QC was an actual practing practicing barrister in addition to being a writer, and thus knew legal life, extremely well. He would get up at 4:00 in the morning to write the scripts and then go to work at court. He eventually retired from the Bar to focus on writing full time.



* AwLookTheyReallyDoLoveEachOther: They may fight and argue but in Rumpole's words "they'd rather have war together than a lonely peace". There are several indications that Hilda is secretly proud of her husband, despite her loud dissapointment that's he not a judge or a QC, although she'd never say so to her face. Lampshaded in "Rumpole and the Married Woman", where Rumpole notes that the couple in his divorce case stayed together because "they didn't want to be alone."

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* AwLookTheyReallyDoLoveEachOther: They may fight and argue but in Rumpole's words "they'd rather have war together than a lonely peace". There are several indications that Hilda is secretly proud of her husband, despite her loud dissapointment disappointment that's he not a judge or a QC, although she'd never say so to her face. Lampshaded in "Rumpole and the Married Woman", where Rumpole notes that the couple in his divorce case stayed together because "they didn't want to be alone."



** Hilda and Liz Probert join forces in the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," to trick Rumpole out of giving up his career. All it takes is [[spoiler: Hilda detailing all the things they're going to do together now that he's retired.]]

to:

** Hilda and Liz Probert join forces in the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," to trick Rumpole out of giving up his career. All it takes is [[spoiler: Hilda detailing all the things they're going to do together now that he's retired.]]retired]].



* CantStandThemCantLiveWithoutThem: The ever-antagonistic Rumpoles may not love each other, exactly, but they occasionally show signs of a deep-seated loyalty. Horace learns to dance to make Hilda happy; Hilda fiercely defends Horace in "Rumpole on Trial"; and they prove themselves unbeatable when they join forces in the BatmanGambit discussed above.

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* CantStandThemCantLiveWithoutThem: CantLiveWithThemCantLiveWithoutThem: The ever-antagonistic Rumpoles may not love each other, exactly, but they occasionally show signs of a deep-seated loyalty. Horace learns to dance to make Hilda happy; Hilda fiercely defends Horace in "Rumpole on Trial"; and they prove themselves unbeatable when they join forces in the BatmanGambit discussed above.



** A literal one occurs in "Rumpole and the Fascist Beast". The gun is in the titular "fascist beast"'s shed, where he keeps birds, hidden under the bird seed. [[spoiler:He commits suicide after his acquittal leads to the local chapter of the party -- an obvious stand-in for the BNP -- unseating him]].

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** A literal one occurs in "Rumpole and the Fascist Beast". The gun is in the titular "fascist beast"'s shed, where he keeps birds, hidden under the bird seed. [[spoiler:He commits suicide after his acquittal leads to the local chapter of the party -- an obvious stand-in for the BNP -- unseating him]].him.]]



* CloudCuckooLander: Uncle Tom, who hasn't had a brief in anyone's living memory, but still happily potters around Chambers playing golf. His chief role in the show is to go off on long semi-relevant recollections of past events whenever anyone discuses anything near him. (It is never explained how he supports himself.)

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* CloudCuckooLander: {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Uncle Tom, who hasn't had a brief in anyone's living memory, but still happily potters around Chambers playing golf. His chief role in the show is to go off on long semi-relevant recollections of past events whenever anyone discuses anything near him. (It is never explained how he supports himself.)



* ADayInTheLimelight: "Hilda's Story," collected in ''Rumpole and the Angel of Death.''



** At the beginning of the series, Claude Erskine-Brown is a somewhat pompous but nevertheless effective barrister with a thriving civil practice. By the end, he's an incompetent and completely un-self-aware milquetoast. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] when Erskine-Brown complains to Rumpole about how he's been reduced to "scraping the bottom of your [i.e. Rumpole's] barrel." Also, at the beginning of the series, Erskine-Brown is an all-around devotee of classical music in general and opera in particular, whereas at the end he focuses exclusively on Wagner.

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** At the beginning of the series, Claude Erskine-Brown is a somewhat pompous but nevertheless effective barrister with a thriving civil practice. By the end, he's an incompetent and completely un-self-aware milquetoast. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d when Erskine-Brown complains to Rumpole about how he's been reduced to "scraping the bottom of your [i.e. Rumpole's] barrel." Also, at the beginning of the series, Erskine-Brown is an all-around devotee of classical music in general and opera in particular, whereas at the end he focuses exclusively on Wagner.



** Most season finales where written in a way to wrap up the show, because [=Leo McKern=], although he enjoyed the role, wanted to avoid typecasting and was frustrated how it seemed to overshadow his other works (much like Alec Guiness with Star Wars), but John Mortimer convinced him to keep coming back. The ultimate finale was "Rumpole on Trial", where all of the cast main and supporting reunite for a party, at the end.
** In the final novel published, ''Rumpole Misbehaves'', Rumpole makes a serious attempt to become a QC, because his client wants a QC, and only a QC to defend him. [[spoiler: He doesn't get it because during a cross examination he implied that a Home Office official was connected to a prostitution ring much to anger of the presiding judge, who happens to be on the Committe that grants applications for [=QCs=].]]

to:

** Most season finales where written in a way to wrap up the show, because [=Leo McKern=], although he enjoyed the role, wanted to avoid typecasting and was frustrated how it seemed to overshadow his other works (much like Alec Guiness Guinness with Star Wars), but John Mortimer convinced him to keep coming back. The ultimate finale was "Rumpole on Trial", where all of the cast main and supporting reunite for a party, at the end.
** In the final novel published, ''Rumpole Misbehaves'', Rumpole makes a serious attempt to become a QC, because his client wants a QC, and only a QC to defend him. [[spoiler: He doesn't get it because during a cross examination he implied that a Home Office official was connected to a prostitution ring much to anger of the presiding judge, who happens to be on the Committe Committee that grants applications for [=QCs=].]]



'''Claude Erskine-Brown:''' Please, don't tell me! It's absolutely none of my business…You mean Tommy Tomkins?\\

to:

'''Claude Erskine-Brown:''' Please, don't tell me! It's absolutely none of my business…You business...You mean Tommy Tomkins?\\



** He calls Liz Probert "Miz Liz". [[StrawFeminist Guess why]].

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** He calls Liz Probert "Miz Liz". [[StrawFeminist Guess why]].why.]]



* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: The "Ostlers" of the (fictional) town of Gunster in "Rumpole and the Right to Silence" bear a ([[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]]) resemblance to the Freemasons.

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* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: The "Ostlers" of the (fictional) town of Gunster in "Rumpole and the Right to Silence" bear a ([[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]]) ({{lampshade|Hanging}}d) resemblance to the Freemasons.



* NoodleIncident: Rumpole's greatest professional success, the case of the Penge Bungalow Murders, was a NoodleIncident for almost three decades before recently being told in a novel suprisingly named ''Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders''.

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* NoodleIncident: Rumpole's greatest professional success, the case of the Penge Bungalow Murders, was a NoodleIncident for almost three decades before recently being told in a novel suprisingly surprisingly named ''Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders''.



** Rumpole's habit of turning down more lucrative law practices, and promotions seems all find and admirable until you remember he how often his bank account get overdrawn. In ''Rumpole and the Last Resort'' he has no money to pay utilties because a particular seedy solicitor is refusing to pay him his due from a back case.

to:

** Rumpole's habit of turning down more lucrative law practices, and promotions seems all find and admirable until you remember he how often his bank account get overdrawn. In ''Rumpole and the Last Resort'' he has no money to pay utilties utilities because a particular seedy solicitor is refusing to pay him his due from a back case.



* Retcon: Somewhere along the line in the books Judge Roger Bullingham became Judge ''Leonard'' Bullingham. Whether or not they are the same charcter is open to fan debate.

to:

* Retcon: [[ReferencedBy/WilliamShakespeare Referenced By: William Shakespeare]]: Several references, and hardly surprising given Rumpole's love of English literature.
** Some are built into the stories. In "The Dear Departed," Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from ''Richard II'' ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs...") The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.
* {{Retcon}}:
Somewhere along the line in the books Judge Roger Bullingham became Judge ''Leonard'' Bullingham. Whether or not they are the same charcter is open to fan debate.



* ShoutOutToShakespeare: Several, and hardly surprising given Rumpole's love of English literature.
** Some are built into the stories. In "The Dear Departed," Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from ''Richard II'' ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs...") The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.
* SilentSnarker: A lot of Rumpole's snark is actually delivered in voiceovers, audible only to viewers. One of the [[RunningGag running gags]] is the frequent discrepancy between Rumpole's internal snarking and his external restraint. For instance, from "Rumpole and the Old, Old Story":

to:

* ShoutOutToShakespeare: Several, and hardly surprising given Rumpole's love of English literature.
** Some are built into the stories. In "The Dear Departed," Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from ''Richard II'' ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs...") The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.
* SilentSnarker: A lot of Rumpole's snark is actually delivered in voiceovers, audible only to viewers. One of the [[RunningGag running gags]] {{running gag}}s is the frequent discrepancy between Rumpole's internal snarking and his external restraint. For instance, from "Rumpole and the Old, Old Story":
16th May '17 12:23:11 PM shawnmstewart
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Added DiffLines:

** A nasty one is played on Rumpole in "Rumpole and the Golden Thread", where he's called to a fictional African nation to defend a former student of his from a capital charge by a corrupt government. He finds his client surprisingly uncooperative despite the stakes, but nonetheless keeps investigating and finds the evidence that will clear his name. Unfortunately, [[spoiler: the alibi that proves his client's innocence is proof of his second marriage with a woman from a different ethnic group. Rumpole's client was actually counting on being condemned, which would have caused his faction to revolt and break him out of prison, but instead the knowledge of the love affair results in him being killed by his own people shortly after being acquitted. The government was counting on Rumpole to find and use the evidence of innocence, as this way they got to have the appearance of a "fair" trial yet eliminate a thorn in their side while keeping their own hands clean.]]
26th Mar '17 9:27:51 PM karstovich2
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[[caption-width-right:348:Horace Rumpole]]

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[[caption-width-right:348:Horace Rumpole]]
Rumpole, My Lord, appearing for the defendant...]]
20th Feb '17 5:26:23 PM nombretomado
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* BritishNewspapers: Make an occasional appearance. Rumpole is partial to ''The Times'', especially its crossword. Hilda prefers the ''Evening Telegraph'' (and its crossword). Papers appear as important points in certain episodes: "Rumpole and the Tap End" features embarrassing reports on a decision of (Mr. Justice) Guthrie Featherstone's in ''The Evening Standard''; "Rumpole and the Bubble Reputation" features Rumpole and Claude Erskine-Brown's dealings with an [[ProductDisplacement obvious replacement]] for ''The Sun'' (complete with PageThreeStunna!) called the ''Beacon''. Specifically, Rumpole has to defend the sleazy editor of ''Beacon'' on a libel charge (it's a "money brief", with an [[UndisclosedFunds unspeakably large]] fee and a £500/day refresher), while Erskine-Brown is caught at a strip club (doing research on his case about a fight at the club some time earlier) by the ''Beacon'' photographers and has to deal with the consequences.
4th Oct '16 2:53:15 AM chrisboote
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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got her off that she was in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.

to:

* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got her them off that she was they wre in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.
7th Aug '16 7:17:08 PM PaulA
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]

to:

** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]
7th Aug '16 2:49:55 PM karstovich2
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").

to:

** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]
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