History Series / RumpoleOfTheBailey

26th Mar '17 9:27:51 PM karstovich2
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[[caption-width-right:348:Horace Rumpole]]

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[[caption-width-right:348:Horace Rumpole]]
Rumpole, My Lord, appearing for the defendant...]]
20th Feb '17 5:26:23 PM nombretomado
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* BritishNewspapers: Make an occasional appearance. Rumpole is partial to ''The Times'', especially its crossword. Hilda prefers the ''Evening Telegraph'' (and its crossword). Papers appear as important points in certain episodes: "Rumpole and the Tap End" features embarrassing reports on a decision of (Mr. Justice) Guthrie Featherstone's in ''The Evening Standard''; "Rumpole and the Bubble Reputation" features Rumpole and Claude Erskine-Brown's dealings with an [[ProductDisplacement obvious replacement]] for ''The Sun'' (complete with PageThreeStunna!) called the ''Beacon''. Specifically, Rumpole has to defend the sleazy editor of ''Beacon'' on a libel charge (it's a "money brief", with an [[UndisclosedFunds unspeakably large]] fee and a £500/day refresher), while Erskine-Brown is caught at a strip club (doing research on his case about a fight at the club some time earlier) by the ''Beacon'' photographers and has to deal with the consequences.
4th Oct '16 2:53:15 AM chrisboote
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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got her off that she was in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.

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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got her them off that she was they wre in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.
7th Aug '16 7:17:08 PM PaulA
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]

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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]
7th Aug '16 2:49:55 PM karstovich2
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").

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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]Julian Curry, who played Erskine-Brown, actually is an amateur expert on wine, and the episode was in many ways [[TheCastShowOff an opportunity to show off his knowledge]].[[/note]]
13th Jul '16 8:20:39 AM Gillimer
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** "Justitia" in "Rumpole and the Golden Thread" is a clear Expy for Amnesty International... And a semi-autobiographical reference to one Mortimer's own cases.
13th Jul '16 8:12:12 AM Gillimer
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* HarmlessVillain: The Timson clan, very, ''very'' low-level crooks ("minor villains" is what Rumpole likes to call them) whom Rumpole defends on a regular basis (they appear to be his primary source of income, and at one point he refers to himself as being "CT -- Counsel to the Timsons.").

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* HarmlessVillain: The Timson clan, very, ''very'' low-level crooks ("minor villains" is what Rumpole likes to call them) whom Rumpole defends on a regular basis (they appear to be his primary source of income, and at one point he refers to himself as being "CT -- Counsel to the Timsons."). They are quite proud that they never resort to violence, only what Rumpole and Mortimer call "ordinary decent crime."
13th Jul '16 8:08:51 AM Gillimer
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* AwLookTheyReallyDoLoveEachOther: They may fight and argue but in Rumpole's words "they'd rather have war together than a lonely peace". There are several indications that Hilda is secretly proud of her husband, despite her loud dissapointment that's he not a judge or a QC, although she'd never say so to her face.

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* AwLookTheyReallyDoLoveEachOther: They may fight and argue but in Rumpole's words "they'd rather have war together than a lonely peace". There are several indications that Hilda is secretly proud of her husband, despite her loud dissapointment that's he not a judge or a QC, although she'd never say so to her face. Lampshaded in "Rumpole and the Married Woman", where Rumpole notes that the couple in his divorce case stayed together because "they didn't want to be alone."



* CelibateHero: According to the novels, the Rumpoles had sex exactly once, on their honeymoon, which explains how they managed to have a child. Other than that, no, and Horace has only been MistakenForCheating.

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* CelibateHero: According to the novels, the Rumpoles had sex exactly once, on their honeymoon, which explains how they managed to have a child. Other than that, no, and Horace has only been MistakenForCheating. Although he was tempted by the feminine wiles, of Kathy Trelawney and Elizabeth Casterini.. But not enough to get him to betray his professional ethics.



* CloudCuckooLander: Uncle Tom, who hasn't had a brief in anyone's living memory, but still happily potters around Chambers playing golf. His chief role in the show is to go off on long semi-relevant recollections of past events whenever anyone discuses anything near him.

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* CloudCuckooLander: Uncle Tom, who hasn't had a brief in anyone's living memory, but still happily potters around Chambers playing golf. His chief role in the show is to go off on long semi-relevant recollections of past events whenever anyone discuses anything near him. (It is never explained how he supports himself.)



* FormerTeenRebel: Sam Ballard. In the later novels and short stories, he and his teenage rock group get back together for jam sessions.

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* FormerTeenRebel: Sam Ballard. In the later novels and short stories, he and his teenage rock group get back together for jam sessions. Ironically, Rumpole thought spilling the beans on his dread past would embarrass him, but instead people in chambers conclude he is less stuffy than they thought.
18th Jun '16 9:14:46 PM ApeAccount
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* DescriptionCut: A rather subtle one in "Rumpole on Trial". A man in court is quoting from the book of proverbs, "It is better to dwell in a corner of the housetop than with a brawling woman in a wide house. It is better to dwell in the wilderness than with a contentious and an angry woman." Then the scene immediately shifts to Hilda walking down the street...
18th Jun '16 7:39:25 PM ApeAccount
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*ComicallyMissingThePoint: Both Claude Erskine-Brown and Ballard could be prone to this. When a psychiatrist suggested he wanted to sleep with his mother and he was asked if he did, Erskine-Brown replied, “Certainly not, Mummy would never have stood for it”. When Ballard was told that Erskine-Brown thought it’d be easier for him to become a QC if he were a woman, Ballard replied, “I think that’s very silly. I mean Claude Erskine-Brown couldn’t possibly be a woman, could he? So he might just as well forget the idea and settle down to being himself.”
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.RumpoleOfTheBailey