History Series / RumpoleOfTheBailey

18th Jun '16 9:14:46 PM ApeAccount
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* DescriptionCut: A rather subtle one in "Rumpole on Trial". A man in court is quoting from the book of proverbs, "It is better to dwell in a corner of the housetop than with a brawling woman in a wide house. It is better to dwell in the wilderness than with a contentious and an angry woman." Then the scene immediately shifts to Hilda walking down the street...
18th Jun '16 7:39:25 PM ApeAccount
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*ComicallyMissingThePoint: Both Claude Erskine-Brown and Ballard could be prone to this. When a psychiatrist suggested he wanted to sleep with his mother and he was asked if he did, Erskine-Brown replied, ďCertainly not, Mummy would never have stood for itĒ. When Ballard was told that Erskine-Brown thought itíd be easier for him to become a QC if he were a woman, Ballard replied, ďI think thatís very silly. I mean Claude Erskine-Brown couldnít possibly be a woman, could he? So he might just as well forget the idea and settle down to being himself.Ē
17th Jun '16 8:25:40 PM PaulA
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* CastingGag: Peter Cellier as Sir Frank Fawcett, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Defence, in "Rumpole and the Official Secret", doubtless referencing his recurring role as Permanent Secretary to the Treasury Sir Frank Gordon in ''Series/YesMinister''. The Attorney General in the same episode, Donald Pickering, played Sir Richard Wharton in ''Series/YesMinister'' too.



** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting"). Possibly a case of TheCastShowoff; Julian Curry (who plays Erskine-Brown) is also a noted wine expert.

to:

** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting"). Possibly a case of TheCastShowoff; Julian Curry (who plays Erskine-Brown) is also a noted wine expert.
17th Jun '16 8:22:24 PM PaulA
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* CatchPhrase: the "Golden Thread of British justice" and "never plead guilty" as personal mantras. There was also Percy Hoskins who had variants of "speaking as a man with daughters". This was lampshaded in "Rumpole and The Quality of Life" when he started out "I speak as a man with daughters" and Rumpole, Ballard and Uncle Tom all finished his sentence for him and echoed the word "daughters" around the room.

to:

* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase:
** Rumpole has
the "Golden Thread of British justice" and "never plead guilty" as personal mantras. There was also mantras.
**
Percy Hoskins who had variants of "speaking as a man with daughters". This was lampshaded in "Rumpole and The Quality of Life" when he started out "I speak as a man with daughters" and Rumpole, Ballard and Uncle Tom all finished his sentence for him and echoed the word "daughters" around the room.



* DeadpanSnarker: Rumpole, in both his life but especially in his style of advocacy.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker:
**
Rumpole, in both his life but especially in his style of advocacy.



-->'''Rumpole''': If Uncle Tom goes, I go.
-->'''Ballard'''[[note]]''Ballard''![[/note]]: That would seem to make the departure of Uncle Tom even ''more'' desirable.

to:

-->'''Rumpole''': --->'''Rumpole:''' If Uncle Tom goes, I go.
-->'''Ballard'''[[note]]''Ballard''![[/note]]:
go.\\
'''Ballard:'''[[note]]Of all people![[/note]]
That would seem to make the departure of Uncle Tom even ''more'' desirable.



-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Well, I expect you want to know a bit about my experience.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''' (alarmed): Good heavens, no.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': You donít?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': No, no, no, no. I take the attitude, Dave, that your experiences are entirely a matter between you andÖwell, whoever youíve had the experiences with.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Tomkins in Testament Buildings.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': Please, donít tell me! Itís absolutely none of my businessÖYou mean Tommy Tomkins?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Yes, I was with him for about a year.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': But I thought Tommy was married to a lady magistrate?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': So he is. Does that make a difference?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': Well, not nowadays, I suppose.

to:

-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Inchcape:''' Well, I expect you want to know a bit about my experience.
-->'''Claude
experience.\\
'''Claude
Erskine-Brown''' (alarmed): ''[alarmed]'' Good heavens, no.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''':
no.\\
'''Dave Inchcape:'''
You donít?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':
don't?\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:'''
No, no, no, no. I take the attitude, Dave, that your experiences are entirely a matter between you andÖwell, whoever youíve you've had the experiences with.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''':
with.\\
'''Dave Inchcape:'''
Tomkins in Testament Buildings.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':
Buildings.\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:'''
Please, donít don't tell me! Itís It's absolutely none of my businessÖYou mean Tommy Tomkins?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''':
Tomkins?\\
'''Dave Inchcape:'''
Yes, I was with him for about a year.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':
year.\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:'''
But I thought Tommy was married to a lady magistrate?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''':
magistrate?\\
'''Dave Inchcape:'''
So he is. Does that make a difference?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':
difference?\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:'''
Well, not nowadays, I suppose.



* SilentSnarker: A lot of Rumpole's snark is actually delivered in voiceovers, audible only to viewers. One of the [[RunningGag running gags]] is the frequent discrepancy between Rumpole's internal snarking and his external restraint.
-->'''Solicitor''': What do you think of the prosecution, Mr. Rumpole?
-->'''Rumpole''' (''voiceover''): I think if it were conducted by a nervous first-year law student with a serious speech impediment they'd ''still'' get a conviction.
-->'''Rumpole''' (''aloud''): Well, we do face certain difficulties. (''Rumpole and the Old, Old Story'')

to:

* SilentSnarker: A lot of Rumpole's snark is actually delivered in voiceovers, audible only to viewers. One of the [[RunningGag running gags]] is the frequent discrepancy between Rumpole's internal snarking and his external restraint.
-->'''Solicitor''':
restraint. For instance, from "Rumpole and the Old, Old Story":
-->'''Solicitor:'''
What do you think of the prosecution, Mr. Rumpole?
-->'''Rumpole''' (''voiceover''):
Rumpole?\\
'''Rumpole:''' ''[voiceover]''
I think if it were conducted by a nervous first-year law student with a serious speech impediment they'd ''still'' get a conviction.
-->'''Rumpole''' (''aloud''):
conviction.\\
'''Rumpole:''' ''[aloud]''
Well, we do face certain difficulties. (''Rumpole and the Old, Old Story'')difficulties.



-->'''Ballard:''' Look here, Rumpole, I would advise you to take this matter seriously.
-->'''Rumpole:''' And I would advise you, [[MaliciousMisnaming Bollard]], if you can find a taxidermist willing to undertake the work, to get stuffed.

to:

-->'''Ballard:''' Look here, Rumpole, I would advise you to take this matter seriously.
-->'''Rumpole:'''
seriously.\\
'''Rumpole:'''
And I would advise you, [[MaliciousMisnaming Bollard]], if you can find a taxidermist willing to undertake the work, to get stuffed.



-->'''Liz Probert''': The point for you to understand is what you've done to Phillida as a woman.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':What I've done?
-->'''Liz Probert''': Well donít tell me you havenít driven her to it. If a woman does something like that itís always the husbandís fault, isnít it?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': And if a man does something like that?
-->'''Liz Probert''': Well, then, itís always his fault.

to:

-->'''Liz Probert''': Probert:''' The point for you to understand is what you've done to Phillida as a woman.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':What
woman.\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:''' What
I've done?
-->'''Liz Probert''':
done?\\
'''Liz Probert:'''
Well donít don't tell me you havenít haven't driven her to it. If a woman does something like that itís it's always the husbandís husband's fault, isnít it?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':
isn't it?\\
'''Claude Erskine-Brown:'''
And if a man does something like that?
-->'''Liz Probert''':
that?\\
'''Liz Probert:'''
Well, then, itís it's always his fault.
fault.
17th Jun '16 7:25:41 PM ApeAccount
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* CatchPhrase: the "Golden Thread of British justice" and "never plead guilty" as personal mantras.

to:

* CatchPhrase: the "Golden Thread of British justice" and "never plead guilty" as personal mantras. There was also Percy Hoskins who had variants of "speaking as a man with daughters". This was lampshaded in "Rumpole and The Quality of Life" when he started out "I speak as a man with daughters" and Rumpole, Ballard and Uncle Tom all finished his sentence for him and echoed the word "daughters" around the room.
17th Jun '16 6:50:01 PM ApeAccount
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* MistakenForGay: One of Liz Probert's boyfriends (Dave Inchcape) makes it into Chambers because Claude Erskine-Brown believes that he's gay.

to:

* MistakenForGay: One of Liz Probert's boyfriends (Dave Inchcape) makes it into Chambers because Claude Erskine-Brown believes that he's gay. This led to a rather hilarious exchange when Claude was attempting to interview the man and was alluding to him being gay, but Dave thought he was talking about him being a barrister.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Well, I expect you want to know a bit about my experience.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''' (alarmed): Good heavens, no.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': You donít?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': No, no, no, no. I take the attitude, Dave, that your experiences are entirely a matter between you andÖwell, whoever youíve had the experiences with.
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Tomkins in Testament Buildings.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': Please, donít tell me! Itís absolutely none of my businessÖYou mean Tommy Tomkins?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': Yes, I was with him for about a year.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': But I thought Tommy was married to a lady magistrate?
-->'''Dave Inchcape''': So he is. Does that make a difference?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': Well, not nowadays, I suppose.
17th Jun '16 5:15:21 PM ApeAccount
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* StrawFeminist: Liz Probert (mostly in the later novels and short stories).

to:

* StrawFeminist: Liz Probert (mostly in the later novels and short stories). The following quote from "Rumpole and Portia" demonstrates her attitude (after Phillida was seen having lunch with another man in the park).
-->'''Liz Probert''': The point for you to understand is what you've done to Phillida as a woman.
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''':What I've done?
-->'''Liz Probert''': Well donít tell me you havenít driven her to it. If a woman does something like that itís always the husbandís fault, isnít it?
-->'''Claude Erskine-Brown''': And if a man does something like that?
-->'''Liz Probert''': Well, then, itís always his fault.
12th Apr '16 4:39:09 PM PaulA
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* MysteryWriterDetective: Played with in "Rumpole At Sea", where a mystery writer tries to play detective after a mysterious event on the cruise ship, and comes up with an entirely inaccurate theory about what happened.
29th Feb '16 9:53:43 PM Mdumas43073
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A ThamesTelevision for Creator/{{ITV}} series, intermittently from 1978 to 1992, following a one-off [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] drama, focused on the professional and personal life of one Horace Rumpole, barrister at law.

to:

A ThamesTelevision for Creator/{{ITV}} series, intermittently from 1978 to 1992, following a one-off [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] drama, focused on the professional and personal life of one Horace Rumpole, barrister at law.
law (played by Leo [=McKern=]).
10th Jan '16 12:11:02 AM ApeAccount
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* RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil: Played with and discussed in ďRumpole and the Honourable MemberĒ. Rumpole treated everything about the case with the same level of sobriety and respect that he would any other crime (read: very little). However, this wasnít shown to be because he didnít regard rape as a serious crime but rather because he believed a man whoís innocent of rape (as he always assumes his clients to be innocent) deserves just as thorough a defence as one whoís innocent of petty theft. At the same time, Rumpole acknowledged that everyone in the courtroom would regard the crime differently particularly because it was a rape. In particular, Erica was shocked by the way he would attack the alleged victim which led Rumpole to challenge her on whether itís fair that a lower standard of proof (the victimís word) should exist for rape as opposed to other crimes.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.RumpoleOfTheBailey