History Series / RumpoleOfTheBailey

4th Apr '18 2:56:56 AM PaulA
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]This is largely because [[TheCastShowOff Julian Curry]] ''is'' a wine connoisseur.[[/note]]

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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]This is largely because [[TheCastShowOff Julian Curry]] ''is'' a wine connoisseur.[[/note]]
31st Mar '18 4:59:30 PM karstovich2
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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").

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** Claude Erskine-Brown fancies himself a wine connoisseur ("Rumpole and the Blind Tasting").[[note]]This is largely because [[TheCastShowOff Julian Curry]] ''is'' a wine connoisseur.[[/note]]
24th Mar '18 4:41:53 PM Laurellien
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Added DiffLines:

* MeaningfulName: When Rumpole visits Nuranga, a former British colony, the rather old-fashioned British High Commissioner is named Sir Arthur Remnant.
16th Mar '18 3:51:47 PM Laurellien
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Added DiffLines:

* DownerEnding: Several examples, but few with long-lasting consequences. One of the most notable occurs at the end of "Rumpole and the Man of God", where Rumpole's involvement in a case long ago causes him to permanently fall out with George Frobisher, who had consistently been Rumpole's best friend up to that point in the series. In his later appearances, Frobisher is noticeably frostier and more curt with Rumpole, the only barrister to whom he had been close enough that they were on first-name terms.
21st Feb '18 6:35:05 PM nombretomado
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* ThemeNaming: Claude and Phyllida's children are named [[Creator/RichardWagner Tristan and Isolde]].

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* ThemeNaming: Claude and Phyllida's children are named [[Creator/RichardWagner [[Music/RichardWagner Tristan and Isolde]].
21st Feb '18 6:33:59 PM nombretomado
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** Claude Erskine-Brown's obsession with {{Opera}}; ''[[Creator/RichardWagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg]]'' gets mentioned a lot.

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** Claude Erskine-Brown's obsession with {{Opera}}; ''[[Creator/RichardWagner ''[[Music/RichardWagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg]]'' gets mentioned a lot.
6th Dec '17 12:55:42 PM xcountryguy
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** Rumpole executes a magnificent one in "Rumpole and the Last Resort." [[spoiler: The gambit was focused on the solicitor Blythe, who at once owed Rumpole nearly £2,500 in fees going back as ten years earlier (at a time when Rumpole was late on his utility bills and overdrawn at his bank) and was a material witness in the fraud case he was defending. Blythe was known to hold out payment to barristers until they died, then wheedle the widow into settling the payment for a small fraction of the original fee. On top of that, Blythe had a tendency to have "just slipped out of the office" every time somebody called the office; he was more or less nowhere to be found. After Rumpole fails to convince Judge Bullingham to grant an adjournment in the fraud case to find Blythe, he decides to [[FakingTheDead fake his own death]]: he collapses in the middle of his application to Bullingham, sends a message to Chambers (supposedly from his wife) informing them that he is dead, and hides in his house for some time (possibly a week or more) until Blythe shows up at the door, offering Mrs. Rumpole the same pittance of a settlement he usually offered. She declines, forces him to sign a check for the exact amount Rumpole was owed, and then lets in PrivateDetective "Fig" Newton, who hands Blythe a subpoena. Finally, when Blythe is forced to take the stand and the fraud case recommences, Bullingham starts something of a eulogy for Rumpole. At this point, Rumpole appears in the courtroom and begins his questioning of a terrified Blythe. In the meantime, Chambers had gotten rather excited by the prospect of the death of Rumpole, with "Soapy Sam" trying to use it as an excuse to take on Guthrie Featherstone's well-connected nephew, and Claude Erskine-Brown hoping to take possession of Rumpole's umbrella stand: all of which Rumpole heard about and used to make a point about his Chambers.]]

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** Rumpole executes a magnificent one in "Rumpole and the Last Resort." [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The gambit was focused on the solicitor Blythe, who at once owed Rumpole nearly £2,500 in fees going back as ten years earlier (at a time when Rumpole was late on his utility bills and overdrawn at his bank) and was a material witness in the fraud case he was defending. Blythe was known to hold out payment to barristers until they died, then wheedle the widow into settling the payment for a small fraction of the original fee. On top of that, Blythe had a tendency to have "just slipped out of the office" every time somebody called the office; he was more or less nowhere to be found. After Rumpole fails to convince Judge Bullingham to grant an adjournment in the fraud case to find Blythe, he decides to [[FakingTheDead fake his own death]]: he collapses in the middle of his application to Bullingham, sends a message to Chambers (supposedly from his wife) informing them that he is dead, and hides in his house for some time (possibly a week or more) until Blythe shows up at the door, offering Mrs. Rumpole the same pittance of a settlement he usually offered. She declines, forces him to sign a check for the exact amount Rumpole was owed, and then lets in PrivateDetective "Fig" Newton, who hands Blythe a subpoena. Finally, when Blythe is forced to take the stand and the fraud case recommences, Bullingham starts something of a eulogy for Rumpole. At this point, Rumpole appears in the courtroom and begins his questioning of a terrified Blythe. In the meantime, Chambers had gotten rather excited by the prospect of the death of Rumpole, with "Soapy Sam" trying to use it as an excuse to take on Guthrie Featherstone's well-connected nephew, and Claude Erskine-Brown hoping to take possession of Rumpole's umbrella stand: all of which Rumpole heard about and used to make a point about his Chambers.]]



** A nasty one is played on Rumpole in "Rumpole and the Golden Thread", where he's called to a fictional African nation to defend a former student of his from a capital charge by a corrupt government. He finds his client surprisingly uncooperative despite the stakes, but nonetheless keeps investigating and finds the evidence that will clear his name. Unfortunately, [[spoiler: the alibi that proves his client's innocence is proof of his second marriage with a woman from a different ethnic group. Rumpole's client was actually counting on being condemned, which would have caused his faction to revolt and break him out of prison, but instead the knowledge of the love affair results in him being killed by his own people shortly after being acquitted. The government was counting on Rumpole to find and use the evidence of innocence, as this way they got to have the appearance of a "fair" trial yet eliminate a thorn in their side while keeping their own hands clean.]]
** Hilda and Liz Probert join forces in the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," to trick Rumpole out of giving up his career. All it takes is [[spoiler: Hilda detailing all the things they're going to do together now that he's retired]].

to:

** A nasty one is played on Rumpole in "Rumpole and the Golden Thread", where he's called to a fictional African nation to defend a former student of his from a capital charge by a corrupt government. He finds his client surprisingly uncooperative despite the stakes, but nonetheless keeps investigating and finds the evidence that will clear his name. Unfortunately, [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the alibi that proves his client's innocence is proof of his second marriage with a woman from a different ethnic group. Rumpole's client was actually counting on being condemned, which would have caused his faction to revolt and break him out of prison, but instead the knowledge of the love affair results in him being killed by his own people shortly after being acquitted. The government was counting on Rumpole to find and use the evidence of innocence, as this way they got to have the appearance of a "fair" trial yet eliminate a thorn in their side while keeping their own hands clean.]]
** Hilda and Liz Probert join forces in the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," to trick Rumpole out of giving up his career. All it takes is [[spoiler: Hilda [[spoiler:Hilda detailing all the things they're going to do together now that he's retired]].



** Another literal ChekhovsGun appears in ''Rumpole and the Show Folk''; whilst demonstrating with a gun in court, Rumpole notices that the hammer is extremely prone to going off accidentally when cocked, which becomes relevant when the defendant testifies to the gun going off accidentally in self defence. [[spoiler: Subverted when it's [[TheReveal revealed]] the defendant did actually murder the victim in cold blood and was just very good at covering her tracks.]]

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** Another literal ChekhovsGun appears in ''Rumpole and the Show Folk''; whilst demonstrating with a gun in court, Rumpole notices that the hammer is extremely prone to going off accidentally when cocked, which becomes relevant when the defendant testifies to the gun going off accidentally in self defence. [[spoiler: Subverted [[spoiler:Subverted when it's [[TheReveal revealed]] the defendant did actually murder the victim in cold blood and was just very good at covering her tracks.]]



* DrivenToSuicide: One of the characters in "Rumpole and the Official Secret" winds up [[spoiler: throwing himself under a train.]]

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* DrivenToSuicide: One of the characters in "Rumpole and the Official Secret" winds up [[spoiler: throwing [[spoiler:throwing himself under a train.]]



* FakingTheDead: [[spoiler: See BatmanGambit above]]. And the entire scheme serves as the setup to one TV's greatest OverlyPrepreparedGag moments: [[spoiler: Rumpole, after it's revealed he's alive: "It must have come as a huge relief for those who heard Rumpole had kicked the bucket, to hear he had just turned a little pail."]]

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* FakingTheDead: [[spoiler: See [[spoiler:See BatmanGambit above]]. And the entire scheme serves as the setup to one TV's greatest OverlyPrepreparedGag moments: [[spoiler: Rumpole, [[spoiler:Rumpole, after it's revealed he's alive: "It must have come as a huge relief for those who heard Rumpole had kicked the bucket, to hear he had just turned a little pail."]]



** In the final novel published, ''Rumpole Misbehaves'', Rumpole makes a serious attempt to become a QC, because his client wants a QC, and only a QC to defend him. [[spoiler: He doesn't get it because during a cross examination he implied that a Home Office official was connected to a prostitution ring much to anger of the presiding judge, who happens to be on the Committee that grants applications for [=QCs=].]]

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** In the final novel published, ''Rumpole Misbehaves'', Rumpole makes a serious attempt to become a QC, because his client wants a QC, and only a QC to defend him. [[spoiler: He [[spoiler:He doesn't get it because during a cross examination he implied that a Home Office official was connected to a prostitution ring much to anger of the presiding judge, who happens to be on the Committee that grants applications for [=QCs=].]]



** "Rumpole and the Sporting Life" features an unusual and literal example in the elderly Mr Justice Twyburne, who once sentenced a man to hang for killing a policeman. [[spoiler: The man was later proven innocent, a fact which has preyed on Twyburne's conscience ever since.]]

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** "Rumpole and the Sporting Life" features an unusual and literal example in the elderly Mr Justice Twyburne, who once sentenced a man to hang for killing a policeman. [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The man was later proven innocent, a fact which has preyed on Twyburne's conscience ever since.]]



* RankUp: Phyllida Trant begins the series as a junior barrister and ends it as [[spoiler: a High Court judge]].

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* RankUp: Phyllida Trant begins the series as a junior barrister and ends it as [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a High Court judge]].



* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," Hilda dragoons Ballard into defending Rumpole after he insults Justice Oliphant. Ballard is horrified and Rumpole initially uncooperative, but Ballard for once manages to be effective: [[spoiler: he convinces Oliphant that it would look better if he accepted an apology from Rumpole.]]

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* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In the final episode, "Rumpole on Trial," Hilda dragoons Ballard into defending Rumpole after he insults Justice Oliphant. Ballard is horrified and Rumpole initially uncooperative, but Ballard for once manages to be effective: [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he convinces Oliphant that it would look better if he accepted an apology from Rumpole.]]



3rd Sep '17 7:44:10 PM PaulA
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* [[ReferencedBy/WilliamShakespeare Referenced By: William Shakespeare]]: Several references, and hardly surprising given Rumpole's love of English literature.
** Some are built into the stories. In "The Dear Departed," Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from ''Richard II'' ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs...") The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.


Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: "The Dear Departed" contains several shout-outs to ''Theatre/RichardII''. Rumpole opens and closes with a quote from the play ("Let's talk of graves, and worms, and epitaphs..."). The solicitors in his will case are Mowbray and Pontefract -- Mowbray being the accused knight whose duel opens ''Richard II'', and Pontefract (Pomfret) being the castle where Richard is imprisoned at the end of the play.
1st Sep '17 8:15:44 AM hullflyer
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* HangoverSensitivity: here's at least one episode of wherein Rumpole, after a night of "carousing" with Henry the clerk, has to come in to court shading his eyes.

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* HangoverSensitivity: here's There's at least one episode of wherein Rumpole, after a night of "carousing" with Henry the clerk, has to come in to court shading his eyes.
1st Sep '17 8:14:39 AM hullflyer
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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got them off that they wre in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.

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* GoodLawyersGoodClients: Subverted. While it is true that almost all of Rumpole's clients that we see are in fact innocent of the crime they're on trial for, they are very frequently guilty of some other crime. This is particularly true of the Timsons, a clan of South London "[[HarmlessVillain minor villains]]" who make their living off of petty larceny and [[FellOffTheBackOfATruck fencing]], and whose fees seem to pay a fair chunk of Rumpole's own bills. There's also more than one DownerEnding where Rumpole's client tells him ''after'' he's got them off that they wre were in fact guilty and thanks to the double jeopardy rule there's nothing he can do about it.
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