History Series / RoboCopTheSeries

17th Jun '16 5:31:49 AM Anicomicgeek
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* ExpandedStatesOfAmerica: One of the ''[=MediaBreak=]'' segments in an episode mentioned a debate about Newfoundland becoming about the 53rd state.

to:

* ExpandedStatesOfAmerica: One of the ''[=MediaBreak=]'' segments in an episode mentioned a debate about Newfoundland becoming about the 53rd state. Ironically, despite being a staple in other uses of this trope, Puerto Rico ''isn't'' one of them, as another episode has a [=MediaBreak=] segment state the governemtn sold it off to a company because they didn't have plans for it.



* LighterAndSofter: Following up on ''Film/RoboCop3'', the series was dulled down to appeal to family audiences (and, indeed, it was shown in syndication in Canada on weekends at pre-watershed timeslots). [=RoboCop=] didn't kill (he used gadgets to incapacitate them), the humour was dulled down and the plots became cartoonish.
** Pretty much the start of the DorkAge of [=RoboCop=] where the target audience are now grade school kids of fourth grade or older. Merchandise from the show even includes a [=RoboCop=] action figure that say MoralGuardian-approved lines ("[[DrugsAreBad Say No To Drugs!]]" among other things).

to:

* LighterAndSofter: Following up on ''Film/RoboCop3'', the series was dulled down to appeal to family audiences (and, indeed, it was shown in syndication in Canada on weekends at pre-watershed timeslots). [=RoboCop=] didn't kill (he used gadgets to incapacitate them), the humour was dulled down and the plots became cartoonish.
** Pretty
cartoonish. It's pretty much the start of the DorkAge of [=RoboCop=] where the target audience are now grade school kids of fourth grade or older. Merchandise from the show even includes a [=RoboCop=] action figure that say MoralGuardian-approved lines ("[[DrugsAreBad Say No To Drugs!]]" among other things).



* StrawFeminist: Two epsidoes ("Inside Crime"and "Sisters in Crime") feature a CorruptCorporateExecutive named Rochelle Carney, who outright said in her debut that she considered everything a gender issue, even blaming her getting fired when she returns on her being a woman and her boss, Aubrey Fox, being a louse who hit on her--and while Fox did indeed try to hook up with her, [[NeverMyFault she refused to acknowledge real reason she got fired]] was because she was in league with the series' {{archenemy}} "Pudface" Morgan (who, among other things, tried to kill Robo repeatedly, took a retirement home's citizen hostage, led a siege on OCP heaquarters, and helped push a deinhibitor as a diet pill) as part of a ratings stunt (though her boss did indeed try to hit on her).

to:

* StrawFeminist: Two epsidoes ("Inside Crime"and "Sisters in Crime") feature a CorruptCorporateExecutive named Rochelle Carney, who outright said in her debut that she considered everything a gender issue, even blaming her getting fired when she returns on her being a woman and her boss, Aubrey Fox, being a louse who hit on her--and while Fox did indeed try to hook up with her, [[NeverMyFault she refused to acknowledge real reason she got fired]] was because she was in league with the series' {{archenemy}} "Pudface" Morgan (who, among other things, tried to kill Robo repeatedly, took a retirement home's citizen hostage, led a siege on OCP heaquarters, and helped push a deinhibitor as a diet pill) as part of a ratings stunt (though her boss did indeed try to hit on her).stunt.
17th Jun '16 5:27:05 AM Anicomicgeek
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** The episode ''Inside Crime'' focuses on the eponymous TV show that follows criminals around as they commit crime. In a ratings stunt the producers team up with Pudface to get a showdown between him and Robo.

to:

** The episode ''Inside Crime'' focuses on the eponymous TV show that follows criminals around as they commit crime. In a ratings stunt stunt, the producers team up with Pudface to get a showdown between him and Robo.Robo.
* StrawFeminist: Two epsidoes ("Inside Crime"and "Sisters in Crime") feature a CorruptCorporateExecutive named Rochelle Carney, who outright said in her debut that she considered everything a gender issue, even blaming her getting fired when she returns on her being a woman and her boss, Aubrey Fox, being a louse who hit on her--and while Fox did indeed try to hook up with her, [[NeverMyFault she refused to acknowledge real reason she got fired]] was because she was in league with the series' {{archenemy}} "Pudface" Morgan (who, among other things, tried to kill Robo repeatedly, took a retirement home's citizen hostage, led a siege on OCP heaquarters, and helped push a deinhibitor as a diet pill) as part of a ratings stunt (though her boss did indeed try to hit on her).
15th Jun '16 10:57:28 AM Anicomicgeek
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** A CorruptCorporateExecutive and StrawFeminist named Rochelle Carney who was fired in the episode "Inside Crime" after being in league in the aforementioned Pudface as part of a ratings stunt for the episode's titular ShowWithinaShow. However, while her boss was indeed hitting on her, she chose to blame his behavior and her being a woman for the reason she was fired rather than what actually got her fired, which was being in league with a well-known criminal.

to:

** A CorruptCorporateExecutive and StrawFeminist named Rochelle Carney who was fired in the episode "Inside Crime" after being in league in the aforementioned Pudface as part of a ratings stunt for the episode's titular ShowWithinaShow.ShowWithinAShow. However, while her boss was indeed hitting on her, she chose to blame his behavior and her being a woman for the reason she was fired rather than what actually got her fired, which was being in league with a well-known criminal.



** The episode ''Inside Crime'' focuses on the eponymous TV show that follows criminals around as they commit crime. In a ratings stunt the producers team up with Pudface to get a show down between him and Robo.

to:

** The episode ''Inside Crime'' focuses on the eponymous TV show that follows criminals around as they commit crime. In a ratings stunt the producers team up with Pudface to get a show down showdown between him and Robo.
13th May '16 2:16:22 PM Anicomicgeek
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Added DiffLines:

* NeverMyFault:
** "Pudface" Morgan is a criminal (who's also Murphy's archenemy in the show) was disfigured in an accident he caused. However, the minute he sees [=RoboCop=], it's clear he blames Murphy for it and not himself.
** A CorruptCorporateExecutive and StrawFeminist named Rochelle Carney who was fired in the episode "Inside Crime" after being in league in the aforementioned Pudface as part of a ratings stunt for the episode's titular ShowWithinaShow. However, while her boss was indeed hitting on her, she chose to blame his behavior and her being a woman for the reason she was fired rather than what actually got her fired, which was being in league with a well-known criminal.
22nd Nov '15 1:27:09 PM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* EvilVegetarian: Dr. Cray Z. Mallardo, although being a vegetarian has little to do with him being a villain.
7th Oct '15 6:39:19 PM Anicomicgeek
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* CastingGag: The late Martin Milner appears in "The Human Factor" and "Corporate Raiders" as Alex Murphy's father, Russell Murphy. Turns out, the apple didn't fall fat from the tree, as [[Series/AdamTwelve Russell as a cop, too]].
30th Sep '15 2:08:05 PM moloch
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* LighterAndSofter: Following up on ''Film/RoboCop3'', the series was dulled down to appear to family audiences (and, indeed, it was shown in syndication in Canada on weekends at pre-watershed timeslots). [=RoboCop=] didn't kill (he used gadgets to incapacitate them), the humor was dulled down and the plots became cartoonish.
** Pretty much the start of the DorkAge of [=RoboCop=] where the target audience are now grade school kids of fourth grade or older. Merchandise from the show even includes a [=RoboCop=] action figure that say MoralGuardian approved lines ("[[DrugsAreBad Say No To Drugs!]]" among other things).

to:

* LighterAndSofter: Following up on ''Film/RoboCop3'', the series was dulled down to appear appeal to family audiences (and, indeed, it was shown in syndication in Canada on weekends at pre-watershed timeslots). [=RoboCop=] didn't kill (he used gadgets to incapacitate them), the humor humour was dulled down and the plots became cartoonish.
** Pretty much the start of the DorkAge of [=RoboCop=] where the target audience are now grade school kids of fourth grade or older. Merchandise from the show even includes a [=RoboCop=] action figure that say MoralGuardian approved MoralGuardian-approved lines ("[[DrugsAreBad Say No To Drugs!]]" among other things). things).
30th Sep '15 2:05:49 PM moloch
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''[=RoboCop=]: The series'' is a 1994 Live-Action TV series following on from the ''Franchise/RoboCop'' films of the 1980/90's; 21 episodes were made with a double feature pilot. The series was aimed at a younger demographic, namely teenagers, as such the violence is toned down with [=RoboCop=] going out of his way to use non-lethal alternatives to capture criminals. OCP is now merely incompetent and naive; the Old Man of the film series being replaced by the greedy, but otherwise decent, Chairman.

Starring [[TheOtherDarrin Richard Eden]] the show takes place in an AlternateContinuity where [[GratuitousGreek Delta City]] (the goal of OCP in the films) is finally completed; the show ignores the ''Film/RoboCop3''. The series has a new set of supporting characters; Detective Lisa Madigan is now his partner, Sgt Stan Parks now runs the precinct, Charlie Lippencott is his technician (and partly responsible for his creation) and [[TagalongKid adopted orphan]] Gadget now hangs around the police station. His son Jimmy is back, but now has a new mother, Nancy Murphy; both of which are kept in the dark over who is under the helmet. In the pilot episode we are introduced to Diana Powers, and after having her brain forcibly removed to run OCP's new [[WetwareCPU Metronet]], runs the city enabling [=RoboCop=] access to systems he normally wouldn't have.

to:

''[=RoboCop=]: The series'' is a 1994 Live-Action TV series following on from the ''Franchise/RoboCop'' films of the 1980/90's; 21 episodes were made with a double feature pilot. The series also followed the series' then-recent trend towards family-friendliness, and was aimed at a younger demographic, namely teenagers, as such the with toned-down violence is toned down with and [=RoboCop=] going out of his way to use non-lethal alternatives to capture criminals. More jarringly, OCP is now merely incompetent and naive; the Old Man of the film series being replaced by the greedy, but otherwise decent, Chairman.

Starring [[TheOtherDarrin Richard Eden]] the show takes place in an AlternateContinuity where [[GratuitousGreek Delta City]] (the goal of OCP in the films) is finally completed; the show ignores the ''Film/RoboCop3''. The series has a new set of supporting characters; Detective Lisa Madigan is now his partner, Sgt Stan Parks now runs the precinct, Charlie Lippencott is his technician (and partly responsible for his creation) and [[TagalongKid adopted orphan]] Gadget now hangs around the police station. His son Jimmy is back, but now has a new mother, Nancy Murphy; both of which are kept in the dark over who is under the helmet. In the pilot episode we are introduced to Diana Powers, and after having her brain forcibly removed to run OCP's new [[WetwareCPU Metronet]], runs the city enabling [=RoboCop=] access to systems he normally wouldn't have.
20th Sep '15 7:49:18 PM jormis29
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* OrganTheft: "What Money Can't Buy" deals with this as Murphy goes against a rblack markey organ ring when two people steal a pair of lungs meant to save a boy after his body Murphy helped rescue in the prior episode ("Officer Down") started to reject the lungs he was given in an earlier operation. [[spoiler: The duo and their boss stole the lungs are a crime boss and the boy's earlier lungs came from the same criminal ring and were taken from someone who died from tuberculosis.]]

to:

* OrganTheft: "What Money Can't Buy" deals with this as Murphy goes against a rblack markey black market organ ring when two people steal a pair of lungs meant to save a boy after his body Murphy helped rescue in the prior episode ("Officer Down") started to reject the lungs he was given in an earlier operation. [[spoiler: The duo and their boss stole the lungs are a crime boss and the boy's earlier lungs came from the same criminal ring and were taken from someone who died from tuberculosis.]]
20th Sep '15 3:08:26 PM Anicomicgeek
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* TagalongKid: Gadget, a young orphan, turns up in the pilot and seemingly gets adopted by the police-station giving her a reason to stick around. You would think Officer Parks adopted her but in one episode she says she lives in the station, and she doesn't seem to go to school either.

to:

* TagalongKid: Gadget, a young orphan, turns up in the pilot and seemingly gets adopted by the police-station giving her a reason to stick around. You would think Officer Parks adopted her but in one episode she says she lives in the station, and she doesn't seem to go to school either.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.RoboCopTheSeries