History Series / MurdochMysteries

26th May '17 5:59:00 AM StFan
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*** [[spoiler:But ultimately revealed to be a mislead; he did survive, but with a badly deformed face. His campaign of revenge leads to him being [[KilledOffForReal hanged with Murdoch and Ogden watching]].]]



** Season 10 ended with [[spoiler:Murdoch in jail for murder and having to clear his own name amid corrupt police officials]]

to:

** Season 10 ended ends with [[spoiler:Murdoch in jail for murder and having to clear his own name amid corrupt police officials]]officials]].



** In the season ender in season 10, [[spoiler: it Murdoch's turn again, but he is being set up by crooked city police officials; the fate of Murdoch and several other cast members is left ambiguous at episode's end.]]

to:

** In the season ender in finale of season 10, [[spoiler: it [[spoiler:it's Murdoch's turn again, but he is being set up by crooked city police officials; the fate of Murdoch and several other cast members is left ambiguous at episode's end.]]



* StockFootage: many establishing shots in the early seasons made use of photos in the Toronto Archives, often with carriages or pedestrians animated. A particularly noteworthy example is the second part of "Great Balls of Fire", the two-episode opener to season 10, which briefly faded from colour to black and white in order to use film footage of the 1904 Great fire of Toronto.

to:

* StockFootage: many Many establishing shots in the early seasons made use of photos in the Toronto Archives, often with carriages or pedestrians animated. A particularly noteworthy example is the second part of "Great Balls of Fire", the two-episode opener to season 10, which briefly faded from colour color to black and white in order to use film footage of the 1904 Great fire of Toronto.



* TitleDrop: Both for the series and episode's titles in "The Filmed Adventures of Detective William Murdoch". Crabtree comments that aforementioned title for the movie-whithin-a-show is too much of a mouthful, and suggests "''Murdoch Mysteries''" instead.

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* TitleDrop: TitleDrop:
**
Both for the series and episode's titles in "The Filmed Adventures of Detective William Murdoch". Crabtree comments that aforementioned title for the movie-whithin-a-show is too much of a mouthful, and suggests "''Murdoch Mysteries''" instead.
25th May '17 10:23:34 PM danlansdowne
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** Season 10 ended with [[spoiler:Murdoch in jail for murder and having to clear his own name amid corrupt police officials]]



** Murdoch attempts to invoke this in "The Green Fairy" to see if someone could be driven to murder under the influence of absinthe, but only gets a headache.



** Brackenreid is PutOnABus temporarily in season 10 when he goes to St Louis to coach the Canadian men's soccer team at the 1904 Olympics, returning with a gold medal.



** In season 8's "What Lies Buried", a body found in the cellar of Station House 4 dates back to the 1880s, when Brackenreid, Chief Constable Giles, and a couple other senior constables were just getting started in the constabulary. Giles mandates that the station is off-limits to anyone who was with the police at the time.
** In the season ender in season 10, [[spoiler: it Murdoch's turn again, but he is being set up by crooked city police officials; the fate of Murdoch and several other cast members is left ambiguous at episode's end.]]



** An Indian guide kills men who accidentally wounded him in the chest and left him stranded.

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** An Indian hunting guide kills men who accidentally wounded him in the chest and left him stranded.



** Murdoch, a Catholic, initially receives some stick from Brackenreid for being a "Papist", but this is dropped relatively early.

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** Murdoch, a Catholic, initially receives some stick from Brackenreid for being a "Papist", but this is dropped relatively early. It remains a barrier to further promotion, however.



** Canadian government spymaster Terrence Meyers seems to show up at least once per season. [[spoiler:At least until he's trapped in a rocket being launched into space with no way out]].

to:

** Canadian government spymaster Terrence Meyers seems to show up at least once per season. [[spoiler:At least until he's trapped in a rocket being launched into space with no way out]].



** Season 7 episode "Unfinished Business" features a pair of prominent Toronto brothers, where one is accused of illegal behaviour, and the other appears to be the smarter, more controlling of the two who always bails his brother out and enables him. Of course they were businessmen and not Mayor and Councillor, but it does seem to be a remarkable coincidence and probably a reference to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and his brother Councillor Doug Ford who have been in the international news frequent due to their antics in 2013 and 2014.

to:

** Season 7 episode "Unfinished Business" features a pair of prominent Toronto brothers, where one is accused of illegal behaviour, and the other appears to be the smarter, more controlling of the two who always bails his brother out and enables him. Of course they were businessmen and not Mayor and Councillor, but it does seem to be a remarkable coincidence and probably a reference to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and his brother Councillor Doug Ford who have been were in the international news frequent due to their antics in 2013 and 2014.



** Crabtree's aunts, all [[FloralThemeNaming named after different flowers and plants]]. Fifteen identified: Aunt Amaryllis, Aunt Aster, Aunt Azalea, Aunt Begonia, Aunt Briony, Aunt Clematis, Aunt Dahlia (though George managed to pronounce just "Dahl--"), Aunt Hyacinth, Aunt Iris, Aunt Ivy, Aunt Lily, Aunt Marigold, Aunt Nettle, Aunt Petunia, Aunt Primrose. We finally meet them in season 7. As it turns out, [[spoiler:they're all prostitutes who George's preacher father gave a safe place to live at the rectory.]] They're delighted when George visits them while he and Murdoch are in Newfoundland on a case.

to:

** Crabtree's aunts, all [[FloralThemeNaming named after different flowers and plants]]. Fifteen identified: Aunt Amaryllis, Aunt Aster, Aunt Azalea, Aunt Begonia, Aunt Briony, Aunt Clematis, Aunt Dahlia (though George managed to pronounce just "Dahl--"), Aunt Hyacinth, Aunt Iris, Aunt Ivy, Aunt Lily, Aunt Marigold, Aunt Nettle, Aunt Petunia, Aunt Primrose. We finally meet them in season 7. As it turns out, [[spoiler:they're all prostitutes who George's preacher adoptive father gave a safe place to live at the rectory.]] They're delighted when George visits them while he and Murdoch are in Newfoundland on a case.



** An out-of-universe example leads to a couple mistakes in "Dinosaur Fever:"

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** An out-of-universe example leads to a couple mistakes in "Dinosaur Fever:"Fever":



* StockFootage: many establishing shots in the early seasons made use of photos in the Toronto Archives, often with carriages or pedestrians animated. A particularly noteworthy example is the second part of "Great Balls of Fire", the two-episode opener to season 10, which briefly faded from colour to black and white in order to use film footage of the 1904 Great fire of Toronto.



* TakeThatAudience: A friendly jab the end of "The Filmed Adventures of Detective William Murdoch."

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* TakeThatAudience: A friendly jab the end of "The Filmed Adventures of Detective William Murdoch."" Also the Detective Murdoch fan club in "The Murdoch Appreciation Society".


Added DiffLines:

** A bonus entry occurs in "The Artful Detective", which is the [[MarketBasedTitle name of the show in the US]].
25th May '17 9:41:34 PM danlansdowne
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Added DiffLines:

*** [[spoiler:But ultimately revealed to be a mislead; he did survive, but with a badly deformed face. His campaign of revenge leads to him being [[KilledOffForReal hanged with Murdoch and Ogden watching]].]]
12th May '17 5:24:59 PM StFan
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* AbsurdlyHighStakesGame: In "Stairway to Heaven", a small society meets annually and plays faro for [[spoiler: the chance to die in controlled circumstances and be revived in an effort to learn about the afterlife]]. One of the players extols the pure chance of the game allowing everyone to have the same chance of winning, but it turns out [[spoiler: one of the players cheated with marked cards]].

to:

* AbsurdlyHighStakesGame: In "Stairway to Heaven", a small society meets annually and plays faro for [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the chance to die in controlled circumstances and be revived in an effort to learn about the afterlife]]. One of the players extols the pure chance of the game allowing everyone to have the same chance of winning, but it turns out [[spoiler: one [[spoiler:one of the players cheated with marked cards]].



** The Crown Prosecutor in "Hangman", who does everything to make sure the defendant gets hanged, even the obviously innocent ones. Once a judge suspects his methods, [[spoiler: he confronts the judge, kills him, and frames a known criminal for it]].
** Leslie Garland in the two-part "On the Waterfront" has passed his bar exam and is working for one of the Crown Prosecutors--specifically the one handling the charges against Drs. Ogden and Grace and the other suffragettes arrested at the protest march. Garland offers to have a word with his new boss in the doctors' favour, but both of them refuse his help. He later ensures Dr. Grace's charges aren't dropped immediately [[spoiler: no doubt because she threw him over after she learned he'd posed as the infamous James Gilies and threatened the lives of Julia and William]], and he gloats over her incarceration. Julia and her attorney present the Prosecutor with evidence of [[spoiler: his terror campaign]], and Garland is fired. He drops by Julia's office and gets a surprise of his own: [[spoiler: a fearsome William Murdoch who promises to take off his badge and settle their differences if Garland bothers Julia again]].

to:

** The Crown Prosecutor in "Hangman", who does everything to make sure the defendant gets hanged, even the obviously innocent ones. Once a judge suspects his methods, [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he confronts the judge, kills him, and frames a known criminal for it]].
** Leslie Garland in the two-part "On the Waterfront" has passed his bar exam and is working for one of the Crown Prosecutors--specifically Prosecutors -- specifically the one handling the charges against Drs. Ogden and Grace and the other suffragettes arrested at the protest march. Garland offers to have a word with his new boss in the doctors' favour, favor, but both of them refuse his help. He later ensures Dr. Grace's charges aren't dropped immediately [[spoiler: no [[spoiler:no doubt because she threw him over after she learned he'd posed as the infamous James Gilies Gillies and threatened the lives of Julia and William]], and he gloats over her incarceration. Julia and her attorney present the Prosecutor with evidence of [[spoiler: his [[spoiler:his terror campaign]], and Garland is fired. He drops by Julia's office and gets a surprise of his own: [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a fearsome William Murdoch who promises to take off his badge and settle their differences if Garland bothers Julia again]].



* {{Area 51}}: After Murdoch and Company stumble into a US/UK secret airship research facility in the middle of Ontario (on "Concession 51", no less!), the station house four team noted that it's probably smarter to relocate the research station to the deserts of New Mexico.

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* {{Area 51}}: Area51: After Murdoch and Company stumble into a US/UK secret airship research facility in the middle of Ontario (on "Concession 51", no less!), the station house four team noted that it's probably smarter to relocate the research station to the deserts of New Mexico.



** In "Victoria Cross", Crabtree is eating a hard boiled egg while watching Dr. Grace working on a corpse when she removes [[spoiler: a prosthetic glass eye]] from the corpse's stomach. It makes for a striking visual.

to:

** In "Victoria Cross", Crabtree is eating a hard boiled egg while watching Dr. Grace working on a corpse when she removes [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a prosthetic glass eye]] from the corpse's stomach. It makes for a striking visual.



** Subverted in [[spoiler:"Last Train To Kingston". Although James Gillies manages to outsmart Murdoch and company and escape, he apparently gets himself killed by jumping off a railway bridge into a shallow river.]]

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** Subverted in [[spoiler:"Last Train To to Kingston". Although James Gillies manages to outsmart Murdoch and company and escape, he apparently gets himself killed by jumping off a railway bridge into a shallow river.]]



** Emily violently kisses [[spoiler: Lillian Moss]] in "Toronto's Girl Problem".

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** Emily violently kisses [[spoiler: Lillian [[spoiler:Lillian Moss]] in "Toronto's Girl Problem".



** In "Murodch at the Opera", Dr. Grace describes smelling the aroma of bitter almonds coming from the corpse of the young opera singer. Later, after [[spoiler: the culprit prima donna takes poison and dies onstage]], Crabtree brings out a wine glass he found and Murdoch himself sniffs it and says, "Cyanide."

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** In "Murodch at the Opera", Dr. Grace describes smelling the aroma of bitter almonds coming from the corpse of the young opera singer. Later, after [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the culprit prima donna takes poison and dies onstage]], Crabtree brings out a wine glass he found and Murdoch himself sniffs it and says, "Cyanide."



** "Hangman" opens with an execution scene in a prison, with Murdoch, another detective and the crown prosecutor among the witnesses. Near the end, the scene returns to the same room, with [[spoiler: the crown prosecutor]] being hanged.

to:

** "Hangman" opens with an execution scene in a prison, with Murdoch, another detective and the crown prosecutor among the witnesses. Near the end, the scene returns to the same room, with [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the crown prosecutor]] being hanged.



* BrokenPedestal: Often for poor Inspector Brackenreid. High-talent has a knack for making a monster out of the [[LargeHam divas]] that the inspector so admires, first in [[spoiler: "Body Double"]] with Stella then in [[spoiler: "Murdoch at the Opera"]] with Rosa, both of whom have committed murder.

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* BrokenPedestal: Often for poor Inspector Brackenreid. High-talent has a knack for making a monster out of the [[LargeHam divas]] that the inspector so admires, first in [[spoiler: "Body [[spoiler:"Body Double"]] with Stella then in [[spoiler: "Murdoch [[spoiler:"Murdoch at the Opera"]] with Rosa, both of whom have committed murder.



* TheButlerDidIt: Played with in the episode "Downstairs, Upstairs". The butler proves to have an alibi for the murder of his employer, but [[spoiler: he knows who did it and suffocated his late employer's mother to keep her from revealing that information]].

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* TheButlerDidIt: Played with in the episode "Downstairs, Upstairs". The butler proves to have an alibi for the murder of his employer, but [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he knows who did it and suffocated his late employer's mother to keep her from revealing that information]].



** Percival Giles, particularly when interacting with Murdoch and Brackenreid. After [[spoiler: the escape of Ava Moon]], he is routinely critical of Murdoch and Brackenreid's methods. When they go to another jurisdiction and remove a corpse back to Toronto, he insists they return the body to the other department and write letters of apology to the other cops and coroner.

to:

** Percival Giles, particularly when interacting with Murdoch and Brackenreid. After [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the escape of Ava Moon]], he is routinely critical of Murdoch and Brackenreid's methods. When they go to another jurisdiction and remove a corpse back to Toronto, he insists they return the body to the other department and write letters of apology to the other cops and coroner.



** "Murdoch of the Klondike" begins this way. Murdoch has left Toronto [[spoiler: after releasing murder Ava Moon from jail]] having given up his urban police career to pan for gold. His appearance and even speech patterns are more those of a scruffy cowboy than an articulate urban man. He camps near his claim and goes to town with the other miners, where he learns of the arrest of a hotel owner for murder.

to:

** "Murdoch of the Klondike" begins this way. Murdoch has left Toronto [[spoiler: after [[spoiler:after releasing murder Ava Moon from jail]] having given up his urban police career to pan for gold. His appearance and even speech patterns are more those of a scruffy cowboy than an articulate urban man. He camps near his claim and goes to town with the other miners, where he learns of the arrest of a hotel owner for murder.



** In "Victoria Cross", Murdoch himself comes upon a killer approaching Julia and her patient (an eyewitness to his earlier robbery and murder), and grabs the guy's arm from behind without further ado--no flashing the badge or issuing a verbal order to stop.

to:

** In "Victoria Cross", Murdoch himself comes upon a killer approaching Julia and her patient (an eyewitness to his earlier robbery and murder), and grabs the guy's arm from behind without further ado--no ado -- no flashing the badge or issuing a verbal order to stop.



* CrammingTheCoffin: In "The Black Hand", Murdoch is investigating the shooting death of a businessman from New York City when he learns of a sudden change in the funeral arrangements for the dead man. He and Constable Crabtree visit the mortician, and Crabtree notices the body seems to be rather high in his coffin. The cops find the coffin has a false bottom concealing another dead man [[spoiler: the fiancé of Anna Fulford, who stole counterfeit money from an organized crime outfit]].

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* CrammingTheCoffin: In "The Black Hand", Murdoch is investigating the shooting death of a businessman from New York City when he learns of a sudden change in the funeral arrangements for the dead man. He and Constable Crabtree visit the mortician, and Crabtree notices the body seems to be rather high in his coffin. The cops find the coffin has a false bottom concealing another dead man [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the fiancé of Anna Fulford, who stole counterfeit money from an organized crime outfit]].



** In "Friday the 13th 1901", Julia gets locked in a cold storage cellar and finds a childish drawing and a doll, which triggers her memories of James Gillies [[spoiler: who kidnapped her and buried her alive]]. She is later reminded of this again when going over the Gillies case file and looking at a photo of one of the dolls.

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** In "Friday the 13th 1901", Julia gets locked in a cold storage cellar and finds a childish drawing and a doll, which triggers her memories of James Gillies [[spoiler: who [[spoiler:who kidnapped her and buried her alive]]. She is later reminded of this again when going over the Gillies case file and looking at a photo of one of the dolls.



** Mr. Carducci in "This One Goes to Eleven". He has a neatly trimmed beard, twirly-styled hair, and wears several fashionable suits in addition to owning a walking stick. He is impeccably gentlemanly throughout the episode [[spoiler: until the reveal]].

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** Mr. Carducci in "This One Goes to Eleven". He has a neatly trimmed beard, twirly-styled hair, and wears several fashionable suits in addition to owning a walking stick. He is impeccably gentlemanly throughout the episode [[spoiler: until [[spoiler:until the reveal]].



* DeadpanSnarker: As noted below under SherlockHomage, Murdoch is one of these from time to time. Late in "The Murdoch Sting", he comes upon [[spoiler: Eva Pearce]] standing in a pond desperately searching for [[spoiler: the corpse she hid there]]. He addresses [[spoiler: her]] and says, "What ''are'' you doing? You'll catch your death." Bear in mind, this is in a time and place where there is a death penalty for murder, and his listener has just been caught red-handed.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: As noted below under SherlockHomage, Murdoch is one of these from time to time. Late in "The Murdoch Sting", he comes upon [[spoiler: Eva [[spoiler:Eva Pearce]] standing in a pond desperately searching for [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the corpse she hid there]]. He addresses [[spoiler: her]] [[spoiler:her]] and says, "What ''are'' you doing? You'll catch your death." Bear in mind, this is in a time and place where there is a death penalty for murder, and his listener has just been caught red-handed.



* DesecratingTheDead: In "Winston's Lost Night", Winston Chruchill speaks out against the desecration of the tomb of [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_Ahmad Muhammad Ahmad al-Mahdi]] in response to someone in a gentlemen's club who praised the action. The story was that [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Kitchener Kitchener]] had ordered the act in revenge for what the Mahdi's troops had done to [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_George_Gordon General Gordon]], and the Mahdi's skull was taken from his tomb so Kitchener could "use it as an ink pot." It turns out that this act, carried out by Chruchill's friend Reginald Mayfair, was the motive for Mayfair's murder [[spoiler: by one of the Mahdi's former soldiers, who happened to be working in a bar where Churchill and Mayfair were drinking]].
* DeterminedWidow: Elizabeth Bryant from the episode "Murdoch of the Klondike" runs one of the two hotels in a formerly booming mining town in the Yukon. Murdoch returns to the town from his claim site to find she's been arrested for killing a rival hotel owner. She asserts her innocence, and when she learns he was once a police detective, she wants his help to clear her name--so much that when he initially refuses, she berates him from her cell, shouting "You're NOTHING!" at him as he leaves. Later, after he's bailed her out of jail and started to investigate, she learns he suspects a friend of the deceased who's buying up mining claims and she goes to physically confront the man in a local hotel barroom. Murdoch finally has her return to jail so he can investigate without her "help". In a quieter conversation, Murdoch asks her why she stays, and she cites the fact that her husband is buried there and insists the hotel provides enough of a living for her. She even flirts openly with Murdoch, hoping he'll stay with her, but he demurs.

to:

* DesecratingTheDead: In "Winston's Lost Night", Winston Chruchill speaks out against the desecration of the tomb of [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_Ahmad Muhammad Ahmad al-Mahdi]] in response to someone in a gentlemen's club who praised the action. The story was that [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Kitchener Kitchener]] had ordered the act in revenge for what the Mahdi's troops had done to [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_George_Gordon General Gordon]], and the Mahdi's skull was taken from his tomb so Kitchener could "use it as an ink pot." It turns out that this act, carried out by Chruchill's friend Reginald Mayfair, was the motive for Mayfair's murder [[spoiler: by [[spoiler:by one of the Mahdi's former soldiers, who happened to be working in a bar where Churchill and Mayfair were drinking]].
* DeterminedWidow: Elizabeth Bryant from the episode "Murdoch of the Klondike" runs one of the two hotels in a formerly booming mining town in the Yukon. Murdoch returns to the town from his claim site to find she's been arrested for killing a rival hotel owner. She asserts her innocence, and when she learns he was once a police detective, she wants his help to clear her name--so name -- so much that when he initially refuses, she berates him from her cell, shouting "You're NOTHING!" at him as he leaves. Later, after he's bailed her out of jail and started to investigate, she learns he suspects a friend of the deceased who's buying up mining claims and she goes to physically confront the man in a local hotel barroom. Murdoch finally has her return to jail so he can investigate without her "help". In a quieter conversation, Murdoch asks her why she stays, and she cites the fact that her husband is buried there and insists the hotel provides enough of a living for her. She even flirts openly with Murdoch, hoping he'll stay with her, but he demurs.



** Murdoch is rescued from "The Murdoch Trap", literally a cage in a lair set up by the infamous James Gillies, by Inspector Brackenreid and Constable Crabtree, backed by most of the rest of the men of Station Four. He's carried out by his colleagues since he's [[spoiler: unconscious from carbon monoxide pumped into the room]].
** Late in "Murdoch Ahoy", Murdoch is helping to rescue the ship owner's daughter from a cargo hold fast filling with water when [[spoiler: a falling trunk knocks him out and he sinks below the water]]. Dr. Ogden goes to his rescue, aided by Inspector Brackenreid.

to:

** Murdoch is rescued from "The Murdoch Trap", literally a cage in a lair set up by the infamous James Gillies, by Inspector Brackenreid and Constable Crabtree, backed by most of the rest of the men of Station Four. He's carried out by his colleagues since he's [[spoiler: unconscious [[spoiler:unconscious from carbon monoxide pumped into the room]].
** Late in "Murdoch Ahoy", Murdoch is helping to rescue the ship owner's daughter from a cargo hold fast filling with water when [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a falling trunk knocks him out and he sinks below the water]]. Dr. Ogden goes to his rescue, aided by Inspector Brackenreid.



** Episode 8x07, which ends with [[spoiler: Chief Constable Giles and Constable Hodge both in jail.]]

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** Episode 8x07, which ends with [[spoiler: Chief [[spoiler:Chief Constable Giles and Constable Hodge both in jail.]]



* DueToTheDead: Devout Roman Catholic Murdoch always crosses himself when he first comes upon a corpse, whether it's at a reported crime scene, or when someone dies in his presence (such as "Back and to the Left", "Stroll on the Wild Side" and "Tour de Murdoch"). Additionally, he does this at funerals such as the cop's memorial-cum-wake at the bar in "The Great Wall" and the graveside service for [[spoiler: the long-dead Canadian government official]] in "Confderate Treasure". The gesture outs him as a minority Catholic in a Protestant-controlled city, so it is more of a big deal than it seems on the surface. On occasion, other characters do this: the hotel manager in "Return of Sherlock Holmes" performs it when a guest is found dead, and Crabtree tries to imitate his boss at that graveside in "Confederate Treasure".

to:

* DueToTheDead: Devout Roman Catholic Murdoch always crosses himself when he first comes upon a corpse, whether it's at a reported crime scene, or when someone dies in his presence (such as "Back and to the Left", "Stroll on the Wild Side" and "Tour de Murdoch"). Additionally, he does this at funerals such as the cop's memorial-cum-wake at the bar in "The Great Wall" and the graveside service for [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the long-dead Canadian government official]] in "Confderate Treasure". The gesture outs him as a minority Catholic in a Protestant-controlled city, so it is more of a big deal than it seems on the surface. On occasion, other characters do this: the hotel manager in "Return of Sherlock Holmes" performs it when a guest is found dead, and Crabtree tries to imitate his boss at that graveside in "Confederate Treasure".



* EnfantTerrible: [[spoiler: Dorrie]] in "Dial M for Murdoch" who is responsible for [[WouldHurtAChild murdering a boy]], attempting to takeover a jewelry-theft ring, and is only a child himself. Murdoch speculates as to whether [[spoiler: Dorrie]] simply [[TheSociopath lacks a conscience]].

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* EnfantTerrible: [[spoiler: Dorrie]] [[spoiler:Dorrie]] in "Dial M for Murdoch" who is responsible for [[WouldHurtAChild murdering a boy]], attempting to takeover a jewelry-theft ring, and is only a child himself. Murdoch speculates as to whether [[spoiler: Dorrie]] [[spoiler:Dorrie]] simply [[TheSociopath lacks a conscience]].



* EverybodyDidIt: In "Body Double", the first murder was committed by only one person [[spoiler: the leading lady of a theatrical company]], but the coverup (which involves a second murder) is arranged by all of the acting company.

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* EverybodyDidIt: In "Body Double", the first murder was committed by only one person [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the leading lady of a theatrical company]], but the coverup (which involves a second murder) is arranged by all of the acting company.



** Cecil Fox, who was sentenced to death by hanging, sits up on the autopsy table and grabs Julia. He [[spoiler: had a tracheotomy tube and a helpful hangman who used a short rope]] so he would be seen to be hanged yet actually survive.

to:

** Cecil Fox, who was sentenced to death by hanging, sits up on the autopsy table and grabs Julia. He [[spoiler: had [[spoiler:had a tracheotomy tube and a helpful hangman who used a short rope]] so he would be seen to be hanged yet actually survive.



* FirstGirlWins: This one is played with involving Constable George Crabtree and Edna Garrison. They meet in the very first episode of the series ("Power") when she's an animal rights activist protesting the planned electrocution of a dog to demonstrate the dangers of alternating current. The demonstration is sabotaged and a woman dies. George has to investigate Edna, who is found to have incriminating device plans, and the suspicion comes between them--at one point George says, "That ship has sailed." Several seasons pass, during which George has a budding romance with Dr. Grace that also fizzles out, partly over George's class insecurities. Edna reappears in the eighth season having married a soldier with a young son; she's recently received an official letter telling her she's a widow, and over the course of the season she and George rekindle their romance. Late in the season, after learning of his impending promotion to detective, he proposes marriage to her and she accepts. Just when the trio is discussing their new family life over dinner, Edna's first husband suddenly reappears and things go downhill fast.

to:

* FirstGirlWins: This one is played with involving Constable George Crabtree and Edna Garrison. They meet in the very first episode of the series ("Power") when she's an animal rights activist protesting the planned electrocution of a dog to demonstrate the dangers of alternating current. The demonstration is sabotaged and a woman dies. George has to investigate Edna, who is found to have incriminating device plans, and the suspicion comes between them--at them -- at one point George says, "That ship has sailed." Several seasons pass, during which George has a budding romance with Dr. Grace that also fizzles out, partly over George's class insecurities. Edna reappears in the eighth season having married a soldier with a young son; she's recently received an official letter telling her she's a widow, and over the course of the season she and George rekindle their romance. Late in the season, after learning of his impending promotion to detective, he proposes marriage to her and she accepts. Just when the trio is discussing their new family life over dinner, Edna's first husband suddenly reappears and things go downhill fast.



* FiveSecondForeshadowing: In the episode "Murdoch in Toyland", Murdoch and Inspector Brackenreid descend the stairs of a church basement and Brackenreid comments, "It's like a tomb down here." Seconds later, Murdoch turns on a light and they find [[spoiler: a headless corpse]].

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* FiveSecondForeshadowing: In the episode "Murdoch in Toyland", Murdoch and Inspector Brackenreid descend the stairs of a church basement and Brackenreid comments, "It's like a tomb down here." Seconds later, Murdoch turns on a light and they find [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a headless corpse]].



** In "Murdoch at the Opera", the opera company's manager observes that while the dead singer was the understudy to the star, the younger woman was unlikely to go on in the lead role of ''Theatre/LaBoheme'' because the diva would sing on her deathbed. At the end of the episode, [[spoiler: the diva, who was also the culprit, took poison and sang her final scene in the opera on a bed as she was actually dying]].
** In "Murdoch on the Corner", a seemingly crazy beggar talks to himself incessantly, and one of his early phrases is "She's the one!" It turns out [[spoiler: the culprit in a series of murders is a woman, an apparently kindly pastor's widow]].

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** In "Murdoch at the Opera", the opera company's manager observes that while the dead singer was the understudy to the star, the younger woman was unlikely to go on in the lead role of ''Theatre/LaBoheme'' because the diva would sing on her deathbed. At the end of the episode, [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the diva, who was also the culprit, took poison and sang her final scene in the opera on a bed as she was actually dying]].
** In "Murdoch on the Corner", a seemingly crazy beggar talks to himself incessantly, and one of his early phrases is "She's the one!" It turns out [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the culprit in a series of murders is a woman, an apparently kindly pastor's widow]].



* GenderSeparatedEnsembleEpisode: "Friday the 13th 1901" has two plots: Julia and Emily go to an island with several women friends for a weekend "hen party" (a bachelorette party) for one of the friends, while the guys of Station 4 play in a curling match on a bet. Brackenreid urges Murdoch to get involved in a effort to remedy the detective's depression over [[spoiler: Julia's rejection of his marriage proposal]], and true to form, Murdoch studies the game and invents a sliding shoe for the team. Meanwhile, the doctors' enjoyment of food, alcohol, tobacco and camaraderie are rudely interrupted by an axe murderer.

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* GenderSeparatedEnsembleEpisode: "Friday the 13th 1901" has two plots: Julia and Emily go to an island with several women friends for a weekend "hen party" (a bachelorette party) for one of the friends, while the guys of Station 4 play in a curling match on a bet. Brackenreid urges Murdoch to get involved in a effort to remedy the detective's depression over [[spoiler: Julia's [[spoiler:Julia's rejection of his marriage proposal]], and true to form, Murdoch studies the game and invents a sliding shoe for the team. Meanwhile, the doctors' enjoyment of food, alcohol, tobacco and camaraderie are rudely interrupted by an axe murderer.



** In "Twentieth Century Murdoch", the professor with the time machine meets with Murodch and mentions the work of one of his brilliant students in Berlin--none other than UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein.

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** In "Twentieth Century Murdoch", the professor with the time machine meets with Murodch Murdoch and mentions the work of one of his brilliant students in Berlin--none Berlin -- none other than UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein.



** [[YouWakeUpInARoom "The Murdoch Trap" opens with Murdoch lying unconscious on the floor of what proves to be a cage.]] After he comes to, he finds [[spoiler: a hanging mannequin that looks like Julia with a recording of her voice playing]] and is greeted by his captor [[spoiler: James Gillies]]. The story goes back to events a week earlier and then alternates between that backstory and Murdoch's present predicament.

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** [[YouWakeUpInARoom "The Murdoch Trap" opens with Murdoch lying unconscious on the floor of what proves to be a cage.]] After he comes to, he finds [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a hanging mannequin that looks like Julia with a recording of her voice playing]] and is greeted by his captor [[spoiler: James [[spoiler:James Gillies]]. The story goes back to events a week earlier and then alternates between that backstory and Murdoch's present predicament.



** In "'Til Death Do Us Part", the murder weapon turns out to be [[spoiler: a processional cross]] that was in the room where the victim and his killer were arguing.

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** In "'Til Death Do Us Part", the murder weapon turns out to be [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a processional cross]] that was in the room where the victim and his killer were arguing.



** In "Downstairs, Upstairs", the household objects used to kill include [[spoiler: a fireplace poker]] and [[spoiler: a chair cushion]].

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** In "Downstairs, Upstairs", the household objects used to kill include [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a fireplace poker]] and [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a chair cushion]].



** In "Murdoch Ahoy", a man proved to have been stabbed to death with [[spoiler: a specialized screwdriver]].

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** In "Murdoch Ahoy", a man proved to have been stabbed to death with [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a specialized screwdriver]].



* InternalizedCategorism: The culprit in "Future Imperfect" [[spoiler: the fiancé of a judge's daughter]] believes wholeheartedly in eugenics and the eugenics movement. During the last interrogation, Murdoch confronts the man with the information on how his own family tree is full of criminal types, how the victim discovered this information, and how it might [[spoiler: or might not]] have ended his engagement. The man says he isn't worthy of his fiancée, confesses his guilt and wants to be hanged, saying, "Put an end to my mongrel blood."
* InterruptedDeclarationOfLove: Late in "The Murdoch Sting", Murdoch literally goes down on one knee and tries to propose to Dr. Ogden. At first, [[CanNotSpitItOut he interrupts himself while trying to pop the question]], but then she interrupts him to say, "I can't!" before fleeing into her house. He doesn't know this at the time--indeed, he knocks on her door and calls out to her--but she's gotten a letter [[spoiler: purportedly]] from arch-nemesis James Gillies threatening death if she marries Murdoch or tells him of the threat.

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* InternalizedCategorism: The culprit in "Future Imperfect" [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the fiancé of a judge's daughter]] believes wholeheartedly in eugenics and the eugenics movement. During the last interrogation, Murdoch confronts the man with the information on how his own family tree is full of criminal types, how the victim discovered this information, and how it might [[spoiler: or [[spoiler:or might not]] have ended his engagement. The man says he isn't worthy of his fiancée, confesses his guilt and wants to be hanged, saying, "Put an end to my mongrel blood."
* InterruptedDeclarationOfLove: Late in "The Murdoch Sting", Murdoch literally goes down on one knee and tries to propose to Dr. Ogden. At first, [[CanNotSpitItOut he interrupts himself while trying to pop the question]], but then she interrupts him to say, "I can't!" before fleeing into her house. He doesn't know this at the time--indeed, time -- indeed, he knocks on her door and calls out to her--but her -- but she's gotten a letter [[spoiler: purportedly]] [[spoiler:purportedly]] from arch-nemesis James Gillies threatening death if she marries Murdoch or tells him of the threat.



** In the B-plot of "Staircase to Heaven", Brackenreid and Crabtree are in the station house guarding a prisoner due to flooding at another station when they share some whiskey. Their conversation turns to the subject of Murdoch (who is on an island investigating a murder), and they confide to each other things about their colleague that they find annoying, including the fact that he never seems to have a hair out of place. Crabtree mentions the detective's repeated advice to "look for the small details" as a particular irritant, [[{{Foreshadowing}} and Crabtree later notices such a detail]] that tips him off to [[spoiler: the presence of an infamous criminal trying to kidnap their prisoner to prevent him from testifying in court]].

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** In the B-plot of "Staircase to Heaven", Brackenreid and Crabtree are in the station house guarding a prisoner due to flooding at another station when they share some whiskey. Their conversation turns to the subject of Murdoch (who is on an island investigating a murder), and they confide to each other things about their colleague that they find annoying, including the fact that he never seems to have a hair out of place. Crabtree mentions the detective's repeated advice to "look for the small details" as a particular irritant, [[{{Foreshadowing}} and Crabtree later notices such a detail]] that tips him off to [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the presence of an infamous criminal trying to kidnap their prisoner to prevent him from testifying in court]].



* LectureAsExposition: Late in "Big Murderer on Campus", Murdoch is in a university classroom giving a lecture on the "applied physics" of execution by hanging. The lecture turns into [[spoiler: a means of pressuring one of the accomplices to a murder into confessing against the other--the soon-to-be-infamous James Gillies]].
* LegallyDead: The titular scam in "The Murodch Sting" turns on this point of law. A wealthy bank official goes missing and does turn up dead, but there's no evidence to charge the suspect [[spoiler: Eva Pearce]] with his murder. Murdoch and company persuade the suspect that she's due to inherit half the banker's substantial estate, then close the investigation with the man still officially missing, forcing the banker's heirs to wait seven years to collect. The idea is to catch her in the place the body was found, since if she killed the guy and hid his body there, this demonstration of the guilty knowledge would clinch the case against her. [[spoiler:Despite her best efforts, it works and Murdoch catches her in the act of searching the pond for the body.]]

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* LectureAsExposition: Late in "Big Murderer on Campus", Murdoch is in a university classroom giving a lecture on the "applied physics" of execution by hanging. The lecture turns into [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a means of pressuring one of the accomplices to a murder into confessing against the other--the other -- the soon-to-be-infamous James Gillies]].
* LegallyDead: The titular scam in "The Murodch Sting" turns on this point of law. A wealthy bank official goes missing and does turn up dead, but there's no evidence to charge the suspect [[spoiler: Eva [[spoiler:Eva Pearce]] with his murder. Murdoch and company persuade the suspect that she's due to inherit half the banker's substantial estate, then close the investigation with the man still officially missing, forcing the banker's heirs to wait seven years to collect. The idea is to catch her in the place the body was found, since if she killed the guy and hid his body there, this demonstration of the guilty knowledge would clinch the case against her. [[spoiler:Despite her best efforts, it works and Murdoch catches her in the act of searching the pond for the body.]]



* LiquidCourage: Near the end of "The Murdoch Sting", Inspector Brackenreid advises Crabtree to make an effort to win back Dr. Grace's affections. Murdoch is in the room, and after Crabtree leaves, he declares he too will take the inspector's advice and (in his own case) propose to Dr. Ogden. Murdoch then goes to Brackenreid's decanter, pours two glasses (one for himself and one for his boss), and quickly downs his own drink. It turns out he probably needed that drink, since [[spoiler: Julia refuses him before can finish]] due to [[spoiler: threats against their lives]].

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* LiquidCourage: Near the end of "The Murdoch Sting", Inspector Brackenreid advises Crabtree to make an effort to win back Dr. Grace's affections. Murdoch is in the room, and after Crabtree leaves, he declares he too will take the inspector's advice and (in his own case) propose to Dr. Ogden. Murdoch then goes to Brackenreid's decanter, pours two glasses (one for himself and one for his boss), and quickly downs his own drink. It turns out he probably needed that drink, since [[spoiler: Julia [[spoiler:Julia refuses him before can finish]] due to [[spoiler: threats [[spoiler:threats against their lives]].



** At the end of "The Murdoch Trap" [[spoiler: when Murdoch brings Gillies' filmed confession and the judge orders the noose removed from Julia's neck]], Murdoch embraces Julia and tears are visibly streaming down his face.

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** At the end of "The Murdoch Trap" [[spoiler: when [[spoiler:when Murdoch brings Gillies' Gillies's filmed confession and the judge orders the noose removed from Julia's neck]], Murdoch embraces Julia and tears are visibly streaming down his face.



* MassiveMultiplayerScam: In "The Murdoch Sting", Murdoch and company pull one of these to get the culprit [[spoiler: Eva Pearce]] to incriminate [[spoiler: herself]] in a murder, and it really is a case of all hands on deck. Brackenreid solicits the help of one Cassie Chadwick, who claims the culprit has impersonated her to get engaged to the murder victim. Constable Higgins impersonates an attorney, Dr. Grace portrays the murder victim's floozy girlfriend, and she even drags in Leslie Garland at one point when his unexpected entrance threatens to blow the whole set-up.

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* MassiveMultiplayerScam: In "The Murdoch Sting", Murdoch and company pull one of these to get the culprit [[spoiler: Eva [[spoiler:Eva Pearce]] to incriminate [[spoiler: herself]] [[spoiler:herself]] in a murder, and it really is a case of all hands on deck. Brackenreid solicits the help of one Cassie Chadwick, who claims the culprit has impersonated her to get engaged to the murder victim. Constable Higgins impersonates an attorney, Dr. Grace portrays the murder victim's floozy girlfriend, and she even drags in Leslie Garland at one point when his unexpected entrance threatens to blow the whole set-up.



* MisplacedWildlife: Of the supernatural variety. In "A Merry Murdoch Christmas", Brackenreid claims to have encountered the Krampus, a holiday demon from Bavaria and the Tyrol, as a boy in Yorkshire and that he is now terrorizing the episode's victims. [[spoiler: It's one of the culprits in disguise.]]

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* MisplacedWildlife: Of the supernatural variety. In "A Merry Murdoch Christmas", Brackenreid claims to have encountered the Krampus, a holiday demon from Bavaria and the Tyrol, as a boy in Yorkshire and that he is now terrorizing the episode's victims. [[spoiler: It's [[spoiler:It's one of the culprits in disguise.]]



* MuggedForDisguise: In "Hangman", escapee Cecil Fox surprises Constables Crabtree and Higgins to get a police uniform as a disguise. The two constables report to Station Four, one of them missing his tunic and the other missing his trousers. In his police guise, Fox goes to [[spoiler: Dr. Ogden at the morgue to get medical treatment for his tracheotomy wound]].

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* MuggedForDisguise: In "Hangman", escapee Cecil Fox surprises Constables Crabtree and Higgins to get a police uniform as a disguise. The two constables report to Station Four, one of them missing his tunic and the other missing his trousers. In his police guise, Fox goes to [[spoiler: Dr.[[spoiler:Dr. Ogden at the morgue to get medical treatment for his tracheotomy wound]].



* MyGreatestSecondChance: In "Unfinished Business", Murdoch plays a recording of a man's deathbed confession of murder, and Dr. Ogden recognizes the details of an unsolved case the two of them worked on early in their careers. As she retrieves the case file, Dr. Ogden [[ThatOneCase expresses regret that she couldn't find enough evidence to solve the woman's murder.]] Later, Murdoch re-investigates the woman's husband, who objects to the scrutiny along with his equally indignant brother. It turns out [[spoiler: the brother made a murder pact with the confessed killer to kill his sister-in-law]] and Murdoch sincerely apologizes to the widower for suspecting him.

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* MyGreatestSecondChance: In "Unfinished Business", Murdoch plays a recording of a man's deathbed confession of murder, and Dr. Ogden recognizes the details of an unsolved case the two of them worked on early in their careers. As she retrieves the case file, Dr. Ogden [[ThatOneCase expresses regret that she couldn't find enough evidence to solve the woman's murder.]] Later, Murdoch re-investigates the woman's husband, who objects to the scrutiny along with his equally indignant brother. It turns out [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the brother made a murder pact with the confessed killer to kill his sister-in-law]] and Murdoch sincerely apologizes to the widower for suspecting him.



** At a crucial point during the episode, Murdoch will have an ImagineSpot that shows him "witnessing" the crime as it's taking place. In "The Murdoch Identity", he dreams one of these while having a nap on Anna Fulford's sofa as well as having small ones rather like fragments of memory [[spoiler: in part since he's suffering the after-effects of a brain injury]]. Jasper Linney, Brackenreid and Dr. Ogden have each shared the ImagineSpot with him once, Brackenreid and Murdoch each have their own (solving the same case by different routes) in "Murdoch at the Opera", and in the Season 7 finale Brackenreid takes Murdoch's place in the ImagineSpot while solving the B-plot case.

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** At a crucial point during the episode, Murdoch will have an ImagineSpot that shows him "witnessing" the crime as it's taking place. In "The Murdoch Identity", he dreams one of these while having a nap on Anna Fulford's sofa as well as having small ones rather like fragments of memory [[spoiler: in [[spoiler:in part since he's suffering the after-effects of a brain injury]]. Jasper Linney, Brackenreid and Dr. Ogden have each shared the ImagineSpot with him once, Brackenreid and Murdoch each have their own (solving the same case by different routes) in "Murdoch at the Opera", and in the Season 7 finale Brackenreid takes Murdoch's place in the ImagineSpot while solving the B-plot case.



** This builds up in "Murdoch in Toyland" as the culprit's actions begin to get under Murdoch's skin, a fact Brackenreid [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]]. When Brackenreid says he can't hear anything on a recording, Murdoch testily insists he can. When the inspector is slow on the uptake after Murdoch explains the cancellation of sound waves, the normally-deferential detective snaps the goal at his boss: "A clean recording!" When he finally confronts the culprit [[spoiler: James Gillies]], Murdoch has to be restrained from punching him in the face not once but ''twice'': once by Constable Crabtree in the hotel room and once by Inspector Brackenreid in the station house interview room.

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** This builds up in "Murdoch in Toyland" as the culprit's actions begin to get under Murdoch's skin, a fact Brackenreid [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]]. When Brackenreid says he can't hear anything on a recording, Murdoch testily insists he can. When the inspector is slow on the uptake after Murdoch explains the cancellation of sound waves, the normally-deferential detective snaps the goal at his boss: "A clean recording!" When he finally confronts the culprit [[spoiler: James [[spoiler:James Gillies]], Murdoch has to be restrained from punching him in the face not once but ''twice'': once by Constable Crabtree in the hotel room and once by Inspector Brackenreid in the station house interview room.



** In the B-plot of "Kung Fu Crabtree", Brackenreid goes to a hotel room and is greeted by an anxious Dr. Ogden and an equally tense Murdoch holding a gun. Brackenreid reacts to the sight of the gun and realizes things are serious, since Murdoch rarely uses or even carries a firearm. He then learns that Julia has been getting death threats against herself and Murdoch [[spoiler: purporting to be]] from their nemesis James Gillies.

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** In the B-plot of "Kung Fu Crabtree", Brackenreid goes to a hotel room and is greeted by an anxious Dr. Ogden and an equally tense Murdoch holding a gun. Brackenreid reacts to the sight of the gun and realizes things are serious, since Murdoch rarely uses or even carries a firearm. He then learns that Julia has been getting death threats against herself and Murdoch [[spoiler: purporting [[spoiler:purporting to be]] from their nemesis James Gillies.



** In "The Artful Detective", Brackenreid notices an extra race published in the racing form; he's familiar with the track and draws Murdoch's attention to the discrepancy. The team compares the horse names to the profiles of several recent murder victims and finds several of the "horse" names are each descriptive of their victims. They come up with the hypothesis that the victims and a few other people are actually [[spoiler: killing each other in a DeadlyGame]], and they stake out the racing form's publisher. Sure enough, the "horses" they have matched to their corpses are missing from the next "running" of that non-existent race, but a new entry is added: "Artful Detective". Guess who soon finds himself attacked in the street?

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** In "The Artful Detective", Brackenreid notices an extra race published in the racing form; he's familiar with the track and draws Murdoch's attention to the discrepancy. The team compares the horse names to the profiles of several recent murder victims and finds several of the "horse" names are each descriptive of their victims. They come up with the hypothesis that the victims and a few other people are actually [[spoiler: killing [[spoiler:killing each other in a DeadlyGame]], and they stake out the racing form's publisher. Sure enough, the "horses" they have matched to their corpses are missing from the next "running" of that non-existent race, but a new entry is added: "Artful Detective". Guess who soon finds himself attacked in the street?



** In "The Curse Of Beaton Manor" Murdoch scolds George that voodoo is not real. It is revealed that [[spoiler: Timothy]] Beaton used pufferfish poison (from Haitian voodoo) to induce a near-death state and thus 'come back' from the dead. At the end of the episode the final Beaton suffers a fatal heart-attack from being pierced by a VoodooDoll.
** The Holy Grail in "Murdoch and the Temple of Death" is also strongly implied to be the real thing. The killer jumps off a 60-foot cliff thinking it will save him, despite Murdoch telling the man to stop, and [[DramaticThunder as Murdoch looks down on the man's corpse, a thunderclap sounds (seemingly in daylight) and Murdoch reacts to it]]. Later, [[spoiler: Dr. Iris Bajali]] steals it from the station house and flees with Murodoch in pursuit; he tells her it belongs to God, and [[BoltOfDivineRetribution when she shouts back, "There is no God," she is struck by lightning and dies]]. Later still, a museum staffer accidentally knocks it over and disposes of the clay outer layer, leaving a metal chalice standing on the shelf that appears bathed in a (heavenly?) shaft of light.

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** In "The Curse Of Beaton Manor" Murdoch scolds George that voodoo is not real. It is revealed that [[spoiler: Timothy]] [[spoiler:Timothy]] Beaton used pufferfish poison (from Haitian voodoo) to induce a near-death state and thus 'come back' from the dead. At the end of the episode the final Beaton suffers a fatal heart-attack from being pierced by a VoodooDoll.
** The Holy Grail in "Murdoch and the Temple of Death" is also strongly implied to be the real thing. The killer jumps off a 60-foot cliff thinking it will save him, despite Murdoch telling the man to stop, and [[DramaticThunder as Murdoch looks down on the man's corpse, a thunderclap sounds (seemingly in daylight) and Murdoch reacts to it]]. Later, [[spoiler: Dr.[[spoiler:Dr. Iris Bajali]] steals it from the station house and flees with Murodoch in pursuit; he tells her it belongs to God, and [[BoltOfDivineRetribution when she shouts back, "There is no God," she is struck by lightning and dies]]. Later still, a museum staffer accidentally knocks it over and disposes of the clay outer layer, leaving a metal chalice standing on the shelf that appears bathed in a (heavenly?) shaft of light.



* RubeGoldbergHatesYourGuts: In "Invention Convention", an inventor accepting an award is shot in the head by a complicated device using parts that implicate several other inventors. Turns out [[spoiler: the victim]] stole ideas and tech from the inventors and built the device [[spoiler: to euthanize himself and prove himself superior to his rivals]].

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* RubeGoldbergHatesYourGuts: In "Invention Convention", an inventor accepting an award is shot in the head by a complicated device using parts that implicate several other inventors. Turns out [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the victim]] stole ideas and tech from the inventors and built the device [[spoiler: to [[spoiler:to euthanize himself and prove himself superior to his rivals]].



*** A prominent location in the episode features an Albertasaurus on display in the gallery of a museum, [[spoiler: where the victim's body is discovered in its jaws]]. However the animal is displayed in the ''modern horizontal'' walking position. In the late-19th/early-20th centuries, the skeleton would have been mounted upright in a kangaroo-like posture.

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*** A prominent location in the episode features an Albertasaurus on display in the gallery of a museum, [[spoiler: where [[spoiler:where the victim's body is discovered in its jaws]]. However the animal is displayed in the ''modern horizontal'' walking position. In the late-19th/early-20th centuries, the skeleton would have been mounted upright in a kangaroo-like posture.



* SelfDeprecation: In "Republic of Murdoch", after [[spoiler: Jacob Doyle]] escapes from Constable Crabtree by hitting the constable in the head with a length of board, Crabtree sheepishly reports to Murdoch how the man got away. Murdoch is concerned for his colleague, but Crabtree dismisses this worry by saying, "He got me in my least vulnerable spot."

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* SelfDeprecation: In "Republic of Murdoch", after [[spoiler: Jacob [[spoiler:Jacob Doyle]] escapes from Constable Crabtree by hitting the constable in the head with a length of board, Crabtree sheepishly reports to Murdoch how the man got away. Murdoch is concerned for his colleague, but Crabtree dismisses this worry by saying, "He got me in my least vulnerable spot."



** The true explanation for the serial deaths in [[spoiler: "Twisted Sisters"]]. A man is being blackmailed by a woman who works for him, and during their argument she hits her head. The man knows she was involved in another death some years earlier (along with several other women), so he disposes of his blackmailer and the other women to divert suspicion from himself. While he's at it, his actions point to a Persian university professor who had been romantically involved with the young white woman who had died years ago, and [[spoiler: his own secret involves his interracial marriage]].

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** The true explanation for the serial deaths in [[spoiler: "Twisted [[spoiler:"Twisted Sisters"]]. A man is being blackmailed by a woman who works for him, and during their argument she hits her head. The man knows she was involved in another death some years earlier (along with several other women), so he disposes of his blackmailer and the other women to divert suspicion from himself. While he's at it, his actions point to a Persian university professor who had been romantically involved with the young white woman who had died years ago, and [[spoiler: his [[spoiler:his own secret involves his interracial marriage]].



* SherlockHomage: Detective William Murdoch has the stellar record of solving cases (which he himself cites in his promotion interview in "The Glass Ceiling"), as well as being an autodidact (self-educated) whose studies are largely scientific. He keeps a selection of reference books in his office, but is also known to send out for research materials--or even conduct experiments--when needed. In an episode revolving around a talented "''idiot savant''", Julia speaks of him as also being disconnected from his emotions [[BreakingTheFourthWall to no one in particular as she stands by her office phonograph, while William himself is standing in the background]]. On occasion, he can be a first-class DeadpanSnarker: a particularly good example (from "Holy Matrimony, Murdoch!") is his epic takedown of a judge who's convinced a woman killed her husband--the same judge mistakenly thought the same thing about Julia, and Murdoch points this out to his face. He generally avoids alcohol due to his father's alcoholism. As noted under {{Expy}}, other characters echo those of Doyle's stories: Crabtree is the mundane assistant who also pens fiction (like Watson); medical services and expertise come from Drs Ogden, Francis, Grace and Roberts; various people (including Constables Crabtree and Higgins and Inspector Brackenreid) act as TheWatson in having things explained to them; and James Gillies and Sally Pendrick bear striking resemblances to two of Holmes' most famous adversaries (Professor Moriarty and Irene Adler Norton).

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* SherlockHomage: Detective William Murdoch has the stellar record of solving cases (which he himself cites in his promotion interview in "The Glass Ceiling"), as well as being an autodidact (self-educated) whose studies are largely scientific. He keeps a selection of reference books in his office, but is also known to send out for research materials--or materials -- or even conduct experiments--when experiments -- when needed. In an episode revolving around a talented "''idiot savant''", Julia speaks of him as also being disconnected from his emotions [[BreakingTheFourthWall to no one in particular as she stands by her office phonograph, while William himself is standing in the background]]. On occasion, he can be a first-class DeadpanSnarker: a particularly good example (from "Holy Matrimony, Murdoch!") is his epic takedown of a judge who's convinced a woman killed her husband--the husband -- the same judge mistakenly thought the same thing about Julia, and Murdoch points this out to his face. He generally avoids alcohol due to his father's alcoholism. As noted under {{Expy}}, other characters echo those of Doyle's stories: Crabtree is the mundane assistant who also pens fiction (like Watson); medical services and expertise come from Drs Ogden, Francis, Grace and Roberts; various people (including Constables Crabtree and Higgins and Inspector Brackenreid) act as TheWatson in having things explained to them; and James Gillies and Sally Pendrick bear striking resemblances to two of Holmes' most famous adversaries (Professor Moriarty and Irene Adler Norton).



* SwitchToEnglish: Early in "Monsieur Murdoch" when Murdoch, Higgins and Crabtree find a man in a missing woman's hotel room, the constables tackle the man, who speaks in French, demanding to be released. Murdoch asks the man to identify himself in French, and the man does so [[spoiler: turns out he's a member of the Paris police]]. Soon he insultingly suggests switching to English so he can butcher that language instead. Murdoch doesn't take the bait, but later on (once the two are working together), he reverts to French without provoking any complaint from the Frenchman.

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* SwitchToEnglish: Early in "Monsieur Murdoch" when Murdoch, Higgins and Crabtree find a man in a missing woman's hotel room, the constables tackle the man, who speaks in French, demanding to be released. Murdoch asks the man to identify himself in French, and the man does so [[spoiler: turns [[spoiler:turns out he's a member of the Paris police]]. Soon he insultingly suggests switching to English so he can butcher that language instead. Murdoch doesn't take the bait, but later on (once the two are working together), he reverts to French without provoking any complaint from the Frenchman.



* TakingTheHeat: At the start of season 9, [[spoiler: Crabtree has gone to jail for the murder of Edna Brooks's husband, putting in a plea of "uncontested" because he doesn't want to perjure himself by pleading guilty. He refuses to discuss the case, even with Murdoch, until evidence starts appearing that she didn't commit it either.]]

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* TakingTheHeat: At the start of season 9, [[spoiler: Crabtree [[spoiler:Crabtree has gone to jail for the murder of Edna Brooks's husband, putting in a plea of "uncontested" because he doesn't want to perjure himself by pleading guilty. He refuses to discuss the case, even with Murdoch, until evidence starts appearing that she didn't commit it either.]]



* TarotTroubles: In the episode "Blood and Circuses", Murdoch is investigating the death of a circus lion tamer and is particularly frustrated by the fortuneteller's refusal to answer questions directly. The woman prefers to communicate using her cards and refers to their predictive power, despite Murdoch's objections that he doesn't believe in such things. Crabtree insists her prognostications are valuable, and eventually Murdoch goes along with her conversational style to get information out of her. Interestingly, her cards sometimes need to be taken literally: as the deaths continue among the circus performers, she produces first [[spoiler: the magician]] card and later [[spoiler: the Queen of Swords]], which refer to people involved in the murders. Murdoch also gets two contradictory predictions about his love-life, which the fortuneteller explains away by saying the future isn't fixed.

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* TarotTroubles: In the episode "Blood and Circuses", Murdoch is investigating the death of a circus lion tamer and is particularly frustrated by the fortuneteller's refusal to answer questions directly. The woman prefers to communicate using her cards and refers to their predictive power, despite Murdoch's objections that he doesn't believe in such things. Crabtree insists her prognostications are valuable, and eventually Murdoch goes along with her conversational style to get information out of her. Interestingly, her cards sometimes need to be taken literally: as the deaths continue among the circus performers, she produces first [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the magician]] card and later [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the Queen of Swords]], which refer to people involved in the murders. Murdoch also gets two contradictory predictions about his love-life, which the fortuneteller explains away by saying the future isn't fixed.



** Edna Garrison/Brooks for George again. A character who he had a brief date with in Season 1, and who then returned in Season 8. [[spoiler: At the start of Season 9, she goes on the run with her stepson once she realises he's the one who killed his abusive father]].

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** Edna Garrison/Brooks for George again. A character who he had a brief date with in Season 1, and who then returned in Season 8. [[spoiler: At [[spoiler:At the start of Season 9, she goes on the run with her stepson once she realises realizes he's the one who killed his abusive father]].



* TimeTravel: Part of the plot in "Twentieth Century Murdoch" revolves around a time machine. A man gets involved in a couple of incidents (a suicide attempt and a shooting) and claims he went to the future, saw the events and went back to intervene. He also wants to save a boy from being trampled by horses, and Constables Crabtree and Higgins later go to the street intersection and witness events unfold just as the man said they would. Soon word gets around, and people are lining up and paying for trips to the future. Murdoch is initially skeptical despite the testimony of other paying travelers, but when the scientist suggests he try the device, Murdoch takes him up on the offer. What Murdoch sees (including himself married to Julia in 1912 and an eight year old boy who introduces himself as "William Murdoch Junior") changes his mind, and he's soon closeted in his office with the scientist, with his blackboard covered in equations. It turns out [[spoiler: to be a hoax using a form of shock therapy to show the user the future they want to see]] and [[spoiler: the scientist is using the money to finance a cryogenic chamber for his half-brother Dr. Roberts, who has Huntington's disease]].

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* TimeTravel: Part of the plot in "Twentieth Century Murdoch" revolves around a time machine. A man gets involved in a couple of incidents (a suicide attempt and a shooting) and claims he went to the future, saw the events and went back to intervene. He also wants to save a boy from being trampled by horses, and Constables Crabtree and Higgins later go to the street intersection and witness events unfold just as the man said they would. Soon word gets around, and people are lining up and paying for trips to the future. Murdoch is initially skeptical despite the testimony of other paying travelers, but when the scientist suggests he try the device, Murdoch takes him up on the offer. What Murdoch sees (including himself married to Julia in 1912 and an eight year old boy who introduces himself as "William Murdoch Junior") changes his mind, and he's soon closeted in his office with the scientist, with his blackboard covered in equations. It turns out [[spoiler: to [[spoiler:to be a hoax using a form of shock therapy to show the user the future they want to see]] and [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the scientist is using the money to finance a cryogenic chamber for his half-brother Dr. Roberts, who has Huntington's disease]].



** Eugenics is still considered a serious science, despite having been discredited. What makes it this as well of ScienceMarchesOn is its close ties to concepts of racial and class superiority; one murder was committed by a man whose fiance's father disapproved of their marriage because of his "lesser" pedigree.[[note]][[spoiler:Ironically, the victim reconsidered and was even going to leave the Eugenics Society.]][[/note]]

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** Eugenics is still considered a serious science, despite having been discredited. What makes it this as well of ScienceMarchesOn is its close ties to concepts of racial and class superiority; one murder was committed by a man whose fiance's fiancée's father disapproved of their marriage because of his "lesser" pedigree.[[note]][[spoiler:Ironically, pedigree. [[spoiler:Ironically, the victim reconsidered and was even going to leave the Eugenics Society.]][[/note]]]]



** Late in "Unfinished Business" (Season 7, Episode 12), Julia gets a photo of her and Murdoch kissing in an alley (which she and viewers recognize happened after they attended a recent opera performance) together with a letter [[spoiler: apparently]] from James Gillies. The letter threatens that if she marries Murdoch, he'll die, and if she tells him about the letter (and the threat), they'll both die. This starts a subplot over the next several episodes in which she tries to resolve the problem herself to keep Murdoch safe. At one point, she applies Murdoch's methods and finds the room where the photo was taken. In that room, she also finds ''a second photo'' of Murdoch taken inside his office with a second note threatening death if she continues her investigation.

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** Late in "Unfinished Business" (Season 7, Episode 12), Julia gets a photo of her and Murdoch kissing in an alley (which she and viewers recognize happened after they attended a recent opera performance) together with a letter [[spoiler: apparently]] [[spoiler:apparently]] from James Gillies. The letter threatens that if she marries Murdoch, he'll die, and if she tells him about the letter (and the threat), they'll both die. This starts a subplot over the next several episodes in which she tries to resolve the problem herself to keep Murdoch safe. At one point, she applies Murdoch's methods and finds the room where the photo was taken. In that room, she also finds ''a second photo'' of Murdoch taken inside his office with a second note threatening death if she continues her investigation.



** [[spoiler: Arlene Dennet]] in "Bloodlust" has one on Detective Murdoch. She tells Murdoch to call her by her first name, clings onto Murdoch several times, stabs herself in the neck to be near him, and tells him a 'secret' that he must vow not to tell because vows are "sacred as say a vow of fidelity between lovers" (cue Murdoch looking around uncomfortably). Made even more squick in that it doubles as a PrecociousCrush since Murdoch is investigating the murder of a popular girl at a boarding school. [[GreenEyedMonster Wonder who did it?]]

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** [[spoiler: Arlene [[spoiler:Arlene Dennet]] in "Bloodlust" has one on Detective Murdoch. She tells Murdoch to call her by her first name, clings onto Murdoch several times, stabs herself in the neck to be near him, and tells him a 'secret' that he must vow not to tell because vows are "sacred as say a vow of fidelity between lovers" (cue Murdoch looking around uncomfortably). Made even more squick in that it doubles as a PrecociousCrush since Murdoch is investigating the murder of a popular girl at a boarding school. [[GreenEyedMonster Wonder who did it?]]



* VomitDiscretionShot: In the episode "Republic of Murdoch", Constable Crabtree gets friendly with some Newfoundland locals while bragging about an old treasure map he wants to sell in a scam to trap a killer. After an extended drinking session featuring the potent local rum, he awakes the next morning [[spoiler: embracing a fish wrapped in his jacket]], then vomits behind a bush while Murdoch and local man Jake Doyle are watching for the culprit to arrive at the location marked on the map. Murdoch seems concerned for his colleague, but Doyle comments that Crabtree can't hold his liquor, and George replies that he's merely out of practice.
* WartsAndAll: Early in "Winston's Lost Night", Inspector Brackenreid is unhappy that the great Winston Churchill is locked in one of the station's cells, and he effusively praises Churchill's book as "stirring stuff". As he learns of Churchill's apparent alcohol-induced blackout and aristocratic ways (including traveling with servants and his treatment of Crabtree as another of his servants--asking the constable to fetch his hat and stick) and gets insulted by Churchill for requesting an autograph, Brackenreid begins to write him off as another "toff". Eventually, Brackenreid quotes from Churchill's book (to the author's delight) [[spoiler: to talk down a murderer threatening to kill Churchill]], and Churchill apologizes for his insulting comment on the autograph book and asks to sign it.

to:

* VomitDiscretionShot: In the episode "Republic of Murdoch", Constable Crabtree gets friendly with some Newfoundland locals while bragging about an old treasure map he wants to sell in a scam to trap a killer. After an extended drinking session featuring the potent local rum, he awakes the next morning [[spoiler: embracing [[spoiler:embracing a fish wrapped in his jacket]], then vomits behind a bush while Murdoch and local man Jake Doyle are watching for the culprit to arrive at the location marked on the map. Murdoch seems concerned for his colleague, but Doyle comments that Crabtree can't hold his liquor, and George replies that he's merely out of practice.
* WartsAndAll: Early in "Winston's Lost Night", Inspector Brackenreid is unhappy that the great Winston Churchill is locked in one of the station's cells, and he effusively praises Churchill's book as "stirring stuff". As he learns of Churchill's apparent alcohol-induced blackout and aristocratic ways (including traveling with servants and his treatment of Crabtree as another of his servants--asking servants -- asking the constable to fetch his hat and stick) and gets insulted by Churchill for requesting an autograph, Brackenreid begins to write him off as another "toff". Eventually, Brackenreid quotes from Churchill's book (to the author's delight) [[spoiler: to [[spoiler:to talk down a murderer threatening to kill Churchill]], and Churchill apologizes for his insulting comment on the autograph book and asks to sign it.



* WeddingRingRemoval: In the episode "The Tesla Effect", as Murdoch and inventor/businessman James Pendrick are discussing how and why [[spoiler: his wife Sally Pendrick]] framed Pendrick for murder and masterminded an art theft, Pendrick removes and looks at his wedding ring before placing it on a table.

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* WeddingRingRemoval: In the episode "The Tesla Effect", as Murdoch and inventor/businessman James Pendrick are discussing how and why [[spoiler: his [[spoiler:his wife Sally Pendrick]] framed Pendrick for murder and masterminded an art theft, Pendrick removes and looks at his wedding ring before placing it on a table.



* WhenEldersAttack: In "Convalescence", Murdoch's elderly landlady Mrs Kitchen has been get imprisoned for several days while criminals search her house. When a weakened Murdoch passes out while fighting one of the criminals, Mrs Kitchen picks up Murdoch's crutch and whacks the crook over the head with it, knocking her out.

to:

* WhenEldersAttack: In "Convalescence", Murdoch's elderly landlady Mrs Kitchen has been get imprisoned for several days while criminals search her house. When a weakened Murdoch passes out while fighting one of the criminals, Mrs Kitchen picks up Murdoch's crutch and whacks the crook over the head with it, knocking her out.



* WhoopeeCushion: In the episode "The Keystone Constables", Murodch is introduced to one of these by one of the vaudeville performers he's investigating. At the time, Murdoch doesn't seem to get the joke (or many of the other jokes, for that matter), but he later makes his own whoopee cushion and tricks Julia into sitting on it. Murdoch not only laughs heartily at Julia's reaction, he's also very pleased that his version worked so well.



* WhoopeeCushion: In the episode "The Keystone Constables", Murodch is introduced to one of these by one of the vaudeville performers he's investigating. At the time, Murdoch doesn't seem to get the joke (or many of the other jokes, for that matter), but he later makes his own whoopee cushion and tricks Julia into sitting on it. Murdoch not only laughs heartily at Julia's reaction, he's also very pleased that his version worked so well.



** In "Loch Ness Murdoch", Inspector Brackenreid has a very unusual moment and insists he saw a StockNessMonster. Detective Murdoch suspects that Inspector's love of whisky might be responsible and hints at it "with all due respect". But Inspector knows bloody well what he saw. Besides, it was ale--who'd drink whiskey at the beach?

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** In "Loch Ness Murdoch", Inspector Brackenreid has a very unusual moment and insists he saw a StockNessMonster. Detective Murdoch suspects that Inspector's love of whisky might be responsible and hints at it "with all due respect". But Inspector knows bloody well what he saw. Besides, it was ale--who'd ale -- who'd drink whiskey at the beach?



** At the end of the episode "The Black Hand", Murdoch explains to Anna Fulford that she needs to leave Toronto because the Black Hand has a contract on her [[spoiler: for the theft of counterfeit money her fiancé committed]]. He gives her a manila envelope with the details of a new life and background for her, telling her they cannot have further contact. She doesn't stay gone, but returns to work as a librarian in Toronto in the two-parter "Stroll on the Wild Side", and Murdoch is aghast when he recognizes her. Eventually, the Black Hand proves to be back in the person of Mr. Falcone, and she has to disappear [[DeathFakedForYou more permanently this time]].

to:

** At the end of the episode "The Black Hand", Murdoch explains to Anna Fulford that she needs to leave Toronto because the Black Hand has a contract on her [[spoiler: for [[spoiler:for the theft of counterfeit money her fiancé committed]]. He gives her a manila envelope with the details of a new life and background for her, telling her they cannot have further contact. She doesn't stay gone, but returns to work as a librarian in Toronto in the two-parter "Stroll on the Wild Side", and Murdoch is aghast when he recognizes her. Eventually, the Black Hand proves to be back in the person of Mr. Falcone, and she has to disappear [[DeathFakedForYou more permanently this time]].
24th Apr '17 3:04:29 PM StFan
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: In the Season 1 episode "Body Double", Brackenreid refers to the "Toronto Police Department". The expression "Toronto Constabulary" is used almost every other time in the series.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
In the Season 1 episode "Body Double", Brackenreid refers to the "Toronto Police Department". The expression "Toronto Constabulary" is used almost every other time in the series.
24th Apr '17 11:13:40 AM danlansdowne
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Added DiffLines:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: In the Season 1 episode "Body Double", Brackenreid refers to the "Toronto Police Department". The expression "Toronto Constabulary" is used almost every other time in the series.
** Another Season 1 episode portrays Brackenreid in uniform, when meeting with superiors; he has never been shown in uniform since.
20th Apr '17 8:57:19 PM danlansdowne
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** Dr. Grace hands Constable Crabtree a sample of substance from a dead body. He looks at it, sniffs it and then tastes it. He comments that is looks like soot, smells like sotd and tastes like soot. Dr. Grace is surprised that he's in the habit of tasting soot, and George tells her he used to clean his aunt's chimney and was once destined to do so for a living.

to:

** Dr. Grace hands Constable Crabtree a sample of substance from a dead body. He looks at it, sniffs it and then tastes it. He comments that is looks like soot, smells like sotd soot, and tastes like soot. Dr. Grace is surprised that he's in the habit of tasting soot, and George tells her he used to clean his aunt's chimney and was once destined to do so for a living.



** Again for [[spoiler:Brackenreid]] in "Bloody Hell".



** Chief Constable Davis does the same in "Bloody Hell", [[spoiler:not realizing Murdoch was setting him up]].



** Early in season 10, [[spoiler:Brackenreid goes on a scientific trip to Panama with James Pendrick. It has been yet to seen when he's coming back.]]

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** Early in season 10, [[spoiler:Brackenreid goes on a scientific trip to Panama with James Pendrick. It has been yet to seen when he's coming back.Pendrick for several episodes.]]
20th Apr '17 8:31:50 PM danlansdowne
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** In "Unlucky in Love", the only decent writer in Crabtree's creative writing class is one [[Creator/LMMontgomery Maud Montgomery]].

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** In "Unlucky in Love", the only decent writer in Crabtree's creative writing class is one [[Creator/LMMontgomery Lucy Maud Montgomery]].
20th Apr '17 8:27:44 PM danlansdowne
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* BombThrowingAnarchists: {{Double Subverted}} when Murdoch investigates the bombing of a clothing store that seriously injures Crabtree and Higgins. At first it seems like a group of anarchists that are hosting firebrand Emma Goldman are responsible, and then a Marxist activist tries to cake credit for the bombing. However, [[spoiler:Crabtree eventually finds that the owner of the building the clothing store was in bombed his own building to try and drive out his tenant, the owner of the clothing store, so he could sell the property to a large company. Later in the episode, a second bombing occurs, and this time one of the anarchists ''is'' responsible.]]

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* BombThrowingAnarchists: {{Double Subverted}} when Murdoch investigates the bombing of a clothing store that seriously injures Crabtree and Higgins. At first it seems like a group of anarchists that are hosting firebrand Emma Goldman are responsible, and then a Marxist activist tries to cake take credit for the bombing. However, [[spoiler:Crabtree eventually finds that the owner of the building the clothing store was in bombed his own building to try and drive out his tenant, the owner of the clothing store, so he could sell the property to a large company. Later in the episode, a second bombing occurs, and this time one of the anarchists ''is'' responsible.]]
20th Apr '17 11:45:51 AM erracht
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* AlwaysMurder: The crime in most episode is murder, often predictably at the beginning. NeverOneMurder is invoked in not a few episodes.

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* AlwaysMurder: The crime in most episode episodes is murder, often predictably at the beginning. NeverOneMurder is invoked in not a few episodes.
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