History Series / MASH

15th Jan '17 12:09:18 AM bweb
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** A mild case occurs with Father Mulcahy, of all people. Frank had asked the Father to give a sermon on temperance. However, Mulcahy was uncomfortable with the subject ("The Prodigal Son" and "Turn the Other Cheek" being more familiar territory for him). Needing to calm his nerves, he has a drink from a bottle gifted to him by a greatful soldier. It may have been a case of it being some unusually potent stuff, or it may be that the good Father CantHoldHisLiquor, but the result was that Mulcahy delivered his temperance sermon while drunk.
11th Jan '17 12:10:04 AM bweb
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* BuryYourGays: Actually averted in the episode "George", although Weston was asking Hawkeye to clear him for further duty on the front, even if he wasn't physically fit, so how long he survived past the episode is anyone's guess.
11th Jan '17 12:03:23 AM bweb
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10th Jan '17 10:34:53 AM hullflyer
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-->'''Hawkeye:''' You won again! Who do you know?
-->'''Mulcahy:''' ''Looks skyward''
-->'''Hawkeye:''' (Good-naturedly) Name-dropper.
10th Jan '17 8:20:39 AM hullflyer
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* BadassPreacher: Father Mulcahy, who ''seemed'' rather quiet, unassuming, and largely ineffective, was credited by many in the unit as being the driving force behind any sense of sanity or morality in the camp, frequently dealt with the black market ("You'd be surprised what a priest can get away with"), disarmed a soldier who had a gun on him at point-blank range, talked Klinger out of using a live grenade on Frank Burns, performed an emergency tracheotomy under fire, ran to a POW compound under heavy shelling to free the prisoners who were sitting ducks ([[spoiler: which cost him his hearing]]), and [[BewareTheNiceOnes had a right hook like a brick house]].

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* BadassPreacher: Father Mulcahy, who ''seemed'' rather quiet, unassuming, and largely ineffective, was credited by many in the unit as being the driving force behind any sense of sanity or morality in the camp, frequently dealt with the black market ("You'd be surprised what a priest can get away with"), disarmed a soldier who had a gun on him at point-blank range, talked Klinger out of using a live grenade on Frank Burns, performed an emergency tracheotomy under fire, ran to a POW compound under heavy shelling to free the prisoners who were sitting ducks ([[spoiler: which ([[spoiler:which cost him his hearing]]), and [[BewareTheNiceOnes had a right hook like a brick house]].
10th Jan '17 8:14:28 AM hullflyer
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* AnArmAndALeg: Several episodes deal with patients who lost limbs in battle and are coming to grips with the results.

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* AnArmAndALeg: Several episodes deal with patients who lost limbs in battle and are coming to grips with the results. One episode showing Charles' better side dealt with a patient who didn't actually ''lose'' a limb, but sustained nerve damage to several fingers that, since he was a gifted, Juliard-trained pianist, he believes is just as bad as losing the limb outright.
10th Jan '17 8:08:16 AM hullflyer
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** In the episode "Der Tag," Radar is shown sleeping with a copy of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' comic book on his chest, with the 1970s logo. One shot later, it switches to another issue of the same comic with the '60s logo. Either way, the Avengers weren't around during the Korean War (in fact, none of the major character from the Marvel Universe had even been ''created'', other than ComicBook/CaptainAmerica).

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** In the episode "Der Tag," Radar is shown sleeping with a copy of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' comic book on his chest, with the 1970s logo. One shot later, it switches to another issue of the same comic with the '60s logo. Either way, the Avengers weren't around during the Korean War (in fact, none of the major character characters from the Marvel Universe had even been ''created'', other than ComicBook/CaptainAmerica).
10th Jan '17 8:08:00 AM hullflyer
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** In the episode "Der Tag," Radar is shown sleeping with a copy of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' comic book on his chest, with the 1970s logo. One shot later, it switches to another issue of the same comic with the '60s logo. Either way, the Avengers weren't around during the Korean War (in fact, none of the characters had even been ''created'', other than ComicBook/CaptainAmerica).

to:

** In the episode "Der Tag," Radar is shown sleeping with a copy of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' comic book on his chest, with the 1970s logo. One shot later, it switches to another issue of the same comic with the '60s logo. Either way, the Avengers weren't around during the Korean War (in fact, none of the characters major character from the Marvel Universe had even been ''created'', other than ComicBook/CaptainAmerica).
7th Jan '17 9:30:11 AM Mdumas43073
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"Abyssinia, Henry" was the final episode of the third season, and can be seen as a turning point for the series. It was the final episode for both Henry Blake ([=McLean=] Stevenson) and "Trapper" John [=McIntyre=] (Wayne Rogers), and its tragic ending -- Henry's plane home is shot down; "there were no survivors" -- delineated the line between "Funny ''M*A*S*H''" and "Dramatic ''M*A*S*H''," as many fans would later divide the series. The fourth season was crucial to the show's long-term success; very few series, ensemble or otherwise, had ever lost such significant characters and kept its audience, but the creators' decision to replace Henry and Trapper with completely different character types in Colonel Potter (Harry Morgan) and B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell) succeeded, and the show continued to enjoy high UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} and critical acclaim.

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"Abyssinia, Henry" was the final episode of the third season, and can be seen as a turning point for the series. It was the final episode for both Henry Blake ([=McLean=] Stevenson) and "Trapper" John [=McIntyre=] (Wayne Rogers), and its tragic shock ending -- Henry's plane home is shot down; "there were no survivors" -- delineated the line between "Funny ''M*A*S*H''" and "Dramatic ''M*A*S*H''," as many fans would later divide the series. The fourth season was crucial to the show's long-term success; very few series, ensemble or otherwise, had ever lost such significant characters and kept its audience, but the creators' decision to replace Henry and Trapper with completely different character types in Colonel Potter (Harry Morgan) and B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell) succeeded, and the show continued to enjoy high UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} and critical acclaim.
7th Jan '17 9:29:40 AM Mdumas43073
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"Abyssinia, Henry" was the final episode of the third season, and can be seen as a turning point for the series. It was the final episode for both Henry Blake ([=McLean=] Stevenson) and "Trapper" John [=McIntyre=] (Wayne Rogers), and its tragic ending (Henry's plane home is shot down; "there were no survivors") delineated the line between "Funny ''M*A*S*H''" and "Dramatic ''M*A*S*H''," as many fans would later divide the series. The fourth season was crucial to the show's long-term success -- very few series, ensemble or otherwise, had ever lost such significant characters and kept its audience, but the creators' decision to replace Henry and Trapper with completely different character types in Colonel Potter (Harry Morgan) and B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell) succeeded, and the show continued to enjoy high UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} and critical acclaim.

to:

"Abyssinia, Henry" was the final episode of the third season, and can be seen as a turning point for the series. It was the final episode for both Henry Blake ([=McLean=] Stevenson) and "Trapper" John [=McIntyre=] (Wayne Rogers), and its tragic ending (Henry's -- Henry's plane home is shot down; "there were no survivors") survivors" -- delineated the line between "Funny ''M*A*S*H''" and "Dramatic ''M*A*S*H''," as many fans would later divide the series. The fourth season was crucial to the show's long-term success -- success; very few series, ensemble or otherwise, had ever lost such significant characters and kept its audience, but the creators' decision to replace Henry and Trapper with completely different character types in Colonel Potter (Harry Morgan) and B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell) succeeded, and the show continued to enjoy high UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} and critical acclaim.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.MASH