History Series / LawandOrder

19th Sep '16 12:44:05 AM Freezer
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* AcceptableBreaksFromReality: 95% of pre or in-trial fact finding would be done by investigators (of the type Lenny Briscoe was on ''Trial By Jury''), not the [=DAs=] themselves.

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* AcceptableBreaksFromReality: 95% of pre or in-trial fact finding would be done by investigators (of the type Lenny Briscoe was on ''Trial By Jury''), not the [=DAs=] themselves. Alson, in-trial pleas or deals would be extremely rare. Once the trial starts, the state would have little incentive not to go for the maximum penalty; the time and resources for the trial have already been allocated.
31st Aug '16 3:26:09 PM DustSnitch
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* {{Horrible Hollywood}}: Taken to almost reflective levels in "Everybody Loves Raimando's", where Hollywood's romanticized portrayal of Italian mob families (TheGodfather is cited as being guilty of this) directly results in [[spoiler: a mob boss ordering a hit on the producer of such a film]].

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* {{Horrible Hollywood}}: HorribleHollywood: Taken to almost reflective levels in "Everybody Loves Raimando's", where Hollywood's romanticized portrayal of Italian mob families (TheGodfather is cited as being guilty of this) directly results in [[spoiler: a mob boss ordering a hit on the producer of such a film]].
12th Aug '16 10:03:06 AM dmcreif
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*HollywoodLaw:



** In "Corpus Delicti," Rey and Lennie lament the fact that they cannot arrest a man for [[spoiler: killing his daughter's beloved horse]] for the insurance money, as he has technically committed no crime (he withdrew the insurance claim on the horse's life and, therefore, cannot be prosecuted for insurance fraud.) Um, I'm pretty sure cruelty to animals IS a crime...

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** In "Corpus Delicti," Rey and Lennie lament the fact that they cannot arrest a man for [[spoiler: killing his daughter's beloved horse]] for the insurance money, as he has technically committed no crime (he withdrew the insurance claim on the horse's life and, therefore, cannot be prosecuted for insurance fraud.) Um, I'm pretty sure cruelty to animals IS a crime...Did they forget that they could still arrest him for animal cruelty?
11th Aug '16 10:01:50 AM madammina
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** Lampshaded in a late Briscoe episode. It's a day in the life episode, starts off as a pregnant woman is kidnapped, and they keep on finding these other crimes as they investigate. Including a woman running over a man with a car. They arrest her, she goes to preliminary court, and openly admits she killed him, she hated her husband, and doesn't mind being guilty. Then we go back to the detectives for the rest of the episode.
6th Jul '16 3:41:38 AM Morgenthaler
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* CopsNeedTheVigilante: This franchise, with its passion for legal truthiness, was typically careful about this. Cops weren't allowed to break the rules and neither was anyone else. When someone did break a rule, it usually meant the DA's office had to tap dance on quicksand to keep the perp from getting away with it.
29th Jun '16 6:35:40 AM Toadofsteel
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* AcquittedTooLate: Victor Cruz in "By Perjury", where he was sentenced to death for a crime he didn't commit. The man who ''did'' commit the murder, Cruz's [[spoiler: corporate attorney who represented him in a class-action lawsuit against an airline, perjured himself on the stand to implicate him. So, Cutter pulls off an extremely compelling argument where he tries the attorney for the murder of Victor Cruz by perjury, since there wasn't any evidence against the attorney for the actual murder of which Cruz was convicted]].

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* AcquittedTooLate: Victor Cruz in ([[NamesTheSame no relation]] to the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball wide receiver]])in "By Perjury", where he was sentenced to death for a crime he didn't commit. The man who ''did'' commit the murder, Cruz's [[spoiler: corporate attorney who represented him in a class-action lawsuit against an airline, perjured himself on the stand to implicate him. So, Cutter pulls off an extremely compelling argument where he tries the attorney for the murder of Victor Cruz by perjury, since there wasn't any evidence against the attorney for the actual murder of which Cruz was convicted]].
17th Jun '16 6:48:29 AM nirao01
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In the show's 20 seasons, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_%26_Order#Casting_and_characters twenty-seven different actors have starred in the leading six roles]], with a substantial number of recurring guest stars. Notable long-running cast members include S. Epatha Merkerson as Lieutenant Anita Van Buren (Seasons 4-20), Sam Waterston as Executive A.D.A. (later D.A.) Jack [=McCoy=] (Seasons 5-20), Creator/JerryOrbach as Det. Lennie Briscoe (Seasons 3-14), Steven Hill as D.A. Adam Schiff (Seasons 1-10), Jesse L. Martin as Det. Ed Green (Seasons 10-18), Chris Noth as Det. Mike Logan (Seasons 1-5), former U.S. Senator Fred Dalton Thompson as D.A. Arthur Branch (Seasons 13-17), and Alana de la Garza as A.D.A. Connie Rubirosa (Seasons 17-20).

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In the show's 20 seasons, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_%26_Order#Casting_and_characters twenty-seven different actors have starred in the leading six roles]], with a substantial number of recurring guest stars. Notable long-running cast members include S. Epatha Merkerson as Lieutenant Anita Van Buren (Seasons 4-20), Sam Waterston as Executive A.D.A. (later D.A.) Jack [=McCoy=] (Seasons 5-20), Creator/JerryOrbach as Det. Lennie Briscoe (Seasons 3-14), Steven Hill as D.A. Adam Schiff (Seasons 1-10), Jesse L. Martin Creator/JesseLMartin as Det. Ed Green (Seasons 10-18), Chris Noth as Det. Mike Logan (Seasons 1-5), former U.S. Senator Fred Dalton Thompson as D.A. Arthur Branch (Seasons 13-17), and Alana de la Garza as A.D.A. Connie Rubirosa (Seasons 17-20).
5th Jun '16 7:26:23 AM Ohio9
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* WeaponOfChoice: Almost all the older detective main characters carry Smith & Wesson model 36 revolvers, while the younger ones tend to carry Glock 19 semi-automatic pistols. This is realistic, as both guns were/are standard issue in the NYPD. The most notable exception is detective Fontana, who carries a Smith & Wesson model 19.
23rd May '16 10:29:05 AM Josef5678
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* DoNotPassGo: In "Blaze", 23 people die after a fire breaks out in a facility where a rock concert occurs. The detectives are disgusted by the fact that the owners of the facility would only have to pay two fines for building code violations (having no sprinklers inside, not having accessible exits), when those violations directly caused so many fatalities.
--> '''Briscoe''': 23 people dead. Someone's gotta do more than just pay a couple of bucks.
--> '''Random Cop''': If you ask me, they should go right to the needle. Do not pass go, do not pay two hundred dollars.
3rd May '16 2:20:25 PM ChaoticNovelist
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* GambitRoulette: "Lucky Stiff" involved a man [[spoiler: sleeping with his stepsister, murdering his father and stepmother, and making volatile financial stakes in his father's businesses. He was able to thus predict the values of the stocks of the companies and shares he was invested in by being constantly kept in the loop of his father's shady business practices. He thus used the same volatile financial stakes his father used, as part of a get-rich-quick investment scheme to rip off his stepsister]].



* GreyAndGrayMorality: Lots. Especially in "Prisoner of Love": Greevey wants to be taken off the case because he's a Catholic, and he feels sickened because the victim was a BDSM sex worker. Later, when interviewing the daughter of the victim, who died from hanging, she says that her father never would have committed suicide. When asked why, she says that it's because he's a Catholic.

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* GreyAndGrayMorality: Lots. Especially For instance, in "Prisoner of Love": Greevey wants to be taken off the case because he's a Catholic, and he feels sickened because the victim was a BDSM sex worker. Later, when interviewing the daughter of the victim, who died from hanging, she says that her father never would have committed suicide. When asked why, she says that it's because he's a Catholic.



* StereotypeReactionGag: [=McCoy=] is notorious for putting his [=ADAs=] on when he wants to portray something sympathetic toward the jury. Most notably when he asks Claire to cross-examine a battered woman, and she calls him out on this. [=McCoy=] acts surprised and replies, "I just want to win."

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* StereotypeReactionGag: [=McCoy=] is notorious for putting his [=ADAs=] on when he wants to portray something sympathetic toward the jury. Most notably Such as when he asks Claire to cross-examine a battered woman, and she calls him out on this. [=McCoy=] acts surprised and replies, "I just want to win."



* StrictlyFormula: With certain notable exceptions, every episode would begin with the commission / discovery of a crime (often, but not always, a murder) and would follow the police investigation through the viewpoint of the two main detectives assigned to the case. At about the halfway point, they would make an arrest, and the point of view would switch to the prosecutors as they prepared and conducted the prosecution in court or tried to make a deal with the suspect. Certain other scenes also tended to be codified as part of the formula:

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* StrictlyFormula: With certain notable exceptions, every episode would begin with the commission / discovery of a crime (often, but not always, a murder) and would follow the police investigation through the viewpoint of the two main detectives assigned to the case. At about the halfway point, they would make an arrest, and the point of view would switch to the prosecutors as they prepared and conducted the prosecution in court or tried to make a deal with the suspect. Certain other scenes also tended to be codified as part of the formula:



* WorthlessForeignDegree: In the first episode, an Indian doctor is reticent to testify against his prestigious boss, because doing so would get himself fired. And in the medical world, social skills are far more valued than integrity and expertise, as portrayed in the episode.
* WrongGenreSavvy: The rich families who ''don't'' get away with their crimes are usually this. Notably the politician in "Family Hour", who is a belligerent SmugSnake throughout the entire proceeding.

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* WorthlessForeignDegree: In the first episode, an Indian doctor is reticent to testify against his prestigious boss, because doing so would get himself fired. And in In the medical world, social skills are far more valued than integrity and expertise, as portrayed in the episode.
* WrongGenreSavvy: The rich families who ''don't'' get away with their crimes are usually this. Notably this such as the politician in "Family Hour", who is a belligerent SmugSnake throughout the entire proceeding.



* XanatosGambit: In "Empire", [[spoiler: a business mogul who used Creator/JuliaRoberts' character to kill a public figure did it to subvert the approval he needed to finance a bond to construct a large football stadium. The prosecution is successfully able to convict the mogul for murder; however, the trial itself bought him just enough time to fully subscribe his bond to the construction of the stadium. In addition, he becomes a VillainWithGoodPublicity in the end, as the construction of the stadium carries his name, and thus his power, with it. To put the icing on the cake, Creator/JuliaRoberts' character, who contributed to the murder in the first place, gets away scot-free by [[BewareTheNiceOnes portraying herself as a poor, poor girl seduced by Det. Curtis]], and thus also profits from said construction]].
* XanatosRoulette: "Lucky Stiff" involved a man [[spoiler: sleeping with his stepsister, murdering his father and stepmother, and making volatile financial stakes in his father's businesses. He was able to thus predict the values of the stocks of the companies and shares he was invested in by being constantly kept in the loop of his father's shady business practices. He thus used the same volatile financial stakes his father used, as part of a get-rich-quick investment scheme to rip off his stepsister]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.LawandOrder