History Series / LastOfTheSummerWine

25th Dec '15 8:38:43 AM Kitchen90
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''Last of the Summer Wine'' was a gentle, family-friendly TV comedy set in rural Yorkshire, OopNorth in England, which became the world's [[LongRunner longest]]-running SitCom. First aired in [[TheSeventies 1973]] and running almost continually until [[TheNewTens 2010]], its remarkable longevity is starkly ironic in light of the fact that it centred from the word go upon a ComicTrio of elderly men who as the show's title suggests were meant to be living out the autumn of their years, and their friends and neighbours of a similar, erm, vintage. Frequently regressing to a kind of eccentric second youth, the trio routinely got themselves [[HilarityEnsues into comic scrapes]], often while trying to help somebody or partake in a perfectly sensible-sounding ZanyScheme. Just quite how old the characters were meant to be originally is unsure, but the actors were actually in their 50s when the show was first aired, and by the final episode the oldest surviving cast members were in their late 80s. The original trio was Compo (scruffy and lazy, played by Bill Owen), Clegg (meek, quiet and sensible, played by ever-present Peter Sallis) and Blamire (pompous, opinionated conservative, played by Michael Bates); Blamire was replaced in 1976 by the first of several {{Suspiciously Similar Substitute}}s, 'Foggy' Dewhirst (pompous, ex-military), played by Brian Wilde and who quickly elected himself the leader of the other two, who put up with this arrangement because his schemes always went so amusingly wrong. Subsequent leaders, all pompous, were incompetent inventor and ex-teacher Seymour Utterthwaite (Michael Aldridge, 1986-90), a returning Foggy (1990-97) and ex-policeman 'Truly' Truelove (Frank Thornton, 1998-2010). Toward the end, a new trio took the central role, while Clegg and Truly receded into supporting roles.
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''Last '''''Last of the Summer Wine'' Wine''''' was a gentle, family-friendly TV comedy set in rural Yorkshire, OopNorth in England, which became the world's [[LongRunner longest]]-running SitCom. First aired in [[TheSeventies 1973]] and running almost continually until [[TheNewTens 2010]], its remarkable longevity is starkly ironic in light of the fact that it centred from the word go upon a ComicTrio of elderly men who -- as the show's title suggests -- were meant to be living out the autumn of their years, and their friends and neighbours of a similar, erm, vintage. Frequently regressing to a kind of eccentric second youth, the trio routinely got themselves [[HilarityEnsues into comic scrapes]], often while trying to help somebody or partake in a perfectly sensible-sounding ZanyScheme. ZanyScheme. Just quite how old the characters were meant to be originally is unsure, but the actors were actually in their 50s when the show was first aired, and by the final episode the oldest surviving cast members were in their late 80s. The original trio was Compo (scruffy and lazy, played by Bill Owen), Clegg (meek, quiet and sensible, played by ever-present Peter Sallis) and Blamire (pompous, opinionated conservative, played by Michael Bates); Blamire was replaced in 1976 by the first of several {{Suspiciously Similar Substitute}}s, 'Foggy' {{suspiciously similar substitute}}s, "Foggy" Dewhirst (pompous, ex-military), played by Brian Wilde and who quickly elected himself the leader of the other two, who put up with this arrangement because his schemes always went so amusingly wrong. Subsequent leaders, all pompous, were incompetent inventor and ex-teacher Seymour Utterthwaite (Michael Aldridge, 1986-90), a returning Foggy (1990-97) and ex-policeman 'Truly' Truelove (Frank Thornton, 1998-2010). Toward the end, a new trio took the central role, while Clegg and Truly receded into supporting roles.
24th Dec '15 4:45:15 PM nombretomado
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Unsurprisingly perhaps, after decades on the air the show was frequently a target of those who saw it as stale and repetitive and wished to see it axed. Creator/TheBBC kept producing new episodes, however, as it remained highly popular, in particular among older generations; several older members of the BritishRoyalFamily were known to have apparently stated ''Summer Wine'' was their favourite television programme, including UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen and the Queen Mother. More bizarrely, so did President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan.
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Unsurprisingly perhaps, after decades on the air the show was frequently a target of those who saw it as stale and repetitive and wished to see it axed. Creator/TheBBC kept producing new episodes, however, as it remained highly popular, in particular among older generations; several older members of the BritishRoyalFamily UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily were known to have apparently stated ''Summer Wine'' was their favourite television programme, including UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen and the Queen Mother. More bizarrely, so did President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan.
5th Sep '15 11:58:24 PM ScottMarshall
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** Perhaps the most extreme example of this trope is Ivy, the only character besides Clegg to last through the series from beginning to end, appearing in 291 of 295 episodes, and never once being given a surname.

* HenpeckedHusband: Practically all of them, but especially Howard and Wesley.
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* HenpeckedHusband: Practically all of them, but especially Howard Wally, Howard, and Wesley.
2nd Sep '15 12:06:39 PM nairn1983
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Correct grammar
** Auntie Wainwright on the other hand, even ignoring her ability to continually sell worthless junk to everyone who falls into her grasp, she's done some pretty impressive things for a small old lady. For instance when someone tried to mug her, she ended up breaking their nose, another time she stopped a robber by grasping hold of there legs and holding on all the way to end of the street when they gave up. And another, she held the trio at shotgun point, just to make sure they weren't after a refund.
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** Auntie Wainwright on the other hand, even ignoring her ability to continually sell worthless junk to everyone who falls into her grasp, she's done some pretty impressive things for a small old lady. For instance when someone tried to mug her, she ended up breaking their nose, nose; another time she stopped a robber by grasping hold of there their legs and holding on all the way to end of the street when they gave up. And In another, she held the trio at shotgun point, just to make sure they weren't after a refund.
2nd Sep '15 12:05:21 PM nairn1983
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Correct grammar
** Auntie Wainwright on the other hand, even ignoring her ability to continually sell worthless junk to everyone who falls into her grasp, she's done some pretty impressive things for a small old lady. For instance when someone tried to mug her, she ended up breaking there nose, another time she stopped a robber by grasping hold of there legs and holding on all the way to end of the street when they gave up. And another, she held the trio at shotgun point, just to make sure they weren't after a refund.
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** Auntie Wainwright on the other hand, even ignoring her ability to continually sell worthless junk to everyone who falls into her grasp, she's done some pretty impressive things for a small old lady. For instance when someone tried to mug her, she ended up breaking there their nose, another time she stopped a robber by grasping hold of there legs and holding on all the way to end of the street when they gave up. And another, she held the trio at shotgun point, just to make sure they weren't after a refund.
3rd Jun '15 11:04:08 AM MGD107
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Added DiffLines:
* BadassGrandpa: Foggy likes to make it out he's one, but really he's nothing of the sort, and nobody's fooled. ** Auntie Wainwright on the other hand, even ignoring her ability to continually sell worthless junk to everyone who falls into her grasp, she's done some pretty impressive things for a small old lady. For instance when someone tried to mug her, she ended up breaking there nose, another time she stopped a robber by grasping hold of there legs and holding on all the way to end of the street when they gave up. And another, she held the trio at shotgun point, just to make sure they weren't after a refund.
4th May '15 5:48:30 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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** Many of the supporting actors died during the show's run, with their deaths being written into the script.
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** Many of the supporting actors died during the show's run, with their deaths being written into the script. script. ** Michael Aldridge had no desire to quit as Seymour, but was forced to by the need to care for his wife, who had dementia.
24th Apr '15 2:03:34 PM tenryufan
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* TheCharacterDiedWithHim: The show generally wasn't shy about having (the mostly elderly) characters die at the same time that their actors did, with the most memorable onscreen funeral being that of Compo, who had been a central character for 26 years. His actor, Bill Owen, who died the year before, was even buried in the town of Holmfirth where the series was filmed.

* TheDanza: Tom Simmonite (Tom Owen), following in the footsteps of his dad William "Compo" Simmonite" (Bill Owen).

* FakeNationality: Well, region, which in England is almost the same thing. Peter Sallis, a southerner, as Norman Clegg used a Yorkshire accent convincing enough that ''WallaceAndGromit'' creator Nick Park, upon calling him to ask him to voice Wallace, refused to believe that Sallis' natural accent was his own. The trope fits Sallis' fellow Londoner Bill Owen as well. Burt Kwouk, who is of Chinese parentage and grew up in Shanghai, appears as a Yorkshireman in the show but was actually born over the county border in Lancashire... which is a division of utmost seriousness OopNorth.

* HeyItsThatGuy: As the show entered its later years in particular, it became a sort of retirement home for British thespians of a certain vintage, particularly those known from other comedic roles. A good example is Frank Thornton (Truly Truelove), a.k.a. [[Series/AreYouBeingServed Captain Peacock]]. To a lesser extent, Brian Wilde (Foggy Dewhirst) a.k.a. [[Series/{{Porridge}} Mr Barrowclough]] and Stephen Lewis (Smiler), Blakey from ''Series/OnTheBuses''. Veteran actress Thora Hird (Edie) was also recognisable as herself from ''Songs of Praise''. Possibly less known is Michael Bates (Blamire), who played Rangi Ram in ''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum''. Auntie Wainwright was played by Jean Alexander, who was soap LongRunner ''Series/CoronationStreet'''s Hilda Ogden for 13 years before appearing throughout the last two decades of ''Last of the Summer Wine'', joined by the last few of those by June Whitfield of ''Terry & June'' and ''Series/AbsolutelyFabulous'' fame. Russ Abbot (Hobbo in the show's last series) was well-known for his own comedy shows and music from earlier years, while Burt Kwouk (Entwistle) had spent decades representing all manner of InterchangeableAsianCultures as one of Britain's few well-known oriental actors, in everything from ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' films as Cato to three ''Franchise/JamesBond'' films. * HeyItsThatVoice: Peter Sallis, the actor who plays Cleggy, is more known to many non-British as the voice of Wallace in ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit''. Wallace's accent is the same as Clegg's even though this is not Sallis' own: see FakeNationality above.

* RealLifeRelative: Tom Owen as the son of his late father's character Compo.

* RealitySubtext: As noted, most cast deaths were written into the series, and the most elderly actors increasingly appeared in only marginal roles toward the end. Peter Sallis as Clegg also only appeared in fewer scenes during the later series due to his macular degeneration.
29th Dec '14 12:13:36 PM TheUnsquished
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Unsurprisingly perhaps, after decades on the air the show was frequently a target of those who saw it as stale and repetitive and wished to see it axed. TheBBC kept producing new episodes, however, as it remained highly popular, in particular among older generations; several older members of the BritishRoyalFamily were known to have apparently stated ''Summer Wine'' was their favourite television programme, including UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen and the Queen Mother. More bizarrely, so did President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan.
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Unsurprisingly perhaps, after decades on the air the show was frequently a target of those who saw it as stale and repetitive and wished to see it axed. TheBBC Creator/TheBBC kept producing new episodes, however, as it remained highly popular, in particular among older generations; several older members of the BritishRoyalFamily were known to have apparently stated ''Summer Wine'' was their favourite television programme, including UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen and the Queen Mother. More bizarrely, so did President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan.
18th Oct '14 2:12:52 AM Sahira
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Added DiffLines:
* TheLastTitle: The title of the series.
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