History Series / FridayThe13thTheSeries

12th Sep '16 3:52:52 AM Ingonyama
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* FuelMeterOfPower: When it is revealed that Micki possesses innate, latent WhiteMagic, she is immediately called upon by the end of a magic circle to help protect Ryan, retrieve the witch's ladder, and bring down the "Coven of Darkness." After she succeeds in doing so, Jack reveals that such powers come from one's LifeForce which is not finite--i.e., that she managed [[BroughtDownToNormal to drain all of hers]] in one night by working against an artifact that so augmented the powers of darkness. Jack then suggests that in time her powers may return but that she shouldn't try them again for a good long time to come, something that she seems quite relieved to hear (and which may have been for the best, considering she seems susceptible to corruption at various points in the show), and the matter is never addressed again in the third season, so for all intents and purposes it was indeed permanent.

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* FuelMeterOfPower: When it is revealed that Micki possesses innate, latent WhiteMagic, magic, she is immediately called upon by the end head of a magic circle to help protect Ryan, retrieve the witch's ladder, and bring down the "Coven of Darkness." After she succeeds in doing so, Jack reveals that such powers come from one's LifeForce which is not finite--i.e., that she managed [[BroughtDownToNormal to drain all of hers]] in one night by working against an artifact that so augmented the powers of darkness. Jack then suggests that in time her powers may return but that she shouldn't try them again for a good long time to come, something that she seems quite relieved to hear (and which may have been for the best, considering she seems susceptible to corruption at various points in the show), and the matter is never addressed again in the third season, so for all intents and purposes it was indeed permanent.
12th Sep '16 3:50:32 AM Ingonyama
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12th Sep '16 3:50:14 AM Ingonyama
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* HypnotizeThePrincess: Happens to Micki in "The Baron's Bride" thanks to the power of the cape to lure in women (and, presumably, the vampire's own mental domination powers). No actual hypnosis is involved, but Ryan is otherwise forced to be this trope by Lysa in "Coven of Darkness" when she curses him into an agony of fever and pain unless he brings her the witch's ladder (while also misleading him into believing she's a good psychic simply trying to destroy it). It is played straight with him however in "The Prophecies."
* IHaveYouNowMyPretty: A few of the villains indulge in this with Micki, most especially Tommy from "Shadow Boxer."
12th Sep '16 3:41:47 AM Ingonyama
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* AmbiguousSituation: The ending of "Coven of Darkness" acts as this. On the one hand, the way Micki's hand trembles when she touches the book of WhiteMagic and the expression on her face suggest fear and a bit of relief, which would make sense since Jack had just claimed she had been drained of all her power (whether permanently or for a good long time) and she had clearly been afraid of possessing occult powers since the revelation was made (either due to ComesGreatResponsibility or her experiences throughout the show making her [[IJustWantToBeNormal rightfully afraid]] [[MagicIsEvil of pretty much all magic]]). But her expression and trembling hand, plus the creepy musical stinger, could ''also'' mean that something about the draining of her magic, plus how closely she was intertwined with the villain's powers when trying to break her curse, either caused a corrupting backlash or even allowed Lysa to somehow possess or influence Micki toward the darkness. Because the matter of the coven (as stated above) was an AbortedArc, and the main purpose of having Micki drained (aside from StatusQuoIsGod) was so that there'd be no way to [[spoiler:save Ryan in the third season's two-part opener]], this never gets revisited again...so it's never clear what the ending actually means. It's most likely the first option, with TheStinger being a TrollingCreator's TheEndOrIsIt, but we can't be sure.



* BackFromTheDead: Some of the antiques allowed this. One in particular, the Coin of Ziocles, [[spoiler:killed and then later resurrected a main character.]]



* BackFromTheDead: Some of the antiques allowed this. One in particular, the Coin of Ziocles, [[spoiler:killed and then later resurrected a main character.]]

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* BackFromTheDead: Some of ** One exception seems to be the antiques allowed this. One witch's ladder from "Coven of Darkness", which after Lewis's second-in-command [[JusticeByOtherLegalMeans went to prison]] [[DueToTheDead for graverobbing]] ended up in particular, the Coin possession of Ziocles, [[spoiler:killed a good occult circle known to Jack. According to its leader, it had been employed by them to harmlessly empower their own spellwork, but after learning of its curse he instantly agreed to return it to the vault so that no Satanic group could obtain it and then later resurrected use it for evil as it was meant to be. (Lysa does claim the ladder will corrupt and turn to evil any who are near it, but as this is a main character.]]lie she uses to sway Ryan to her side and explain the curse she places on him, it seems clear it never did any harm to the good magicians while they had it.)



* FuelMeterOfPower: When it is revealed that Micki possesses innate, latent WhiteMagic, she is immediately called upon by the end of a magic circle to help protect Ryan, retrieve the witch's ladder, and bring down the "Coven of Darkness." After she succeeds in doing so, Jack reveals that such powers come from one's LifeForce which is not finite--i.e., that she managed [[BroughtDownToNormal to drain all of hers]] in one night by working against an artifact that so augmented the powers of darkness. Jack then suggests that in time her powers may return but that she shouldn't try them again for a good long time to come, something that she seems quite relieved to hear (and which may have been for the best, considering she seems susceptible to corruption at various points in the show), and the matter is never addressed again in the third season, so for all intents and purposes it was indeed permanent.



** The villain of "Coven of Darkness" ends up being killed by her own blast of magic--partly because Micki's WhiteMagic was returning her curse to her "a thousandfold", partly because Ryan had actually gotten the witch's ladder away from her. (Presumably she assumed him holding it would simply make its power burn right through his hand, and didn't realize what Micki's spell was doing.) End result? [[DestinationDefenestration Sent smashing out]] [[KarmicDeath the church's stained-glass window]].
* HollywoodSatanism: Unsurprising, considering the main premise of the show is based around Lucifer existing as the UltimateEvil, Lewis Vendredi making a literal DealWithTheDevil, and various witches, warlocks, and other magic-users acting as necromancers, calling on BlackMagic, or speaking of the Realms of Darkness. [=LaVeyan=] Church of Satan accouterments such as the effigy and name of Baphomet, the upside-down pentacle, cursing others, and perverting/inverting Christian rites are combined with the usual human sacrifice, BloodMagic, black robes and OminousLatinChanting, and desire to destroy or supplant all good magic. Also included are previous erroneous beliefs from medieval and Renaissance times (such as the witch's ladder); pagan elements such as the athame and chalice; raising the dead and seeking to bring about the Antichrist (including an attempt by Lucifer himself to impregnate Micki); suggesting a history of the cult and its evil practices extending all the way back to ancient times via previous long-dead witches and sorcerers (needless to say, [[NewerThanTheyThink untrue]]); and even HollywoodVoodoo by employing the use of clay figures to control, possess, or harm their living counterparts. The only thing they get right is referring to their belief system as the left-hand path.



* NewPowersAsThePlotDemands: Subverted. When the cursed compact that was lost in a previous episode turns up again, it seems to have a completely different curse. But Jack reasons that the ''actual'' curse had been to give the owner whatever their heart's desire was; for the first owner, that was love, for the second, beauty. With as open-ended as this is, it actually makes it one of the most dangerous artifacts in the store.

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* NewPowersAsThePlotDemands: NewPowersAsThePlotDemands:
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Subverted. When the cursed compact that was lost in a previous episode turns up again, it seems to have a completely different curse. But Jack reasons that the ''actual'' curse had been to give the owner whatever their heart's desire was; for the first owner, that was love, for the second, beauty. With as open-ended as this is, it actually makes it one of the most dangerous artifacts in the store.store.
** Played straight with Micki in "Coven of Darkness" where, after absolutely no indication prior to this (such as, say, in either "Bottle of Dreams" or "Doorway to Hell" when they had Rashid right there to make note of it) she is revealed to possess great occult power. The WhiteMagic practitioner of the episode guided her into using it for good (Jack mentions the power can go either way) in order to save Ryan and recover the witch's ladder; the end of the episode indicates she could well have fallen to darkness herself. But conveniently enough, [[FuelMeterOfPower all her power is used up by episode's end]], and while Jack says it could return, this is never revisited later. Classic example of StatusQuoIsGod and ResetButton (and allows the two-part opener of season three to have the BittersweetEnding it does).
10th Sep '16 2:22:06 AM Ingonyama
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* ChekhovsHobby[=/=]SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: Ryan's ability to sculpt, so crucial to the [[GuileHero clever trick]] he and Jack use to get a Satanist to [[spoiler:bring Micki BackFromTheDead]], straddles the line between these tropes. The ability is shown earlier in the episode, and it was also hinted that he had some skill with art in the comic book episode (although there it was drawing, which is not quite the same skill set), but it still seems to come out of nowhere just when it becomes absolutely critical for him to know it.

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* ChekhovsHobby[=/=]SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: ChekhovsHobby / SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: Ryan's ability to sculpt, so crucial to the [[GuileHero clever trick]] he and Jack use to get a Satanist to [[spoiler:bring Micki BackFromTheDead]], straddles the line between these tropes. The ability is shown earlier in the episode, and it was also hinted that he had some skill with art in the comic book episode (although there it was drawing, which is not quite the same skill set), but it still seems to come out of nowhere just when it becomes absolutely critical for him to know it.



* CriminalDoppelganger[=/=]EvilKnockoff: Inversion--the villain of "Double Exposure" can use the cursed camera to create what is confused for the first trope but is actually the second...for ''himself'', thus giving him an alibi for the murder spree he creates to [[GoingForTheBigScoop make a name for himself in reporting]]. A more played straight version comes when he creates an EvilKnockoff of Jack to take out Ryan and Micki, then confess to the murders, but this is foiled by Ryan [[SpottingTheThread catching the knockoff in ignorance]] (thinking an artifact can be damaged), then by the villain's own knockoff [[BecomeARealBoy trying to maintain his existence]]. Of note is the rather disturbing way it is created, rising out of a bubbling chemical bath in the darkroom.

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* CriminalDoppelganger[=/=]EvilKnockoff: CriminalDoppelganger / EvilKnockoff: Inversion--the villain of "Double Exposure" can use the cursed camera to create what is confused for the first trope but is actually the second...for ''himself'', thus giving him an alibi for the murder spree he creates to [[GoingForTheBigScoop make a name for himself in reporting]]. A more played straight version comes when he creates an EvilKnockoff of Jack to take out Ryan and Micki, then confess to the murders, but this is foiled by Ryan [[SpottingTheThread catching the knockoff in ignorance]] (thinking an artifact can be damaged), then by the villain's own knockoff [[BecomeARealBoy trying to maintain his existence]]. Of note is the rather disturbing way it is created, rising out of a bubbling chemical bath in the darkroom.



* JackOfAllTrades[=/=]RenaissanceMan: Jack, punnily enough, seems to be one of these. While it's never revealed what all he knows, and much of his talents seem to relate to the occult or his role as a procurer of antiques (or at least would be useful while doing so), he does have some rather unusual (and handy) abilities, such as forgery which lets him, among other things, be able to fake both ancient documents and modern [=IDs=], as well as reproduce copies of artifacts like the quill pen.

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* JackOfAllTrades[=/=]RenaissanceMan: JackOfAllTrades / RenaissanceMan: Jack, punnily enough, seems to be one of these. While it's never revealed what all he knows, and much of his talents seem to relate to the occult or his role as a procurer of antiques (or at least would be useful while doing so), he does have some rather unusual (and handy) abilities, such as forgery which lets him, among other things, be able to fake both ancient documents and modern [=IDs=], as well as reproduce copies of artifacts like the quill pen.



* OutfitDecoy[=/=]ImpersonationGambit: Happens in back-to-back episodes early on: in "Cupid's Quiver" Micki dresses up as the villain's most recent target after they overhear her agreeing to meet him, and in "A Cup of Time" Jack pretends to be a vagrant in the park so he can get the teacup back from the villain.

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* OutfitDecoy[=/=]ImpersonationGambit: OutfitDecoy / ImpersonationGambit: Happens in back-to-back episodes early on: in "Cupid's Quiver" Micki dresses up as the villain's most recent target after they overhear her agreeing to meet him, and in "A Cup of Time" Jack pretends to be a vagrant in the park so he can get the teacup back from the villain.



* ThePowerOfHate[=/=]ThePowerOfLove: How "The Playhouse" absorbs the souls of children and is forced to release them, respectively.

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* ThePowerOfHate[=/=]ThePowerOfLove: ThePowerOfHate / ThePowerOfLove: How "The Playhouse" absorbs the souls of children and is forced to release them, respectively.
9th Sep '16 7:57:51 AM Ingonyama
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** The villain in "The Prisoner" is killing all the members of his former robbery gang, both out of revenge for them abandoning him to the cops and a 20-year jail sentence and to find where they hid the money he helped steal.
9th Sep '16 7:56:19 AM Ingonyama
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* {{Frameup}}: Occurs fairly often in a minor fashion, such as "A Cup of Time" where the villain knocks out an old woman friend of the trio, only for them to be arrested by the police for her assault because [[TheCorpseStopsHere they happened to be bending over her]] (and Ryan [[BetterManhandleTheMurderWeapon was holding the rock she was hit with]]). An episode-long version, however, occurs with "The Prisoner" when the villain kills Johnny's father and then makes it appear Johnny himself did it, so that Ryan, Micki, and Jack have to clear his name in addition to stopping the villain and getting back the artifact. The second half of the two-parter "The Quilt of Hathor" also involves [[SinisterMinister Reverend Grange]] framing Ryan for the murder of the inquisitor, both to keep him from taking the quilt and to keep the truth from coming out about his mishandling of the colony's funds (which would likely result in his removal as head of the colony).

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* {{Frameup}}: Occurs fairly often in a minor fashion, such as "A Cup of Time" where the villain knocks out an old woman friend of the trio, only for them to be arrested by the police for her assault because [[TheCorpseStopsHere they happened to be bending over her]] (and Ryan [[BetterManhandleTheMurderWeapon was holding the rock she was hit with]]). An episode-long version, however, occurs with "The Prisoner" when the villain kills Johnny's father and then makes it appear Johnny himself did it, so that Ryan, Micki, and Jack have to [[ClearTheirName clear his name name]] in addition to stopping the villain and getting back the artifact. The second half of the two-parter "The Quilt of Hathor" also involves [[SinisterMinister Reverend Grange]] framing Ryan for the murder of the inquisitor, both to keep him from taking the quilt and to keep the truth from coming out about his mishandling of the colony's funds (which would likely result in his removal as head of the colony).
9th Sep '16 7:53:37 AM Ingonyama
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Frameup}}: Occurs fairly often in a minor fashion, such as "A Cup of Time" where the villain knocks out an old woman friend of the trio, only for them to be arrested by the police for her assault because [[TheCorpseStopsHere they happened to be bending over her]] (and Ryan [[BetterManhandleTheMurderWeapon was holding the rock she was hit with]]). An episode-long version, however, occurs with "The Prisoner" when the villain kills Johnny's father and then makes it appear Johnny himself did it, so that Ryan, Micki, and Jack have to clear his name in addition to stopping the villain and getting back the artifact. The second half of the two-parter "The Quilt of Hathor" also involves [[SinisterMinister Reverend Grange]] framing Ryan for the murder of the inquisitor, both to keep him from taking the quilt and to keep the truth from coming out about his mishandling of the colony's funds (which would likely result in his removal as head of the colony).


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* InvisibilityCloak: "The Prisoner" involves a case of a WorldWarTwo kamikaze fighter's jacket that renders its wearer invisible when smeared with blood. It clearly renders everything the villain wears invisible as well, although in one scene when he sneaks into the bathtub of a victim to kill her, his footprints as he chases her are naked ones. He can be identified by the scent of his telltale cigars [[spoiler:as well as, of course, when soaked by kerosene and then [[ManOnFire lit on fire]]]].
6th Sep '16 3:32:04 AM Ingonyama
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* DramaticIrony: All over the place, usually in regards to either how an artifact functions (something that heals having to kill give life and vice versa), [[HoistByHisOwnPetard what happens to the artifact-owner]], or the manners in which the main characters trick the villains. One non-death-related (or curse-related) example of this, however, occurs in "Dr. Jack" where the villain of the episode causes Jack to fall down an elevator shaft, rupturing his aorta and requiring immediate surgery...but the severity of the injury is such there's only one surgeon who can save him--the villain himself, with the cursed scalpel. The end result of this is Ryan, disguised as an orderly, being forced to give the scalpel back after having taken it and the villain, once he sees Jack's face, being forced to continue the operation since he's being watched by the press and all the other OR staff. Of course post-op is a different story...

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* DramaticIrony: All over the place, usually in regards to either how an artifact functions (something that heals having to kill to give life and or vice versa), [[HoistByHisOwnPetard what happens to the artifact-owner]], or the manners in which the main characters trick the villains. One non-death-related (or curse-related) example of this, however, occurs in "Dr. Jack" where the villain of the episode causes Jack to fall down an elevator shaft, rupturing his aorta and requiring immediate surgery...but the severity of the injury is such there's only one surgeon who can save him--the villain himself, with the cursed scalpel. The end result of this is Ryan, disguised as an orderly, being forced to give the scalpel back after having taken it and the villain, once he sees Jack's face, being forced to continue the operation since he's being watched by the press and all the other OR staff. Of course post-op is a different story...
6th Sep '16 3:31:03 AM Ingonyama
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Added DiffLines:

* DramaticIrony: All over the place, usually in regards to either how an artifact functions (something that heals having to kill give life and vice versa), [[HoistByHisOwnPetard what happens to the artifact-owner]], or the manners in which the main characters trick the villains. One non-death-related (or curse-related) example of this, however, occurs in "Dr. Jack" where the villain of the episode causes Jack to fall down an elevator shaft, rupturing his aorta and requiring immediate surgery...but the severity of the injury is such there's only one surgeon who can save him--the villain himself, with the cursed scalpel. The end result of this is Ryan, disguised as an orderly, being forced to give the scalpel back after having taken it and the villain, once he sees Jack's face, being forced to continue the operation since he's being watched by the press and all the other OR staff. Of course post-op is a different story...


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* DyingClue: In "Shadow Boxer" the first victim of the villain tries to write his killer's name in his own blood but only manages "T-O" before dying. This could be anything (not even necessarily a name) until another boxer who is seen arguing with the villain is also killed, and the trio realizes the "T-O" referred to Tommy. [[note]]It would also have been a case of SuspectExistenceFailure, since the victim's name was Tony, except he would only have been a suspect--there being no known motive at the time--if they had realized what the DyingClue referred to ahead of time. By the time they did, he was already dead. Whether there were no other members of the gym whose names started with "T-O", so that killing Tony left Tommy as the only possible suspect, or if the trio just assumed it was him because he'd been arguing with the man not long before his death and didn't bother to check any others, isn't clear but moot in the end.[[/note]]
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