History Series / AdventuresInWonderland

13th Apr '18 10:49:57 PM Pamina
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* SeriesContinuityError: ''The Sound and the Furry'' centers around the whole cast learning sign language and the Queen and the White Rabbit don't even know what it is until about halfway into the episode. In ''Take My Tonsils... Please!'', during the musical number going over ways to communicate without speaking to the Hatter, the two mention sign language, with the Rabbit even signing the Queen's singing part. No matter what order you watch the episodes in, it makes no sense continuity-wise (if the Hatter knew that he was going to lose his voice after getting his tonsils removed, why didn't they think of sign language right away?).

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* SeriesContinuityError: SeriesContinuityError:
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''The Sound and the Furry'' centers around the whole cast learning sign language and the Queen and the White Rabbit don't even know what it is until about halfway into the episode. In ''Take My Tonsils... Please!'', during the musical number going over ways to communicate without speaking to the Hatter, the two mention sign language, with the Rabbit even signing the Queen's singing part. No matter what order you watch the episodes in, it makes no sense continuity-wise (if the Hatter knew that he was going to lose his voice after getting his tonsils removed, why didn't they think of sign language right away?).away?).
** In the first episode, "Her-Story in the Making," the Hatter and Hare apparently don't like grocery shopping - each tries to convince the other to do it, until finally they fob it off on Alice. In the later episode "Dinner Fit for a Queen," they enjoy doing it, especially when one of them gets to ride in the shopping cart.



* TooManyCooks: In "Her-story in the Making", Alice tries getting her Wonderland friends to write a story for her school assignment for her. They each write a passage and it comes out... less than comprehensible.

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* TooManyCooks: TooManyCooksSpoilTheSoup: In "Her-story in the Making", Alice tries getting her Wonderland friends to write a story for her school assignment for her. They each write a passage and it comes out... less than comprehensible.
24th Mar '18 8:04:28 AM Pamina
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** In "Game Shows People Play," the Queen is a contestant on "Name That Adverb" and gets to move on to the bonus round. "What's the bonus round?" she asks. We then cut to her sitting in a dunk tank, where she'll be dunked in cold water if she gets a single adverb wrong, asking "This is the bonus round?"
21st Mar '18 1:34:05 PM Pamina
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Added DiffLines:

* LostVoicePlot: In "Lip-Sunk," the Queen loses her voice just before she's supposed to give a speech. The other Wonderland characters [[LiteralMinded try to find her missing voice,]] but in the end [[OnlySaneMan Alice]] cures her with lemon-and-honey tea.
21st Mar '18 1:30:51 PM Pamina
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* GilliganCut: In "TV Or Not TV," Alice expresses concern that the Tweedles, the Hatter, and the Hare are more concerned with watching television than practicing softball for the upcoming Wonderland Picnic. The Queen tells her not to worry: "It's not like they're going to do nothing but sit there for three straight days and nights and watch TV!" We then cut to a montage of the group doing just that.

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* GilliganCut: GilliganCut:
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In "TV Or Not TV," Alice expresses concern that the Tweedles, the Hatter, and the Hare are more concerned with watching television than practicing softball for the upcoming Wonderland Picnic. The Queen tells her not to worry: "It's not like they're going to do nothing but sit there for three straight days and nights and watch TV!" We then cut to a montage of the group doing just that.that.
** In "Card 54, Where Are You?" the Queen becomes obsessed with collecting a set trading cards and makes the White Rabbit, Alice and the Tweedles eat through hundreds of the cereal boxes they come in. The Rabbit insists that this won't be a problem, because "I never tire of Carrot Crunchies." Cue a close-up of the Rabbit eleven boxes later, forcing himself to keep eating, obviously sick of the stuff.
14th Mar '18 10:12:13 AM Pamina
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** It's somewhat softened by the fact that both the Red Queen and the White Rabbit say that watching television is OK in moderation throughout the episode, unlike other shows that point out how absolutely ''amazing'' a lack of television is ([[WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}} "Arthur's TV-Free Week" comes to mind). Plus it seems that Wonderland operates on a different time schedule, considering that the whole episode takes place over three days, but when Alice exits her mirror, she talks to Dinah as if she left two minutes ago.

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** It's somewhat softened by the fact that both the Red Queen and the White Rabbit say that watching television is OK in moderation throughout the episode, unlike other shows that point out how absolutely ''amazing'' a lack of television is ([[WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}} "Arthur's TV-Free Week" Week"]] comes to mind). Plus it seems that Wonderland operates on a different time schedule, considering that the whole episode takes place over three days, but when Alice exits her mirror, she talks to Dinah as if she left two minutes ago.
14th Mar '18 10:10:45 AM Pamina
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* GoodAngelBadAngel: Tweedledum goes through this in "All That Glitters," when trying to decide whether or not to eat a fruit that will make him stronger but might make him sick.
12th Mar '18 12:10:18 AM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

** It's somewhat softened by the fact that both the Red Queen and the White Rabbit say that watching television is OK in moderation throughout the episode, unlike other shows that point out how absolutely ''amazing'' a lack of television is ([[WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}} "Arthur's TV-Free Week" comes to mind). Plus it seems that Wonderland operates on a different time schedule, considering that the whole episode takes place over three days, but when Alice exits her mirror, she talks to Dinah as if she left two minutes ago.


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** Even [[OnlySaneMan the reasonable Alice]] falls victim to this trope occasionally. In an episode about pizza making, she declares that she only likes plain cheese. The Caterpillar suggests that she try a variety of flavors, and she replies "I like a ''variety'' of cheeses on my pizza!"


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* ShaggyDogStory: The "real world" plot of "The Red Queen Crown Affair" is Alice trying to determine which of her siblings ate the candy she was saving for herself. After the Wonderland plot, she returns and tells Dinah that she's remembered that neither of them did--''she'' brought the candy to a softball practice and shared it with her friends. The clues implicating her brother and sister were her own mistakes.
** The Friday the 13th episode kicks off when the Hatter breaks a few teacups at his party; he and the Hare decide this unlucky event means that the superstitions about the day are true. At the end of the episode, he casually mentions that he broke ''less'' teacups on the thirteenth than he did the day before.


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* StartMyOwn: One episode sees the Hatter upset that the Hare is always late to their tea parties, so the Hare decides he's going to throw his own at precisely the same time. The rest of the Wonderlandians don't want to make either feel bad, so they go to both and end up too full to enjoy themselves.


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** In one episode, the Walrus eats a delicious food called "Purple Potato Pancakes," but it turns out that the process of making them is extremely complicated. The Wonderlandians are reluctant to do it, until the Cheshire Cat mentions that there's a treasure hidden in the potato patch; he later explains that the treasure is in the potatoes themselves, so they'll have to be peeled. Whether he was implying that the "treasure" was the results of their hard work or simply tricking them isn't explained.
** In "Christmas in Wonderland," the Queen is crabby about the Wonderlandians' attempt to bring her snow, especially since the snow they found melted and ended up as a bucket of water on her head. The Cheshire Cat fades in and pretends to commiserate with the Queen, casually dropping hints about all of the hard work her subjects did to make her happy. She quickly realizes she's been a jerk and rushes off to apologize.


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* YearInsideHourOutside: While the show never came down firmly on the question of how Wonderland and "real world" time differ, a few episodes drop clues that Alice returns to her bedroom mere seconds after her trips regardless of their length. "TV or Not TV?" is explicitly stated to take place over a period of three days, but when Alice comes back to sum up what she's learned to Dinah, she talks about the homework she has to do that night (the same homework that she was complaining about when the show started), so it's been a period of minutes at most. Similarly, "Christmas in Wonderland" happens over the course of at least eight hours (it's bright and sunny when Alice arrives, and nightfall at the end of the Wonderland segment), but again, she returns to the real world without any time elapsing.
22nd Feb '18 1:53:25 AM mopsmirror
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The usual episode format consists of Alice coming home from school and talking to her cat, Dinah, about a problem facing her that day, then going into Wonderland and finding the residents (all of whom she considers her friends) facing a similar crisis, and returning to the real world with AnAesop relating to her own problem. Notably, most episodes include as many as three or four musical numbers. Along with standard life lessons, the series was meant to introduce young viewers to various literary conventions and elements of story, uncommon for a show targeting children beyond preschool age.

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The usual episode format consists of Alice coming home from school and talking to her cat, Dinah, about a problem facing her that day, then going into Wonderland and finding the residents (all of whom she considers her friends) facing a similar crisis, and returning to the real world with AnAesop relating to her own problem. Notably, most episodes include as many as three or four musical numbers. Along with standard life lessons, the series was meant to introduce young viewers to various literary conventions and elements of story, uncommon for a show targeting children beyond preschool age.
story.
22nd Feb '18 1:51:02 AM mopsmirror
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''Adventures in Wonderland'' was a live action [[KidCom children's sitcom]] and a loose adaptation of ''[[Literature/AliceInWonderland Alice's Adventures in Wonderland]]'', which ran on the Disney Channel from March 1992 to 1995, and reran until 1998. In the series, Alice (played by Elisabeth Harnois), was portrayed as a teenage girl who can go to and from Wonderland simply by walking through her mirror (a reference to Lewis Carroll's ''Through the Looking-Glass'').

Usually the format consisted of Alice coming home from school and talking to Dinah (her cat) about a problem facing her that day, then going into Wonderland and finding the residents of that world facing a similar crisis, where she would learn AnAesop relating to her RealLife problems. Also of note is that each episode usually included around three or four musical numbers. At the end of each episode she would return to the real world with a solution to her problem, which were usually mundane everyday problems.

Unfortunately for fans of the series, [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes no DVD set is even being planned]].

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''Adventures in Wonderland'' was is a live action [[KidCom children's sitcom]] and a loose adaptation of ''[[Literature/AliceInWonderland Alice's Adventures in Wonderland]]'', which ran on the Disney Channel from March 1992 to 1995, 1995 and reran until 1998. In the series, Alice (played by Elisabeth Harnois), was Harnois) is portrayed as a teenage girl who can go come to and from Wonderland simply by walking through her bedroom mirror (a reference to Lewis Carroll's ''Through the Looking-Glass'').

Usually the The usual episode format consisted consists of Alice coming home from school and talking to Dinah (her cat) her cat, Dinah, about a problem facing her that day, then going into Wonderland and finding the residents (all of that world whom she considers her friends) facing a similar crisis, where she would learn and returning to the real world with AnAesop relating to her RealLife problems. Also of note is that each episode usually included around own problem. Notably, most episodes include as many as three or four musical numbers. At the end of each episode she would return to the real world Along with a solution standard life lessons, the series was meant to her problem, which were usually mundane everyday problems.

introduce young viewers to various literary conventions and elements of story, uncommon for a show targeting children beyond preschool age.

Unfortunately for fans of the series, [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes no DVD set is even being planned]]. release has been planned]].
31st Jan '18 3:16:04 PM XFllo
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* RoyalBrat / SpoiledSweet: The Queen tends to [[ZigZaggingTrope zigzag]] between these two tropes.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.AdventuresInWonderland