History Series / AdamTwelve

24th Mar '18 8:18:21 PM Twiddler
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* BerserkButton:
** Do NOT molest a child, injure her enough to require hospitalization, and then tell Malloy that she asked for it.
** Do NOT try to hurt Jean or Jimmy. Reed will get very ticked.
4th Mar '18 5:22:15 PM StarSword
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* StrawmanU: Malloy goes back to school to finish his degree in one episode, but this being TheSixties he comes in for guff from student activists for being a cop. Then he has to respond in uniform to a sit-in at the school, for which his car is vandalized.
4th Mar '18 5:19:52 PM StarSword
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* DoubleTake:
** Reed and Malloy due to strange-sounding dispatch calls, on occasion.
--->'''Reed:''' "Grand theft ''horse''"?\\
'''Malloy:''' [[SeenItAll That's what they said.]]
** One time they return the favor when calling for the sergeant to meet them with a blanket for a stoner driving naked. It's possibly the only time the dispatcher actually expresses an emotion the whole series.
--->'''Dispatch:''' One-Adam-Twelve confirm. ''A blanket?''
21st Dec '17 12:58:30 PM Briguy52748
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** "Good Cop: Handle With Care": Two rogue freelance journalists, seeking to do a sensationalist story on police brutality, harass Malloy and Reed throughout the episode. Things reach their climax when the officers pull over a car matching the description of one used in an armed robbery. The journalists harass the officers as they're trying to take the suspects into custody just enough for one of the suspects to fire his gun ... and he ends up shooting an innocent passer-by across the street. The assailed whom we quickly learn is a married father of three later dies at the hospital of his wounds, and the officers muse about it in the tag scene.

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** "Good Cop: Handle With Care": Two rogue freelance journalists, seeking to do a sensationalist story on police brutality, harass Malloy and Reed throughout the episode. Things reach their climax when the officers pull over a car matching the description of one used in an armed robbery. The journalists harass the officers as they're trying to take the suspects into custody just enough for one of the suspects to fire his gun ... and he ends up shooting an innocent passer-by across the street. The assailed whom we quickly learn is a married father of three later dies at the hospital of his wounds, and the officers muse about it the situation and lives impacted (a family now thrown into grieving, and two otherwise-promising young journalists whose careers might be destroyed because of their overbearing tactics) in the tag scene.
18th Dec '17 10:48:17 AM WhosAsking
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** In 1972's "Badge Heavy," we meet a rogue cop who thinks that criminals should be dealt with severely. Reed witnesses once such incident and tries to flush him from the department, but his complaint is determined to be unfounded (after the cop and the suspect lie about the incident, the officer claiming it was retaliation from another officer who was tired of his (unfunny) practical jokes). In the end, the officer's rant about asserting authority over suspects with brutal force leads to his downfall.
** While Malloy and Reed were both professional about their duties and kept their cool, Malloy blows it once in the 1974 episode "X-Force," where he is accused of roughing up a child molester he just arrested (after the creep had made a snide remark); Malloy is suspended for four days without pay for his mistake, and it is suggested that it may hinder his chances for promotion to sergeant.
** Another episode "Good Cop, Handle With Care" has two freelance journalists trying to make Malloy and Reed out to be bad cops out to beat up people and arrest others at random. They seem to have found their catch after taking a seemingly incriminating photo of a drugged-out suspect with a broken nose (obtained by hitting his head against the seat frame of the police car, after he had gone into a seizure), but in the end the two rogue journalists end up (indirectly) causing a tragedy.
* PoliceProcedural: Most episodes focus strictly on the day-to-day routine of policework, including the less exciting aspects of the job (paperwork, pre-shift briefings, inspections, car trouble, etc.).

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** Season two episode "Good Cop, Handle With Care" has two freelance journalists trying to make Malloy and Reed out to be bad cops out to beat up people and arrest others at random. They seem to have found their catch after taking a seemingly incriminating photo of a drugged-out suspect with a broken nose (obtained by hitting his head against the seat frame of the police car, after he had gone into a seizure), but in the end the two rogue journalists end up (indirectly) causing a tragedy.
** In 1972's the season five episode "Badge Heavy," we meet a rogue cop who thinks that criminals should be dealt with severely. Reed witnesses once such incident and tries to flush him from the department, but his complaint is determined to be unfounded (after the cop and the suspect lie about the incident, the officer claiming it was retaliation from another officer who was tired of his (unfunny) practical jokes). In the end, the officer's rant about asserting authority over suspects with brutal force leads to his downfall.
** While Malloy and Reed were both professional about their duties and kept their cool, Malloy blows it once in the 1974 season seven episode "X-Force," where he is accused of roughing up a child molester he just arrested (after the creep had made a snide remark); Malloy is suspended for four days without pay for his mistake, and it is suggested that it may hinder his chances for promotion to sergeant.
** Another episode "Good Cop, Handle With Care" has two freelance journalists trying to make Malloy and Reed out to be bad cops out to beat up people and arrest others at random. They seem to have found their catch after taking a seemingly incriminating photo of a drugged-out suspect with a broken nose (obtained by hitting his head against the seat frame of the police car, after he had gone into a seizure), but in the end the two rogue journalists end up (indirectly) causing a tragedy.
* PoliceProcedural: Most episodes focus strictly on the day-to-day routine of policework, including the less exciting aspects of the job (paperwork, pre-shift briefings, inspections, car trouble, tedious calls, ungrateful citizens, etc.).
30th Nov '17 11:22:23 AM WhosAsking
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* NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer: Like ''Series/{{Dragnet}}'', ''Adam-12'' stories were taken from actual police files, so the show used a ''Dragnet''-like disclaimer at the end of its episodes: "''The incidents you have seen are true. The names were changed to protect the innocent.''"
21st Sep '17 11:06:27 AM Hallwings
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* FakeOutOpening: The opening scene of "Training Division" features a group of robbers being pulled over and then taking out the arresting officers and the backup officers. Adam-12 then shows up...[[spoiler:and then the camera pans to a group of trainees in street clothes, revealing that the entire scenario was a recreation of an actual incident. (It's supposedly based on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newhall_massacre Newhall massacre]], which resulted in the death of four California Highway Patrol officers.) The whole thing was a training exercise, where Mac and other other officers explain how an incident like this should have been handled and, if done correctly, would have resulted in just the arrests and nothing else]].

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* FakeOutOpening: The opening scene of "Training Division" features a group of robbers being pulled over and then taking out the arresting officers and the backup officers. Adam-12 then shows up...[[spoiler:and then the camera pans to a group of trainees in street clothes, revealing that the entire scenario was a recreation of an actual incident. (It's supposedly based on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newhall_massacre Newhall massacre]], which resulted in the death of four California Highway Patrol officers.) The whole thing was a training exercise, where Mac and other other officers explain how an incident like this should have been handled and, if done correctly, would have resulted in just the arrests and nothing else]].
14th Sep '17 8:50:45 PM Tarlonniel
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*** Gus Corbin, a rookie Reed is saddled with in the episode of the same name, has some of these tendencies. He gets chewed out twice for taking reckless chances and "playing with the Academy's money" - once for going into a building without waiting for backup, and again for chasing an armed suspect without backup ''and'' without his gun.

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*** ** Gus Corbin, a rookie Reed is saddled with in the episode of the same name, has some of these tendencies. He gets chewed out twice for taking reckless chances and "playing with the Academy's money" - once for going into a building without waiting for backup, and again for chasing an armed suspect without backup ''and'' without his gun.
14th Sep '17 8:46:41 PM Spotts1701
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** Gus Corbin, a rookie Reed is saddled with in the episode of the same name, has some of these tendencies. He gets chewed out twice for taking reckless chances and "playing with the Academy's money" - once for going into a building without waiting for backup, and again for chasing an armed suspect without backup ''and'' without his gun.

to:

** *** Gus Corbin, a rookie Reed is saddled with in the episode of the same name, has some of these tendencies. He gets chewed out twice for taking reckless chances and "playing with the Academy's money" - once for going into a building without waiting for backup, and again for chasing an armed suspect without backup ''and'' without his gun.
14th Sep '17 5:45:47 AM Tarlonniel
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* CowboyCop: A big no in Jack Webb land. In the episode "A Dead Cop Can't Help Anyone", recurring officer Ed Wells is characterized as a cop of the cowboy variety. He learns his lesson... Via shotgun. He lives and is reeled in a bit, but he's still an almighty JerkAss.

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* CowboyCop: CowboyCop:
**
A big no no-no in Jack Webb land. In the episode "A Dead Cop Can't Help Anyone", recurring officer Ed Wells is characterized as a cop of the cowboy variety. He learns his lesson... Via via shotgun. He lives and is reeled in a bit, but he's still an almighty JerkAss.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.AdamTwelve