History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / WesternAnimation

9th Apr '17 3:56:48 PM Glowsquid
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* ''WesternAnimation/DonkeyKongCountry'' was groundbreaking in one respect - not for being among the first wave of 3D-animated show, but rather, it was the first full-length, regular CG TV series to be animated entirely using MotionCapture[[note]]''The Moxy Show'' was the first TV serioes to feature motion capture-based animation, but only during short interstial segments, and in a comparatively jerky and limited manner.[[/note]]. While now widely used in blockbuster films and video games, ''Donkey Kong Country'''s use of motion capture was unprecedented enough at the time that an Emmy nomination for the show was rejected on the ground motion capture could not be considered animation. Nodaway though, the show looks hardly impressive, and modern audiences are more likely to laugh at the animation's frequent glitches, stilted movement and goofy facial expressions.
4th Apr '17 5:46:52 PM nombretomado
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** The trend of including a very well-known PopStarComposer in charge of the music and/or lyrics of an big-budget animated musical (''WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine'' and the like aside) took off with the success (and Oscar win) of ''Disney/TheLionKing'' employing Music/EltonJohn and Creator/TimRice. Following that would be similar contributions, such as [[Music/ThePolice Sting]] writing for ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', Music/PhilCollins writing for ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear'', Music/RandyNewman contributing music for the ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' franchise and other {{Pixar}} works, Music/BarryManilow working on ''WesternAnimation/ThePebbleAndThePenguin'', etc.

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** The trend of including a very well-known PopStarComposer in charge of the music and/or lyrics of an big-budget animated musical (''WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine'' and the like aside) took off with the success (and Oscar win) of ''Disney/TheLionKing'' employing Music/EltonJohn and Creator/TimRice. Following that would be similar contributions, such as [[Music/ThePolice Sting]] writing for ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', Music/PhilCollins writing for ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear'', Music/RandyNewman contributing music for the ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' franchise and other {{Pixar}} Creator/{{Pixar}} works, Music/BarryManilow working on ''WesternAnimation/ThePebbleAndThePenguin'', etc.



** Compare to [[PixarShorts Tin Toy]] to ''really'' see the evolution.

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** Compare to [[PixarShorts [[WesternAnimation/PixarShorts Tin Toy]] to ''really'' see the evolution.
28th Mar '17 4:05:10 PM Golondrina
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21st Mar '17 7:08:23 PM Golondrina
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' is the [[TropeMaker quintessential]] self-aware high school program that broke from all established conventions and deeply satirized American culture and the teenage world view, as a time "teen shows" were generally limited to [[HighSchoolRocks light and comedic]] fare like ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' and ''Series/WelcomeFreshmen''. The tropes and archetypes have shown up in just about everything aimed at or about teenagers since and both the light and comedic, and the dark and [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] tropes have been deconstructed, exaggerated, played straight and pretty much run into the ground since the initial run of the show in the late 1990s. It's hard, if not impossible, for people to appreciate just how much this show impacted an entire generation.



* The relative tameness of old cartoons is lovingly parodied on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' with "That Happy Cat", an early Max Fleischer-style "Itchy and Scratchy" cartoon, in which all Scratchy does is walk along a street. Even the 1920s and 1930s, Mickey could be subject to this after the rise of ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry''.
** It was also parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', in an OriginsEpisode, where the three protagonists' history was established. Supposedly, they were first inserted in a cartoon with a character named "Buddy" to liven it up, after the producer claimed Buddy was "a cure for insomnia" ([[AluminumChristmasTrees Buddy was, in fact, a real Warner Bros. character who was phased out because his cartoons were boring]]).



* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has their own breed that is almost like an inversion -- with a few exceptions like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'', plenty of Dreamworks's early CG-I movies were seen as budget Pixar movies to downright knock-offs of Pixar movies. However, they have since [[GrowingTheBeard grown the beard]], and in the new tens, are considered to be one of the better animation studios, producing movies that rival Pixar's.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow''. Unprecedented and freakish when it debuted, it practically invented the "gross cartoon" paradigm. The gratuitous amounts of snot, ToiletHumor and FamilyUnfriendlyViolence were something completely new and unknown to the audience. Nowadays, Ren and Stimpy wouldn't shock or disgust many people ([[{{Squick}} unless we're talking about the "Adult Party" version]]), with many cartoons that use similar tropes. However, the DVD boxes still sport parental guidance labels on them, and Common Sense Media rates it as unsuitable for viewers [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids '''below 15''']]. Honestly, how many kids' cartoons these days show characters pulling out [[{{Squick}} their nerve endings with a pair of tweezers?]]

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow''. Unprecedented and freakish when it debuted, it practically invented the "gross cartoon" paradigm. The gratuitous amounts relative tameness of snot, ToiletHumor and FamilyUnfriendlyViolence were something completely new and unknown to the audience. Nowadays, Ren and Stimpy wouldn't shock or disgust many people ([[{{Squick}} unless we're talking about the "Adult Party" version]]), with many old cartoons that use similar tropes. However, is lovingly parodied on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' with "That Happy Cat", an early Max Fleischer-style "Itchy and Scratchy" cartoon, in which all Scratchy does is walk along a street. Even the DVD boxes still sport parental guidance labels on them, 1920s and Common Sense Media rates 1930s, Mickey could be subject to this after the rise of ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry''.
** It was also parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', in an OriginsEpisode, where the three protagonists' history was established. Supposedly, they were first inserted in a cartoon with a character named "Buddy" to liven
it as unsuitable up, after the producer claimed Buddy was "a cure for viewers [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids '''below 15''']]. Honestly, how many kids' insomnia" ([[AluminumChristmasTrees Buddy was, in fact, a real Warner Bros. character who was phased out because his cartoons these days show characters pulling out [[{{Squick}} their nerve endings with a pair of tweezers?]]were boring]]).



* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has their own breed that is almost like an inversion -- with a few exceptions like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'', plenty of Dreamworks's early CG-I movies were seen as budget Pixar movies to downright knock-offs of Pixar movies. However, they have since [[GrowingTheBeard grown the beard]], and in the new tens, are considered to be one of the better animation studios, producing movies that rival Pixar's.
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
** Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.

to:

* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has their own breed ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyTales'' had a considerable impact on the SliceOfLife genre. These days, however, the series appears to be cliched and rather dated, even more so ever since ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' premiered.
* Creator/RalphBakshi: His 1970s animated feature films, like ''WesternAnimation/FritzTheCat'', ''WesternAnimation/HeavyTraffic'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Coonskin}}'', were groundbreaking for introducing adult topics in a medium
that is had been almost exclusively child friendly up to then. Nowadays, in an era where adult animation with references to drugs, sex, politics and bloody violence have more or less become part of the mainstream Bakshi's work doesn't look that special anymore. Apart from the explicit nudity and pornography there's nothing that you won't see in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' these days. To a modern audience something like an inversion -- "Fritz the Cat" now comes across as a RandomEventsPlot with a few exceptions like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'', plenty of Dreamworks's early CG-I movies were seen boobies here and there to make schoolboys snicker. It's also very dated, even for something from TheSeventies. Bakshi himself has whined that if he did ''Fritz the Cat'' today the censors wouldn't harass him as budget Pixar movies to downright knock-offs of Pixar movies. However, much as they have since [[GrowingTheBeard grown the beard]], and in the new tens, are considered did.
** His version of ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' also seems inferior nowadays compared
to be one of the better animation studios, producing movies that rival Pixar's.
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
** Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'',
Peter Jackson's fully worked-out film trilogy, which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that at least tells the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.story of all three books.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow''. Unprecedented and freakish when it debuted, it practically invented the "gross cartoon" paradigm. The gratuitous amounts of snot, ToiletHumor and FamilyUnfriendlyViolence were something completely new and unknown to the audience. Nowadays, Ren and Stimpy wouldn't shock or disgust many people ([[{{Squick}} unless we're talking about the "Adult Party" version]]), with many cartoons that use similar tropes. However, the DVD boxes still sport parental guidance labels on them, and Common Sense Media rates it as unsuitable for viewers [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids '''below 15''']]. Honestly, how many kids' cartoons these days show characters pulling out [[{{Squick}} their nerve endings with a pair of tweezers?]]
* ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' is an interesting example in that it's become this trope due to an entirely different medium. When it debuted back in 2005, its unique style of rapid-fire, witty humor and clever parodies of beloved pop culture icons simply couldn't be found in any other stop-motion animated show. The closest it resembled are the cutaway gags in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', which is an animated cartoon. To an extent, that's still true; to this day, nothing like it exists ''[[ExactWords on television]]''. However, it's spawned countless [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] on the Web, a good number of which manage to stand out even in comparison to the show they imitate (see ''[[WebAnimation/ASDFMovie asdfmovie]]'', ''WebAnimation/TheLazerCollection'', and ''WebAnimation/SonicShorts'' for a few examples), so for someone who started on one of those series and was then introduced to ''Robot Chicken'' later, it likely wouldn't come off as anything special.
* Even ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' may have suffered from this. Back when it first premiered, the GettingCrapPastTheRadar moments were ''extremely'' impressive, and shocked many people. Lots of kids' cartoons nowadays, however, do the same thing, and so ''Rocko'' may not seem that impressive to some people who are used to watching ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' or ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', the latter of which got "pissed" past the radar.
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'' debuted in 1969 on CBS and became Saturday morning's number 2 show (''The Archie Comedy Hour'' was the top show). Upon its success, Saturday morning became littered with crime-fighting/mystery-solving teens with wise-cracking animal sidekicks, many (if not all) by Scooby's studio, Creator/HannaBarbera. (Curiously, one such show, ''The Hardy Boys'', which aired on ABC opposite Scooby-Doo, was by Filmation.)
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
** Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.



** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary. Nowadays, many popular cartoons have strong continuity; its sister series, ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', so much so that ''The Simpsons'' is often labeled with StatusQuoIsGod, even right here on TV Tropes, as its own continuity is mild by comparison.

to:

** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary. Nowadays, many popular cartoons have strong continuity; its sister series, ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', so much so that ''The Simpsons'' is often labeled with StatusQuoIsGod, even right here on TV Tropes, , as its own continuity is mild by comparison.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' can apply this trope to itself. The DenserAndWackier early seasons seem shallow and unsatisfying compared to the [[ArtEvolution slicker]], more robust, [[CerebusSyndrome dramatic]] and sophisticated episodes that followed, but back when it debuted its unique brand of surrealism, [[ComedicSociopathy sociopathic]] satire and "less is more" animation were quite captivating to witness.
** Also, many of the jokes and issues that seemed downright shocking in the first couple of seasons now seem pretty tame and commonplace. A perfect example of this is the season one episode "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride." Today, the episode's premise (Stan's dog being gay and Stan needing to accept it) seems like pretty standard TV-14+ cartoon fare. However, in 1997, this was about as edgy and socially conscious as cartoon plots got.
** And back then, practically every episode was considered "the most obscene thing on television", earning the series the wrath of many a MoralGuardian. Nowadays, the show is mostly left alone by MoralGuardians (in an ironic twist, even some conservative Christian leaders admit to being fans!) and only makes the headlines over a depiction of something offensive to a specific minority (ex. "Trapped in the Closet" and "200/201").
** A good example of the show invoking this onto itself is with the character of Eric Cartman. In the first four seasons, he was easily the most manipulative and foul-mouthed of the main characters but still a relatively harmless BrattyHalfPint. Even having moments of genuine concern and/or empathy from time to time (such as in "Cartman's Mom Is A Dirty Slut"). Compared to the conniving sociopath he would become in Season 5 ("Scott Tenorman Must Die" being the big turning point for his character), the Cartman of the first few seasons seems almost ''adorable'' now.
** An in-universe example occurs in "The Tale of Scrotie [=McBoogerballs=]". The boys are assigned to read ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', and are excited because of the controversy it caused... but become disappointed with it and write the eponymous book as what they think is controversial in response.



* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyTales'' had a considerable impact on the SliceOfLife genre. These days, however, the series appears to be cliched and rather dated, even more so ever since ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' premiered.
* Even ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' may have suffered from this. Back when it first premiered, the GettingCrapPastTheRadar moments were ''extremely'' impressive, and shocked many people. Lots of kids' cartoons nowadays, however, do the same thing, and so ''Rocko'' may not seem that impressive to some people who are used to watching ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' or ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', the latter of which got "pissed" past the radar.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' is the [[TropeMaker quintessential]] self-aware high school program that broke from all established conventions and deeply satirized American culture and the teenage world view, as a time "teen shows" were generally limited to [[HighSchoolRocks light and comedic]] fare like ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' and ''Series/WelcomeFreshmen''. The tropes and archetypes have shown up in just about everything aimed at or about teenagers since and both the light and comedic, and the dark and [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] tropes have been deconstructed, exaggerated, played straight and pretty much run into the ground since the initial run of the show in the late 1990s. It's hard, if not impossible, for people to appreciate just how much this show impacted an entire generation.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' can apply this trope to itself. The DenserAndWackier early seasons seem shallow and unsatisfying compared to the [[ArtEvolution slicker]], more robust, [[CerebusSyndrome dramatic]] and sophisticated episodes that followed, but back when it debuted its unique brand of surrealism, [[ComedicSociopathy sociopathic]] satire and "less is more" animation were quite captivating to witness.
** Also, many of the jokes and issues that seemed downright shocking in the first couple of seasons now seem pretty tame and commonplace. A perfect example of this is the season one episode "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride." Today, the episode's premise (Stan's dog being gay and Stan needing to accept it) seems like pretty standard TV-14+ cartoon fare. However, in 1997, this was about as edgy and socially conscious as cartoon plots got.
** And back then, practically every episode was considered "the most obscene thing on television", earning the series the wrath of many a MoralGuardian. Nowadays, the show is mostly left alone by MoralGuardians (in an ironic twist, even some conservative Christian leaders admit to being fans!) and only makes the headlines over a depiction of something offensive to a specific minority (ex. "Trapped in the Closet" and "200/201").
** A good example of the show invoking this onto itself is with the character of Eric Cartman. In the first four seasons, he was easily the most manipulative and foul-mouthed of the main characters but still a relatively harmless BrattyHalfPint. Even having moments of genuine concern and/or empathy from time to time (such as in "Cartman's Mom Is A Dirty Slut"). Compared to the conniving sociopath he would become in Season 5 ("Scott Tenorman Must Die" being the big turning point for his character), the Cartman of the first few seasons seems almost ''adorable'' now.
** An in-universe example occurs in "The Tale of Scrotie [=McBoogerballs=]". The boys are assigned to read ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', and are excited because of the controversy it caused... but become disappointed with it and write the eponymous book as what they think is controversial in response.
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'' debuted in 1969 on CBS and became Saturday morning's number 2 show (''The Archie Comedy Hour'' was the top show). Upon its success, Saturday morning became littered with crime-fighting/mystery-solving teens with wise-cracking animal sidekicks, many (if not all) by Scooby's studio, Creator/HannaBarbera. (Curiously, one such show, ''The Hardy Boys'', which aired on ABC opposite Scooby-Doo, was by Filmation.)
* Creator/RalphBakshi: His 1970s animated feature films, like ''WesternAnimation/FritzTheCat'', ''WesternAnimation/HeavyTraffic'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Coonskin}}'', were groundbreaking for introducing adult topics in a medium that had been almost exclusively child friendly up to then. Nowadays, in an era where adult animation with references to drugs, sex, politics and bloody violence have more or less become part of the mainstream Bakshi's work doesn't look that special anymore. Apart from the explicit nudity and pornography there's nothing that you won't see in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' these days. To a modern audience something like "Fritz the Cat" now comes across as a RandomEventsPlot with a few boobies here and there to make schoolboys snicker. It's also very dated, even for something from TheSeventies. Bakshi himself has whined that if he did ''Fritz the Cat'' today the censors wouldn't harass him as much as they did.
** His version of ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' also seems inferior nowadays compared to Peter Jackson's fully worked-out film trilogy, which at least tells the story of all three books.
* ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' is an interesting example in that it's become this trope due to an entirely different medium. When it debuted back in 2005, its unique style of rapid-fire, witty humor and clever parodies of beloved pop culture icons simply couldn't be found in any other stop-motion animated show. The closest it resembled are the cutaway gags in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', which is an animated cartoon. To an extent, that's still true; to this day, nothing like it exists ''[[ExactWords on television]]''. However, it's spawned countless [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] on the Web, a good number of which manage to stand out even in comparison to the show they imitate (see ''[[WebAnimation/ASDFMovie asdfmovie]]'', ''WebAnimation/TheLazerCollection'', and ''WebAnimation/SonicShorts'' for a few examples), so for someone who started on one of those series and was then introduced to ''Robot Chicken'' later, it likely wouldn't come off as anything special.
28th Feb '17 10:49:11 AM Larkmarn
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** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary.

to:

** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary. Nowadays, many popular cartoons have strong continuity; its sister series, ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', so much so that ''The Simpsons'' is often labeled with StatusQuoIsGod, even right here on TV Tropes, as its own continuity is mild by comparison.
28th Feb '17 10:45:54 AM system
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28th Feb '17 10:05:05 AM ObeisantCattle
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* Even ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' may have suffered from this. Back when it first premiered, the GettingCrapPastTheRadar moments were ''extremely'' impressive, and shocked many people. Lots of kids' cartoons nowadays, however, do the same thing, and so ''Rocko'' may not seem that impressive to some people who are used to watching ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' or ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', the latter of which got "pissed" past the radar.
28th Feb '17 2:53:01 AM ObeisantCattle
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** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary. Nowadays, many popular cartoons have strong continuity; its sister series, ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', so much so that ''The Simpsons'' is often labeled with StatusQuoIsGod, even right here on TV Tropes, as its own continuity is mild by comparison.

to:

** ''The Simpsons'' also paved the way for continuity in an animated series. The episode "A Milhouse Divided" was subversive in that not only did Milhouse's parents, who got divorced mid-episode, ''not'' get back together by the end of the episode, later episodes depicted them living apart. Before then, all animated series, and most live-action sitcoms, had no continuity and relied on the SnapBack if an episode didn't end the way it started. This was even brought up in the DVD commentary. Nowadays, many popular cartoons have strong continuity; its sister series, ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', so much so that ''The Simpsons'' is often labeled with StatusQuoIsGod, even right here on TV Tropes, as its own continuity is mild by comparison.
31st Jan '17 7:48:07 PM RacattackForce
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* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was one of the first mainstream Western kids' comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with world-building and story arcs, predating other such shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. A new viewer going back to watch this early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why it's such a big deal that some silly cigar from a season one episode came back as a major plot element in season two, or why the fifth season in general was so interesting.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was one of the first mainstream Western kids' comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with world-building and story arcs, predating other such shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. A new viewer going back to watch this early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why it's such a big deal that some silly cigar from a season one episode came back as a major plot element in season two, or why the fifth final season in general was so interesting.
31st Jan '17 7:33:31 PM RacattackForce
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* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was one of the first mainstream Western kids' comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with world-building and story arcs, predating other such shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls. A new viewer going back to watch this early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why it's such a big deal that some silly cigar from a season one episode came back as a major plot element in season two, or why the fifth season in general was so interesting.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was one of the first mainstream Western kids' comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with world-building and story arcs, predating other such shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls.''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. A new viewer going back to watch this early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why it's such a big deal that some silly cigar from a season one episode came back as a major plot element in season two, or why the fifth season in general was so interesting.
This list shows the last 10 events of 209. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.WesternAnimation