History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / WesternAnimation

8th Apr '18 7:20:21 AM Ccook1956
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/MightyMouseTheNewAdventures'' suffers from this badly nowadays. It was a revolutionary show and concept for its day, and essentially served as a training ground for future animation pros today, and for bringing back cartoon animation in the vein of classic cartoons to the mainstream in TV. However, today, due to the success of all the shows created in it's wake, especially ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'''' most modern viewers might not find it revolutionary, not helped that the show had many production woes and animation and art mistakes (as attested by former staff, [[http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2008/09/wonky-2.html including]] Creator/JohnKricfalusi).

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/MightyMouseTheNewAdventures'' suffers from this badly nowadays. It was a revolutionary show and concept for its day, and essentially served as a training ground for future animation pros today, and for bringing back cartoon animation in the vein of classic cartoons to the mainstream in TV. However, today, due to the success of all the shows created in it's its wake, especially ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'''' most modern viewers might not find it revolutionary, not helped that the show had many production woes and animation and art mistakes (as attested by former staff, [[http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2008/09/wonky-2.html including]] Creator/JohnKricfalusi).
19th Jan '18 11:07:33 PM RacattackForce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** On top of that, the main reason it got such a diehard fanbase was ''because'' of all the shock and panic it caused (a lot of it undeserved). Now, years removed from the hype, explaining to today's kids what's so great about it is flat-out ''impossible''. Why Creator/MikeJudge made any attempt to relaunch it is a mystery.
*** MTV's president [[http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/exclusive-new-beavis-and-butthead-will-tackle-jersey-shore-and-more-20110216 said]] that today's culture is so weird that we need the duo's POV (they even riff ''Series/JerseyShore'' in the revival!).

to:

** On top of that, the main reason it got such a diehard fanbase was ''because'' of all the shock and panic it caused (a lot of it undeserved). Now, years removed from the hype, explaining to today's kids what's so great about it is flat-out ''impossible''. Why Creator/MikeJudge made any attempt to relaunch it is a mystery.
*** MTV's president [[http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/exclusive-new-beavis-and-butthead-will-tackle-jersey-shore-and-more-20110216 said]]
With that today's culture is so weird in mind, it isn't too much of a surprise that we need the duo's POV (they even riff ''Series/JerseyShore'' in the revival!).2011 revival only lasted one season.



* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown'' were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown'' were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer viewers going back to watch these early 2000s show cartoons would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.time. These days, such cartoons have become more common. Back then, they were the only ones doing it.
6th Sep '17 6:51:41 PM Manny20444
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was a huge leap forward in its depiction of action and drama in a superhero cartoon. A modern audience, however, may not be as impressed with it, given how much further superhero shows have come in terms of darkness and drama since then. A few of them ("I've Got Batman in My Basement" comes to mind) actually have more in common with the corny kiddie shows they were trying to replace than with the newer shows they inspired, and are now an OldShame to the animators.
** Creator/KevinConroy is generally said to be the one true Batman. This is usually the viewpoint of longtime Batfans. If Website/YouTube and forum comments are anything to go by, many newer Batfans, particularly ''[[Film/TheDarkKnight Dark Knight]]'' fanboys consider Conroy to be dull, robotic and a genuinely terrible actor and have no idea why people love him, other than [[NostalgiaFilter nostalgia]]. Though most of Conroy's recent Batman roles have been a little on the robotic side, it's mainly due to the fact that he hasn't had any Batman roles that require genuine emotion in years. His more recent Batman roles often have Batman as a side character or the DecoyProtagonist. Even the [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamSeries Arkham series]] focuses on Batman's allies and enemies more than Batman's personal growth, save for ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins'' which Conroy wasn't a part of. He seems to have stepped up his game for ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight'', where he is seen interrogating a soldier and legitimately sounds angry.
31st Aug '17 5:24:03 PM MBG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''The Simpsons'' as a whole is very much a case of this trope by this point. During the shows golden age of the early to mid 90's, the show was extremely original, and not only because it was an animated program intended for adults. Its particular style of satirical, subversive humor made it stand out not only as a television cartoon, but as a ''comedy''. To younger people who have spent their adolescent years watching shows like ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', whose brand of humor is very much derived from ''The Simpsons'', it is probably quite hard to appreciate just how groundbreaking the yellow skinned family and their show were back in their heyday.

to:

** ''The Simpsons'' as a whole is very much a case of this trope by this point. During the shows show's golden age of the early to mid 90's, the show was extremely original, and not only because it was an animated program intended for adults. Its particular style of satirical, subversive humor made it stand out not only as a television cartoon, but as a ''comedy''. To younger people who have spent their adolescent years watching shows like ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', whose brand of humor is very much derived from ''The Simpsons'', it is probably quite hard to appreciate just how groundbreaking the yellow skinned family and their show were back in their heyday.


Added DiffLines:

** ''The Simpsons'' is also often acknowledged as having been a GenreKiller for the entire genre of "functional family sitcom", a genre that completely dominated the airwaves in the late 80s and early 90s, and that many early episodes directly satirized. Homer in particular was a satire of the StandardFiftiesFather, an archetype that was still going strong, and, along with [[Series/MarriedWithChildren Al Bundy,]] he basically dunked it straight in the DeadHorseTrope pile overnight. Nowadays, family sitcoms are nowhere near as overwhelming, and wholly unironic family sitcoms are borderline nonexistent; it's expected that they be at least a little dysfunctional or cynical. Homer's own archetype, the BumblingDad, has gone from a sudden and surprising attack on the role of the father and American values to ''the'' standard sitcom protagonist, and often knocked for its frequently irritating nature and occasional UnfortunateImplications.
10th Aug '17 6:13:35 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Minions from ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' were lauded as the movie's funniest characters and became the series' EnsembleDarkhorse group. This, of course, wound up leading to other companies [[FollowTheLeader wanting a piece of the pie]] and coming up with their own Minion like characters themselves. (i.e. [=McDonald's=] Happy Meal creatures, the elves in Dreamworks' ''WesternAnimation/RiseOfTheGuardians'', and the lemmings in ''WesternAnimation/NormOfTheNorth'', etc.) The verbally-impaired-friends/helpers-of-the-protagonist trope has seen so much use that anyone who went back to watch the movie that broke it into the mainstream will likely fail to see the appeal of the quirky Minions. (The fact that the Minions themselves became ludicrously popular themselves to the point of HypeBacklash and are blamed for this trend results in this example teetering on the edge of DeaderThanDisco, as well.)
* Traditional Creator/{{Disney}} movies, particularly the fairy tale-based ones. A few can appear rather corny today. Especially the ones where the characters were similar to their original fairy tale inspirations, before the writers decided to adapt some more characterization to the princesses. The studio later experimented with new techniques that look rather sketchy today. (Namely the stuff in the 1960s; xerography was a pretty new technique for Disney then. Before, they mostly rotoscoped.)
** Disney animation from the 1930s and 1940s: Think of this: many animation techniques have all been pioneered and perfected by the Walt Disney Company: synchronizing animation with sound, color animation, animated features, making characters appear as if they are actual personalities, dramatic atmosphere, overcoming technical difficulties (streaming rivers, ocean water, rain, light effects, shadows, fire,...), detailed backgrounds, having large groups of characters appear in the same scene, avoiding continuity errors, storyboarding scenes,... And all of it was done ''by hand''! Yet nowadays most people take it all for granted, failing to see how groundbreaking all these innovations were at the time and still are.

to:

* The Minions from ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' were lauded as the movie's funniest characters and became the series' EnsembleDarkhorse group. This, of course, wound up leading to other companies [[FollowTheLeader wanting a piece of the pie]] and coming up with their own Minion like characters themselves. (i.e. [=McDonald's=] Happy Meal creatures, the elves in Dreamworks' ''WesternAnimation/RiseOfTheGuardians'', and the lemmings in ''WesternAnimation/NormOfTheNorth'', etc.) The verbally-impaired-friends/helpers-of-the-protagonist trope has seen so much use that anyone who went back to watch the movie that broke it into the mainstream will likely fail to see the appeal of the quirky Minions. (The fact that the Minions themselves became ludicrously popular themselves to the point of HypeBacklash and are blamed for this trend results in this example teetering on the edge of DeaderThanDisco, as well.)
* Traditional Creator/{{Disney}} movies, particularly the fairy tale-based ones. A few can appear rather corny today. Especially the ones where the characters were similar to their original fairy tale inspirations, before the writers decided to adapt some more characterization to the princesses. The studio later experimented with new techniques that look rather sketchy today. (Namely the stuff in the 1960s; xerography was a pretty new technique for Disney then. Before, they mostly rotoscoped.)
**
Disney animation from the 1930s and 1940s: Think of this: many animation techniques have all been pioneered and perfected by the Walt Disney Company: synchronizing animation with sound, color animation, animated features, making characters appear as if they are actual personalities, dramatic atmosphere, overcoming technical difficulties (streaming rivers, ocean water, rain, light effects, shadows, fire,...), detailed backgrounds, having large groups of characters appear in the same scene, avoiding continuity errors, storyboarding scenes,... And all of it was done ''by hand''! Yet nowadays most people take it all for granted, failing to see how groundbreaking all these innovations were at the time and still are.



** {{Disney princess}}es. Disney/SnowWhite, [[Disney/SleepingBeauty Princess Aurora]], and Disney/{{Cinderella}}. People like to complain that these characters are boring and don't do much, especially as compared to their later counterparts. What many forget however is that these characters could be considered very active when compared to most depictions of women in media at the time, and had at least as much personality. They appear even more active and nuanced when compared to the characters from the original fairy tales who did and said far less. For example both Snow White and Aurora's relationships with their princes was an improvement over the original fairy tales - in that they met before they were saved. Aurora in particular was the first princess to actually properly get to know her prince - even though their time together was brief.
** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'': Back in 1937 this was the first studio animated feature that was so perfect that it surpassed all the previous attempts to make an animated feature. While still popular few people realize this cartoon pretty much placed the standard on which all animated cartoons afterwards are still judged to this day. It was such a landmark film that proved that animation was a viable medium alongside Live Action. This also means that every animated movie that followed it takes cues from it. As a result, the 70+ years of films homaging, parodying, and generally being influenced by ''Snow White'' makes the original film look like a ClicheStorm. And it's not just a great cartoon, a lot of techniques pioneered in this movie were even groundbreaking and impressive when compared to most live-action movies at the time.
** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'': Would you believe that, after decades of music videos, the concept of this was novel? While it has been able to age well due to the VisualEffectsOfAwesome, the concept sounds entirely cliche with the availability of music videos on the internet.
*** The Rite of Spring deserves special mention -- would you believe that it showing the history of earth being formed not by God, but by what is considered scientific was actually ''pushing the limits'' of what was allowed?
* CG, if for splicing it with cel-animation or using it as an AllCGICartoon has evolved a ''lot'' over the years. ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron (1985)'' was the first to use CG-I as a special effect. Watching it nowadays will be ''beyond'' ConspicuousCG and veer almost into SpecialEffectFailure, same with the somewhat out of place looking gears in ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective (1986)''. Pixar and Dreamworks's early movies also look a ''lot'' more rubbery and stiff compared to their most recent cartoons, and the humans will fall ''right'' into the UncannyValley. But at the time, they were some of the most technically impressive films on the market.
** Genie in ''Disney/{{Aladdin}} (1993)'' A-List actors did not star in speaking roles before this. They all did afterwards. The film that really set the trend of AnachronismStew and ParentalBonus was ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'', which was different to what Disney was doing at the time, and yet has influenced countless subsequent movies including ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. However, by ''WesternAnimation/QuestForCamelot'', it had worn thin and really, only Genie could get away with it.
** The trend of including a very well-known PopStarComposer in charge of the music and/or lyrics of an big-budget animated musical (''WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine'' and the like aside) took off with the success (and Oscar win) of ''Disney/TheLionKing'' employing Music/EltonJohn and Creator/TimRice. Following that would be similar contributions, such as [[Music/ThePolice Sting]] writing for ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', Music/PhilCollins writing for ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear'', Music/RandyNewman contributing music for the ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' franchise and other Creator/{{Pixar}} works, Music/BarryManilow working on ''WesternAnimation/ThePebbleAndThePenguin'', etc.
** ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' might seem like a paint-by-numbers Disney flick these days. But when it came out in 1989 it was hugely ground breaking. It was the first Disney film to merge the fairy tale plot with Broadway elements. Numerous other stock cliches of the Disney Renaissance - feisty PluckyGirl, IWantSong, AwardBaitSong, comedy animal sidekicks (great potential for tie-in merchandise), campy villain - were all innovated by this. Pretty much most animated projects made in the 90s owe their existence to this film. It's notable to see that ''The Little Mermaid'' and its successor ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' are far more Broadway-esque than later Renaissance films.
*** No surprise there, they were scored by Broadway musical duo Music/AlanMenken and Music/HowardAshman.
** ''{{Disney/Pocahontas}}'' is a strange one. When it came out, it was badly received by American audiences ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff but did very well in Europe]]). The main reason? It was an animated film that took Artistic Lisence with American history (though filmmakers insisted they were adapting the ''legend'' of Pocahontas rather than trying to be accurate). After ''Pocahontas'' we got films like ''{{WesternAnimation/Anastasia}}'', ''WesternAnimation/TitanicTheLegendGoesOn'', ''{{Disney/Mulan}}'' and ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' - which took place in named times and depicted historical events. The general public would be desensitised to that kind of thing these days. ''Anastasia'''s producers took note of the reaction to ''Pocahontas'' and marketed the film as merely a historical fairy tale not to be taken as fact. It worked and they loved it in Russia.
* Creator/{{Disney}} and Creator/DreamWorksAnimation have an... odd history. When the first ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movie came out, it was considered a witty and refreshing break from the then-formulaic Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon fare, despite the fact that, at that point, Disney was going through a different and experimental period with ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}'', ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'', ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', ''Disney/TreasurePlanet'', ''Disney/BrotherBear'', and ''Disney/HomeOnTheRange''. The freshness still hadn't eroded by the time of ''Shrek 2'', which was considered an EvenBetterSequel by many. However, by the time of ''Shrek the Third'', [=DreamWorks=] Animation - and their competitors - had ran the formula into the ground harder than Disney's "[[{{Disneyfication}} Disneyfied]] musical adaptations of mythology/classic literature with spunky heroines and goofy sidekicks" did in the 90s. To add insult to injury, most of the Disney films criticized for following ''their'' formula (''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'', ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'', ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'', ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'') have been VindicatedByHistory by 90s kids, and the experimental films often became [[CultCLassic Cult Classics]]. ''Shrek'', on the other hand, is now often blamed for killing traditional animated films and starting a trend of [[AllCGICartoon CGI films]] that overdo AnachronismStew and ParentalBonus to painful levels, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}}'', ''WesternAnimation/HappilyNEverAfter'' and Disney's disastrous ''Disney/ChickenLittle''.
* ''WesternAnimation/DonkeyKongCountry'' was groundbreaking in one respect - not for being among the first wave of 3D-animated show, but rather, it was the first full-length, regular CG TV series to be animated entirely using MotionCapture[[note]]''The Moxy Show'' was the first TV serioes to feature motion capture-based animation, but only during short interstial segments, and in a comparatively jerky and limited manner.[[/note]]. While now widely used in blockbuster films and video games, ''Donkey Kong Country'''s use of motion capture was unprecedented enough at the time that an Emmy nomination for the show was rejected on the ground motion capture could not be considered animation. Nodaway though, the show looks hardly impressive, and modern audiences are more likely to laugh at the animation's frequent glitches, stilted movement and goofy facial expressions.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'' premiered in 1991, long before most SliceOfLife animated series were created. Nowadays, everything in ''Doug'' looks rather cliche, though that's mainly due to the nature of the genre meaning that many shows of this type are stuck using the similar plots.
* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has their own breed that is almost like an inversion -- with a few exceptions like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'', plenty of Dreamworks's early CG-I movies were seen as budget Pixar movies to downright knock-offs of Pixar movies. However, they have since [[GrowingTheBeard grown the beard]], and in the new tens, are considered to be one of the better animation studios, producing movies that rival Pixar's.

to:

** {{Disney princess}}es. Disney/SnowWhite, [[Disney/SleepingBeauty Princess Aurora]], and Disney/{{Cinderella}}. People like to complain that these characters are boring and don't do much, especially as compared to their later counterparts. What many forget however is that these characters could be considered very active when compared to most depictions of women in media at the time, and had at least as much personality. They appear even more active and nuanced when compared to the characters from the original fairy tales who did and said far less. For example both Snow White and Aurora's relationships with their princes was an improvement over the original fairy tales - in that they met before they were saved. Aurora in particular was the first princess to actually properly get to know her prince - even though their time together was brief.
** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'': Back in 1937 this was the first studio animated feature that was so perfect that it surpassed all the previous attempts to make an animated feature. While still popular few people realize this cartoon pretty much placed the standard on which all animated cartoons afterwards are still judged to this day. It was such a landmark film that proved that animation was a viable medium alongside Live Action. This also means that every animated movie that followed it takes cues from it. As a result, the 70+ years of films homaging, parodying, and generally being influenced by ''Snow White'' makes the original film look like a ClicheStorm. And it's not just a great cartoon, a lot of techniques pioneered in this movie were even groundbreaking and impressive when compared to most live-action movies at the time.
** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'': Would you believe that, after decades of music videos, the concept of this was novel? While it has been able to age well due to the VisualEffectsOfAwesome, the concept sounds entirely cliche with the availability of music videos on the internet.
*** The Rite of Spring deserves special mention -- would you believe that it showing the history of earth being formed not by God, but by what is considered scientific was actually ''pushing the limits'' of what was allowed?
* CG, if for splicing it with cel-animation or using it as an AllCGICartoon has evolved a ''lot'' over the years. ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron (1985)'' was the first to use CG-I as a special effect. Watching it nowadays will be ''beyond'' ConspicuousCG and veer almost into SpecialEffectFailure, same with the somewhat out of place looking gears in ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective (1986)''. Pixar and Dreamworks's early movies also look a ''lot'' more rubbery and stiff compared to their most recent cartoons, and the humans will fall ''right'' into the UncannyValley. But at the time, they were some of the most technically impressive films on the market.
** Genie in ''Disney/{{Aladdin}} (1993)'' A-List actors did not star in speaking roles before this. They all did afterwards. The film that really set the trend of AnachronismStew and ParentalBonus was ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'', which was different to what Disney was doing at the time, and yet has influenced countless subsequent movies including ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. However, by ''WesternAnimation/QuestForCamelot'', it had worn thin and really, only Genie could get away with it.
** The trend of including a very well-known PopStarComposer in charge of the music and/or lyrics of an big-budget animated musical (''WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine'' and the like aside) took off with the success (and Oscar win) of ''Disney/TheLionKing'' employing Music/EltonJohn and Creator/TimRice. Following that would be similar contributions, such as [[Music/ThePolice Sting]] writing for ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', Music/PhilCollins writing for ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear'', Music/RandyNewman contributing music for the ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' franchise and other Creator/{{Pixar}} works, Music/BarryManilow working on ''WesternAnimation/ThePebbleAndThePenguin'', etc.
** ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' might seem like a paint-by-numbers Disney flick these days. But when it came out in 1989 it was hugely ground breaking. It was the first Disney film to merge the fairy tale plot with Broadway elements. Numerous other stock cliches of the Disney Renaissance - feisty PluckyGirl, IWantSong, AwardBaitSong, comedy animal sidekicks (great potential for tie-in merchandise), campy villain - were all innovated by this. Pretty much most animated projects made in the 90s owe their existence to this film. It's notable to see that ''The Little Mermaid'' and its successor ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' are far more Broadway-esque than later Renaissance films.
*** No surprise there, they were scored by Broadway musical duo Music/AlanMenken and Music/HowardAshman.
** ''{{Disney/Pocahontas}}'' is a strange one. When it came out, it was badly received by American audiences ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff but did very well in Europe]]). The main reason? It was an animated film that took Artistic Lisence with American history (though filmmakers insisted they were adapting the ''legend'' of Pocahontas rather than trying to be accurate). After ''Pocahontas'' we got films like ''{{WesternAnimation/Anastasia}}'', ''WesternAnimation/TitanicTheLegendGoesOn'', ''{{Disney/Mulan}}'' and ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' - which took place in named times and depicted historical events. The general public would be desensitised to that kind of thing these days. ''Anastasia'''s producers took note of the reaction to ''Pocahontas'' and marketed the film as merely a historical fairy tale not to be taken as fact. It worked and they loved it in Russia.
* Creator/{{Disney}} and Creator/DreamWorksAnimation have an... odd history. When the first ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movie came out, it was considered a witty and refreshing break from the then-formulaic Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon fare, despite the fact that, at that point, Disney was going through a different and experimental period with ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}'', ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'', ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'', ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', ''Disney/TreasurePlanet'', ''Disney/BrotherBear'', and ''Disney/HomeOnTheRange''. The freshness still hadn't eroded by the time of ''Shrek 2'', which was considered an EvenBetterSequel by many. However, by the time of ''Shrek the Third'', [=DreamWorks=] Animation - and their competitors - had ran the formula into the ground harder than Disney's "[[{{Disneyfication}} Disneyfied]] musical adaptations of mythology/classic literature with spunky heroines and goofy sidekicks" did in the 90s. To add insult to injury, most of the Disney films criticized for following ''their'' formula (''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'', ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'', ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'', ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}'') have been VindicatedByHistory by 90s kids, and the experimental films often became [[CultCLassic Cult Classics]]. ''Shrek'', on the other hand, is now often blamed for killing traditional animated films and starting a trend of [[AllCGICartoon CGI films]] that overdo AnachronismStew and ParentalBonus to painful levels, such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}}'', ''WesternAnimation/HappilyNEverAfter'' and Disney's disastrous ''Disney/ChickenLittle''.
* ''WesternAnimation/DonkeyKongCountry'' was groundbreaking in one respect - -- not for being among the first wave of 3D-animated show, but rather, it was the first full-length, regular CG TV series to be animated entirely using MotionCapture[[note]]''The Moxy Show'' was the first TV serioes to feature motion capture-based animation, but only during short interstial segments, and in a comparatively jerky and limited manner.[[/note]]. While now widely used in blockbuster films and video games, ''Donkey Kong Country'''s use of motion capture was unprecedented enough at the time that an Emmy nomination for the show was rejected on the ground motion capture could not be considered animation. Nodaway though, the show looks hardly impressive, and modern audiences are more likely to laugh at the animation's frequent glitches, stilted movement and goofy facial expressions.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'' premiered in 1991, long before most SliceOfLife animated series were created. Nowadays, everything in ''Doug'' looks rather cliche, though that's mainly due to the nature of the genre meaning that many shows of this type are stuck using the similar plots.
* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has their own breed that is almost like an inversion -- with a few exceptions like ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'', plenty of Dreamworks's early CG-I movies were seen as budget Pixar movies to downright knock-offs of Pixar movies. However, they have since [[GrowingTheBeard grown the beard]], and in the new tens, are considered to be one of the better animation studios, producing movies that rival Pixar's.
plots.



* The relative tameness of old cartoons is lovingly parodied on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' with "That Happy Cat", an early Max Fleischer-style "Itchy and Scratchy" cartoon, in which all Scratchy does is walk along a street. Even the 1920s and 1930s, Mickey could be subject to this after the rise of ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry''.
** It was also parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', in an OriginsEpisode, where the three protagonists' history was established. Supposedly, they were first inserted in a cartoon with a character named "Buddy" to liven it up, after the producer claimed Buddy was "a cure for insomnia" ([[AluminumChristmasTrees Buddy was, in fact, a real Warner Bros. character who was phased out because his cartoons were boring]]).

to:

* The relative tameness of old cartoons is lovingly parodied on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' with "That Happy Cat", an early Max Fleischer-style "Itchy and Scratchy" cartoon, in which all Scratchy does is walk along a street. Even the 1920s and 1930s, Mickey could be subject to this after the rise of ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry''.
**
''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry''. It was also parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', in an OriginsEpisode, where the three protagonists' history was established. Supposedly, they were first inserted in a cartoon with a character named "Buddy" to liven it up, after the producer claimed Buddy was "a cure for insomnia" ([[AluminumChristmasTrees Buddy was, in fact, a real Warner Bros. character who was phased out because his cartoons were boring]]).



* Creator/RalphBakshi: His 1970s animated feature films, like ''WesternAnimation/FritzTheCat'', ''WesternAnimation/HeavyTraffic'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Coonskin}}'', were groundbreaking for introducing adult topics in a medium that had been almost exclusively child friendly up to then. Nowadays, in an era where adult animation with references to drugs, sex, politics and bloody violence have more or less become part of the mainstream Bakshi's work doesn't look that special anymore. Apart from the explicit nudity and pornography there's nothing that you won't see in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' these days. To a modern audience something like "Fritz the Cat" now comes across as a RandomEventsPlot with a few boobies here and there to make schoolboys snicker. It's also very dated, even for something from TheSeventies. Bakshi himself has whined that if he did ''Fritz the Cat'' today the censors wouldn't harass him as much as they did.
** His version of ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' also seems inferior nowadays compared to Peter Jackson's fully worked-out film trilogy, which at least tells the story of all three books.
* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' was the very first fully CGI television show that came out in the [[TheNineties early nineties]] and was a pretty big success at the time. In this day and age, shows with CGI are completely common, and most people would consider ''[=ReBoot=]'' pretty tame in terms of computer accomplishments, although it had a great story, wonderful characters, and is still hailed today as one of the best, if not the best, CGI show of all time, with its biggest competitor for the title being another Mainframe series: ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''.
** One thing that didn't help was that a year after it premiered ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' came out, with a movie-level budget and production time frame. Thus many people were dismissing ''[=ReBoot=]'' as a cheap, inferior product as part of ToughActToFollow. It is admittedly a little clunky to watch because of some stilted animation but there is no denying the amazing story and visuals of episodes like "Talent Night" and "Painted Windows."

to:

* Creator/RalphBakshi: His 1970s animated feature films, like ''WesternAnimation/FritzTheCat'', ''WesternAnimation/HeavyTraffic'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Coonskin}}'', were groundbreaking for introducing adult topics in a medium that had been almost exclusively child friendly up to then. Nowadays, in an era where adult animation with references to drugs, sex, politics and bloody violence have more or less become part of the mainstream Bakshi's work doesn't look that special anymore. Apart from the explicit nudity and pornography there's nothing that you won't see in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' or ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' these days. To a modern audience something like "Fritz the Cat" now comes across as a RandomEventsPlot with a few boobies here and there to make schoolboys snicker. It's also very dated, even for something from TheSeventies. Bakshi himself has whined that if he did ''Fritz the Cat'' today the censors wouldn't harass him as much as they did.
** His version of ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' also seems inferior nowadays compared to Peter Jackson's fully worked-out film trilogy, which at least tells the story of all three books.
* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' was the very first fully CGI television show that came out in the [[TheNineties early nineties]] and was a pretty big success at the time. In this day and age, shows with CGI are completely common, and most people would consider ''[=ReBoot=]'' pretty tame in terms of computer accomplishments, although it had a great story, wonderful characters, and is still hailed today as one of the best, if not the best, CGI show of all time, with its biggest competitor for the title being another Mainframe series: ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''.
**
''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''. One thing that didn't help was that a year after it premiered ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' came out, with a movie-level budget and production time frame. Thus many people were dismissing ''[=ReBoot=]'' as a cheap, inferior product as part of ToughActToFollow. It is admittedly a little clunky to watch because of some stilted animation but there is no denying the amazing story and visuals of episodes like "Talent Night" and "Painted Windows."



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
* Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.



* While ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'''s graphics that were state of the art back in 1995, they pale in comparison to what's being done today. The humans look [[UncannyValley almost as plastic as the toys]] (which is why they told a story where the main characters ''were'' toys), there's an airless quality to the outside scenes, and the animation is not as fluid and nuanced as what we see today. Not that the movie has now become unwatchable, far from it, but compare it to ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'' just four years later and the improvement is remarkable. And then compare ''that'' to ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory3'' 11 years after, and you appreciate how much CGI has evolved in such a short time. Also, consider the fact that before ''Toy Story'', the number of fully computer-generated feature films was exactly zero, and it would be two more years before there was another such film. [[TechnologyMarchesOn With CGI so ubiquitous today]], it's hard to imagine how mindblowing an experience it was to see Woody and Buzz for the first time.
** Compare to [[WesternAnimation/PixarShorts Tin Toy]] to ''really'' see the evolution.
** When you watch the behind-the-scenes features about ''Toy Story'', it's clear that John Lasseter and the late Joe Ranft were aware of this issue. They made sure they put as much effort into the story and the characters as they did into the technology. Which is why people will probably still be watching ''Toy Story'' in fifty years, long after its technology has become outdated.



11th Jul '17 9:32:49 AM rjd1922
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
** Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.

to:

** * ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. Back in 2001, this iconoclastic take on FairyTales and use of pop-culture references felt like a welcome reprieve from the usual clean fare. Now, with several films, including a few from Shrek's own studio Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, [[FollowTheLeader following the same formula]], the sheen has worn off the franchise.
** * Most consider this trope to have reached UpToEleven with the [[TrailersAlwaysLie misleading ad campaign]] for Disney's ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', which tried to portray a more traditional fairy tale as a hip spoof of fairy tales -- meaning, in essence, that the TropeMaker for such traditional movies is now scared to admit they're still making them.
22nd Jun '17 4:55:09 AM tropower
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGalaxyRangers'' was a very off beat show when it first appeared in 1985 with its blend of space opera, western and samurai motifs and an atmosphere that felt closer to a show from the early '90s rather than the mid '80s, what with all the NightmareFuel. Today it probably wouldn't look nearly as unique to a more cynical and less sensitive audience.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGalaxyRangers'' was a very off beat show when it first appeared in 1985 1986 with its blend of space opera, western and samurai motifs and an atmosphere that felt closer to a show from the early '90s rather than the mid '80s, what with all the NightmareFuel. Today it probably wouldn't look nearly as unique to a more cynical and less sensitive audience.
18th Jun '17 11:33:42 AM ObeisantCattle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown''were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown''were ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown'' were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.
18th Jun '17 11:31:47 AM ObeisantCattle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/Xiaolin Showdown''were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' and ''WesternAnimation/Xiaolin Showdown''were ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown''were one of the first mainstream Western animated comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.
18th Jun '17 11:30:16 AM ObeisantCattle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was one of the first mainstream Western animated series to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch this early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why the show's approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' was and ''WesternAnimation/Xiaolin Showdown''were one of the first mainstream Western animated series comedies to undergo CerebusSyndrome and heavily experiment with a mix of serialized storytelling alongside more episodic fare, predating similar shows like ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' by several years. Any new viewer going back to watch this these early 2000s show would have trouble understanding why the show's these shows approach to worldbuilding, season-long story arcs, and regular use of ChekhovsGun was so special at the time.
This list shows the last 10 events of 226. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.WesternAnimation