History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Theatre

3rd May '16 12:12:21 PM Jhonny
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** This was a far bigger deal in Continental Europe, especially in France. In England, during the Elizabethan Age, Aristotle and classical Greek texts were not as dominating an influence as Roman drama by Seneca and Latin texts. So Creator/WilliamShakespeare happily violated the unities, likely because he didn't even know about it to start with. The most learned and informed dramatist, Ben Jonson, gently ribbed his friend in the First Folio for his "little Latin and Greek" and his comedies and dramas were the most formal and classically structured.

to:

** This was a far bigger deal in Continental Europe, especially in France. In England, during the Elizabethan Age, Aristotle and classical Greek texts were not as dominating an influence as Roman drama by Seneca and Latin texts. So Creator/WilliamShakespeare happily violated the unities, likely because he didn't even know about it to start with. The most learned and informed dramatist, Ben Jonson, gently ribbed his friend in the First Folio for his "little Latin and less Greek" and his comedies and dramas were the most formal and classically structured.
3rd May '16 12:09:19 PM Jhonny
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* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Theatre/{{Faust}} the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together.[[note]]If you hear a famous turn of phrase in German and have to guess where it's from you have a better than even chance it ultimately comes from Luther's translation of the bible or Goethe's Faust[[/note]] However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.

to:

* Goethe [[Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe Goethe]] and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Theatre/{{Faust}} the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together.[[note]]If you hear a famous turn of phrase in German and have to guess where it's from you have a better than even chance it ultimately comes from Luther's translation of the bible or Goethe's Faust[[/note]] However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.
3rd May '16 12:08:25 PM Jhonny
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* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Theatre/{{Faust]] the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together.[[note]]If you hear a famous turn of phrase in German and have to guess where it's from you have a better than even chance it ultimately comes from Luther's translation of the bible or Goethe's Faust[[/note]] However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.

to:

* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Theatre/{{Faust]] Theatre/{{Faust}} the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together.[[note]]If you hear a famous turn of phrase in German and have to guess where it's from you have a better than even chance it ultimately comes from Luther's translation of the bible or Goethe's Faust[[/note]] However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.
3rd May '16 12:07:56 PM Jhonny
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* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.

to:

* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust Theatre/{{Faust]] the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. together.[[note]]If you hear a famous turn of phrase in German and have to guess where it's from you have a better than even chance it ultimately comes from Luther's translation of the bible or Goethe's Faust[[/note]] However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.
3rd May '16 12:04:45 PM Jhonny
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* The "first" plays to break the Aristotelian unity of place, action and time described in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}''. [[note]]Even some classical Greek drama, mostly be Creator/{{Euripides}}, actually broke this convention, Aristotle was wrong on this if it is interpreted as a descriptive text, whether he was right on it as a prescriptive text is for the audience to judge[[/note]]. Aristotle was regarded as pretty much right about everything for most of the medieval period and the Renaissance had a fondness for everything Greco-Roman. Going against that took guts. Today plays set in different places over several days containing numerous plots and subplots are par for the course on the stages of the world.

to:

* The "first" plays to break the Aristotelian unity of place, action and time described in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}''. [[note]]Even some classical Greek drama, mostly be Creator/{{Euripides}}, actually broke this convention, Aristotle was wrong on this if it is interpreted as a descriptive text, whether he was right on it as a prescriptive text is for the audience to judge[[/note]]. judge.[[/note]] Aristotle was regarded as pretty much right about everything for most of the medieval period and the Renaissance had a fondness for everything Greco-Roman. Going against that took guts. Today plays set in different places over several days containing numerous plots and subplots are par for the course on the stages of the world.
3rd May '16 11:50:48 AM JulianLapostat
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* The "first" plays to break the Aristotelian unity of place, action and time [[note]] even some classical Greek drama actually broke this convention, Aristotle was wrong on this if it is interpreted as a descriptive text, whether he was right on it as a prescriptive text is for the audience to judge[[/note]]. Aristotle was regarded as pretty much right about everything for most of the medieval period and the Renaissance had a fondness for everything Greco-Roman. Going against that took guts. Today plays set in different places over several days containing numerous plots and subplots are par for the course on the stages of the world.

to:

* The "first" plays to break the Aristotelian unity of place, action and time [[note]] even described in ''Literature/{{Poetics}}''. [[note]]Even some classical Greek drama drama, mostly be Creator/{{Euripides}}, actually broke this convention, Aristotle was wrong on this if it is interpreted as a descriptive text, whether he was right on it as a prescriptive text is for the audience to judge[[/note]]. Aristotle was regarded as pretty much right about everything for most of the medieval period and the Renaissance had a fondness for everything Greco-Roman. Going against that took guts. Today plays set in different places over several days containing numerous plots and subplots are par for the course on the stages of the world.world.
** This was a far bigger deal in Continental Europe, especially in France. In England, during the Elizabethan Age, Aristotle and classical Greek texts were not as dominating an influence as Roman drama by Seneca and Latin texts. So Creator/WilliamShakespeare happily violated the unities, likely because he didn't even know about it to start with. The most learned and informed dramatist, Ben Jonson, gently ribbed his friend in the First Folio for his "little Latin and Greek" and his comedies and dramas were the most formal and classically structured.
** Shakespeare was unpopular in France until the Romantic era for his violation of classical unities, with Creator/{{Voltaire}} dismissing him on these grounds. It took the critic Creator/SamuelJohnson to first defend Shakespeare's approach as valid and argue that the unities are more guidelines than actual rules. In Germany, the Sturm-und-Drang avant-garde saw Shakespeare as a modern writer on these grounds and admired his bold original spirit. In France, Creator/VictorHugo a huge Shakespeare-buff wrote a play called ''Hernani'' that was a scandal in its day because it violated the "classical unities", which had underpinned France's GoldenAge of Cornielle, Moliere and Racine.
** Creator/BertoltBrecht defined his conception of drama as "Non-Aristotleian" at the start of the 20th Century. By the time he arrived, drama had already greatly advanced away from the original Aristotleian schema (Creator/AntonChekhov and Creator/HenrikIbsen were the innovators on this front) but Brecht noted that most people still agreed with ideas of three-act structure and the division of epic form and dramatic form, a large cast and the small cast, and the idea that a tragedy can begin end and achieve catharsis in a small space and time.
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2nd May '16 11:52:04 AM Jhonny
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* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.

to:

* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.regime.
* The "first" plays to break the Aristotelian unity of place, action and time [[note]] even some classical Greek drama actually broke this convention, Aristotle was wrong on this if it is interpreted as a descriptive text, whether he was right on it as a prescriptive text is for the audience to judge[[/note]]. Aristotle was regarded as pretty much right about everything for most of the medieval period and the Renaissance had a fondness for everything Greco-Roman. Going against that took guts. Today plays set in different places over several days containing numerous plots and subplots are par for the course on the stages of the world.
2nd May '16 11:08:26 AM WhatArtThee
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** ''Theatre/WestSideStory'' has arguably aged very well, particularly since its characters look a lot less stylized and stereotyped than most 1950s "delinquent" characters. In fact, it probably ''influenced'' street-gang fashions (particularly the wearing of the bandanna) for decades afterward!
4th Apr '16 2:12:32 PM Jhonny
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* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like Die Räuber (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.

to:

* Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like [[Theatre/TheRobbers Die Räuber Räuber]] (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.
4th Apr '16 2:07:24 PM Jhonny
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* Could be called "The Problem With Chekhov." In Chekhov's day, naturalistic theater about people's real emotional lives was a strange and radical notion. Now it's what almost every play is about, and it's hard to understand why Chekhov's work was so powerful at the time. In fact, Chekhov plays themselves can sometimes seem as stolid and old-fasioned as the works he was rebelling against at the time.

to:

* Could be called "The Problem With Chekhov." In Chekhov's day, naturalistic theater about people's real emotional lives was a strange and radical notion. Now it's what almost every play is about, and it's hard to understand why Chekhov's work was so powerful at the time. In fact, Chekhov plays themselves can sometimes seem as stolid and old-fasioned as the works he was rebelling against at the time.time.
*Goethe and Schiller, thanks to being the quintessential German writers and often mentioned in one breath (they were HeterosexualLifePartners for most of their careers) can come of as extremely stuffy with their plays a bit formulaic and in the case of Goethe's Faust the same problem as with Hamlet above: Just a bunch of quotes strung together. However, back in the day when plays like Die Räuber (Schiller) or Götz von Berlichingen (Goethe) were first performed, they were downright ''revolutionary''. Some of this revolutionary zeal could be seen centuries later, when the line "Geben Sie Gedankenfreiheit" (give freedom of thought) from Schiller's Don Carlos was met with roaring applause during a performance in the GDR because most of the audience could not help but notice its appropriateness for their oppressive regime.
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