History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / ProWrestling

22nd Jul '13 10:30:22 PM JIKTV
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* The ladder match. At ''Wrestling/{{Wrestlemania}} X'', it was very exciting and revolutionary for its time. Fans who grew up watching TLC matches may find this match boring. * The DDT was once a devastating maneuver but it is now a standard move so watching an older match end with one stretches fan's willingness to suspend disbelief. ** Ditto for moves like the Power Bomb, Superplex, Stampeder (running power slam), and -- going back even further -- the Thesz Press. *** Several wrestlers who do use old-school moves as finishers have their moves hyped up as "special", such as [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield JBL]]'s "Clothesline From Hell', Wrestling/KevinNash's Jackknife Powerbomb or Wrestling/{{Raven}}'s Evenflow DDT. ** Watching old [[Wrestling/AmericanWrestlingAssociation AWA]] matches, moves like the Clothesline and Dropkick were also match enders back in the day. * [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOgHMGRp4dc Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka famous splashing of Don Muraco from the top of a cage]]. An iconic SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome for wrestling in 1983 and for years afterward. Several wrestlers note it as the moment that inspired them to get into the business. By today's standards, it looks like just another highspot. * Also common among lucha libre and cruiserweight wrestlers. As the style becomes more popular, more wrestles add more flippy stuff. At ''Bash at the Beach '96'', Wrestling/ReyMysterioJr. and Psicosis created the "highspot of the night" when Rey hit a huracarrana on Psic in mid-air. But nowadays, with Jack Evan, Ricochet and PAC and the like on the indy circuit doing double rotation corkscrew shooting star presses, that just fails to impress as it did at the time. * Speaking of the '96 ''Bash at the Beach'', that show featured the now-legendary "third man of the Outsiders" angle. [[LateArrivalSpoiler (It was Hulk Hogan.)]] Watching that match today, in retrospect, you can see the supposed ShockingSwerve coming a mile away. This is probably because {{TNA}} now stages similar last-minute betrayals on a more or less regular basis. * The Dynamite Kid vs Tiger Mask series in the early 80's seems slow-paced and short by modern standards. At the time, those matches more or less established the notion of "high-flying" wrestlers. * The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, and though its origins can be traced back to Wrestling/BruiserBrody's then innovative style in the 70s, when WWE first began really using it in 1998 - primarily to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury - it was seen as revolutionary for allowing the sub-par wrestlers to have fast-paced, action-packed matches that the likes of smaller, more agile wrestlers like Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/ShawnMichaels managed in early years. * Back in the 1980s, even title matches were considerably shorter than they are today (Wrestling/HulkHogan's famous victory over Wrestling/TheIronSheik, for example, was barely five minutes long!) and were filmed in long shot, making you feel that you were actually in the arena, thus causing the novelty of watching a wrestling match at home on TV to come off as rather pointless. Add in the general lack of music, pyrotechnics, and so forth, and modern-day fans might think they're watching a StylisticSuck! ** This isn't universally true; ''Hogan'' title matches were short, but there were many long matches in the early days (especially at the arena shows). One of the WWWF (now WWE)'s early huge gates was a Shea Stadium show headlined by a rare babyface vs. babyface match. Bruno Sammartino and Pedro Morales went to a 75-minute draw. Also most television matches weren't filmed at the arena (WWWF was a rarity in that regard), but rather at local television studios, and featured quite a bit of camera play. Most of the "so forth" associated with modern TV wrestling was actually invented by the von Erich wrestling family in Dallas. [[OlderThanTheyThink In 1982.]] * Unless they go back and watch the 1980s stuff first, today's fans may never truly appreciate how game-changing a figure Wrestling/TheUndertaker was. Debuting in 1990 right on the heels of a decade in which pro wrestling's style had been almost without exception family-friendly, colorful, and even corny, the sight of a seven-foot-tall, pale-skinned mute all in black who sought not only to defeat his opponents but to ''kill'' them (along with Wrestling/PaulBearer and the "Dark Side" ring entrance theme, which was a lot more minimalist and less elegiac in the beginning, and thus creepier) was genuinely terrifying. Newer fans who may remember 'Taker as a blues-loving biker in the early 2000s might have a hard time picturing 'Taker's original image, and even the most recent fans, after having witnessed the likes of Wrestling/{{Kane}}, {{Edge}}, RandyOrton, and all the other "dark" WWE Superstars who followed 'Taker's example probably won't find the "Deadman" gimmick all that original. * Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - Wrestling/EddieGuerrero, Wrestling/{{Edge}}, Wrestling/CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. Wrestling/BretHart and ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Nether were small men by any means ( both 6-foot-1 and light heavyweights, which is still bigger than most American males), but they were frequently dwarfed by other "main event" opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Hart to become a three-time WWE Champion and then for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat Hart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid." ** And even this is nothing new. Smaller wrestlers have always had a more difficult time getting over in the US. Antonino Rocca and Bob Backlund were the exceptions rather than the rule. The only difference is the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] took the big/muscular wrestler concept UpToEleven by encouraging 'roided freaks so the difference between the bigger and smaller wrestlers was now that much more distinct. * Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies, or at all, as she came in with NO TALENT and NO EXPERIENCE. As she is an AdoredByTheNetwork SacredCow[=/=][[InvincibleHero Boring Invincible Heroine]][=/=]CreatorsPet[=/=]KarmaHoudini[=/=]GodModeSue, no one is supposed to point this out. ** At the time of her debut in WWE, Wrestling/{{Lita}}'s style of wrestling stood out for moves like headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults, barely used by women in WWE. These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (Wrestling/EveTorres, Wrestling/KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s. Moves such as moonsaults and hurricanranas are more staples of women's wrestling these days than men's, at least in WWE due to the retirement of the Cruiserweight division * At the time of her debut in WWE, [=Lita=]'s style of wrestling was very innovative for American female wrestlers at the time as moves such as headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults were barely used by women in WWE (there were plenty of high-flying women in Japan, though). These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (EveTorres, KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s (*cough* Ashley Massaro). When watching a WWE divas match, if a girl is doing only flashy moves and throwing weak punches and clotheslines then she hasn't been wrestling that long. If there's proper groundwork and chain work in there, she's a lot more experienced. ** Also, moves such as moonsaults and hurricanranas are more staples of women's wrestling these days than men's in WWE at least due to the retirement of the Cruiserweight division. * Averted with regards to Natalya and the Sharpshooter. Aside from a one-off Trish Stratus match, fans had never seen a woman do it before and while it's not as amazing now to see her use it, she still gets great reactions whenever she does use it to win matches. * Wrestling/{{Sable}} gets put down for being a "fake wrestler" and not as tough as today's Divas. Well, you have to understand that when she made her debut in WWE in the mid-1990s, the women's division had almost completely disappeared and it was rare to see females doing ''anything'' in the ring. (The most famous Diva of this era, Sunny, was a manager who hardly wrestled at all.) Sable also was a pioneer in proving that female wrestlers could be both blonde sex symbols and physical powerhouses. * Compared to most of today's Divas, the in-ring efforts of Wrestling/StacyKeibler look pretty unimpressive. But she was a graduate, along with her friend Wrestling/TorrieWilson, of WCW's [[TrainingFromHell famously grueling "Power Plant"]], and she helped pave the way for [[WaifFu slightly-built women to be taken seriously as wrestlers]]. Kelly Kelly and the Bella Twins are arguably her [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Successors]]. ** Speaking of the Divas wrestling, the way the division was from late 2001 until mid 2004 was hugely groundbreaking. American women's wrestling had not been as competitive or hard-hitting since the 90s. For the first time in WWE in ages, women who could wrestle (and wrestle well) were being given competitive matches, storylines, characters and feuds. These days there are a whole slew of all-female promotions like ''Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}}'' and ''Wrestling/{{WSU}}'' that enable women wrestlers to shine so in an ironic way, these promotions that are now considered healthy alternatives to WWE's Divas actually owe their existence to the success of the division in the days of Wrestling/TrishStratus and Wrestling/{{Lita}}. So these days a lot of the matches pale in comparison to the ''SHIMMER'' women but yet these were also the matches that convinced American crowds that women could go just as hard as the men. * Wrestling/{{Sabu}} these days is known more for screwing up his moves all the time despite nearly every major wrestling show of the past 15 years copying them. * The famous ''King of the Ring 1998'' Hell in a Cell between the Undertaker and Mankind. Some fans conditioned to high-risk matches post-2000 view it as a two-bump spotfest, which would be missing the point of why it's famous. This was a time before TLC, et al. had opened up the WWE to potentially life-risking maneuvers, so a wrestler being thrown off the Cell through the announcer's table was truly mind-blowing (Shawn Michaels did a similar spot in the very first HIAC, but he was dangling off the cage and had a lot more control over where he was going). With that bump, it was assumed (correctly) that Mick Foley had done great harm to his body, which had Jim Ross apologizing that the match was being called off, only for Foley to [[{{Determinator}} get back up and continue]], which culminated with Foley taking another breath-catching (unplanned!) bump ''through'' the cage (with a chair falling on Foley's face, knocking out his tooth). And yet he continued, with Jim Ross voicing legitimate concern to Foley's well-being and pleading for the match to end. The match was no longer a traditional bout, but a spectacular peek at what a wrestler was willing to put himself through for the entertainment of the fans, something that has been dulled away years later by other matches aping a formula that was born out of almost inhuman pain tolerance. ** Even in the attitude era, few wrestlers would go to the insane lengths that Mick Foley was willing to go sell a match. The concept has been used up and most wrestlers won't make use of the cage in such ways anymore. Doubly so now that HIAC has been neutered by Linda [=McMahon=]'s "PG" era rules. This only serves to demonstrate how legendary Foley was.
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* The ladder match. At ''Wrestling/{{Wrestlemania}} X'', it was very exciting and revolutionary for its time. Fans who grew up watching TLC matches may find this match boring. * The DDT was once a devastating maneuver but it is now a standard move so watching an older match end with one stretches fan's willingness to suspend disbelief. ** Ditto for moves like the Power Bomb, Superplex, Stampeder (running power slam), and -- going back even further -- the Thesz Press. *** Several wrestlers who do use old-school moves as finishers have their moves hyped up as "special", such as [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield JBL]]'s "Clothesline From Hell', Wrestling/KevinNash's Jackknife Powerbomb or Wrestling/{{Raven}}'s Evenflow DDT. ** Watching old [[Wrestling/AmericanWrestlingAssociation AWA]] matches, moves like the Clothesline and Dropkick were also match enders back in the day. * [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOgHMGRp4dc Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka famous splashing of Don Muraco from the top of a cage]]. An iconic SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome for wrestling in 1983 and for years afterward. Several wrestlers note it as the moment that inspired them to get into the business. By today's standards, it looks like just another highspot. * Also common among lucha libre and cruiserweight wrestlers. As the style becomes more popular, more wrestles add more flippy stuff. At ''Bash at the Beach '96'', Wrestling/ReyMysterioJr. and Psicosis created the "highspot of the night" when Rey hit a huracarrana on Psic in mid-air. But nowadays, with Jack Evan, Ricochet and PAC and the like on the indy circuit doing double rotation corkscrew shooting star presses, that just fails to impress as it did at the time. * Speaking of the '96 ''Bash at the Beach'', that show featured the now-legendary "third man of the Outsiders" angle. [[LateArrivalSpoiler (It was Hulk Hogan.)]] Watching that match today, in retrospect, you can see the supposed ShockingSwerve coming a mile away. This is probably because {{TNA}} now stages similar last-minute betrayals on a more or less regular basis. * The Dynamite Kid vs Tiger Mask series in the early 80's seems slow-paced and short by modern standards. At the time, those matches more or less established the notion of "high-flying" wrestlers. * The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, and though its origins can be traced back to Wrestling/BruiserBrody's then innovative style in the 70s, when WWE first began really using it in 1998 - primarily to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury - it was seen as revolutionary for allowing the sub-par wrestlers to have fast-paced, action-packed matches that the likes of smaller, more agile wrestlers like Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/ShawnMichaels managed in early years. * Back in the 1980s, even title matches were considerably shorter than they are today (Wrestling/HulkHogan's famous victory over Wrestling/TheIronSheik, for example, was barely five minutes long!) and were filmed in long shot, making you feel that you were actually in the arena, thus causing the novelty of watching a wrestling match at home on TV to come off as rather pointless. Add in the general lack of music, pyrotechnics, and so forth, and modern-day fans might think they're watching a StylisticSuck! ** This isn't universally true; ''Hogan'' title matches were short, but there were many long matches in the early days (especially at the arena shows). One of the WWWF (now WWE)'s early huge gates was a Shea Stadium show headlined by a rare babyface vs. babyface match. Bruno Sammartino and Pedro Morales went to a 75-minute draw. Also most television matches weren't filmed at the arena (WWWF was a rarity in that regard), but rather at local television studios, and featured quite a bit of camera play. Most of the "so forth" associated with modern TV wrestling was actually invented by the von Erich wrestling family in Dallas. [[OlderThanTheyThink In 1982.]] * Unless they go back and watch the 1980s stuff first, today's fans may never truly appreciate how game-changing a figure Wrestling/TheUndertaker was. Debuting in 1990 right on the heels of a decade in which pro wrestling's style had been almost without exception family-friendly, colorful, and even corny, the sight of a seven-foot-tall, pale-skinned mute all in black who sought not only to defeat his opponents but to ''kill'' them (along with Wrestling/PaulBearer and the "Dark Side" ring entrance theme, which was a lot more minimalist and less elegiac in the beginning, and thus creepier) was genuinely terrifying. Newer fans who may remember 'Taker as a blues-loving biker in the early 2000s might have a hard time picturing 'Taker's original image, and even the most recent fans, after having witnessed the likes of Wrestling/{{Kane}}, {{Edge}}, RandyOrton, and all the other "dark" WWE Superstars who followed 'Taker's example probably won't find the "Deadman" gimmick all that original. * Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - Wrestling/EddieGuerrero, Wrestling/{{Edge}}, Wrestling/CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. Wrestling/BretHart and ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Nether were small men by any means ( both 6-foot-1 and light heavyweights, which is still bigger than most American males), but they were frequently dwarfed by other "main event" opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Hart to become a three-time WWE Champion and then for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat Hart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid." ** And even this is nothing new. Smaller wrestlers have always had a more difficult time getting over in the US. Antonino Rocca and Bob Backlund were the exceptions rather than the rule. The only difference is the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] took the big/muscular wrestler concept UpToEleven by encouraging 'roided freaks so the difference between the bigger and smaller wrestlers was now that much more distinct. * Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies, or at all, as she came in with NO TALENT and NO EXPERIENCE. As she is an AdoredByTheNetwork SacredCow[=/=][[InvincibleHero Boring Invincible Heroine]][=/=]CreatorsPet[=/=]KarmaHoudini[=/=]GodModeSue, no one is supposed to point this out. ** At the time of her debut in WWE, Wrestling/{{Lita}}'s style of wrestling stood out for moves like headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults, barely used by women in WWE. These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (Wrestling/EveTorres, Wrestling/KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s. Moves such as moonsaults and hurricanranas are more staples of women's wrestling these days than men's, at least in WWE due to the retirement of the Cruiserweight division * At the time of her debut in WWE, [=Lita=]'s style of wrestling was very innovative for American female wrestlers at the time as moves such as headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults were barely used by women in WWE (there were plenty of high-flying women in Japan, though). These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (EveTorres, KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s (*cough* Ashley Massaro). When watching a WWE divas match, if a girl is doing only flashy moves and throwing weak punches and clotheslines then she hasn't been wrestling that long. If there's proper groundwork and chain work in there, she's a lot more experienced. ** Also, moves such as moonsaults and hurricanranas are more staples of women's wrestling these days than men's in WWE at least due to the retirement of the Cruiserweight division. * Averted with regards to Natalya and the Sharpshooter. Aside from a one-off Trish Stratus match, fans had never seen a woman do it before and while it's not as amazing now to see her use it, she still gets great reactions whenever she does use it to win matches. * Wrestling/{{Sable}} gets put down for being a "fake wrestler" and not as tough as today's Divas. Well, you have to understand that when she made her debut in WWE in the mid-1990s, the women's division had almost completely disappeared and it was rare to see females doing ''anything'' in the ring. (The most famous Diva of this era, Sunny, was a manager who hardly wrestled at all.) Sable also was a pioneer in proving that female wrestlers could be both blonde sex symbols and physical powerhouses. * Compared to most of today's Divas, the in-ring efforts of Wrestling/StacyKeibler look pretty unimpressive. But she was a graduate, along with her friend Wrestling/TorrieWilson, of WCW's [[TrainingFromHell famously grueling "Power Plant"]], and she helped pave the way for [[WaifFu slightly-built women to be taken seriously as wrestlers]]. Kelly Kelly and the Bella Twins are arguably her [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Successors]]. ** Speaking of the Divas wrestling, the way the division was from late 2001 until mid 2004 was hugely groundbreaking. American women's wrestling had not been as competitive or hard-hitting since the 90s. For the first time in WWE in ages, women who could wrestle (and wrestle well) were being given competitive matches, storylines, characters and feuds. These days there are a whole slew of all-female promotions like ''Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}}'' and ''Wrestling/{{WSU}}'' that enable women wrestlers to shine so in an ironic way, these promotions that are now considered healthy alternatives to WWE's Divas actually owe their existence to the success of the division in the days of Wrestling/TrishStratus and Wrestling/{{Lita}}. So these days a lot of the matches pale in comparison to the ''SHIMMER'' women but yet these were also the matches that convinced American crowds that women could go just as hard as the men. * Wrestling/{{Sabu}} these days is known more for screwing up his moves all the time despite nearly every major wrestling show of the past 15 years copying them. * The famous ''King of the Ring 1998'' Hell in a Cell between the Undertaker and Mankind. Some fans conditioned to high-risk matches post-2000 view it as a two-bump spotfest, which would be missing the point of why it's famous. This was a time before TLC, et al. had opened up the WWE to potentially life-risking maneuvers, so a wrestler being thrown off the Cell through the announcer's table was truly mind-blowing (Shawn Michaels did a similar spot in the very first HIAC, but he was dangling off the cage and had a lot more control over where he was going). With that bump, it was assumed (correctly) that Mick Foley had done great harm to his body, which had Jim Ross apologizing that the match was being called off, only for Foley to [[{{Determinator}} get back up and continue]], which culminated with Foley taking another breath-catching (unplanned!) bump ''through'' the cage (with a chair falling on Foley's face, knocking out his tooth). And yet he continued, with Jim Ross voicing legitimate concern to Foley's well-being and pleading for the match to end. The match was no longer a traditional bout, but a spectacular peek at what a wrestler was willing to put himself through for the entertainment of the fans, something that has been dulled away years later by other matches aping a formula that was born out of almost inhuman pain tolerance. ** Even in the attitude era, few wrestlers would go to the insane lengths that Mick Foley was willing to go sell a match. The concept has been used up and most wrestlers won't make use of the cage in such ways anymore. Doubly so now that HIAC has been neutered by Linda [=McMahon=]'s "PG" era rules. This only serves to demonstrate how legendary Foley was.[[redirect:SeinfeldIsUnfunny/ProfessionalWrestling]]
22nd Jul '13 10:28:09 PM JIKTV
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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOgHMGRp4dc Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka famous splashing of Don Muraco from the top of a cage]]. An iconic MomentOfAwesome for wrestling in 1983 and for years afterward. Several wrestlers note it as the moment that inspired them to get into the business. By today's standards, it looks like just another highspot.
to:
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOgHMGRp4dc Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka famous splashing of Don Muraco from the top of a cage]]. An iconic MomentOfAwesome SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome for wrestling in 1983 and for years afterward. Several wrestlers note it as the moment that inspired them to get into the business. By today's standards, it looks like just another highspot.

* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. BretHart and ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Nether were small men by any means ( both 6-foot-1 and light heavyweights, which is still bigger than most American males), but they were frequently dwarfed by other "main event" opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Hart to become a three-time WWE Champion and then for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat Hart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid."
to:
* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk Wrestling/EddieGuerrero, Wrestling/{{Edge}}, Wrestling/CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. BretHart Wrestling/BretHart and ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Nether were small men by any means ( both 6-foot-1 and light heavyweights, which is still bigger than most American males), but they were frequently dwarfed by other "main event" opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Hart to become a three-time WWE Champion and then for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat Hart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid."

* Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies.
to:
* Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies.indies, or at all, as she came in with NO TALENT and NO EXPERIENCE. As she is an AdoredByTheNetwork SacredCow[=/=][[InvincibleHero Boring Invincible Heroine]][=/=]CreatorsPet[=/=]KarmaHoudini[=/=]GodModeSue, no one is supposed to point this out.

* Compared to most of today's Divas, the in-ring efforts of Stacy Keibler look pretty unimpressive. But she was a graduate, along with her friend Torrie Wilson, of WCW's [[TrainingFromHell famously grueling "Power Plant"]], and she helped pave the way for [[WaifFu slightly-built women to be taken seriously as wrestlers]]. Kelly Kelly and the Bella Twins are arguably her [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Successors]]. ** Speaking of the Divas wrestling, the way the division was from late 2001 until mid 2004 was hugely groundbreaking. American women's wrestling had not been as competitive or hard-hitting since the 90s. For the first time in WWE in ages, women who could wrestle (and wrestle well) were being given competitive matches, storylines, characters and feuds. These days there are a whole slew of all-female promotions like ''Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}}'' and ''WSU'' that enable women wrestlers to shine so in an ironic way, these promotions that are now considered healthy alternatives to WWE's Divas actually owe their existence to the success of the division in the days of Wrestling/TrishStratus and Wrestling/{{Lita}}. So these days a lot of the matches pale in comparison to the ''SHIMMER'' women but yet these were also the matches that convinced American crowds that women could go just as hard as the men.
to:
* Compared to most of today's Divas, the in-ring efforts of Stacy Keibler Wrestling/StacyKeibler look pretty unimpressive. But she was a graduate, along with her friend Torrie Wilson, Wrestling/TorrieWilson, of WCW's [[TrainingFromHell famously grueling "Power Plant"]], and she helped pave the way for [[WaifFu slightly-built women to be taken seriously as wrestlers]]. Kelly Kelly and the Bella Twins are arguably her [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Successors]]. ** Speaking of the Divas wrestling, the way the division was from late 2001 until mid 2004 was hugely groundbreaking. American women's wrestling had not been as competitive or hard-hitting since the 90s. For the first time in WWE in ages, women who could wrestle (and wrestle well) were being given competitive matches, storylines, characters and feuds. These days there are a whole slew of all-female promotions like ''Wrestling/{{SHIMMER}}'' and ''WSU'' ''Wrestling/{{WSU}}'' that enable women wrestlers to shine so in an ironic way, these promotions that are now considered healthy alternatives to WWE's Divas actually owe their existence to the success of the division in the days of Wrestling/TrishStratus and Wrestling/{{Lita}}. So these days a lot of the matches pale in comparison to the ''SHIMMER'' women but yet these were also the matches that convinced American crowds that women could go just as hard as the men.

** Even in the attitude era, few wrestlers would go to the insane lengths that MickFoley was willing to go sell a match. The concept has been used up and most wrestlers won't make use of the cage in such ways anymore. Doubly so now that HIAC has been neutered by Linda McMahon's "PG" era rules. This only serves to demonstrate how legendary Foley was.
to:
** Even in the attitude era, few wrestlers would go to the insane lengths that MickFoley Mick Foley was willing to go sell a match. The concept has been used up and most wrestlers won't make use of the cage in such ways anymore. Doubly so now that HIAC has been neutered by Linda McMahon's [=McMahon=]'s "PG" era rules. This only serves to demonstrate how legendary Foley was.
19th Jul '13 9:29:54 PM Rowdycmoore
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* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers. ** The Brawling Based style akin to WWE's "Main Event Style" can be attributed to Wrestling/BruiserBrody's then innovative style in the 70s and 80s. Also, at the risk of being informal, how could the style Steve Austin "innovated" help Wrestling/ShawnMichaels and Wrestling/BretHart if they were gone (left or were semi-retired) shortly after he debuted it? *** It didn't. It helped other, slower wrestlers have action-packed matches on par with what Bret and Shawn had done in the preceding years.
to:
* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers. ** The Brawling Based style akin to WWE's "Main Event Style" though its origins can be attributed traced back to Wrestling/BruiserBrody's then innovative style in the 70s 70s, when WWE first began really using it in 1998 - primarily to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury - it was seen as revolutionary for allowing the sub-par wrestlers to have fast-paced, action-packed matches that the likes of smaller, more agile wrestlers like Wrestling/BretHart and 80s. Also, at the risk of being informal, how could the style Steve Austin "innovated" help Wrestling/ShawnMichaels and Wrestling/BretHart if they were gone (left or were semi-retired) shortly after he debuted it? *** It didn't. It helped other, slower wrestlers have action-packed matches on par with what Bret and Shawn had done managed in the preceding early years.
19th Jul '13 9:20:13 PM Rowdycmoore
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* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Michaels was not a small man by any means (6-foot-1 and a light heavyweight, which is still bigger than most American males), but he was dwarfed by his opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat BretHart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid." *** Bret Hart would really be the first one to pave the way for 'smaller' wrestlers, being the same height and 9 pounds heavier than Shawn Michaels and having won the WWE championship three times and the Royal Rumble once in the three and a half years prior to Shawn Michaels winning the title.
to:
* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. BretHart and ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Michaels was not a Nether were small man men by any means (6-foot-1 ( both 6-foot-1 and a light heavyweight, heavyweights, which is still bigger than most American males), but he was they were frequently dwarfed by his other "main event" opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Hart to become a three-time WWE Champion and then for Michaels to become the second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat BretHart Hart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid." *** Bret Hart would really be the first one to pave the way for 'smaller' wrestlers, being the same height and 9 pounds heavier than Shawn Michaels and having won the WWE championship three times and the Royal Rumble once in the three and a half years prior to Shawn Michaels winning the title."
7th Jul '13 9:35:14 PM Megafighter3
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* Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America, which is what happens when you are able to sufficiently brainwash large audiences of stupid people. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies.
to:
* Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career -- WWE had brought in Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America, which is what happens when you are able to sufficiently brainwash large audiences of stupid people.America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies.
5th Jul '13 7:18:05 PM JIKTV
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* Averted with regards to Natalya and the Sharpshooter. Aside from a one-off TrishStratus match, fans had never seen a woman do it before and while it's not as amazing now to see her use it, she still gets great reactions whenever she does use it to win matches.
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* Averted with regards to Natalya and the Sharpshooter. Aside from a one-off TrishStratus Trish Stratus match, fans had never seen a woman do it before and while it's not as amazing now to see her use it, she still gets great reactions whenever she does use it to win matches.
4th Jul '13 4:52:23 PM JIKTV
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* {{Sable}} gets put down for being a "fake wrestler" and not as tough as today's Divas. Well, you have to understand that when she made her debut in WWE in the mid-1990s, the women's division had almost completely disappeared and it was rare to see females doing ''anything'' in the ring. (The most famous Diva of this era, Sunny, was a manager who hardly wrestled at all.) Sable also was a pioneer in proving that female wrestlers could be both blonde sex symbols and physical powerhouses.
to:
* {{Sable}} Wrestling/{{Sable}} gets put down for being a "fake wrestler" and not as tough as today's Divas. Well, you have to understand that when she made her debut in WWE in the mid-1990s, the women's division had almost completely disappeared and it was rare to see females doing ''anything'' in the ring. (The most famous Diva of this era, Sunny, was a manager who hardly wrestled at all.) Sable also was a pioneer in proving that female wrestlers could be both blonde sex symbols and physical powerhouses.
4th Jul '13 4:51:41 PM JIKTV
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* The ladder match. At {{Wrestlemania}} X, it was very exciting and revolutionary for its time. Fans who grew up watching TLC matches may find this match boring.
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* The ladder match. At {{Wrestlemania}} X, ''Wrestling/{{Wrestlemania}} X'', it was very exciting and revolutionary for its time. Fans who grew up watching TLC matches may find this match boring.

** Ditto for moves like the Power Bomb, Superplex, Stampeder (running power slam), and -- going back even further -- the Thez Press. *** Several wrestlers who do use old-school moves as finishers have their moves hyped up as "special", such as JBL's "Clothesline From Hell', Kevin Nash's Jackknife Powerbomb or Raven's Evenflow DDT.
to:
** Ditto for moves like the Power Bomb, Superplex, Stampeder (running power slam), and -- going back even further -- the Thez Thesz Press. *** Several wrestlers who do use old-school moves as finishers have their moves hyped up as "special", such as JBL's [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield JBL]]'s "Clothesline From Hell', Kevin Nash's Wrestling/KevinNash's Jackknife Powerbomb or Raven's Wrestling/{{Raven}}'s Evenflow DDT.

* Also common among lucha libre and cruiserweight wrestlers. As the style becomes more popular, more wrestles add more flippy stuff. At ''Bash at the Beach '96'', ReyMysterioJr. and Psicosis created the "highspot of the night" when Rey hit a huracarrana on Psic in mid-air. But nowadays, with Jack Evan, Ricochet and PAC and the like on the indy circuit doing double rotation corkscrew shooting star presses, that just fails to impress as it did at the time.
to:
* Also common among lucha libre and cruiserweight wrestlers. As the style becomes more popular, more wrestles add more flippy stuff. At ''Bash at the Beach '96'', ReyMysterioJr.Wrestling/ReyMysterioJr. and Psicosis created the "highspot of the night" when Rey hit a huracarrana on Psic in mid-air. But nowadays, with Jack Evan, Ricochet and PAC and the like on the indy circuit doing double rotation corkscrew shooting star presses, that just fails to impress as it did at the time.

* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as BretHart and ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers.
to:
* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as BretHart Wrestling/BretHart and ShawnMichaels) Wrestling/ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers.

* TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career - WWE had brought in various models to build its women's division into more about T&A than athleticism ({{Sable}}, Terri Runnels, Debra) but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charasmatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit and in Japan, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies. No, she's not as good as Akira Hokuto in her prime was. Maybe 0.5% of women and 5% of guys in wrestling are. * At the time of her debut in WWE, {{Lita}}'s style of wrestling was very innovative for American female wrestlers at the time as moves such as headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults were barely used by women in WWE (there were plenty of high-flying women in Japan, though). These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (EveTorres, KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s (*cough* Ashley Massaro). When watching a WWE divas match, if a girl is doing only flashy moves and throwing weak punches and clotheslines then she hasn't been wrestling that long. If there's proper groundwork and chain work in there, she's a lot more experienced.
to:
* TrishStratus Wrestling/TrishStratus was a huge success story during her career - -- WWE had brought in various models to build its women's division into more about T&A than athleticism ({{Sable}}, Terri Runnels, Debra) Wrestling/{{Sable}} as a valet in 1996 and she had a brief run with the revived [[http://www.wrestling-titles.com/wwe/wwf-wm.html WWE Women's Title]] before her ego took over and she made herself PersonaNonGrata, but Trish herself was the first (in WWE at least) to develop onscreen from an eye candy valet with patchy mic skills to a charasmatic charismatic star who is now regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in North America.America, which is what happens when you are able to sufficiently brainwash large audiences of stupid people. These days at least 60% of the women's division in WWE (and some of TNA's roster too) is made up of former models brought in and trained to wrestle in the hopes of replicating Trish's success. Due to this and comparison with women's wrestling on the indie circuit and in Japan, circuit, many purists label Trish as "overrated" and resent her for not wrestling on the indies. No, she's not as good as Akira Hokuto in indies. ** At the time of her prime was. Maybe 0.5% debut in WWE, Wrestling/{{Lita}}'s style of women and 5% of guys in wrestling are. stood out for moves like headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults, barely used by women in WWE. These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (Wrestling/EveTorres, Wrestling/KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s. Moves such as moonsaults and hurricanranas are more staples of women's wrestling these days than men's, at least in WWE due to the retirement of the Cruiserweight division * At the time of her debut in WWE, {{Lita}}'s [=Lita=]'s style of wrestling was very innovative for American female wrestlers at the time as moves such as headscissors, hurricanranas, and moonsaults were barely used by women in WWE (there were plenty of high-flying women in Japan, though). These days (see the Trish example above) due to having to work extremely short matches all the time, the models brought in by WWE will often learn flashy moves like hurricanranas to make their matches appear more exciting and cover up their lack of wrestling ability. If the models are former gymnasts this can work fine and they eventually develop into competent wrestlers (EveTorres, KellyKelly) or they can just come across as sloppy {{spot monkey}}s (*cough* Ashley Massaro). When watching a WWE divas match, if a girl is doing only flashy moves and throwing weak punches and clotheslines then she hasn't been wrestling that long. If there's proper groundwork and chain work in there, she's a lot more experienced.
10th Jun '13 5:51:27 AM allym999
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Correcting factual errors
* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Michaels was not a small man by any means (6-foot-1 and a light heavyweight, which is still bigger than most American males), but he was dwarfed by his opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Michaels to become the first back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat BretHart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid."
to:
* Over the past decade, fans have gotten used to seeing main-event wrestlers - EddieGuerrero, {{Edge}}, CMPunk - who don't have muscles on top of muscles. ShawnMichaels paved the way for all of them. Michaels was not a small man by any means (6-foot-1 and a light heavyweight, which is still bigger than most American males), but he was dwarfed by his opponents more often than not. It's hard to appreciate just how much of a big deal it was for Michaels to become the first second (after Hulk Hogan) back-to-back Royal Rumble Match winner (and from the first-entrant position one of those times, no less!) and to defeat BretHart clean for the WWE Championship in one of the longest ''[=WrestleMania=]'' matches ever at ''[=WrestleMania=] XII''. Hard to believe now, but there was a time when people actually doubted the "Heart Break Kid."" *** Bret Hart would really be the first one to pave the way for 'smaller' wrestlers, being the same height and 9 pounds heavier than Shawn Michaels and having won the WWE championship three times and the Royal Rumble once in the three and a half years prior to Shawn Michaels winning the title.
16th Apr '13 10:10:34 PM JIKTV
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* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as BretHart and ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers. ** The Brawling Based style akin to WWE's "Main Event Style" can be attributed to Bruiser Brody's then innovative style in the 70s and 80s. Also, at the risk of being informal, how could the style Steve Austin "innovated" help ShawnMichaels and BretHart if they were gone (left or were semi-retired) shortly after he debuted it?
to:
* The brawling-based "Main Event" style used by WWE. While trite and cliche now, when it was first introduced in 1998 (to cover for StoneColdSteveAustin's Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin's neck injury), was seen as revolutionary for allowing 90's style fast-paced action (as defined by wrestlers such as BretHart and ShawnMichaels) from sub-par wrestlers. ** The Brawling Based style akin to WWE's "Main Event Style" can be attributed to Bruiser Brody's Wrestling/BruiserBrody's then innovative style in the 70s and 80s. Also, at the risk of being informal, how could the style Steve Austin "innovated" help ShawnMichaels Wrestling/ShawnMichaels and BretHart Wrestling/BretHart if they were gone (left or were semi-retired) shortly after he debuted it?

* Back in the 1980s, even title matches were considerably shorter than they are today (HulkHogan's famous victory over TheIronSheik, for example, was barely five minutes long!) and were filmed in long shot, making you feel that you were actually in the arena, thus causing the novelty of watching a wrestling match at home on TV to come off as rather pointless. Add in the general lack of music, pyrotechnics, and so forth, and modern-day fans might think they're watching a StylisticSuck!
to:
* Back in the 1980s, even title matches were considerably shorter than they are today (HulkHogan's (Wrestling/HulkHogan's famous victory over TheIronSheik, Wrestling/TheIronSheik, for example, was barely five minutes long!) and were filmed in long shot, making you feel that you were actually in the arena, thus causing the novelty of watching a wrestling match at home on TV to come off as rather pointless. Add in the general lack of music, pyrotechnics, and so forth, and modern-day fans might think they're watching a StylisticSuck!
This list shows the last 10 events of 40. Show all.