History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Other

12th May '18 10:33:40 AM DastardlyDemolition
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* Memes in general. What was considered funny and viral back then can quickly become a DiscreditedMeme when beaten to the ground. For example, the "I was an adventurer like you, then I took an arrow to the knee" meme from Skyrim quickly fell out of grace weeks after the meme was born. With enough fervor, memes can become overused, tired, parodied, and hated within ''days''. Whilst many memes became popular ironically, they then get taken on as being seriously appreciated by the media, and dragged into the ground well beyond the point where the original fans have derided it as an old meme. A notable example is "Gangnam Style", which due to being such a oversaturated mainstream meme at the time, will lead to groans from pretty much anyone nowadays rather than appreciation.

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* Memes in general. What was considered funny and viral back then can quickly become a DiscreditedMeme when beaten to the ground. For example, the "I was an adventurer like you, then I took an arrow to the knee" meme from Skyrim ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' quickly fell out of grace weeks after the meme was born. With enough fervor, memes can become overused, tired, parodied, and hated within ''days''. Whilst many memes became popular ironically, they then get taken on as being seriously appreciated by the media, and dragged into the ground well beyond the point where the original fans have derided it as an old meme. A notable example is "Gangnam Style", which due to being such a oversaturated mainstream meme at the time, will lead to groans from pretty much anyone nowadays rather than appreciation.
12th Apr '18 9:40:01 AM penguinist
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** In general, democracy as we know it (one man one vote) while widely cherished internationally as an ideal today, even by conservatives, was once considered a pipe dream argued only by impractical dreamers and regarded as quasi-Utopian. Even the Founding Fathers likened it to "mob rule". The vote was scrupulously restricted to property owners (all white and male naturally) and nations like England and the United States didn't widen the franchise until well into the 20th Century. It's become such a given that it takes some getting used to accept the fact that it's only in the recent era of history that democracy (full universal suffrage, men and women) was truly practised on what was originally regarded as an utopian scale.

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** In general, democracy as we know it (one man one vote) while widely cherished internationally as an ideal today, even by conservatives, was once considered a pipe dream argued only by impractical dreamers and regarded as quasi-Utopian. Even the Founding Fathers likened it to "mob rule". The vote was scrupulously restricted to property owners (all white and male naturally) and some nations like England and the United States didn't widen the franchise until well into the 20th Century. It's become such a given that it takes some getting used to accept the fact that it's only in the recent era of history that democracy (full universal suffrage, men and women) was truly practised on what was originally regarded as an utopian scale.
16th Mar '18 3:39:25 PM Jhonny
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* In the aftermath of the American Revolution, it was decided that the ruler of the United States should be called "president," rather than king. It was intended to be an extremely humble title, and had previously been used mostly to describe someone who temporarily chaired a small meeting. These days, most countries have presidents, and the title is now so closely associated with being the powerful ruler of a country it may be considered ostentatious or presumptuous for a leader of a small organization to title himself president. Even the phrase "Mr. President," initially chosen for being the humblest possible way of referring to the office-holder, is now often used as a way to mock the pretentiousness of a low-ranking president. It's hard to recall that, in the country America liberated itself from, the monarch was currently being addressed with "By the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneberg."

to:

* In the aftermath of the American Revolution, it was decided that the ruler of the United States should be called "president," rather than king. It was intended to be an extremely humble title, and had previously been used mostly to describe someone who temporarily chaired a small meeting. These days, most countries have presidents, and the title is now so closely associated with being the powerful ruler of a country it may be considered ostentatious or presumptuous for a leader of a small organization to title himself president. Even the phrase "Mr. President," initially chosen for being the humblest possible way of referring to the office-holder, is now often used as a way to mock the pretentiousness of a low-ranking president. It's hard to recall that, in the country America liberated itself from, the monarch was currently being addressed with "By "[[TryToFitThatOnABusinessCard By the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneberg."Brunswick-Luneberg]]." - And that was the "short form" of the official title.
16th Mar '18 2:57:14 PM MBG159
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* In the aftermath of the American Revolution, it was decided that the ruler of the United States should be called "president," rather than king. It was intended to be an extremely humble title, and had previously been used mostly to describe someone who temporarily chaired a small meeting. These days, most countries have presidents, and the title is now so closely associated with being the powerful ruler of a country it may be considered ostentatious or presumptuous for a leader of a small organization to title himself president. Even the phrase "Mr. President," initially chosen for being the humblest possible way of referring to the office-holder, is now often used as a way to mock the pretentiousness of a low-ranking president.

to:

* In the aftermath of the American Revolution, it was decided that the ruler of the United States should be called "president," rather than king. It was intended to be an extremely humble title, and had previously been used mostly to describe someone who temporarily chaired a small meeting. These days, most countries have presidents, and the title is now so closely associated with being the powerful ruler of a country it may be considered ostentatious or presumptuous for a leader of a small organization to title himself president. Even the phrase "Mr. President," initially chosen for being the humblest possible way of referring to the office-holder, is now often used as a way to mock the pretentiousness of a low-ranking president. It's hard to recall that, in the country America liberated itself from, the monarch was currently being addressed with "By the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneberg."
6th Feb '18 3:55:47 PM Discar
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* The establishment of democracy and the republic was not a new thing in the late 18th century, as it had existed in Ancient Greece and Rome, and likewise many Italian City States, the Netherlands, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Switzerland but the general belief was that a democracy or a republic could only govern a small area of land. For a large area of land, only TheKingdom or TheEmpire was feasible. It took UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution to first put the idea that a democracy can conquer, centralize and administer a large nation state in a time of self-centered monarchies. Nowadays most of those monarchies are republics.

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* The establishment of democracy and the republic was not a new thing in the late 18th century, as it had existed in Ancient Greece and Rome, and likewise many Italian City States, the Netherlands, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Switzerland but the general belief was that a democracy or a republic could only govern a small area of land. For a large area of land, only TheKingdom a kingdom or TheEmpire was feasible. It took UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution to first put the idea that a democracy can conquer, centralize and administer a large nation state in a time of self-centered monarchies. Nowadays most of those monarchies are republics.
4th Dec '17 1:53:06 PM Comrade_Kenneth
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* The Toyota Prius, the first [[TropeCodifier commercially successful]] hybrid car, almost single-handedly launched the Hybrid car revolution... and is now quickly becoming a victim of its own success, as the explosion of hybrid cars it helped launch has given rise to bigger, faster, and even more fuel efficient hybrid cars, with even other cars from Toyota like the Camry Hybrid stealing its thunder, and leaving the Prius with less of an edge, and less to recommend it.

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* The Toyota Prius, the first [[TropeCodifier commercially successful]] hybrid car, bolted Toyota into the 21st Century, proved Japanese automakers were a force to be reckoned with, and almost single-handedly launched the Hybrid car revolution... and is now quickly becoming irrelevant and a victim of its own success, as the explosion of hybrid cars it helped launch has given rise to bigger, faster, and even more fuel efficient hybrid cars, with even other cars from Toyota like the Camry Hybrid and Highlander Hybrids stealing its thunder, and leaving the Prius with less of an edge, and less to recommend it.it. And Toyota playing up the Prius's advanced technology, cult-like following, and general quirkiness for marketing purposes isn't helping, leaving it pigeonholed as a Main/{{zeerust}}-y nerdmobile.
** To a lesser extent, the BMW Neue Klasse/5-Series. When it first launched in 1962, it was revolutionary, being the first midsize BMW built since World War II and their first car ever to not be powered by a modified motorcycle engine, and a breath of fresh air in a luxury car market dominated by [[HummerDinger overpriced and oversized limousines and personal luxury coupes]] with [[MightyGlacier massive, inefficient engines and boat-like handling]], being small and light, with compact, high-revving engines and things like four-wheel independent suspension and unibody construction. Thanks to this, it singlehandedly saved the company from bankruptcy, established BMW as a major player in the global car market, and became the TropeCodifier for the modern compact executive car. Now, the 5-series too has become a victim of its own success, losing ground in terms of build quality and driving dynamics to [[AlternateCompanyEquivalent similar models]] from rivals Audi and Mercedes and also [[TransatlanticEquivalent foreign]] [[FollowTheLeader copycats]]from the Americans (Cadillac CTS), Brits (Jaguar XF), Japanese (Lexus GS-Series), and Koreans (Hyundai Genesis), as well it's own stablemate, the smaller 3-series, making it a shell of its former self with not much to recommend to it while remaining the market leader and still having a devoted fanbase.
22nd Aug '17 7:30:19 PM SheldonDinkleburg
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* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar is commonly seen as the first modern war, introducing deadlier weapons such as the Gatling gun, better transportation through the use of railroads, and the ability to observe battles in midair. Greater technology developed by UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, but these came from a conflict that cost more than 600,000 lives.
* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne was one of the worst wars in history -- but it wasn't nearly as bad as [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo its successor]], thus the first war doesn't have the same notoriety it would've have had beforehand.



* Part of the InternetBackdraft against social justice (besides the [[DontShootTheMessage loudmouthed proponents]] on [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment social media]]) is seen as this -- with several generations of people having grown up with major breakthroughs being standardized, proponents of social justice often come off as whiny and unable to appreciate just what a breakthrough things like women's suffrage or the civil rights act in the States ''were''.
* The 1993 World Trade Center bombing was one of the year's biggest stories at the time, but it became far less memorable than it used to be after 9/11, which killed 2,978 innocent lives compared to the 1993 attack's six.
** In fact, numerous pre-9/11 terror attacks and aircraft hijackings were dwarfed by the September 11 attacks, mainly because of its unmatched scale (it was the deadliest terrorist incident to date). The Oklahoma City Bombing is the only pre-9/11 attack to still remain a prominent figure in the public consciousness, mainly because it was the only other one with a particularly big death toll and deadliest homegrown terrorist attack in the United States. Fortunately, there has not been another attack on that scale since 9/11 -- probably the best known post-9/11 terror attacks in America are the Boston Marathon bombing and the Orlando nightclub massacre.
* Hurricane Irene in 2011 became the first hurricane to directly hit New York City in twelve years. It did nearly $20 billion in property damage, enough to get its name retired. Nowadays, the thought of a hurricane hitting New York City will instantly make people think of Superstorm Sandy one year later, and if Irene is remembered, it is usually as a warm-up to Sandy.
* The Charlie Hebdo terrorist attacks of January 2015 was the first huge new story of the year. One of the biggest worldwide solidarity movements ever in response to a tragedy happened afterwards. Then the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris happened with a much bigger death toll, and the worldwide solidarity movement completely dwarfed the one ten months earlier and became the biggest since 9/11.



* Abolitionism -- as in the movement to get rid of slavery -- today being against slavery (even though it still exists in some places in a "modern" form) is probably the definition of a self-evident cause and only a StrawmanPolitical would ever argue ''for'' slavery. However, when the movement first came up it was seen as incredibly daring and outrageously radical. Many abolitionists even paid with their life for what they believed.
1st Aug '17 10:46:18 AM Zekromaster
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** Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX-like system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)

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** GNU plus Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX-like system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, GNU plus Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)
5th Jul '17 6:44:20 AM LondonKdS
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** The same is true for the saying "An eye for an eye" and its many variations. Before it, justice didn't exist so much as arbitrary punishments and in nearly all cases, someone of noble standing would get off with much easier punishment, if any. Being punished the same way the crime was done and societal standing being irrelevant was completely revolutionary. Nowadays people only see the aspect of "So if my daughter gets killed by a person, in return ''their daughter'' should die?"

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** The same is true for the saying "An eye for an eye" and its many variations. Before it, justice didn't exist so much as arbitrary punishments and in nearly all cases, someone of noble standing would get off with much easier punishment, if any. Being punished the same way the crime was done and societal standing being irrelevant was completely revolutionary. Nowadays people only see the aspect of "So if my daughter gets killed by a person, in return ''their daughter'' should die?"die?" Another interpretation is that it was introduced to prevent the problem of escalating blood feuds (Alice accidentally breaks Bob's leg, Bob cuts her head off, Alice's brother kills Bob and both of his brothers, Bob's father traps Alice's entire surviving family in their farmhouse and burns the place down...) that caused chaos in earlier societies.
25th Apr '17 4:35:00 AM GastonRabbit
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** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest ''Homo sapiens'' were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.

to:

** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans ''Homo sapiens'' living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest ''Homo sapiens'' were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.
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