History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Other

22nd Aug '17 7:30:19 PM SheldonDinkleburg
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* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar is commonly seen as the first modern war, introducing deadlier weapons such as the Gatling gun, better transportation through the use of railroads, and the ability to observe battles in midair. Greater technology developed by UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, but these came from a conflict that cost more than 600,000 lives.
* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne was one of the worst wars in history -- but it wasn't nearly as bad as [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo its successor]], thus the first war doesn't have the same notoriety it would've have had beforehand.



* Part of the InternetBackdraft against social justice (besides the [[DontShootTheMessage loudmouthed proponents]] on [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment social media]]) is seen as this -- with several generations of people having grown up with major breakthroughs being standardized, proponents of social justice often come off as whiny and unable to appreciate just what a breakthrough things like women's suffrage or the civil rights act in the States ''were''.
* The 1993 World Trade Center bombing was one of the year's biggest stories at the time, but it became far less memorable than it used to be after 9/11, which killed 2,978 innocent lives compared to the 1993 attack's six.
** In fact, numerous pre-9/11 terror attacks and aircraft hijackings were dwarfed by the September 11 attacks, mainly because of its unmatched scale (it was the deadliest terrorist incident to date). The Oklahoma City Bombing is the only pre-9/11 attack to still remain a prominent figure in the public consciousness, mainly because it was the only other one with a particularly big death toll and deadliest homegrown terrorist attack in the United States. Fortunately, there has not been another attack on that scale since 9/11 -- probably the best known post-9/11 terror attacks in America are the Boston Marathon bombing and the Orlando nightclub massacre.
* Hurricane Irene in 2011 became the first hurricane to directly hit New York City in twelve years. It did nearly $20 billion in property damage, enough to get its name retired. Nowadays, the thought of a hurricane hitting New York City will instantly make people think of Superstorm Sandy one year later, and if Irene is remembered, it is usually as a warm-up to Sandy.
* The Charlie Hebdo terrorist attacks of January 2015 was the first huge new story of the year. One of the biggest worldwide solidarity movements ever in response to a tragedy happened afterwards. Then the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris happened with a much bigger death toll, and the worldwide solidarity movement completely dwarfed the one ten months earlier and became the biggest since 9/11.



* Abolitionism -- as in the movement to get rid of slavery -- today being against slavery (even though it still exists in some places in a "modern" form) is probably the definition of a self-evident cause and only a StrawmanPolitical would ever argue ''for'' slavery. However, when the movement first came up it was seen as incredibly daring and outrageously radical. Many abolitionists even paid with their life for what they believed.
1st Aug '17 10:46:18 AM Zekromaster
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** Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX-like system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)

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** GNU plus Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX-like system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, GNU plus Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)
5th Jul '17 6:44:20 AM LondonKdS
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** The same is true for the saying "An eye for an eye" and its many variations. Before it, justice didn't exist so much as arbitrary punishments and in nearly all cases, someone of noble standing would get off with much easier punishment, if any. Being punished the same way the crime was done and societal standing being irrelevant was completely revolutionary. Nowadays people only see the aspect of "So if my daughter gets killed by a person, in return ''their daughter'' should die?"

to:

** The same is true for the saying "An eye for an eye" and its many variations. Before it, justice didn't exist so much as arbitrary punishments and in nearly all cases, someone of noble standing would get off with much easier punishment, if any. Being punished the same way the crime was done and societal standing being irrelevant was completely revolutionary. Nowadays people only see the aspect of "So if my daughter gets killed by a person, in return ''their daughter'' should die?"die?" Another interpretation is that it was introduced to prevent the problem of escalating blood feuds (Alice accidentally breaks Bob's leg, Bob cuts her head off, Alice's brother kills Bob and both of his brothers, Bob's father traps Alice's entire surviving family in their farmhouse and burns the place down...) that caused chaos in earlier societies.
25th Apr '17 4:35:00 AM GastonRabbit
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** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest ''Homo sapiens'' were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.

to:

** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans ''Homo sapiens'' living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest ''Homo sapiens'' were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.
25th Apr '17 4:32:16 AM GastonRabbit
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* Neanderthals. Intelligent tool using hominids, capable of taking down big prey. Most intelligent animal by far in its home range. The only primate species to survive in ice age Europe for millions of years. Went extinct when [[HoistByHisOwnPetard an even more intelligent species of hominid with better tools, also capable of taking down the same prey]], migrated into their home range. That other intelligent hominid species? Modern Humans.
** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest humans were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.
** Other evidence shows Neanderthals ''did'' have some art. Some research suggests it was the end of the ice age that did them in -- analysis of Neanderthal sites found that their diet was approximately 90% protein and that they lived off of large mammals like the mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, etc. -- a good survival strategy in the ice age, where large mammals like this were common and abundant, but afterwards, when these animals went extinct, Neanderthals couldn't compete next to Homo sapiens, with our more varied diet.
** It has been shown that people with Eurasian ancestry do have up to 5% of their gene pool inherited from Neanderthals. It is likely that there never really was an extinction - the ''Homo sapiens'' simply absorbed the ''Homo neanderthalensis'' by intermarriage. As ''Homo sapiens'' outnumbered ''Homo neanderthalensis'' by being able to produce greater numbers of surviving offspring, this is a likely outcome. Those two species resembled each other so much that if you gave a Neanderthal a shower and haircut, dress him in decent clothes and teach him the basics of the modern society, you could not tell him apart in a big city. So all Caucasians are in a sense descendants of the Neanderthals.

to:

* Neanderthals. Intelligent tool using Intelligent, tool-using hominids, capable of taking down big prey. Most intelligent animal by far in its home range. The only primate species to survive in ice age ice-age Europe for millions of years. Went extinct when [[HoistByHisOwnPetard an even more intelligent species of hominid with better tools, also capable of taking down the same prey]], migrated into their home range. That other intelligent hominid species? Modern Humans.
humans.
** The intelligence of Neanderthals is the source of a lot of discussion. The level of toolmaking of both species was at roughly the same level, but it seems Neanderthals never made any kind of art or jewelry, at least not one that could have survived. There's some evidence of Neanderthals and humans living side-by-side for quite a while and possibly even forming joint societies. Why exactly Neanderthals went extinct is also not completely certain, some theories suggest humans ''Homo sapiens'' were better at procreation, other say we were better at the adapting to changing environments. And there is also the possibility that we simply got lucky.
** Other evidence shows Neanderthals ''did'' have some art. Some research suggests it was the end of the ice age that did them in -- analysis of Neanderthal sites found that their diet was approximately 90% protein and that they lived off of on large mammals like the mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, etc. -- a good survival strategy in the ice age, where large mammals like this were common and abundant, but afterwards, when these animals went extinct, Neanderthals couldn't compete next to Homo sapiens, with our more varied diet.
** It has been shown that people with Eurasian ancestry do have up to 5% of their gene pool inherited from Neanderthals. It is likely that there never really was an extinction - the -- ''Homo sapiens'' simply absorbed the ''Homo neanderthalensis'' by intermarriage. As ''Homo sapiens'' outnumbered ''Homo neanderthalensis'' by being able to produce greater numbers of surviving offspring, this is a likely outcome. Those two species resembled each other so much that if you gave a Neanderthal a shower and haircut, dress him in decent clothes and teach him the basics of the modern society, you could not tell him apart in a big city. So all Caucasians are in a sense descendants of the Neanderthals.



** Greek paintings and sculpture. Most of it looks a bit primitive and even uncharacteristically unrealistic today, but without it literally all of western art the way we know it wouldn't exist (maybe aside from a period of truly Germanic art at TheLowMiddleAges).

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** Greek paintings and sculpture. Most of it looks a bit primitive and even uncharacteristically unrealistic today, but without it literally all of western Western art the way we know it wouldn't exist (maybe aside from a period of truly Germanic art at TheLowMiddleAges).



* Stand-up comics. Most original and groundbreaking ones seem less so a generation later--or less--when their styles and gimmicks are widely reproduced. It can be difficult to understand what makes, e.g., Creator/LennyBruce or Creator/RichardPryor so important when stages are saturated with comedians who do approximately the same thing, many of them at least as well.

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* Stand-up comics. Most original and groundbreaking ones seem less so a generation later--or less--when their styles and gimmicks are widely reproduced. It can be difficult to understand what makes, e.g., for example, Creator/LennyBruce or Creator/RichardPryor so important when stages are saturated with comedians who do approximately the same thing, many of them at least as well.



*** One interesting thing of note about the working men's club comedians is that they themselves were a victim of this trope at the time. Beforehand, British stand-up was very ''stiff upper lip,'' with a guy in an evening suit standing motionless on a stage with very little charisma. As controversial as the racist/sexist acts of men like Bernard Manning would eventually become, they really were the benchmarks that every up and coming comedian tried to copy.
** Similarly, the work of many of the comedians of the "alternative comedy" set of the 1980s now often looks as quaint as the earlier comics they were reacting against, when viewed in context of later work.
** Surrealism, non-sequiturs, and a rambling rhetorical style are so widespread among stand-up comics of the late 1990s / early 2000s that it's easy to overlook how influential Creator/EddieIzzard was when he first coined that style. And even he simply imitated what certain American stand up comedians and Creator/MontyPython did decades earlier.
** Jerry Seinfeld again. His observational stand-up routine was insanely popular in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and it was widely recognized as fresh and original. JohnnyCarson famously gave him the "OK" sign, when Seinfeld first appeared on ''TheTonightShow''. Fast forward a few years and Seinfeld had become the go-to impression of a lazy hack comedian, due to being copied to death by lesser comedians. As early as 1985, a recurring sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' featured a group of these, dressed alike and beginning and ending nearly every sentence with "What is the deal with..." and "I wanna know!"
*** Seinfeld was also the first person to joke about airline peanuts, now pretty much synonymous with "lazy comedian".

to:

*** ** One interesting thing of note about the working men's club comedians is that they themselves were a victim of this trope at the time. Beforehand, British stand-up was very ''stiff upper lip,'' with a guy in an evening suit standing motionless on a stage with very little charisma. As controversial as the racist/sexist acts of men like Bernard Manning would eventually become, they really were the benchmarks that every up and coming comedian tried to copy.
** Similarly, the The work of many of the comedians of the "alternative comedy" set of the 1980s now often looks as quaint as the earlier comics they were reacting against, when viewed in context of later work.
** Surrealism, non-sequiturs, and a rambling rhetorical style are so widespread among stand-up comics of the late 1990s / early 2000s that it's easy to overlook how influential Creator/EddieIzzard was when he first coined that style. And even he simply imitated what certain American stand up stand-up comedians and Creator/MontyPython did decades earlier.
** Jerry Seinfeld again. His Seinfeld's observational stand-up routine was insanely popular in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and it was widely recognized as fresh and original. JohnnyCarson Creator/JohnnyCarson famously gave him the "OK" sign, when Seinfeld first appeared on ''TheTonightShow''.''Series/TheTonightShow''. Fast forward a few years and Seinfeld had become the go-to impression of a lazy hack comedian, due to being copied to death by lesser comedians. As early as 1985, a recurring sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' featured a group of these, dressed alike and beginning and ending nearly every sentence with "What is the deal with..." and "I wanna know!"
***
know!" Seinfeld was also the first person to joke about airline peanuts, now pretty much synonymous with "lazy comedian".



** Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)

to:

** Linux was considered revolutionary because it was a free full UNIX UNIX-like system that could run on a single off-the-shelf PC. Other free UNIX-like [=OSes=] have since been ported to the platform (particularly [=NetBSD=], which aims to be incredibly portable). Even then, Linux wasn't the first version of UNIX that could run on a PC. (That said, it's still more popular than other free UNIX-like operating systems.)



* {{USENET}}. In a world where any schmuck with an Internet connection can start a blog or a message board, this has gone from "groundbreaking innovator" to "place where only spammers frequent" very quickly.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gopher_%28protocol%29 Gopher protocol]], which organized content on the Internet into a browseable (by a text menu interface) hierarchy of sites, files and folders, complete with a search engine has been all but lost to current generations of Web users as the direct predecessor ''of'' the Web. However, a decent-sized gopher space does still exist on the 'net to this day.
* Commercials with the TrixRabbit (where the kids deny him the cereal because "Trix are for kids") may have been funny once, but modern viewers are starting to see those kids as rather cruel and selfish in the modern day, certainly ''not'' the ideal role models for the target audience.
* People these days, with handheld computing devices such as smartphones, electronic book readers, tablet computers, etc. probably don't remember the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MessagePad Newton MessagePad]], the grandfather, so to speak, of many of these, and direct ancestor of the iPad. Quite a few of them very likely would think of them as unwieldy or clunky, but when they were introduced in 1994, they were far ahead of their time.

to:

* {{USENET}}.Website/{{Usenet}}. In a world where any schmuck with an Internet connection can start a blog or a message board, this has gone from "groundbreaking innovator" to "place where only spammers frequent" very quickly.
* The [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gopher_%28protocol%29 Gopher protocol]], which organized content on the Internet into a browseable (by a text menu interface) hierarchy of sites, files files, and folders, complete with a search engine has been all but lost to current generations of Web users as the direct predecessor ''of'' the Web. However, a decent-sized gopher space does still exist on the 'net to this day.
* Commercials with the TrixRabbit Advertising/TrixRabbit (where the kids deny him the cereal because "Trix are for kids") may have been funny once, but modern viewers are starting to see those kids as rather cruel and selfish in the modern day, certainly ''not'' the ideal role models for the target audience.
* People these days, with handheld computing devices such as smartphones, electronic book readers, tablet computers, etc. probably don't remember the [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MessagePad Newton MessagePad]], the grandfather, so to speak, of many of these, and direct ancestor of the iPad. Quite a few of them very likely would think of them as unwieldy or clunky, but when they were introduced in 1994, they were far ahead of their time.



** Computers were marketed based on their speed. It was the quest for 100, then 200, then 300 megahertz. By [[TheNineties late 90's]] half a gigahertz and then one gigahertz finally arrived to a universal meh. Now only do it yourselfers and PC enthusiasts focus on speed or process specs.
** Similarly, science. Theories that were once revolutionary are now things that are taught to anyone with a basic education, and many people who were geniuses of their era and had what was the best and strongest theory at the time now seem to believe things that are ridiculous. Even though we remember Galileo, Newton and Aristotle, it's strange to most people to think how revolutionary their ideas and experiments (thought experiments or otherwise) were and how far ahead of their time they were. There are doubtlessly an even larger number of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers who have been outright forgotten by history because their work is now obsolete or factually wrong, or just became common knowledge and now exists in the work of later people who improved upon their original works.

to:

** Computers were marketed based on their speed. It was the quest for 100, then 200, then 300 megahertz. By [[TheNineties [[UsefulNotes/TheNineties late 90's]] '90s]] half a gigahertz and then one gigahertz finally arrived to a universal meh. Now only do it yourselfers do-it-yourselfers and PC enthusiasts focus on speed or process specs.
** Similarly, science.Science. Theories that were once revolutionary are now things that are taught to anyone with a basic education, and many people who were geniuses of their era and had what was the best and strongest theory at the time now seem to believe things that are ridiculous. Even though we remember Galileo, Newton Newton, and Aristotle, it's strange to most people to think how revolutionary their ideas and experiments (thought experiments or otherwise) were and how far ahead of their time they were. There are doubtlessly an even larger number of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers who have been outright forgotten by history because their work is now obsolete or factually wrong, or just became common knowledge and now exists in the work of later people who improved upon their original works.



*** The above is the rationalization used by some who promote [[AncientAstronauts ancient astronaut]] theories. They express shock and disbelief that such "primitive" cultures could have possibly created complex structures, governmental systems or works of art without the assistance of a higher, alien influence.
* In less than a decade, we went from cell-phone commercials advertising the ability to send photos or text messages as if it was magic, because it really was an innovative thing, to a time where the idea of owning a cell-phone that ''can't'' do those things is unthinkable.
** Really, cell phones in general. From their size (they used to be the size of a brick and just as heavy) to their service (they used to only work in high-traffic areas, and would be useless in the suburbs, for example) to just how many people had them. There was a time when, even after they got smaller, had wider service areas and lower rates, when well over 50% of the adults in the western world still didn't own one, and the idea of teenagers having their own was about as likely as aliens landing. A majority of households still had a landline home phone line, and wouldn't think of getting rid of it because ''that'' was their primary phone while their cells were (supposedly) strictly for emergencies. In the modern era, most households have one cell phone per person, many don't have landline phones at all, and when they do, they barely use them.
*** Strangely enough, while being uglier, costing more to own and operate, and being able to do much less, the cell phones of yesteryear had battery power that could last for nearly a week, even when used heavily. Modern smart phones die in mere hours even with light use. The modern battery life is largely due to the 'feature war' between smartphone manufacturers, to have the brightest screen, the fastest Internet, the slimmest battery etc.
* If you're too used to DVD and Blu-ray, watching a movie on a VHS tape seems... weird. The quality might seem grainy, the sound is lower quality, etc., and there's all sorts of damage that could have been done. Plus, having to fast forward if you wanted to see a certain scene... and knowing they weren't that accurate, as most VCR systems would play about a second of silence and then pick up when you fast-forwarded or rewound.

to:

*** The above is the rationalization used by some who promote [[AncientAstronauts ancient astronaut]] {{ancient astronaut|s}} theories. They express shock and disbelief that such "primitive" cultures could have possibly created complex structures, governmental systems or works of art without the assistance of a higher, alien influence.
* In less than a decade, we went from cell-phone commercials advertising the ability to send photos or text messages as if it was magic, because it really was an innovative thing, to a time where the idea of owning a cell-phone that ''can't'' do those things is unthinkable.
** Really, cell
unthinkable. Cell phones in general. From themselves became examples over time, from their size (they used to be the size of a brick and just as heavy) to their service (they used to only work in high-traffic areas, and would be useless in the suburbs, for example) to just how many people had them. There was a time when, even after they got smaller, had wider service areas and lower rates, when well over 50% of the adults in the western world still didn't own one, and the idea of teenagers having their own was about as likely as aliens landing. A majority of households still had a landline home phone line, and wouldn't think of getting rid of it because ''that'' was their primary phone while their cells were (supposedly) strictly for emergencies. In the modern era, most households have one cell phone per person, many don't have landline phones at all, and when they do, they barely use them.
*** Strangely enough, while ** While being uglier, costing more to own and operate, and being able to do much less, the cell phones of yesteryear had battery power that could last for nearly a week, even when used heavily. Modern smart phones die in mere hours even with light use. The modern battery life is largely due to the 'feature war' between smartphone manufacturers, to have the brightest screen, the fastest Internet, the slimmest battery etc.
* If you're too used to DVD and Blu-ray, watching a movie on a VHS tape seems... weird. The quality might seem grainy, the sound is lower quality, lower-quality, etc., and there's all sorts of damage that could have been done. Plus, having to fast forward if you wanted to see a certain scene... and knowing they weren't that accurate, as most VCR systems would play about a second of silence and then pick up when you fast-forwarded or rewound.



** For those who were around when VHS was the dominant medium, this trope is somewhat mitigated by the fact that VHS was always noticeably poorer quality than broadcast TV; and let's be fair, there was a ''reason'' why Laserdisc was the (albeit niche) choice for serious cinephiles in the pre-DVD days...
** It's also somewhat exaggerated by the larger size of most modern-day TV screens by comparison to what was normal in the '80s and'90s; the actual resolving power of the eye at normal viewing distance means that for smaller screens, higher resolutions are not normally as noticed.
* Similarly, whilst now-normal HD pictures looked amazing a few years ago, they now look much less impressive when compared to watching in 4K...
* The grocery store chain [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piggly_Wiggly Piggly Wiggly ]] is the 'trope maker' of the modern self serve grocery store, but most people likely have forgotten that. (Even fewer people remember that it was one of the first businesses to use the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-in-time_%28business%29 "just-in-time" model of production]], and even one of the first to use the shopping cart, but that's because to most people, a grocery store is simply a place where you can buy food.)
** Similarly, [=A&P=] was one of the first chains to popularize private-label "store brand" merchandise (most famously Eight O'Clock Coffee), which is now all but universal among grocery chains.
* UsefulNotes/McDonalds consistently ranks at or near the bottom in rankings of fast food franchises despite being the one that first codified the business model of a fast food joint, partially because it can't stand out in the status quo it created. That said, they are still #1 in profits by a decent margin, probably out of how utterly ubiquitous they are.
** That, and the fact that even people who routinely trash it still eat there at least once a month. [[FridgeLogic (They]] ''[[FridgeLogic do]]'' [[FridgeLogic have to have something to legitimately complain about, y'know.)]]
* Similarly, Howard Johnson's and Holiday Inn were two of the first chains to really standardize the concept of a hotel chain as we know it today. Things such as on-site swimming pools, meeting rooms, and on-site restaurants that most motel patrons take for granted became the ''norm'' with Ho Jo, but ExecutiveMeddling in the 70s and 80s, combined with a saturation of the market, pushed that chain into near-irrelevance. (Holiday Inn, however, managed to revitalize itself in TheNineties.) Between the saturation of the market and the rampant rebranding present in the motel industry, many facets of the modern hotel that most people don't think twice about were seen as new, convenient, and groundbreaking when they first came out in the 60's or so. A traveler back in the 50's probably would've been blown away by the concept of a motel offering a continental breakfast, for instance.
* The Toyota Prius, the first [[TropeCodifier commercially successful]] hybrid car, almost single handedly launched the Hybrid car revolution... and is now quickly becoming a victim of its own success, as the explosion of hybrid cars it helped launch has given rise to bigger, faster, and even more fuel efficient hybrid cars, with even other cars from Toyota like the Camry Hybrid stealing its thunder, and leaving the Prius with less of an edge, and less to recommend it.

to:

** For those who were around when VHS was the dominant medium, this trope is somewhat mitigated by the fact that VHS was always noticeably poorer quality than broadcast TV; and let's be fair, there was a ''reason'' why Laserdisc was the (albeit niche) choice for serious cinephiles in the pre-DVD days...
days....
** It's also somewhat exaggerated by the larger size of most modern-day TV screens by comparison to what was normal in the '80s and'90s; and '90s; the actual resolving power of the eye at normal viewing distance means that for smaller screens, higher resolutions are not normally as noticed.
* Similarly, whilst Whilst now-normal HD pictures looked amazing a few years ago, they now look much less impressive when compared to watching in 4K...
4K.
* The grocery store chain [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piggly_Wiggly Piggly Wiggly ]] Wiggly]] is the 'trope maker' of the modern self serve self-serve grocery store, but most people likely have forgotten that. (Even fewer people remember that it was one of the first businesses to use the [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-in-time_%28business%29 "just-in-time" model of production]], and even one of the first to use the shopping cart, but that's because to most people, a grocery store is simply a place where you can buy food.)
** Similarly, [=A&P=] was one of the first chains to popularize private-label "store brand" merchandise (most famously Eight O'Clock Coffee), which is now all but universal among grocery chains.
* UsefulNotes/McDonalds consistently ranks at or near the bottom in rankings of fast food franchises despite being the one that first codified the business model of a fast food joint, partially because it can't stand out in the status quo it created. That said, they are still #1 in profits by a decent margin, probably out of how utterly ubiquitous they are.
** That, and the fact that even people
are. People who routinely trash it still eat there at least once a month. [[FridgeLogic (They]] ''[[FridgeLogic do]]'' [[FridgeLogic (They ''do'' have to have something to legitimately complain about, y'know.)]]
)
* Similarly, Howard Johnson's and Holiday Inn were two of the first chains to really standardize the concept of a hotel chain as we know it today. Things such as on-site swimming pools, meeting rooms, and on-site restaurants that most motel patrons take for granted became the ''norm'' with Ho Jo, but ExecutiveMeddling in the 70s and 80s, combined with a saturation of the market, pushed that chain into near-irrelevance. (Holiday Inn, however, managed to revitalize itself in TheNineties.UsefulNotes/TheNineties.) Between the saturation of the market and the rampant rebranding present in the motel industry, many facets of the modern hotel that most people don't think twice about were seen as new, convenient, and groundbreaking when they first came out in the 60's or so. A traveler back in the 50's probably would've been blown away by the concept of a motel offering a continental breakfast, for instance.
* The Toyota Prius, the first [[TropeCodifier commercially successful]] hybrid car, almost single handedly single-handedly launched the Hybrid car revolution... and is now quickly becoming a victim of its own success, as the explosion of hybrid cars it helped launch has given rise to bigger, faster, and even more fuel efficient hybrid cars, with even other cars from Toyota like the Camry Hybrid stealing its thunder, and leaving the Prius with less of an edge, and less to recommend it.



* Memes in general. What was considered funny and viral back then can quickly become a DiscreditedMeme when beaten to the ground. For example, the "I was an adventurer like you, then I took an arrow to the knee" meme from Skyrim quickly fell out of grace weeks after the meme was born. With enough fervor, memes can become overused, tired, parodied, and hated within ''days''.
** Whilst many memes became popular ironically, they then get taken on as being seriously appreciated by the media, and dragged into the ground well beyond the point where the original fans have derided it as an old meme. A notable example is "Gangnam Style", which due to eig such a oversaturated mainstream meme at the time, will lead to groans from pretty much anyone nowadays rather than appreciation.
* In a similar vein, anything used in a WebAnimation/YouTubePoop. Earlier poops, especially those based on VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDIGames or ''VideoGame/HotelMario'', can be seen as crude or uncreative due to so many poopers (amateur and "famous" alike) using those sources early in the medium's history. Also, most poopers these days have become more advanced at techniques such as sentence mixing, pitch-shifting, what have you, that randomly splicing in a "[[{{Mondegreen}} Gay Luigi]]" no longer has the same impact that it did in 2008.
* Jean Robert-Houdin was a french magician in the 1850's who invented the cliched Victorian magician idea. At the time magicians were seen as beggars, thieves, or children's entertainers, seeing one dressed like the finest of gentlemen, on a stage, performing for high society, was revolutionary at the time, so much so it's still most people's go to image of a magician 150 years later.

to:

* Memes in general. What was considered funny and viral back then can quickly become a DiscreditedMeme when beaten to the ground. For example, the "I was an adventurer like you, then I took an arrow to the knee" meme from Skyrim quickly fell out of grace weeks after the meme was born. With enough fervor, memes can become overused, tired, parodied, and hated within ''days''.
**
''days''. Whilst many memes became popular ironically, they then get taken on as being seriously appreciated by the media, and dragged into the ground well beyond the point where the original fans have derided it as an old meme. A notable example is "Gangnam Style", which due to eig being such a oversaturated mainstream meme at the time, will lead to groans from pretty much anyone nowadays rather than appreciation.
* In a similar vein, anything used in a WebAnimation/YouTubePoop. Earlier poops, especially those based on VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDIGames or ''VideoGame/HotelMario'', can be seen as crude or uncreative due to so many poopers (amateur and "famous" alike) using those sources early in the medium's history. Also, most poopers these days have become more advanced at techniques such as sentence mixing, pitch-shifting, what have you, that randomly splicing in a "[[{{Mondegreen}} Gay Luigi]]" no longer has the same impact that it did in 2008.
*
Jean Robert-Houdin was a french French magician in the 1850's 1850s who invented the cliched Victorian magician idea. At the time magicians were seen as beggars, thieves, or children's entertainers, seeing one dressed like the finest of gentlemen, on a stage, performing for high society, was revolutionary at the time, so much so it's still most people's go to go-to image of a magician 150 years later.



* Jokes based around current events tend to get this reaction after awhile. For instance, seeing jokes about Michael Jackson being a pedophile are hard to laugh at now that he's dead.
* VideoGames Strategy Guides. Rather [[CrackIsCheaper infamous for their price]], they got phased out by the Internet boom when gamers started writing their own guides and uploading them to websites like Website/GameFAQs for free.
** Strategy guides still do exist, some often are usually around for collectors value or even the few that still contain {{Feelies}}. (Such as posters.)
** Gaming magazines as well. Magazines that featured ''partial walkthroughs'' would seem like a scam today, but at the time that was popular, that was probably your only way to get help on a game.

to:

* Jokes based around current events tend to get this reaction after awhile. a while. For instance, seeing jokes about Michael Jackson being a pedophile are hard to laugh at now that he's dead.
* VideoGames Strategy Guides. Rather [[CrackIsCheaper infamous for their price]], they got phased out by the Internet boom when gamers started writing their own guides and uploading them to websites like Website/GameFAQs for free.
dead.
** Strategy guides still do exist, some often are usually around for collectors value or even the few that still contain {{Feelies}}. (Such as posters.)
**
* Gaming magazines as well. Magazines that featured ''partial walkthroughs'' would seem like a scam today, but at the time that was popular, that was probably your only way to get help on a game.



* Arguably, this trope is both the cause ''and'' effect for [[ContinuityReboot reboots]] and {{remake}}s. To wit, part of the reason why we get remakes and reboots is because later generations don't appreciate the originals. As a consequence, the later generations judge the ''original'' by the standards of the reboot. This is despite the fact the ''reboot and remakes wouldn't even exist if it were not for the original work in the first place''!



* Abolitionism - as in the movement to get rid of slavery - today being against slavery (even though it still exists in some places in a "modern" form) is probably the definition of a self evident cause and only a StrawmanPolitical would ever argue ''for'' slavery. However, when the movement first came up it was seen as incredibly daring and outrageously radical. Many abolitionists even paid with their life for what they believed.
* Propeller aircraft - for decades, they were the only air transport there was and even a flight from London to New York often involved refueling stops in SuddenlySignificantCity s like Gander, Canada or Shannon, Ireland[[note]] which coincidentally contains the oldest duty free shop in any airport in the world[[/note]], but today jet aircraft has replaced them on almost every route safe a few "short hops" - even though until well into the 1990s jet engines were actually less fuel efficient than propellers.
* As space technology advances, older books and films about robotic missions from previous decades can seem a bit dull in comparison to more recent missions-- it may seem hard to imagine people being excited about grainy black-and white photos taken on a brief flyby of a planet or moon if you've seen high-resolution color photos of the same place from landers and rovers. (Such as the hype about the Viking Mars probes in CosmosAPersonalVoyage compared to the images from the Pathfinder mission in the 2000 "Cosmos Update" epilogue on the [=DVDs.=]) But those older photos were the first close-up glimpse of those worlds at all, and without them, the modern missions could never have been attempted.

to:

* Abolitionism - -- as in the movement to get rid of slavery - -- today being against slavery (even though it still exists in some places in a "modern" form) is probably the definition of a self evident self-evident cause and only a StrawmanPolitical would ever argue ''for'' slavery. However, when the movement first came up it was seen as incredibly daring and outrageously radical. Many abolitionists even paid with their life for what they believed.
* Propeller aircraft - -- for decades, they were the only air transport there was and even a flight from London to New York often involved refueling stops in SuddenlySignificantCity s like Gander, Canada or Shannon, Ireland[[note]] which coincidentally contains the oldest duty free shop in any airport in the world[[/note]], but today jet aircraft has replaced them on almost every route safe a few "short hops" - -- even though until well into the 1990s jet engines were actually less fuel efficient than propellers.
* As space technology advances, older books and films about robotic missions from previous decades can seem a bit dull in comparison to more recent missions-- it may seem hard to imagine people being excited about grainy black-and white photos taken on a brief flyby of a planet or moon if you've seen high-resolution color photos of the same place from landers and rovers. (Such as the hype about the Viking Mars probes in CosmosAPersonalVoyage compared to the images from the Pathfinder mission in the 2000 "Cosmos Update" epilogue on the [=DVDs.=]) [=DVDs=].) But those older photos were the first close-up glimpse of those worlds at all, and without them, the modern missions could never have been attempted.



* Fan conventions. In an era where cons (especially gaming and anime cons) pop up for just about every little thing (including My Little Pony and Power Rangers), it's hard to explain just what was so revolutionary and important about Otakon, GenCon, or Comic-Con. They're still fun and important, but lack a certain gravitas that they used to.

to:

* Fan conventions. In an era where cons (especially gaming and anime cons) pop up for just about every little thing (including My Little Pony and Power Rangers), it's hard to explain just what was so revolutionary and important about Otakon, GenCon, or Comic-Con.Comic Con. They're still fun and important, but lack a certain gravitas that they used to.
25th Feb '17 3:47:14 PM nombretomado
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** Surrealism, non-sequiturs, and a rambling rhetorical style are so widespread among stand-up comics of the late 1990s / early 2000s that it's easy to overlook how influential EddieIzzard was when he first coined that style. And even he simply imitated what certain American stand up comedians and Creator/MontyPython did decades earlier.

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** Surrealism, non-sequiturs, and a rambling rhetorical style are so widespread among stand-up comics of the late 1990s / early 2000s that it's easy to overlook how influential EddieIzzard Creator/EddieIzzard was when he first coined that style. And even he simply imitated what certain American stand up comedians and Creator/MontyPython did decades earlier.
12th Feb '17 3:58:51 AM Wooboo
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*** The above is the rationalization used by some who promote [[AncientAstronauts ancient astronaut]] theories. They express shock and disbelief that such "primitive" cultures could have possibly created complex structures, governmental systems or works of art without the assistance of a higher, alien influence.
27th Jan '17 1:38:16 AM onionmaster
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** Whilst many memes became popular ironically, they then get taken on as being seriously appreciated by the media, and dragged into the ground well beyond the point where the original fans have derided it as an old meme. A notable example is "Gangnam Style", which due to eig such a oversaturated mainstream meme at the time, will lead to groans from pretty much anyone nowadays rather than appreciation.
17th Dec '16 5:22:22 PM Gray
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** Worldcon suffers from this as well. In the 1940s, it was a big deal and was "the" event of the year within science fiction fandom, often the largest con of the year through the 1970s and 1980s, and generally featured some of the best authors, etc. on panels or giving speeches. Now, though it still occupies a prominent place, it's been ''far'' overshadowed by cons such as DragonCon (which can be 10-20x larger and attract "bigger" names).
12th Dec '16 4:51:24 PM ZombieAladdin
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** Anyone getting into pinball nowadays will eventually find access to the older electromechanical machines. In almost all cases, they will find them utterly boring compared to the more modern solid-state driven machines: Those electromechanical machines have no ramps, no pre-recorded audio (and thus no voice clips or music), play rather slowly due to their more primitive machinery, and had absolutely ''[[NintendoHard brutal]]'' difficulty, to where a standard game had 5 balls instead of today's 3. But back in their own time, these electromechanical machines were incredibly popular (albeit in a legal gray area) because not only were they at the cutting edge of electronic gaming, they were dirt-cheap to play. People could insert in a nickel or a dime and play, and if they were good, they could play for a while.
** And pinball in general easily falls into Seinfeld Is Unfunny. Its nature as a physical device limits the types of gameplay, stories ([[NoPlotNoProblem if any]]), and artistic diversity that video games can have, so it can be tough to imagine a time when video games were so technologically primitive that ''Pinball/SpaceShuttle'''s scale model was so impressive, it yanked the market share of pinball machines back from arcade video games. That being said, the real-life physics of pinball is so complex that only in the mid-2010's has home computer technology become advanced enough to accurately replicate pinball virtually. The end result is Seinfeld is Unfunny becoming a CyclicalTrope for pinball, as the gameplay of pinball is nothing like any modern video games, causing an uptick in non-virtual pinball's popularity due to curious video gamers seeking them out to play.


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** Going back further, it can be hard to understand why the World's Fair would have people so excited they came over from other continents, as it had no focus and looked like just another traveling carnival, only bigger. Events like these were the ancestors of today's conventions and expositions that focus on more specific topics and cater to fans.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.Other