History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Music

1st Jan '16 1:19:14 AM Papercut1
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Reverting possible vandalism.
* Music/{{Radiohead}}. Their albums ''Music/TheBends'' and ''Music/OKComputer'' (along with their breakout hit "Creep") were so innovative that the band's combination of introspective darkness and falsetto vocals were promptly ripped off by massive numbers of alternative rock musicians, most of which went on to massive mainstream success greater than Radiohead had ever had at the time. Frustration with this led to the band's NeoclassicalP
to:
* Music/{{Radiohead}}. Their albums ''Music/TheBends'' and ''Music/OKComputer'' (along with their breakout hit "Creep") were so innovative that the band's combination of introspective darkness and falsetto vocals were promptly ripped off by massive numbers of alternative rock musicians, most of which went on to massive mainstream success greater than Radiohead had ever had at the time. Frustration with this led to the band's NeoclassicalPNeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly album, ''Music/KidA'' The genre switch worked, and they've been quite successful and critically acclaimed since. * Music/DireStraits' music video for "Money for Nothing" from ''Music/BrothersInArms'' featured some of the first ever CGI animation. It seems incredibly primitive today, but it was considered groundbreaking in 1985. * Music/GangOfFour's trademark sound to some extent: Starting around the TurnOfTheMillennium, a lot of post-punk/New Wave-influenced bands like Music/FranzFerdinand and Music/MaximoPark started using minimalist, choppy guitar riffs and stiff but funk-influenced rhythms in a similar manner. This actually led to a resurgence of interest in Gang Of Four (and eventually, a partial reunion), but it also can make their debut album ''Entertainment!'' seem less innovative than it was at the time. The key thing that still sets Gang Of Four apart is that these newer bands usually lack their overtly political lyrics and occasionally ''really'' harsh guitar feedback. * Music/{{U2}} When they first arrived, they were praised not only for being the first Irish band to hit it very big abroad, but also for the pure defiance in their lyrics. To have a group from Dublin speak so convincingly about issues that affected them was unheard of. Their music was like nothing else around. Years later They have become better known for Bono's preacherman antics while their political lyrics seem tame compared to bands like Music/RageAgainstTheMachine. ** The ''sound'' of U2, and in particular the guitar work of The Edge, eschewing solos and rock guitar conventions for an atmospheric/rhythmic, textural, chiming approach relying heaving on delay and effects was equally influential, but it's hard not to find an Edge-infuenced guitarist in a rock band (or generally U2-inspired group) since at least TheNineties. ** Their album ''Music/AchtungBaby'' gets swept under the rug these days thanks to a combination of CriticalBacklash ([[TheyChangedItNowItSucks especially by die-hard fans]] of ''Music/TheJoshuaTree'') and countless BritPop bands aping its sound to the point where it no longer sounds as innovative as it once did. * The 2001 album ''Is This It'' by Music/TheStrokes. In an era where popular music was dominated mostly by [[TeenIdol Teen Pop]] and NuMetal, the album was seen as a major breath of fresh air: an authentic indie rock record with enough pop sensibilities for mainstream viability. In its wake, there was a gradual shift in the popular music landscape, with indie bands like Music/ModestMouse, Music/DeathCabForCutie and Music/TheKillers achieving at-the-time unheard of levels of success. Today, with low-fi/indie being the norm in rock, it might be hard for new listeners to understand what was so special about ''Is This It''. [[AC:Pop]] * Music/BarbraStreisand, Music/{{Cher}}, Music/{{Madonna}}, ...three leading ladies of the music industry, almost all possessing [[LGBTFanbase huge gay followings]], who also spent a fair bit of time doing things in the movie biz. Hard to believe they're some of the most innovative girls around, considering (at least in Madonna's case) every blonde pop singer from the nineties onward is compared to them or called their successor. * On that note, Music/LadyGaga appears to have fallen victim to this trope. When her debut album ''The Fame'' was released in 2008, she was seen as a renaissance for dance music, taking the blueprint established by Music/{{Madonna}} and updating it for the new millennium while still having her own unique style. Today, with so many dance pop artists having risen to (pun not intended) fame in the wake of its success, Lady Gaga has become a bit of punch line among music fans. Her [[LargeHam stage antics]] and [[MoralGuardians constant media controversy]] certainly don't help matters. * The arrival of Music/HilaryDuff on the DisneyChannel (and, to some extent, the rebooted ''Series/MickeyMouseClub'' as ''MMC'') led to unexpected success on the DisneyChannel with the equally unexpected success of her show Series/LizzieMcGuire, helped the network cultivate a tween and teen audience they rarely had before, and the push of Duff as a TeenIdol and [[IdolSinger pop princess]], the family-friendly alternative to the increasingly spicy, MMC stars Music/BritneySpears and Msuic/ChristinaAguilera, was new and unprecedented. It helped Hollywood Records escape from being mostly well-known for rereleasing Music/{{Queen}} albums, and her debut, ''Metamorphosis'', was the biggest selling CD in the Disney-owned label's history at the time. As Hilary's receded from the background and stopped releasing pop albums, and successors such as Music/MileyCyrus, Music/SelenaGomez, Music/DemiLovato and Music/TheJonasBrothers took Hilary's spotlight, it can be hard to picture the DisneyChannel not [[CashCowFranchise heavily cross-promoting]] [[IdolSinger pop-music singing]] [[TeenIdol teen idols]] starring in [[PeripheryDemographic tween-marketed]] [[KidCom kidcoms]], all working from the same basic business model Music/HilaryDuff popularized. [[AC:Folk & Country Music]] * Music/WoodyGuthrie's "This Land is Your Land" has come to be associated so much with American pride that it's easy to forget that, at the time it was written, it was essentially a ProtestSong. Guthrie originally wrote it as a TakeThat to Irving Berlin's "God Bless America" [[note]] The revised version of "God Bless America" was released just two years before "This Land is Your Land" was[[/note]], responding to the song's nationalist undertones by singing about the importance of America's diversity and sense of inclusiveness. Hell, some early versions of the song are ''overtly'' political in nature--and a few of them even mention Guthrie's support of the Communist Party. * Music/BobDylan. In the documentary ''No Direction Home'', Dave Van Ronk tells a story about "House of the Rising Sun," which Dylan recorded on his (self-titled) debut album. The version he recorded was arranged by Van Ronk and Dylan had learned it from hearing him perform it live. After Dylan recorded it, so many people accused Van Ronk of ripping it off from him that he finally stopped performing it. Later, when the Animals covered Dylan's version the song, the same thing happened to him. ** And Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, and Roy Acuff had recorded the song back in the 1940s. * CountryMusic sparked several of these: ** Music/ConwayTwitty. Now seen as a linchpin of classic country, he was never part of the Grand Ole Opry in part due to his "rock and roll sound". ** Billy Ray Cyrus became popular in 1992, at a time when there was a trend toward "traditional country", and his very rock- and pop-influenced "crossover country" style (complete with the ubiquitous novelty hit "Achy Breaky Heart") and mulleted, musclebound, hip-wiggling pretty-boy stage presence was both very uncommon in the genre, and polarized many country purists who saw him as a {{Scrappy}}. His success, however, brought a younger, hipper, more rock-influenced audience to country music, and helped to give the genre more mainstream attention and airplay. You can see more exaggerated influences in stars like Blake Shelton or Kenny Chesney topping the charts, but Billy is still not acknowledged, and [[Music/MileyCyrus his daughter]] is now more well-known than he is. ** Music/FaithHill. When she hit it big in late 1999-early 2000 with the massive crossover hit "Breathe", every single female act in the genre was cutting {{Power Ballad}}s with a similar sound and similar incentive to cross over. These attempts usually were met with failure (except for Martina [=McBride=] getting a few huge crossover hits -- albeit in 2004, after the craze died down), and what's more, Faith ended up hoist by her own petard when country radio shunned her very heavily pop-influenced ''Cry'' album. ** Music/GeorgeStrait. When he first hit the charts in 1981, he was markedly more country than his peers, most of whom were following the pop crossovers of acts such as Music/{{Alabama}}, Music/RonnieMilsap and Music/KennyRogers. The rise of similarly "neotraditionalist" acts like Music/RandyTravis, Music/AlanJackson, and Clint Black in the late 1980s-early 1990s followed in George's footsteps. While many of his contemporaries have faded, George has somehow managed to keep his A-list status with minimal change to his sound, sometimes making it quite hard to remember just how much of a pioneer he is. There was also Strait's FountainOfExpies nature, leading to the "hat act" boom of the 90s — a bunch of young up-and-comers looking for a hit dressed in jeans, pressed shirts, and cowboy hats just like him, and sang safe, radio-friendly honky-tonk in a slight twang, all trying to be just like Strait. Over time, "hat act" became a derogatory term in Nashville, and the tide of "hat acts" stopped. Even Music/KennyChesney was a "hat act" [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness early in his career]] before evolving into his own sound. ** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to Music/TaylorSwift and Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent — albeit moreso with male artists. ** Music/JohnnyCash and other acoustic music in general gets this treatment these days. Most teenagers think singers like Johnny Cash are boring. In his day, Cash was shocking to the MoralGuardians. These days, the acoustic guitar seen as a starting point for learning the guitar. It's hard to imagine what music would be like today without the instrument. [[AC: R&B, Soul, Funk]] * Music/RayCharles' fusion of R&B and Gospel vocal stylings in the 1950s (at a time when most R&B singers had more of a smoother show tunes vibe, a la Nat King Cole) was revolutionary and ground-breaking -- and even controversial, as many black people saw such music as blasphemous. The album ''Music/ModernSoundsInCountryAndWesternMusic'' was a huge commercial risk because it combined soul and country; many thought it would fail. But it actually managed to reach both audiences and become a huge seller. Sixty years later... Charles' sound sounds bog standard, if catchy. * The song "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" by ''The Shirelles''. Today, the song's simplistic and rather sappy lyrics don't seem like anything special. However, in 1960, both the song and group were actually very controversial. The reason why is because, until then, the idea of an all female singing group was almost unheard of in popular music (usually, musical groups were fronted by males, with women generally just brought in for singing duties on some songs). Thus, if not for the success of this song and group, we may have never had ''The Supremes'', ''TLC'', ''The Pussycat Dolls'', etc. ** The subject matter of the song, which essentially boiled down to a woman asking a man if he will respect her in the morning, if he truly loves her and cares for her as a person and will stay true to her and hope she isn't just another sexual conquest of his ("Am I lasting treasure/Or just a moment's pleasure"), [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar couched in terms which would allow the song to be played on the radio in 1961]], was similarly groundbreaking. The quaintness and subtlety of the imagery might be lost on younger listeners. And it was co-written by a ''then-fifteen-year old'' Music/CaroleKing! * Music/JamesBrown. The beats and breaks of many of his songs have been sampled or imitated so many times that his music would sound very cliché now, if it wasn't, you know, James Brown. * Larry Graham. When he first came out, his bass style of slapping and popping was new and refreshing. Now people (bass players excluded) complain it's boring and flashy. * It may be lost with newer listeners to appreciate how ''revolutionary'' Music/SlyAndTheFamilyStone were in the late [[TheSixties Sixties]], to have a band performing a very raw, Afrocentric, psychedelic, rock-infused style of funk music, with a very radical and countercultural style of clothing and hairstyles, a multi-racial, multi-gender lineup, and very countercultural/socially conscious lyrics for the time period they were popular in. They helped set the direction for much of what black music, and music in general, would follow from TheSeventies onward. The 1971 album, ''There's A Riot Going On'', in fact, was one of the first funk albums to use a (very crude and early) drum/rhythm machine. * Music/MichaelJackson. In the U.S. those who grew up after the first round of child molestation charges leveled against him in 1993 knew him only as a far too easy target for comedians with his eccentric, increasingly creepy lifestyle, as his post-1980s music wasn't successful enough to overcome his personal baggage. After his death in 2009, and hearing his GloryDays music played over and over on the radio and seeing his videos re-run on MTV, they fail to see anything unique about his style, as the best aspects of it have been standard pop music fare for the past 30+ years. His big-budget music videos often look cheesy and/or low-budget by today's standards -- sure, that works for [[Music/{{Thriller}} "Thriller"]] since it's a B-movie horror pastiche, but "Black or White" and the ''Film/{{Moonwalker}}'' version of "Smooth Criminal" don't have that excuse (and are weighed down by ridiculous storylines and spectacle-for-spectacle's sake). Between that, the datedness of the fashions, ''and'' the synthetic sound, well, they could be forgiven for saying "Why was he ever famous to begin with?" ** Even the MoonWalkDance(which Jackson didn't invent, but rather perfected) looks dated and cheesy compared to all the dance innovations that have come since; so much so that it's easy to forget that almost every one of those newer dance moves was created by someone who started dancing precisely ''because'' of how well and truly blown their minds were by Michael Jackson doing the moonwalk. ** His live performances, be they concerts, award shows, or the Super Bowl halftime show in 1993, were once among the most {{Spectacle}}-filled in popular music, but pale next to the glittering spectaculars mounted by his successors (or even peers like Music/DavidBowie) and/or events such as the 2012 Olympics closing ceremony or any given MTV Video Music Awards. [[AC: Electronic Music]] * Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. In the 70's, they were mind-blowing, because few people had heard pure electronic music before. These days, the band's early work sounds primitive, simple, and just plain dated compared to the legions of bands it inspired. ** It may seem ''primitive'' compared to the modern stuff, but that's [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=VXa9tXcMhXQ not always a bad thing]]. *** Actually only their early work sound quite primitive. Almost anything since ''Music/{{Autobahn}}'' (released in 1974) still sounds fresh. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0tm-yTYZu4 Especially the live versions from ''Minimum-Maxiumum'']] seem really modern. * Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example). ** Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco. * Eiffel 65 sounds a lot less fresh today after thousands of rappers ran the Autotune gimmick into the ground. [[AC:Grunge]] * Grunge suffers from this: ** Music/{{Nirvana}} and Music/PearlJam making it big in the early '90s is heralded as a breath of fresh air, breaking the stranglehold hair metal had on mainstream rock and paving the way for grunge and alternative rock's ascendance from the CollegeRadio ghetto. Today, however, it is hard to avoid Nirvana, Music/PearlJam, [[PostGrunge or their millions of rip-offs on the radio]] for even 15 minutes. ** By the time Music/PearlJam released ''Riot Act'', quite a few younger music fans accused the band of being a Music/{{Creed}} ripoff. (helps that Creed singer Scott Stapp has a voice which sounds ''exactly'' like Eddie Vedder's) ** Even Nirvana, and a number of other popular alt-rock/grunge groups, were highly influenced by Music/ThePixies. Kurt Cobain even admitted that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was his attempt at ripping-off of a Pixies song, specifically "Debaser" from ''Music/{{Doolittle}}''. [[AC: Heavy Metal]] * Music/BlackSabbath is often considered the first metal band. Take a moment and consider how weird that sounds. ** That title is often given to Music/KingCrimson, which just sounds all the weirder. ** It's kind of weird to hear that in the late '70s/early '80s, metal bands like Music/IronMaiden and Music/{{Metallica}} were mistaken for punk. This was because "heavy metal" in the late '70s was seen as the slow or midtempo fare of Music/BlackSabbath and Music/JudasPriest, and it was punk bands that were known for playing at fast tempos. Thus, the early '80s genre of "speed metal" doesn't seem that fast compared to later shred-metal, power-metal and extreme metal bands, but in its day, metal played at the speed of punk rock was a novelty. ** Music/IronMaiden suffers from this generally. ** A serious casualty of this trope was NWOBHM pioneer Diamond Head. They were barely famous, in comparison to Judas Priest, Iron Maiden and Saxon, but their influence on Metallica was profound. Metallica's earliest recordings were covers of ''Am I Evil'' and ''Blitzkrieg'' and much later on in the late 1990s, ''It's Electric''. However, Diamond Head never became as famous as the band they influenced, and ended up opening for them at the National Bowl event in 1993, and opened and ended their set with songs covered by Metallica to get accepted by the crowd. However, a relatively subdued performance and Diamond Head not being so famous made them look and sound like a band covering Metallica. They split up shortly afterwards. ** When listening to Music/OzzyOsbourne after bands like Music/MarilynManson and Music/{{Gwar}}, it's hard to believe he was at one time almost as controversial. ** Music/{{Pantera}} is probably the biggest offender of them all. In the midst of their numerous copycats (really, just about every metalcore and nu-metal band in existence), it's hard to believe that, at one time, their style of metal was both unique and interesting. *** In fact, Pantera are often accused to be a rip-off of Exhorder who already began to developp that sound on their demos while Pantera was still making glamish album. ** Music/JudasPriest can get this themselves. Their music can sound like a ClicheStorm these days, but one has to consider that they themselves ''[[TropeMaker invented]]'' nearly all of those clichés. It's not their fault their music has been so widely imitated since then (or maybe it is, for being so good). * Music/{{Helmet}} virtually invented the start-stop metal riff that dominated the late 90's. You'd never know it to hear their successors (e.g. Music/KoRn, {{Deftones}}, etc.) but the idea came from jazz. * Music/{{Isis}} and their blend of post-rock and SludgeMetal. One mixed review of their album ''In The Absence of Truth'' remarked "it's not Isis' fault that they sound unoriginal these days. All you have to do is pick up a copy of Decibel, open it to any page, and you'll find someone counting the group as an influence..." * {{Gorn}} lyrics in DeathMetal, or even in general. Once upon a time, it was controversial. Nowadays, arguments against the sub-genre are more towards the music itself rather than the lyrics. * Music/{{Suffocation}}. They were among the (if not ''the'') first bands to pioneer the brutal death metal subgenre, and consequently all of its variations, like slam death and so on. Their sound has been so endlessly copied that a lot of people who listen to Suffocation for the first time after already being exposed to other BDM acts, will likely find them generic. ** For that matter, Mike Smith's drumming (along with that of [[Music/MorbidAngel Pete Sandoval]] and [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]]) is likely to inspire this as well. At the time, all three were ''revolutionary''. Mike and Pete essentially created almost all of the tropes of death metal drumming (exceedingly fast blastbeats, rapid-fire double bass rolls, extensive usage of double strokes, etc.) and proved that you could play in a way designed to batter the listener into submission with speed beyond what any of the thrash drummers could pull off without sacrificing technique, clarity, or precision, while Flo took what they were doing and increased the speed and precision even further, in addition to helping lay the groundwork for what would become gravity blasts (he didn't use proper gravity blasts until ''Once Was Not'', but he did use the rim of the snare like a fulcrum to allow for blastbeat speeds that were well beyond what anyone was pulling at the time). To a current listener used to the work of players like [[Music/{{Nile}} George Kollias]], [[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/HateEternal Derek Roddy]], and Tim Yeung, however, they will sound outdated. ** Speaking of death metal drumming, gravity blasts have become this. While not particularly new (one-handed rolls using the rim of the snare as a fulcrum were being used by jazz drummers since at least the 1950s), the usage of the gravity roll within a death metal context (where steady kick and cymbal rhythms were added in to make it a blastbeat) was once an innovative technique used to create a sense of chaos or explosively release built-up tension within the song, but gratuitous overuse by slam, deathcore, and tech death drummers gradually gave the technique a reputation for being something that lazy drummers who had no grasp of dynamics abused, and the frequency with which they were quantized and sound-replaced in studio recordings due to sloppy technique only furthered this stigma. While the original purveyors ([[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/DespisedIcon Alex Pelletier]], [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]], and Marco Pitruzzella) are held in high regard, the technique is now generally viewed as just another thing that most fast death metal drummers should know, and the widespread misuse of the technique means that users have to be a lot more selective about when they employ it to avoid the "lazy drummer who couldn't think of anything better to fill the space" stigma. * Music/{{Darkthrone}} (specifically, their early black metal albums) have spawned so many clones that some confused people think Darkthrone themselves sound "generic". ** Ironically, Darkthrone themselves wanted to reproduce the music of their own influences. For example, they deliberately poorly produce their first Black Metal albums to capture the atmosphere of undeliberatley poorly produced Thrash Metal demos, EP and albums. * "Black Diamond" by Music/{{Kiss}} sounds like really primitive HairMetal, but it wasn't so primitive in 1974. It was unprecedented at the time for a rock song to not only be loud and angry, but to have a "symphonic" sound evocative of opera or classical music. It could be argued that AliceCooper pioneered this sound first, but he was never quite able to equal the Olympian grandeur of Kiss. * Music/LedZeppelin suffers heavily from this. In particular are John Bonham's drum beats. (Especially on "When The Levee Breaks" from ''Music/LedZeppelinIV'') His influence is so pervasive in modern rock that many younger listeners are legitimately baffled as to what's the big deal about him. ** Jimmy Page, aside from influencing many guitarists of the era, also is credited with changing the way producers would record in the studio. His technique of using multiple microphones and different distances created an "ambient sound" with more dimension than was conventional at the time. ** Just about ''everything'' associated with Zeppelin suffers from this. They practically created rock music as we recognize it today, and - without context - it's hard to imagine how revolutionary their entire style was in the late '60s and early '70s. While many British (and even some American) rock bands had dabbled a bit in Celtic folk music before, none of them had ever fused that style with hard rock, which is done on "Stairway to Heaven," "Over the Hills and Far Away," etc. Zeppelin also more or less invented the [[LooksLikeJesus "Jesus hair"]] fashion aesthetic for rock bands, which was pretty standard from the 1970s to the '90s; previous rock musicians may have had long hair, but it had not been as flamboyantly styled. The [[EightiesHair "poodle hair"]] of '80s HairMetal certainly could not have existed without Led Zeppelin. ** In particular, Led Zeppelin are considered progenitors of hard rock and even heavy metal - not only that, but they were one of the heaviest bands of their time, Black Sabbath aside. This sounds almost laughable now, given how easy it became to find songs that are heavier than anything they ever released. * Music/YngwieMalmsteen, while still respected by a lot of shred players, is generally viewed as an irritating, tuneless, masturbatory showoff who never grew out of the "cram in as many notes as possible" phase that most shredders go through and whose [[JerkAss obnoxious, repellent behavior]] is probably even more famous than his music. That being said, he created almost all of the tropes of shred guitar; while he definitely wasn't the one who laid the groundwork for it (and he'll admit as much), he ''was'' the one who took what his influences were doing and brought it all UpToEleven. With plenty of more focused, song-oriented peers like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony [=MacAlpine=], and Vinnie Moore, however, his proclivity for gratuitous overplaying began to grow tiresome, and with a new wave of modern guitar icons like Music/JeffLoomis, Music/ChristianMuenzner, [[Music/ScarSymmetry Per Nilsson]], [[Music/{{Revocation}} Dave Davidson]], and [[Music/AnimalsAsLeaders Tosin Abasi]], younger listeners will probably wonder why he's still seen as a big deal. * '''Music/{{Manowar}}''' is sometimes criticized for using [[ClicheStorm "cliché"]] [[HeavyMithril sword-and-sorcery themes in their lyrics]], despite the fact that their usage goes all the way back to 1983 on their ''Into Glory Ride'' album, which predates the PowerMetal genre by a couple of years, and that they were likely the first North American metal band to dare embrace these tropes. * In the four years since Music/{{Meshuggah}} released their breakout album ''Obzen'', an entire genre - progressive groove metal, or "djent" - has come to the forefront of the metal world, based almost entirely on expanding the Meshuggah sound (the word "djent", the colloquial name for the entire genre, started as onomatopoeia for Meshuggah's guitar tone). Some, including major metal blog Metal Sucks, speculate that, in the wake of what bands like Periphery, Tesseract and Vildhjarta have been creating, the now-upcoming new Meshuggah album Koloss is going to come off as very uninteresting and behind-the-times. * The Music/{{Sepultura}} album ''Roots''. Upon release, it was one of the most critically-acclaimed and commercially successful metal albums of the mid-90's. However, the legions of nu-metal bands that copied its sound (the album was, in fact, arguably the first true nu "metal" album - Korn's s/t being more of a rap/hardcore album with hints of metal) have led this album to gradually become far less acclaimed and celebrated as the years went by. ** ''Chaos A.D'' also suffers from this to some extent. * Music/AtTheGates's riffing style has been [[FollowTheLeader copied]] so much that their album ''Slaughter of the Soul'' might seem predictable to a first time listener who's already acquainted with the knockoffs. * MarilynManson, like Alice Cooper before him, doesn't seem quite as shocking nowadays, with fifty thousand bands from so many different genres trying to be him. At the time, though, the idea of a mostly naked man wearing makeup, a male bassist in kinderwhore getup and a stage show that incorporated everything from the bassist sucking his dick or the guitarist giving him a rimjob to Bibles being ripped up and thrown into the crowd was absolutely horrifying to the religious right. Metal that really was straight-up supported by Anton [=LaVey=], a frontman who was a reverend in the Church of Satan, drugs, sex and androgyny were all shocking to people. Luckily, there was also a terrifyingly complex foundation it was built on, with lyrics and albums [[http://www.nachtkabarett.com/Grotesque that have prompted more writing than one could imagine]]. Coupled with some inspiration from David Bowie to change sound from album to album (although leading to plenty of fandom infighting), the band is still going strong and the latest album, ''The Pale Emperor'' is a huge hit. [[AC:Punk Rock]] * Back in the 1970s wearing a colorful punk mohawk, leather jackets, safety pins, make-up and eyeliner scared off most people, even older rock fans. Praising "anarchy" and rebelling against the system were very audacious things to say too. Nowadays, with so many PopPunk bands imitating the dress code and the style, while actually playing mellowed down pop tunes it may be hard to realize how revolutionary the punk movement once was. * Music/TheSexPistols were considered shocking in 1977 for releasing a song criticizing the British Royal Family ("God Save The Queen", found on ''Music/NeverMindTheBollocksHeresTheSexPistols''). Many people saw them as dangerous and the British intelligence service even spied on them. A rock band! Nowadays you'd be hardpressed to find any band able to get such an overwhelming mainstream outrage as they did. ** Music/TheRamones and the Music/TheSexPistols were a reaction to the largely overproduced and masturbatory progressive rock genre, and decided to do the exact opposite by never really learning to play their instruments. The punk scene exploded into the mainstream in 1977, and to modern day listeners, both of the aforementioned bands sound either sloppy or overly melodic, depending on what you listen to. ** Audiences raised on modern-day PunkRock bands like Music/BadReligion and Music/{{NOFX}} will sometimes hear about how "fast" and "heavy" the Ramones' music was back in the day, only to find it sounding like a string of {{Power Ballad}}s in comparison. ** The ubiquitous Ramones t-shirt on every wannabe "edgy" C-list celeb is borderline example in its own right. Some Guardian music journalist claimed that "the kids" were turning to wearing previously shunned Nirvana/Grunge-era logos as a kind of backlash against '70s rock t-shirts. ** As mentioned above, the original punk rock was a rebellion against the traditional rock 'n' roll sound. But after hardcore punk came with its extremely short songs, simple music and aggressive lyrics, the original punk rock sounds a lot like 1950s rock 'n' roll (which, to be frank, was partly the point). Early punk music is now viable radio material, which it absolutely wasn't when it was current, and which it was never meant to be. ** In photos from before he retired from music, Music/RichardHell could be seen dressed in a very typical punk rock style, with spiked hair and ripped-up, drawn-on shirts held together with safety pins. For this reason, it can be sort of surprising to hear his band Richard Hell & The Voidoids, since they didn't really play conventional punk rock. The thing is, Hell is actually credited with inspiring much of the early punk rock look - Malcolm [=McLaren=] has cited him as the main influence on how Music/TheSexPistols were dressed for instance. ** Conversely, most of the punk bands before the Sex Pistols had SeventiesHair and dressed in perfectly ordinary street clothes. One member of one of the first punk bands, the Dictators, even had an Afro! ** Another factor is that punk -- especially in its formative years -- has always had an undercurrent of sociopolitical outrage, and many of the issues they sang about are [[ValuesDissonance no longer current]]. It was also part of a backlash against the [[WideEyedIdealist Wide-Eyed Idealism]] of the Sixties and early Seventies, when such biting cynicism was genuinely shocking; in the modern climate of [[ConditionedToAcceptHorror jaded acceptance that the world is a horrible place]] and constant exposure to {{Deadpan Snark|er}}, modern listeners tend to wonder why they took things so seriously. ** The Music/BlackFlag album ''Music/{{Damaged}}'' was groundbreaking when it came out in 1981, as it popularized the snarky-yet-socially-conscious attitude of many later-day punk bands. Now that its style has been not only frequently copied but also seriously cleaned up by other bands - including bands that are not and never were even in the punk genre - the album just sounds like an underproduced mess with seriously dated lyrical content to modern ears. (Or the later bands sound like LighterAndSofter versions of Black Flag.) * Music/TheMisfits, a 1980s punk band that was considered edgy for their lyrics inspired by horror films and other horror related imagery. Now this, and their pop punk sound, would be considered mainstream emo. [[AC:Visual Kei]] * VisualKei has developed a lot of these: ** The first is the split of subgenres. At the beginning, VisualKei ''was'' HardRock and HeavyMetal with a huge dose of inspiration from HairMetal. Something similar happened with the mid-90s Goth influence. Now, while some HR/HM VK bands still exist (in the Kote Kei subgenre and the Eroguro Kei subgenre for the most part, with still-active or reunited Visual Shock or Veteran Kei making up the rest), and some Gothic/Industrial bands do still exist (these are mostly those influenced by or connected to MoiDixMois and Mana), the largest portion of ''active'' Visual Kei bands are generally Oshare Kei or Host Kei, and Oshare dance-pop and similar is often more common than harder rock or metal. That said, this is cyclical - as of 2013, a harder rock/metal influence seems to be returning as ''many'' of the Oshare bands fell into the same trap. Still, ''equating'' VisualKei with HR/HM after around 2000 is almost laughable. ** HoYay fanservice. In TheEighties and until the middle of TheNineties, the YaoiFangirl was ''not'' seen as a target market for VisualKei (much less as specifically ''existing''), and quite a few of the artists engaging in most of the HoYay ''were'' actual bisexual or gay men using the stage as a way to express themselves and their sexuality in a culture and world that rejected it. The idea caught on as a [[FollowTheLeader bandwagon trend]] for {{fanservice}} directed at the fangirls ''only'' once some straight bandmen noticed how much the fangirls liked it and with it becoming somewhat socially acceptable (at least within the subculture) to be a YaoiFangirl. [[UnfortunateImplications Unfortunately]] this led to straight men using it as fanservice, and once some other fans found out about the {{Kayfabe}}, some fans insisting that no VK artist could actually be gay or bi for real. ** EightiesHair and the ImprobableHairstyle fell out of style around the mid 90s. When even {{Music/X Japan}} except for hide toned down their hairstyles, it pretty much called an end to the era of OTT VisualKei hair, which was, at the time it was done, something entirely new and awesome. While exotic hairstyles are still common, and this trend may well swing around too, doing an ImprobableHairstyle beyond the "medusa" cut or a typical host cut is often seen as a marker of a bygone time or a parody. ** ANYTHING that is almost exclusively tied to a specific artist will be, unless it is used as a ''direct'' tribute or ShoutOut, seen as this and derisively dismissed as a cheap attention grab or bad cosplay. Good examples were eyeliner swirls for much of the 2000s (anyone doing them was seen as a cheap Mana knockoff/wannabe), nosebands (Reita of the Gazette, and anyone wearing a noseband is seen as that), and almost ''anything'' connected to hide (if you go onstage with that yellow heart Fernandes and it's ''not'' a hide tribute and/or you're not a member of {{Music/X Japan}}, {{Music/Luna Sea}}, or an ex-member of Spread Beaver, you ''will'' get odd looks, and probably start a FlameWar) ** Oshare Kei developed one of its own: the Generic Sparkle Loop. By the time it made it to Maria Cross's PV, it was considered ''such'' an Oshare cliche that any band using it ''seriously'' was just asking to be mocked not only by fans of other genres but by Oshare fans as well. [[AC:Comedy Music]] * In an era where nearly anyone with a halfway decent singing voice and a copy of Garage Band can put up a comedic parody of popular music on Website/YouTube, the appeal of Music/WeirdAlYankovic and similar musicians who were parodists by trade can be lost on a younger generation. [[AC: Hiphop & Rap]] * Much of the old school rap of the late 1970s and 1980s sounds quite corny nowadays. "Rapper's Delight" by Music/TheSugarHillGang is almost a children's nursery rhyme and uses all the tropes that are now clichés in rap music: bragging about your sex life, about the cars you own and partying. Equally Music/RunDMC's albums ''[[Music/RunDMCAlbum Run DMC]]'', ''Music/KingOfRock'' and ''Music/RaisingHell'' sound very clean, safe and inoffensive. ** To be fair, they were pretty inoffensive even in the mid-80's. A lot of the initial backlash against rap was due to its African-American roots (in fact, Creator/{{MTV}} was ''very'' hesitant to play rap videos, out of fear of alienating its predominantly white audience - hence the creation of "Yo! MTV Raps" in 1988). It wouldn't be until GangstaRap took off a couple years later that the genre would become controversial for its lyrical content. * The Music/BeastieBoys' sampling, particularly on ''Music/PaulsBoutique'' - was a huge influence on rap producers and helped create the slicker, jazz-sampling style of rap music that would evolve into G-Funk. However, most new listeners will notice their high pitched rapping styles and the fact they are white, and not really see what has made them so popular. ** Likewise, ''Hello Nasty'' was considered a remarkable achievement upon release in 1998 as, until then, nobody had ever heard a hip hop album with so much variety. The album seemed destined to become a classic along the lines of Paul's Boutique and ''Music/LicensedToIll''. Over time, however, its critical standing has significantly diminished, thanks to the work of rappers like Music/KanyeWest (whose music has the same kind of variety but with more focus). It's now considered by most to be one of the band's weaker albums. * Trap rapper Ace Hood's once-distinctive flow (popular around 2010, when he had a single out with RickRoss and LilWayne called "Hustle Hard"), has since had a legion of imitators, most of whom have had considerably more successful careers than Ace himself. * Boyd Rice. Play an old record by him to someone today and they might think that it's someone trying to learn to make a loop. They might not realize that Boyd was one of the earliest pioneers of sampling and record scratching. * Music/DrDre's "Nothin' But a 'G' Thang". At the time, a hip-hip video with low riders, backyard parties and lots of posing in front of the camera was something new and different. Needless to say, it was certainly influential. * T.I. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area. [[AC: Technology]] * ''Stereo sound''. Up until the mid-to-late [[TheSixties 1960s]], AM radio was the go-to format for listening to popular music, FM was strictly for news, information and [[MnogoNukes well, to find out what to do should the nukes drop]], and hi-fi stereo sound was the province of the wealthy. Stereo records ''were'' manufactured, and pop songs mixed to stereo, but monaural (mono) sound was the default format of morst systems. Bands like Music/TheBeatles and Music/TheBeachBoys in fact were only involved in the mono mixes of their records, and pop songs were mixed and mastered mainly to sound good on cheap single-speaker transistor radios or car radios. The rise of underground rock and jazz radio, "[[WatchItStoned head music]]" and music labels determined to demonstrate their [[TechnologyMarchesOn new multi-track and stereo technology]] led to the popularity of stereo recordings (and headphones), and mono eventually was phased out. ** It should be noted that the early style of stereo was usually the vocal track and instrumental placed in the left and right channel respectively, rather than mixed together - so was effectively made from two mono tracks. Actual stereo recording didn't really come about till the late 60s, where the two tracks were similar sounding but with slight differences in the instruments or panning. Thus, the mono of the early 60s usually sounds more natural to headphone listeners today than the stereo does, as it is more similar to today's stereo. * Synthesizer and sampling technology, particularly from TheEighties can count. With modern, increasingly realistic and expressive all-in-one-box digital workstations now the norm, it can be jarring to know that many of the features now taken for granted in newer instruments were once the exclusive property of $5,000 to $100,000+ instruments like the Fairlight CMI, the E-mu Emulators I and II, the New England Digital Synclavier and the Kurzweil 250 thirty or so years ago. Even with the Yamaha DX-7, Roland D-50 and Korg M1 (and samplers like the Akai S900 and Ensoniq Mirage), it was relatively crude technology. Computer software has often taken over for hardware, and things like the $50 Peter Vogel CMI Pro app (based on Fairlight CMI technology, and designed by the Fairlight's co-inventor) are derided as slow and crude, if not amusing for its retro qualities. * The Compact Disc, introduced in 1982, was a revolutionary breakthrough in TheEighties, offering a cleaner, clearer way of listening to music than the vinyl formats of the previous sixty or seventy years. It brought, even in its 16-bit sound, more intimacy and detail, and captured the whole of the record, uninterrupted by record sides or weird formatting like the eight-tracks of TheSeventies. It may have influenced the way new music is recorded, mixed, mastered and produced, as well, as music grew in complexity and digital precision to cater to CD listeners. The 78-minute storage capabilities might have led to longer albums. Nowadays, it (and the mp3) are the industry standard, and the novelty of it seems lost to newer generations. ** In a [[{{Irony}} hilariously ironic]] twist, vinyl has [[PopularityPolynomial now become]] the "professional" "ideal" "hip new" "audiophile format", thanks to its lack of digital sampling and recording level limitations (the latter of which has been [[LoudnessWar infamously abused]] since the dawn of the 21st century) ----
23rd Dec '15 12:03:17 AM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Music/JimiHendrix. He's been copied by almost every rock guitar player who followed ("There are two kinds of guitar players: those who'll admit to be influenced by Hendrix, and liars")
to:
* Music/JimiHendrix. He's been copied by almost every rock guitar player who followed ("There are two kinds of guitar players: those who'll admit to be influenced by Hendrix, and liars")liars").
23rd Dec '15 12:02:08 AM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** The Beatles do, for the most part, ''avert'' this trope - while people may not always recognize today how groundbreaking they are, they continue to be one of the most popular and beloved bands of all time; their albums continue to sell 50+ years after they were originally released. Every generation of teenagers seems to re-discover The Beatles (the ''1'' GreatestHitsAlbum, ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the Beatles edition of ''RockBand'', etc.). And it's rare to find anyone who actually denies The Beatles' influence\ -- a lot of the HypeBacklash will still admit The Beatles were innovative, just that they weren't the only ones pioneering those things and don't like how they're often discussed as though they were.
to:
** The Beatles do, for the most part, ''avert'' this trope - while people may not always recognize today how groundbreaking they are, they continue to be one of the most popular and beloved bands of all time; their albums continue to sell 50+ years after they were originally released. Every generation of teenagers seems to re-discover The Beatles (the ''1'' GreatestHitsAlbum, ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the Beatles edition of ''RockBand'', etc.). And it's rare to find anyone who actually denies The Beatles' influence\ influence -- a lot of the HypeBacklash will still admit The Beatles were innovative, just that they weren't the only ones pioneering those things and don't like how they're often discussed as though they were.
22nd Dec '15 11:28:27 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message
People still find Beethoven's music earth-shattering, mind you'; it's just that later stuff went even farther in some of the directions he started.
to:
People still find Beethoven's music earth-shattering, mind you'; you; it's just that later stuff went even farther in some of the directions he started.

* Music/{{Radiohead}}. Their albums ''Music/TheBends'' and ''Music/OKComputer'' (along with their breakout hit "Creep") were so innovative that the band's combination of introspective darkness and falsetto vocals were promptly ripped off by massive numbers of alternative rock musicians, most of which went on to massive mainstream success greater than Radiohead had ever had at the time. Frustration with this led to the band's NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly album, ''Music/KidA'' The genre switch worked, and they've been quite successful and critically acclaimed since. * Music/DireStraits' music video for "Money for Nothing" from ''Music/BrothersInArms'' featured some of the first ever CGI animation. It seems incredibly primitive today, but it was considered groundbreaking in 1985. * Music/GangOfFour's trademark sound to some extent: Starting around the TurnOfTheMillennium, a lot of post-punk/New Wave-influenced bands like Music/FranzFerdinand and Music/MaximoPark started using minimalist, choppy guitar riffs and stiff but funk-influenced rhythms in a similar manner. This actually led to a resurgence of interest in Gang Of Four (and eventually, a partial reunion), but it also can make their debut album ''Entertainment!'' seem less innovative than it was at the time. The key thing that still sets Gang Of Four apart is that these newer bands usually lack their overtly political lyrics and occasionally ''really'' harsh guitar feedback. * Music/{{U2}} When they first arrived, they were praised not only for being the first Irish band to hit it very big abroad, but also for the pure defiance in their lyrics. To have a group from Dublin speak so convincingly about issues that affected them was unheard of. Their music was like nothing else around. Years later They have become better known for Bono's preacherman antics while their political lyrics seem tame compared to bands like Music/RageAgainstTheMachine. ** The ''sound'' of U2, and in particular the guitar work of The Edge, eschewing solos and rock guitar conventions for an atmospheric/rhythmic, textural, chiming approach relying heaving on delay and effects was equally influential, but it's hard not to find an Edge-infuenced guitarist in a rock band (or generally U2-inspired group) since at least TheNineties. ** Their album ''Music/AchtungBaby'' gets swept under the rug these days thanks to a combination of CriticalBacklash ([[TheyChangedItNowItSucks especially by die-hard fans]] of ''Music/TheJoshuaTree'') and countless BritPop bands aping its sound to the point where it no longer sounds as innovative as it once did. * The 2001 album ''Is This It'' by Music/TheStrokes. In an era where popular music was dominated mostly by [[TeenIdol Teen Pop]] and NuMetal, the album was seen as a major breath of fresh air: an authentic indie rock record with enough pop sensibilities for mainstream viability. In its wake, there was a gradual shift in the popular music landscape, with indie bands like Music/ModestMouse, Music/DeathCabForCutie and Music/TheKillers achieving at-the-time unheard of levels of success. Today, with low-fi/indie being the norm in rock, it might be hard for new listeners to understand what was so special about ''Is This It''. [[AC:Pop]] * Music/BarbraStreisand, Music/{{Cher}}, Music/{{Madonna}}, ...three leading ladies of the music industry, almost all possessing [[LGBTFanbase huge gay followings]], who also spent a fair bit of time doing things in the movie biz. Hard to believe they're some of the most innovative girls around, considering (at least in Madonna's case) every blonde pop singer from the nineties onward is compared to them or called their successor. * On that note, Music/LadyGaga appears to have fallen victim to this trope. When her debut album ''The Fame'' was released in 2008, she was seen as a renaissance for dance music, taking the blueprint established by Music/{{Madonna}} and updating it for the new millennium while still having her own unique style. Today, with so many dance pop artists having risen to (pun not intended) fame in the wake of its success, Lady Gaga has become a bit of punch line among music fans. Her [[LargeHam stage antics]] and [[MoralGuardians constant media controversy]] certainly don't help matters. * The arrival of Music/HilaryDuff on the DisneyChannel (and, to some extent, the rebooted ''Series/MickeyMouseClub'' as ''MMC'') led to unexpected success on the DisneyChannel with the equally unexpected success of her show Series/LizzieMcGuire, helped the network cultivate a tween and teen audience they rarely had before, and the push of Duff as a TeenIdol and [[IdolSinger pop princess]], the family-friendly alternative to the increasingly spicy, MMC stars Music/BritneySpears and Msuic/ChristinaAguilera, was new and unprecedented. It helped Hollywood Records escape from being mostly well-known for rereleasing Music/{{Queen}} albums, and her debut, ''Metamorphosis'', was the biggest selling CD in the Disney-owned label's history at the time. As Hilary's receded from the background and stopped releasing pop albums, and successors such as Music/MileyCyrus, Music/SelenaGomez, Music/DemiLovato and Music/TheJonasBrothers took Hilary's spotlight, it can be hard to picture the DisneyChannel not [[CashCowFranchise heavily cross-promoting]] [[IdolSinger pop-music singing]] [[TeenIdol teen idols]] starring in [[PeripheryDemographic tween-marketed]] [[KidCom kidcoms]], all working from the same basic business model Music/HilaryDuff popularized. [[AC:Folk & Country Music]] * Music/WoodyGuthrie's "This Land is Your Land" has come to be associated so much with American pride that it's easy to forget that, at the time it was written, it was essentially a ProtestSong. Guthrie originally wrote it as a TakeThat to Irving Berlin's "God Bless America" [[note]] The revised version of "God Bless America" was released just two years before "This Land is Your Land" was[[/note]], responding to the song's nationalist undertones by singing about the importance of America's diversity and sense of inclusiveness. Hell, some early versions of the song are ''overtly'' political in nature--and a few of them even mention Guthrie's support of the Communist Party. * Music/BobDylan. In the documentary ''No Direction Home'', Dave Van Ronk tells a story about "House of the Rising Sun," which Dylan recorded on his (self-titled) debut album. The version he recorded was arranged by Van Ronk and Dylan had learned it from hearing him perform it live. After Dylan recorded it, so many people accused Van Ronk of ripping it off from him that he finally stopped performing it. Later, when the Animals covered Dylan's version the song, the same thing happened to him. ** And Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, and Roy Acuff had recorded the song back in the 1940s. * CountryMusic sparked several of these: ** Music/ConwayTwitty. Now seen as a linchpin of classic country, he was never part of the Grand Ole Opry in part due to his "rock and roll sound". ** Billy Ray Cyrus became popular in 1992, at a time when there was a trend toward "traditional country", and his very rock- and pop-influenced "crossover country" style (complete with the ubiquitous novelty hit "Achy Breaky Heart") and mulleted, musclebound, hip-wiggling pretty-boy stage presence was both very uncommon in the genre, and polarized many country purists who saw him as a {{Scrappy}}. His success, however, brought a younger, hipper, more rock-influenced audience to country music, and helped to give the genre more mainstream attention and airplay. You can see more exaggerated influences in stars like Blake Shelton or Kenny Chesney topping the charts, but Billy is still not acknowledged, and [[Music/MileyCyrus his daughter]] is now more well-known than he is. ** Music/FaithHill. When she hit it big in late 1999-early 2000 with the massive crossover hit "Breathe", every single female act in the genre was cutting {{Power Ballad}}s with a similar sound and similar incentive to cross over. These attempts usually were met with failure (except for Martina [=McBride=] getting a few huge crossover hits -- albeit in 2004, after the craze died down), and what's more, Faith ended up hoist by her own petard when country radio shunned her very heavily pop-influenced ''Cry'' album. ** Music/GeorgeStrait. When he first hit the charts in 1981, he was markedly more country than his peers, most of whom were following the pop crossovers of acts such as Music/{{Alabama}}, Music/RonnieMilsap and Music/KennyRogers. The rise of similarly "neotraditionalist" acts like Music/RandyTravis, Music/AlanJackson, and Clint Black in the late 1980s-early 1990s followed in George's footsteps. While many of his contemporaries have faded, George has somehow managed to keep his A-list status with minimal change to his sound, sometimes making it quite hard to remember just how much of a pioneer he is. There was also Strait's FountainOfExpies nature, leading to the "hat act" boom of the 90s — a bunch of young up-and-comers looking for a hit dressed in jeans, pressed shirts, and cowboy hats just like him, and sang safe, radio-friendly honky-tonk in a slight twang, all trying to be just like Strait. Over time, "hat act" became a derogatory term in Nashville, and the tide of "hat acts" stopped. Even Music/KennyChesney was a "hat act" [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness early in his career]] before evolving into his own sound. ** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to Music/TaylorSwift and Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent — albeit moreso with male artists. ** Music/JohnnyCash and other acoustic music in general gets this treatment these days. Most teenagers think singers like Johnny Cash are boring. In his day, Cash was shocking to the MoralGuardians. These days, the acoustic guitar seen as a starting point for learning the guitar. It's hard to imagine what music would be like today without the instrument. [[AC: R&B, Soul, Funk]] * Music/RayCharles' fusion of R&B and Gospel vocal stylings in the 1950s (at a time when most R&B singers had more of a smoother show tunes vibe, a la Nat King Cole) was revolutionary and ground-breaking -- and even controversial, as many black people saw such music as blasphemous. The album ''Music/ModernSoundsInCountryAndWesternMusic'' was a huge commercial risk because it combined soul and country; many thought it would fail. But it actually managed to reach both audiences and become a huge seller. Sixty years later... Charles' sound sounds bog standard, if catchy. * The song "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" by ''The Shirelles''. Today, the song's simplistic and rather sappy lyrics don't seem like anything special. However, in 1960, both the song and group were actually very controversial. The reason why is because, until then, the idea of an all female singing group was almost unheard of in popular music (usually, musical groups were fronted by males, with women generally just brought in for singing duties on some songs). Thus, if not for the success of this song and group, we may have never had ''The Supremes'', ''TLC'', ''The Pussycat Dolls'', etc. ** The subject matter of the song, which essentially boiled down to a woman asking a man if he will respect her in the morning, if he truly loves her and cares for her as a person and will stay true to her and hope she isn't just another sexual conquest of his ("Am I lasting treasure/Or just a moment's pleasure"), [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar couched in terms which would allow the song to be played on the radio in 1961]], was similarly groundbreaking. The quaintness and subtlety of the imagery might be lost on younger listeners. And it was co-written by a ''then-fifteen-year old'' Music/CaroleKing! * Music/JamesBrown. The beats and breaks of many of his songs have been sampled or imitated so many times that his music would sound very cliché now, if it wasn't, you know, James Brown. * Larry Graham. When he first came out, his bass style of slapping and popping was new and refreshing. Now people (bass players excluded) complain it's boring and flashy. * It may be lost with newer listeners to appreciate how ''revolutionary'' Music/SlyAndTheFamilyStone were in the late [[TheSixties Sixties]], to have a band performing a very raw, Afrocentric, psychedelic, rock-infused style of funk music, with a very radical and countercultural style of clothing and hairstyles, a multi-racial, multi-gender lineup, and very countercultural/socially conscious lyrics for the time period they were popular in. They helped set the direction for much of what black music, and music in general, would follow from TheSeventies onward. The 1971 album, ''There's A Riot Going On'', in fact, was one of the first funk albums to use a (very crude and early) drum/rhythm machine. * Music/MichaelJackson. In the U.S. those who grew up after the first round of child molestation charges leveled against him in 1993 knew him only as a far too easy target for comedians with his eccentric, increasingly creepy lifestyle, as his post-1980s music wasn't successful enough to overcome his personal baggage. After his death in 2009, and hearing his GloryDays music played over and over on the radio and seeing his videos re-run on MTV, they fail to see anything unique about his style, as the best aspects of it have been standard pop music fare for the past 30+ years. His big-budget music videos often look cheesy and/or low-budget by today's standards -- sure, that works for [[Music/{{Thriller}} "Thriller"]] since it's a B-movie horror pastiche, but "Black or White" and the ''Film/{{Moonwalker}}'' version of "Smooth Criminal" don't have that excuse (and are weighed down by ridiculous storylines and spectacle-for-spectacle's sake). Between that, the datedness of the fashions, ''and'' the synthetic sound, well, they could be forgiven for saying "Why was he ever famous to begin with?" ** Even the MoonWalkDance(which Jackson didn't invent, but rather perfected) looks dated and cheesy compared to all the dance innovations that have come since; so much so that it's easy to forget that almost every one of those newer dance moves was created by someone who started dancing precisely ''because'' of how well and truly blown their minds were by Michael Jackson doing the moonwalk. ** His live performances, be they concerts, award shows, or the Super Bowl halftime show in 1993, were once among the most {{Spectacle}}-filled in popular music, but pale next to the glittering spectaculars mounted by his successors (or even peers like Music/DavidBowie) and/or events such as the 2012 Olympics closing ceremony or any given MTV Video Music Awards. [[AC: Electronic Music]] * Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. In the 70's, they were mind-blowing, because few people had heard pure electronic music before. These days, the band's early work sounds primitive, simple, and just plain dated compared to the legions of bands it inspired. ** It may seem ''primitive'' compared to the modern stuff, but that's [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=VXa9tXcMhXQ not always a bad thing]]. *** Actually only their early work sound quite primitive. Almost anything since ''Music/{{Autobahn}}'' (released in 1974) still sounds fresh. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0tm-yTYZu4 Especially the live versions from ''Minimum-Maxiumum'']] seem really modern. * Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example). ** Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco. * Eiffel 65 sounds a lot less fresh today after thousands of rappers ran the Autotune gimmick into the ground. [[AC:Grunge]] * Grunge suffers from this: ** Music/{{Nirvana}} and Music/PearlJam making it big in the early '90s is heralded as a breath of fresh air, breaking the stranglehold hair metal had on mainstream rock and paving the way for grunge and alternative rock's ascendance from the CollegeRadio ghetto. Today, however, it is hard to avoid Nirvana, Music/PearlJam, [[PostGrunge or their millions of rip-offs on the radio]] for even 15 minutes. ** By the time Music/PearlJam released ''Riot Act'', quite a few younger music fans accused the band of being a Music/{{Creed}} ripoff. (helps that Creed singer Scott Stapp has a voice which sounds ''exactly'' like Eddie Vedder's) ** Even Nirvana, and a number of other popular alt-rock/grunge groups, were highly influenced by Music/ThePixies. Kurt Cobain even admitted that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was his attempt at ripping-off of a Pixies song, specifically "Debaser" from ''Music/{{Doolittle}}''. [[AC: Heavy Metal]] * Music/BlackSabbath is often considered the first metal band. Take a moment and consider how weird that sounds. ** That title is often given to Music/KingCrimson, which just sounds all the weirder. ** It's kind of weird to hear that in the late '70s/early '80s, metal bands like Music/IronMaiden and Music/{{Metallica}} were mistaken for punk. This was because "heavy metal" in the late '70s was seen as the slow or midtempo fare of Music/BlackSabbath and Music/JudasPriest, and it was punk bands that were known for playing at fast tempos. Thus, the early '80s genre of "speed metal" doesn't seem that fast compared to later shred-metal, power-metal and extreme metal bands, but in its day, metal played at the speed of punk rock was a novelty. ** Music/IronMaiden suffers from this generally. ** A serious casualty of this trope was NWOBHM pioneer Diamond Head. They were barely famous, in comparison to Judas Priest, Iron Maiden and Saxon, but their influence on Metallica was profound. Metallica's earliest recordings were covers of ''Am I Evil'' and ''Blitzkrieg'' and much later on in the late 1990s, ''It's Electric''. However, Diamond Head never became as famous as the band they influenced, and ended up opening for them at the National Bowl event in 1993, and opened and ended their set with songs covered by Metallica to get accepted by the crowd. However, a relatively subdued performance and Diamond Head not being so famous made them look and sound like a band covering Metallica. They split up shortly afterwards. ** When listening to Music/OzzyOsbourne after bands like Music/MarilynManson and Music/{{Gwar}}, it's hard to believe he was at one time almost as controversial. ** Music/{{Pantera}} is probably the biggest offender of them all. In the midst of their numerous copycats (really, just about every metalcore and nu-metal band in existence), it's hard to believe that, at one time, their style of metal was both unique and interesting. *** In fact, Pantera are often accused to be a rip-off of Exhorder who already began to developp that sound on their demos while Pantera was still making glamish album. ** Music/JudasPriest can get this themselves. Their music can sound like a ClicheStorm these days, but one has to consider that they themselves ''[[TropeMaker invented]]'' nearly all of those clichés. It's not their fault their music has been so widely imitated since then (or maybe it is, for being so good). * Music/{{Helmet}} virtually invented the start-stop metal riff that dominated the late 90's. You'd never know it to hear their successors (e.g. Music/KoRn, {{Deftones}}, etc.) but the idea came from jazz. * Music/{{Isis}} and their blend of post-rock and SludgeMetal. One mixed review of their album ''In The Absence of Truth'' remarked "it's not Isis' fault that they sound unoriginal these days. All you have to do is pick up a copy of Decibel, open it to any page, and you'll find someone counting the group as an influence..." * {{Gorn}} lyrics in DeathMetal, or even in general. Once upon a time, it was controversial. Nowadays, arguments against the sub-genre are more towards the music itself rather than the lyrics. * Music/{{Suffocation}}. They were among the (if not ''the'') first bands to pioneer the brutal death metal subgenre, and consequently all of its variations, like slam death and so on. Their sound has been so endlessly copied that a lot of people who listen to Suffocation for the first time after already being exposed to other BDM acts, will likely find them generic. ** For that matter, Mike Smith's drumming (along with that of [[Music/MorbidAngel Pete Sandoval]] and [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]]) is likely to inspire this as well. At the time, all three were ''revolutionary''. Mike and Pete essentially created almost all of the tropes of death metal drumming (exceedingly fast blastbeats, rapid-fire double bass rolls, extensive usage of double strokes, etc.) and proved that you could play in a way designed to batter the listener into submission with speed beyond what any of the thrash drummers could pull off without sacrificing technique, clarity, or precision, while Flo took what they were doing and increased the speed and precision even further, in addition to helping lay the groundwork for what would become gravity blasts (he didn't use proper gravity blasts until ''Once Was Not'', but he did use the rim of the snare like a fulcrum to allow for blastbeat speeds that were well beyond what anyone was pulling at the time). To a current listener used to the work of players like [[Music/{{Nile}} George Kollias]], [[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/HateEternal Derek Roddy]], and Tim Yeung, however, they will sound outdated. ** Speaking of death metal drumming, gravity blasts have become this. While not particularly new (one-handed rolls using the rim of the snare as a fulcrum were being used by jazz drummers since at least the 1950s), the usage of the gravity roll within a death metal context (where steady kick and cymbal rhythms were added in to make it a blastbeat) was once an innovative technique used to create a sense of chaos or explosively release built-up tension within the song, but gratuitous overuse by slam, deathcore, and tech death drummers gradually gave the technique a reputation for being something that lazy drummers who had no grasp of dynamics abused, and the frequency with which they were quantized and sound-replaced in studio recordings due to sloppy technique only furthered this stigma. While the original purveyors ([[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/DespisedIcon Alex Pelletier]], [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]], and Marco Pitruzzella) are held in high regard, the technique is now generally viewed as just another thing that most fast death metal drummers should know, and the widespread misuse of the technique means that users have to be a lot more selective about when they employ it to avoid the "lazy drummer who couldn't think of anything better to fill the space" stigma. * Music/{{Darkthrone}} (specifically, their early black metal albums) have spawned so many clones that some confused people think Darkthrone themselves sound "generic". ** Ironically, Darkthrone themselves wanted to reproduce the music of their own influences. For example, they deliberately poorly produce their first Black Metal albums to capture the atmosphere of undeliberatley poorly produced Thrash Metal demos, EP and albums. * "Black Diamond" by Music/{{Kiss}} sounds like really primitive HairMetal, but it wasn't so primitive in 1974. It was unprecedented at the time for a rock song to not only be loud and angry, but to have a "symphonic" sound evocative of opera or classical music. It could be argued that AliceCooper pioneered this sound first, but he was never quite able to equal the Olympian grandeur of Kiss. * Music/LedZeppelin suffers heavily from this. In particular are John Bonham's drum beats. (Especially on "When The Levee Breaks" from ''Music/LedZeppelinIV'') His influence is so pervasive in modern rock that many younger listeners are legitimately baffled as to what's the big deal about him. ** Jimmy Page, aside from influencing many guitarists of the era, also is credited with changing the way producers would record in the studio. His technique of using multiple microphones and different distances created an "ambient sound" with more dimension than was conventional at the time. ** Just about ''everything'' associated with Zeppelin suffers from this. They practically created rock music as we recognize it today, and - without context - it's hard to imagine how revolutionary their entire style was in the late '60s and early '70s. While many British (and even some American) rock bands had dabbled a bit in Celtic folk music before, none of them had ever fused that style with hard rock, which is done on "Stairway to Heaven," "Over the Hills and Far Away," etc. Zeppelin also more or less invented the [[LooksLikeJesus "Jesus hair"]] fashion aesthetic for rock bands, which was pretty standard from the 1970s to the '90s; previous rock musicians may have had long hair, but it had not been as flamboyantly styled. The [[EightiesHair "poodle hair"]] of '80s HairMetal certainly could not have existed without Led Zeppelin. ** In particular, Led Zeppelin are considered progenitors of hard rock and even heavy metal - not only that, but they were one of the heaviest bands of their time, Black Sabbath aside. This sounds almost laughable now, given how easy it became to find songs that are heavier than anything they ever released. * Music/YngwieMalmsteen, while still respected by a lot of shred players, is generally viewed as an irritating, tuneless, masturbatory showoff who never grew out of the "cram in as many notes as possible" phase that most shredders go through and whose [[JerkAss obnoxious, repellent behavior]] is probably even more famous than his music. That being said, he created almost all of the tropes of shred guitar; while he definitely wasn't the one who laid the groundwork for it (and he'll admit as much), he ''was'' the one who took what his influences were doing and brought it all UpToEleven. With plenty of more focused, song-oriented peers like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony [=MacAlpine=], and Vinnie Moore, however, his proclivity for gratuitous overplaying began to grow tiresome, and with a new wave of modern guitar icons like Music/JeffLoomis, Music/ChristianMuenzner, [[Music/ScarSymmetry Per Nilsson]], [[Music/{{Revocation}} Dave Davidson]], and [[Music/AnimalsAsLeaders Tosin Abasi]], younger listeners will probably wonder why he's still seen as a big deal. * '''Music/{{Manowar}}''' is sometimes criticized for using [[ClicheStorm "cliché"]] [[HeavyMithril sword-and-sorcery themes in their lyrics]], despite the fact that their usage goes all the way back to 1983 on their ''Into Glory Ride'' album, which predates the PowerMetal genre by a couple of years, and that they were likely the first North American metal band to dare embrace these tropes. * In the four years since Music/{{Meshuggah}} released their breakout album ''Obzen'', an entire genre - progressive groove metal, or "djent" - has come to the forefront of the metal world, based almost entirely on expanding the Meshuggah sound (the word "djent", the colloquial name for the entire genre, started as onomatopoeia for Meshuggah's guitar tone). Some, including major metal blog Metal Sucks, speculate that, in the wake of what bands like Periphery, Tesseract and Vildhjarta have been creating, the now-upcoming new Meshuggah album Koloss is going to come off as very uninteresting and behind-the-times. * The Music/{{Sepultura}} album ''Roots''. Upon release, it was one of the most critically-acclaimed and commercially successful metal albums of the mid-90's. However, the legions of nu-metal bands that copied its sound (the album was, in fact, arguably the first true nu "metal" album - Korn's s/t being more of a rap/hardcore album with hints of metal) have led this album to gradually become far less acclaimed and celebrated as the years went by. ** ''Chaos A.D'' also suffers from this to some extent. * Music/AtTheGates's riffing style has been [[FollowTheLeader copied]] so much that their album ''Slaughter of the Soul'' might seem predictable to a first time listener who's already acquainted with the knockoffs. * MarilynManson, like Alice Cooper before him, doesn't seem quite as shocking nowadays, with fifty thousand bands from so many different genres trying to be him. At the time, though, the idea of a mostly naked man wearing makeup, a male bassist in kinderwhore getup and a stage show that incorporated everything from the bassist sucking his dick or the guitarist giving him a rimjob to Bibles being ripped up and thrown into the crowd was absolutely horrifying to the religious right. Metal that really was straight-up supported by Anton [=LaVey=], a frontman who was a reverend in the Church of Satan, drugs, sex and androgyny were all shocking to people. Luckily, there was also a terrifyingly complex foundation it was built on, with lyrics and albums [[http://www.nachtkabarett.com/Grotesque that have prompted more writing than one could imagine]]. Coupled with some inspiration from David Bowie to change sound from album to album (although leading to plenty of fandom infighting), the band is still going strong and the latest album, ''The Pale Emperor'' is a huge hit. [[AC:Punk Rock]] * Back in the 1970s wearing a colorful punk mohawk, leather jackets, safety pins, make-up and eyeliner scared off most people, even older rock fans. Praising "anarchy" and rebelling against the system were very audacious things to say too. Nowadays, with so many PopPunk bands imitating the dress code and the style, while actually playing mellowed down pop tunes it may be hard to realize how revolutionary the punk movement once was. * Music/TheSexPistols were considered shocking in 1977 for releasing a song criticizing the British Royal Family ("God Save The Queen", found on ''Music/NeverMindTheBollocksHeresTheSexPistols''). Many people saw them as dangerous and the British intelligence service even spied on them. A rock band! Nowadays you'd be hardpressed to find any band able to get such an overwhelming mainstream outrage as they did. ** Music/TheRamones and the Music/TheSexPistols were a reaction to the largely overproduced and masturbatory progressive rock genre, and decided to do the exact opposite by never really learning to play their instruments. The punk scene exploded into the mainstream in 1977, and to modern day listeners, both of the aforementioned bands sound either sloppy or overly melodic, depending on what you listen to. ** Audiences raised on modern-day PunkRock bands like Music/BadReligion and Music/{{NOFX}} will sometimes hear about how "fast" and "heavy" the Ramones' music was back in the day, only to find it sounding like a string of {{Power Ballad}}s in comparison. ** The ubiquitous Ramones t-shirt on every wannabe "edgy" C-list celeb is borderline example in its own right. Some Guardian music journalist claimed that "the kids" were turning to wearing previously shunned Nirvana/Grunge-era logos as a kind of backlash against '70s rock t-shirts. ** As mentioned above, the original punk rock was a rebellion against the traditional rock 'n' roll sound. But after hardcore punk came with its extremely short songs, simple music and aggressive lyrics, the original punk rock sounds a lot like 1950s rock 'n' roll (which, to be frank, was partly the point). Early punk music is now viable radio material, which it absolutely wasn't when it was current, and which it was never meant to be. ** In photos from before he retired from music, Music/RichardHell could be seen dressed in a very typical punk rock style, with spiked hair and ripped-up, drawn-on shirts held together with safety pins. For this reason, it can be sort of surprising to hear his band Richard Hell & The Voidoids, since they didn't really play conventional punk rock. The thing is, Hell is actually credited with inspiring much of the early punk rock look - Malcolm [=McLaren=] has cited him as the main influence on how Music/TheSexPistols were dressed for instance. ** Conversely, most of the punk bands before the Sex Pistols had SeventiesHair and dressed in perfectly ordinary street clothes. One member of one of the first punk bands, the Dictators, even had an Afro! ** Another factor is that punk -- especially in its formative years -- has always had an undercurrent of sociopolitical outrage, and many of the issues they sang about are [[ValuesDissonance no longer current]]. It was also part of a backlash against the [[WideEyedIdealist Wide-Eyed Idealism]] of the Sixties and early Seventies, when such biting cynicism was genuinely shocking; in the modern climate of [[ConditionedToAcceptHorror jaded acceptance that the world is a horrible place]] and constant exposure to {{Deadpan Snark|er}}, modern listeners tend to wonder why they took things so seriously. ** The Music/BlackFlag album ''Music/{{Damaged}}'' was groundbreaking when it came out in 1981, as it popularized the snarky-yet-socially-conscious attitude of many later-day punk bands. Now that its style has been not only frequently copied but also seriously cleaned up by other bands - including bands that are not and never were even in the punk genre - the album just sounds like an underproduced mess with seriously dated lyrical content to modern ears. (Or the later bands sound like LighterAndSofter versions of Black Flag.) * Music/TheMisfits, a 1980s punk band that was considered edgy for their lyrics inspired by horror films and other horror related imagery. Now this, and their pop punk sound, would be considered mainstream emo. [[AC:Visual Kei]] * VisualKei has developed a lot of these: ** The first is the split of subgenres. At the beginning, VisualKei ''was'' HardRock and HeavyMetal with a huge dose of inspiration from HairMetal. Something similar happened with the mid-90s Goth influence. Now, while some HR/HM VK bands still exist (in the Kote Kei subgenre and the Eroguro Kei subgenre for the most part, with still-active or reunited Visual Shock or Veteran Kei making up the rest), and some Gothic/Industrial bands do still exist (these are mostly those influenced by or connected to MoiDixMois and Mana), the largest portion of ''active'' Visual Kei bands are generally Oshare Kei or Host Kei, and Oshare dance-pop and similar is often more common than harder rock or metal. That said, this is cyclical - as of 2013, a harder rock/metal influence seems to be returning as ''many'' of the Oshare bands fell into the same trap. Still, ''equating'' VisualKei with HR/HM after around 2000 is almost laughable. ** HoYay fanservice. In TheEighties and until the middle of TheNineties, the YaoiFangirl was ''not'' seen as a target market for VisualKei (much less as specifically ''existing''), and quite a few of the artists engaging in most of the HoYay ''were'' actual bisexual or gay men using the stage as a way to express themselves and their sexuality in a culture and world that rejected it. The idea caught on as a [[FollowTheLeader bandwagon trend]] for {{fanservice}} directed at the fangirls ''only'' once some straight bandmen noticed how much the fangirls liked it and with it becoming somewhat socially acceptable (at least within the subculture) to be a YaoiFangirl. [[UnfortunateImplications Unfortunately]] this led to straight men using it as fanservice, and once some other fans found out about the {{Kayfabe}}, some fans insisting that no VK artist could actually be gay or bi for real. ** EightiesHair and the ImprobableHairstyle fell out of style around the mid 90s. When even {{Music/X Japan}} except for hide toned down their hairstyles, it pretty much called an end to the era of OTT VisualKei hair, which was, at the time it was done, something entirely new and awesome. While exotic hairstyles are still common, and this trend may well swing around too, doing an ImprobableHairstyle beyond the "medusa" cut or a typical host cut is often seen as a marker of a bygone time or a parody. ** ANYTHING that is almost exclusively tied to a specific artist will be, unless it is used as a ''direct'' tribute or ShoutOut, seen as this and derisively dismissed as a cheap attention grab or bad cosplay. Good examples were eyeliner swirls for much of the 2000s (anyone doing them was seen as a cheap Mana knockoff/wannabe), nosebands (Reita of the Gazette, and anyone wearing a noseband is seen as that), and almost ''anything'' connected to hide (if you go onstage with that yellow heart Fernandes and it's ''not'' a hide tribute and/or you're not a member of {{Music/X Japan}}, {{Music/Luna Sea}}, or an ex-member of Spread Beaver, you ''will'' get odd looks, and probably start a FlameWar) ** Oshare Kei developed one of its own: the Generic Sparkle Loop. By the time it made it to Maria Cross's PV, it was considered ''such'' an Oshare cliche that any band using it ''seriously'' was just asking to be mocked not only by fans of other genres but by Oshare fans as well. [[AC:Comedy Music]] * In an era where nearly anyone with a halfway decent singing voice and a copy of Garage Band can put up a comedic parody of popular music on Website/YouTube, the appeal of Music/WeirdAlYankovic and similar musicians who were parodists by trade can be lost on a younger generation. [[AC: Hiphop & Rap]] * Much of the old school rap of the late 1970s and 1980s sounds quite corny nowadays. "Rapper's Delight" by Music/TheSugarHillGang is almost a children's nursery rhyme and uses all the tropes that are now clichés in rap music: bragging about your sex life, about the cars you own and partying. Equally Music/RunDMC's albums ''[[Music/RunDMCAlbum Run DMC]]'', ''Music/KingOfRock'' and ''Music/RaisingHell'' sound very clean, safe and inoffensive. ** To be fair, they were pretty inoffensive even in the mid-80's. A lot of the initial backlash against rap was due to its African-American roots (in fact, Creator/{{MTV}} was ''very'' hesitant to play rap videos, out of fear of alienating its predominantly white audience - hence the creation of "Yo! MTV Raps" in 1988). It wouldn't be until GangstaRap took off a couple years later that the genre would become controversial for its lyrical content. * The Music/BeastieBoys' sampling, particularly on ''Music/PaulsBoutique'' - was a huge influence on rap producers and helped create the slicker, jazz-sampling style of rap music that would evolve into G-Funk. However, most new listeners will notice their high pitched rapping styles and the fact they are white, and not really see what has made them so popular. ** Likewise, ''Hello Nasty'' was considered a remarkable achievement upon release in 1998 as, until then, nobody had ever heard a hip hop album with so much variety. The album seemed destined to become a classic along the lines of Paul's Boutique and ''Music/LicensedToIll''. Over time, however, its critical standing has significantly diminished, thanks to the work of rappers like Music/KanyeWest (whose music has the same kind of variety but with more focus). It's now considered by most to be one of the band's weaker albums. * Trap rapper Ace Hood's once-distinctive flow (popular around 2010, when he had a single out with RickRoss and LilWayne called "Hustle Hard"), has since had a legion of imitators, most of whom have had considerably more successful careers than Ace himself. * Boyd Rice. Play an old record by him to someone today and they might think that it's someone trying to learn to make a loop. They might not realize that Boyd was one of the earliest pioneers of sampling and record scratching. * Music/DrDre's "Nothin' But a 'G' Thang". At the time, a hip-hip video with low riders, backyard parties and lots of posing in front of the camera was something new and different. Needless to say, it was certainly influential. * T.I. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area. [[AC: Technology]] * ''Stereo sound''. Up until the mid-to-late [[TheSixties 1960s]], AM radio was the go-to format for listening to popular music, FM was strictly for news, information and [[MnogoNukes well, to find out what to do should the nukes drop]], and hi-fi stereo sound was the province of the wealthy. Stereo records ''were'' manufactured, and pop songs mixed to stereo, but monaural (mono) sound was the default format of morst systems. Bands like Music/TheBeatles and Music/TheBeachBoys in fact were only involved in the mono mixes of their records, and pop songs were mixed and mastered mainly to sound good on cheap single-speaker transistor radios or car radios. The rise of underground rock and jazz radio, "[[WatchItStoned head music]]" and music labels determined to demonstrate their [[TechnologyMarchesOn new multi-track and stereo technology]] led to the popularity of stereo recordings (and headphones), and mono eventually was phased out. ** It should be noted that the early style of stereo was usually the vocal track and instrumental placed in the left and right channel respectively, rather than mixed together - so was effectively made from two mono tracks. Actual stereo recording didn't really come about till the late 60s, where the two tracks were similar sounding but with slight differences in the instruments or panning. Thus, the mono of the early 60s usually sounds more natural to headphone listeners today than the stereo does, as it is more similar to today's stereo. * Synthesizer and sampling technology, particularly from TheEighties can count. With modern, increasingly realistic and expressive all-in-one-box digital workstations now the norm, it can be jarring to know that many of the features now taken for granted in newer instruments were once the exclusive property of $5,000 to $100,000+ instruments like the Fairlight CMI, the E-mu Emulators I and II, the New England Digital Synclavier and the Kurzweil 250 thirty or so years ago. Even with the Yamaha DX-7, Roland D-50 and Korg M1 (and samplers like the Akai S900 and Ensoniq Mirage), it was relatively crude technology. Computer software has often taken over for hardware, and things like the $50 Peter Vogel CMI Pro app (based on Fairlight CMI technology, and designed by the Fairlight's co-inventor) are derided as slow and crude, if not amusing for its retro qualities. * The Compact Disc, introduced in 1982, was a revolutionary breakthrough in TheEighties, offering a cleaner, clearer way of listening to music than the vinyl formats of the previous sixty or seventy years. It brought, even in its 16-bit sound, more intimacy and detail, and captured the whole of the record, uninterrupted by record sides or weird formatting like the eight-tracks of TheSeventies. It may have influenced the way new music is recorded, mixed, mastered and produced, as well, as music grew in complexity and digital precision to cater to CD listeners. The 78-minute storage capabilities might have led to longer albums. Nowadays, it (and the mp3) are the industry standard, and the novelty of it seems lost to newer generations. ** In a [[{{Irony}} hilariously ironic]] twist, vinyl has [[PopularityPolynomial now become]] the "professional" "ideal" "hip new" "audiophile format", thanks to its lack of digital sampling and recording level limitations (the latter of which has been [[LoudnessWar infamously abused]] since the dawn of the 21st century) ----
to:
* Music/{{Radiohead}}. Their albums ''Music/TheBends'' and ''Music/OKComputer'' (along with their breakout hit "Creep") were so innovative that the band's combination of introspective darkness and falsetto vocals were promptly ripped off by massive numbers of alternative rock musicians, most of which went on to massive mainstream success greater than Radiohead had ever had at the time. Frustration with this led to the band's NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly album, ''Music/KidA'' The genre switch worked, and they've been quite successful and critically acclaimed since. * Music/DireStraits' music video for "Money for Nothing" from ''Music/BrothersInArms'' featured some of the first ever CGI animation. It seems incredibly primitive today, but it was considered groundbreaking in 1985. * Music/GangOfFour's trademark sound to some extent: Starting around the TurnOfTheMillennium, a lot of post-punk/New Wave-influenced bands like Music/FranzFerdinand and Music/MaximoPark started using minimalist, choppy guitar riffs and stiff but funk-influenced rhythms in a similar manner. This actually led to a resurgence of interest in Gang Of Four (and eventually, a partial reunion), but it also can make their debut album ''Entertainment!'' seem less innovative than it was at the time. The key thing that still sets Gang Of Four apart is that these newer bands usually lack their overtly political lyrics and occasionally ''really'' harsh guitar feedback. * Music/{{U2}} When they first arrived, they were praised not only for being the first Irish band to hit it very big abroad, but also for the pure defiance in their lyrics. To have a group from Dublin speak so convincingly about issues that affected them was unheard of. Their music was like nothing else around. Years later They have become better known for Bono's preacherman antics while their political lyrics seem tame compared to bands like Music/RageAgainstTheMachine. ** The ''sound'' of U2, and in particular the guitar work of The Edge, eschewing solos and rock guitar conventions for an atmospheric/rhythmic, textural, chiming approach relying heaving on delay and effects was equally influential, but it's hard not to find an Edge-infuenced guitarist in a rock band (or generally U2-inspired group) since at least TheNineties. ** Their album ''Music/AchtungBaby'' gets swept under the rug these days thanks to a combination of CriticalBacklash ([[TheyChangedItNowItSucks especially by die-hard fans]] of ''Music/TheJoshuaTree'') and countless BritPop bands aping its sound to the point where it no longer sounds as innovative as it once did. * The 2001 album ''Is This It'' by Music/TheStrokes. In an era where popular music was dominated mostly by [[TeenIdol Teen Pop]] and NuMetal, the album was seen as a major breath of fresh air: an authentic indie rock record with enough pop sensibilities for mainstream viability. In its wake, there was a gradual shift in the popular music landscape, with indie bands like Music/ModestMouse, Music/DeathCabForCutie and Music/TheKillers achieving at-the-time unheard of levels of success. Today, with low-fi/indie being the norm in rock, it might be hard for new listeners to understand what was so special about ''Is This It''. [[AC:Pop]] * Music/BarbraStreisand, Music/{{Cher}}, Music/{{Madonna}}, ...three leading ladies of the music industry, almost all possessing [[LGBTFanbase huge gay followings]], who also spent a fair bit of time doing things in the movie biz. Hard to believe they're some of the most innovative girls around, considering (at least in Madonna's case) every blonde pop singer from the nineties onward is compared to them or called their successor. * On that note, Music/LadyGaga appears to have fallen victim to this trope. When her debut album ''The Fame'' was released in 2008, she was seen as a renaissance for dance music, taking the blueprint established by Music/{{Madonna}} and updating it for the new millennium while still having her own unique style. Today, with so many dance pop artists having risen to (pun not intended) fame in the wake of its success, Lady Gaga has become a bit of punch line among music fans. Her [[LargeHam stage antics]] and [[MoralGuardians constant media controversy]] certainly don't help matters. * The arrival of Music/HilaryDuff on the DisneyChannel (and, to some extent, the rebooted ''Series/MickeyMouseClub'' as ''MMC'') led to unexpected success on the DisneyChannel with the equally unexpected success of her show Series/LizzieMcGuire, helped the network cultivate a tween and teen audience they rarely had before, and the push of Duff as a TeenIdol and [[IdolSinger pop princess]], the family-friendly alternative to the increasingly spicy, MMC stars Music/BritneySpears and Msuic/ChristinaAguilera, was new and unprecedented. It helped Hollywood Records escape from being mostly well-known for rereleasing Music/{{Queen}} albums, and her debut, ''Metamorphosis'', was the biggest selling CD in the Disney-owned label's history at the time. As Hilary's receded from the background and stopped releasing pop albums, and successors such as Music/MileyCyrus, Music/SelenaGomez, Music/DemiLovato and Music/TheJonasBrothers took Hilary's spotlight, it can be hard to picture the DisneyChannel not [[CashCowFranchise heavily cross-promoting]] [[IdolSinger pop-music singing]] [[TeenIdol teen idols]] starring in [[PeripheryDemographic tween-marketed]] [[KidCom kidcoms]], all working from the same basic business model Music/HilaryDuff popularized. [[AC:Folk & Country Music]] * Music/WoodyGuthrie's "This Land is Your Land" has come to be associated so much with American pride that it's easy to forget that, at the time it was written, it was essentially a ProtestSong. Guthrie originally wrote it as a TakeThat to Irving Berlin's "God Bless America" [[note]] The revised version of "God Bless America" was released just two years before "This Land is Your Land" was[[/note]], responding to the song's nationalist undertones by singing about the importance of America's diversity and sense of inclusiveness. Hell, some early versions of the song are ''overtly'' political in nature--and a few of them even mention Guthrie's support of the Communist Party. * Music/BobDylan. In the documentary ''No Direction Home'', Dave Van Ronk tells a story about "House of the Rising Sun," which Dylan recorded on his (self-titled) debut album. The version he recorded was arranged by Van Ronk and Dylan had learned it from hearing him perform it live. After Dylan recorded it, so many people accused Van Ronk of ripping it off from him that he finally stopped performing it. Later, when the Animals covered Dylan's version the song, the same thing happened to him. ** And Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, and Roy Acuff had recorded the song back in the 1940s. * CountryMusic sparked several of these: ** Music/ConwayTwitty. Now seen as a linchpin of classic country, he was never part of the Grand Ole Opry in part due to his "rock and roll sound". ** Billy Ray Cyrus became popular in 1992, at a time when there was a trend toward "traditional country", and his very rock- and pop-influenced "crossover country" style (complete with the ubiquitous novelty hit "Achy Breaky Heart") and mulleted, musclebound, hip-wiggling pretty-boy stage presence was both very uncommon in the genre, and polarized many country purists who saw him as a {{Scrappy}}. His success, however, brought a younger, hipper, more rock-influenced audience to country music, and helped to give the genre more mainstream attention and airplay. You can see more exaggerated influences in stars like Blake Shelton or Kenny Chesney topping the charts, but Billy is still not acknowledged, and [[Music/MileyCyrus his daughter]] is now more well-known than he is. ** Music/FaithHill. When she hit it big in late 1999-early 2000 with the massive crossover hit "Breathe", every single female act in the genre was cutting {{Power Ballad}}s with a similar sound and similar incentive to cross over. These attempts usually were met with failure (except for Martina [=McBride=] getting a few huge crossover hits -- albeit in 2004, after the craze died down), and what's more, Faith ended up hoist by her own petard when country radio shunned her very heavily pop-influenced ''Cry'' album. ** Music/GeorgeStrait. When he first hit the charts in 1981, he was markedly more country than his peers, most of whom were following the pop crossovers of acts such as Music/{{Alabama}}, Music/RonnieMilsap and Music/KennyRogers. The rise of similarly "neotraditionalist" acts like Music/RandyTravis, Music/AlanJackson, and Clint Black in the late 1980s-early 1990s followed in George's footsteps. While many of his contemporaries have faded, George has somehow managed to keep his A-list status with minimal change to his sound, sometimes making it quite hard to remember just how much of a pioneer he is. There was also Strait's FountainOfExpies nature, leading to the "hat act" boom of the 90s — a bunch of young up-and-comers looking for a hit dressed in jeans, pressed shirts, and cowboy hats just like him, and sang safe, radio-friendly honky-tonk in a slight twang, all trying to be just like Strait. Over time, "hat act" became a derogatory term in Nashville, and the tide of "hat acts" stopped. Even Music/KennyChesney was a "hat act" [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness early in his career]] before evolving into his own sound. ** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to Music/TaylorSwift and Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent — albeit moreso with male artists. ** Music/JohnnyCash and other acoustic music in general gets this treatment these days. Most teenagers think singers like Johnny Cash are boring. In his day, Cash was shocking to the MoralGuardians. These days, the acoustic guitar seen as a starting point for learning the guitar. It's hard to imagine what music would be like today without the instrument. [[AC: R&B, Soul, Funk]] * Music/RayCharles' fusion of R&B and Gospel vocal stylings in the 1950s (at a time when most R&B singers had more of a smoother show tunes vibe, a la Nat King Cole) was revolutionary and ground-breaking -- and even controversial, as many black people saw such music as blasphemous. The album ''Music/ModernSoundsInCountryAndWesternMusic'' was a huge commercial risk because it combined soul and country; many thought it would fail. But it actually managed to reach both audiences and become a huge seller. Sixty years later... Charles' sound sounds bog standard, if catchy. * The song "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" by ''The Shirelles''. Today, the song's simplistic and rather sappy lyrics don't seem like anything special. However, in 1960, both the song and group were actually very controversial. The reason why is because, until then, the idea of an all female singing group was almost unheard of in popular music (usually, musical groups were fronted by males, with women generally just brought in for singing duties on some songs). Thus, if not for the success of this song and group, we may have never had ''The Supremes'', ''TLC'', ''The Pussycat Dolls'', etc. ** The subject matter of the song, which essentially boiled down to a woman asking a man if he will respect her in the morning, if he truly loves her and cares for her as a person and will stay true to her and hope she isn't just another sexual conquest of his ("Am I lasting treasure/Or just a moment's pleasure"), [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar couched in terms which would allow the song to be played on the radio in 1961]], was similarly groundbreaking. The quaintness and subtlety of the imagery might be lost on younger listeners. And it was co-written by a ''then-fifteen-year old'' Music/CaroleKing! * Music/JamesBrown. The beats and breaks of many of his songs have been sampled or imitated so many times that his music would sound very cliché now, if it wasn't, you know, James Brown. * Larry Graham. When he first came out, his bass style of slapping and popping was new and refreshing. Now people (bass players excluded) complain it's boring and flashy. * It may be lost with newer listeners to appreciate how ''revolutionary'' Music/SlyAndTheFamilyStone were in the late [[TheSixties Sixties]], to have a band performing a very raw, Afrocentric, psychedelic, rock-infused style of funk music, with a very radical and countercultural style of clothing and hairstyles, a multi-racial, multi-gender lineup, and very countercultural/socially conscious lyrics for the time period they were popular in. They helped set the direction for much of what black music, and music in general, would follow from TheSeventies onward. The 1971 album, ''There's A Riot Going On'', in fact, was one of the first funk albums to use a (very crude and early) drum/rhythm machine. * Music/MichaelJackson. In the U.S. those who grew up after the first round of child molestation charges leveled against him in 1993 knew him only as a far too easy target for comedians with his eccentric, increasingly creepy lifestyle, as his post-1980s music wasn't successful enough to overcome his personal baggage. After his death in 2009, and hearing his GloryDays music played over and over on the radio and seeing his videos re-run on MTV, they fail to see anything unique about his style, as the best aspects of it have been standard pop music fare for the past 30+ years. His big-budget music videos often look cheesy and/or low-budget by today's standards -- sure, that works for [[Music/{{Thriller}} "Thriller"]] since it's a B-movie horror pastiche, but "Black or White" and the ''Film/{{Moonwalker}}'' version of "Smooth Criminal" don't have that excuse (and are weighed down by ridiculous storylines and spectacle-for-spectacle's sake). Between that, the datedness of the fashions, ''and'' the synthetic sound, well, they could be forgiven for saying "Why was he ever famous to begin with?" ** Even the MoonWalkDance(which Jackson didn't invent, but rather perfected) looks dated and cheesy compared to all the dance innovations that have come since; so much so that it's easy to forget that almost every one of those newer dance moves was created by someone who started dancing precisely ''because'' of how well and truly blown their minds were by Michael Jackson doing the moonwalk. ** His live performances, be they concerts, award shows, or the Super Bowl halftime show in 1993, were once among the most {{Spectacle}}-filled in popular music, but pale next to the glittering spectaculars mounted by his successors (or even peers like Music/DavidBowie) and/or events such as the 2012 Olympics closing ceremony or any given MTV Video Music Awards. [[AC: Electronic Music]] * Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. In the 70's, they were mind-blowing, because few people had heard pure electronic music before. These days, the band's early work sounds primitive, simple, and just plain dated compared to the legions of bands it inspired. ** It may seem ''primitive'' compared to the modern stuff, but that's [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=VXa9tXcMhXQ not always a bad thing]]. *** Actually only their early work sound quite primitive. Almost anything since ''Music/{{Autobahn}}'' (released in 1974) still sounds fresh. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0tm-yTYZu4 Especially the live versions from ''Minimum-Maxiumum'']] seem really modern. * Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example). ** Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco. * Eiffel 65 sounds a lot less fresh today after thousands of rappers ran the Autotune gimmick into the ground. [[AC:Grunge]] * Grunge suffers from this: ** Music/{{Nirvana}} and Music/PearlJam making it big in the early '90s is heralded as a breath of fresh air, breaking the stranglehold hair metal had on mainstream rock and paving the way for grunge and alternative rock's ascendance from the CollegeRadio ghetto. Today, however, it is hard to avoid Nirvana, Music/PearlJam, [[PostGrunge or their millions of rip-offs on the radio]] for even 15 minutes. ** By the time Music/PearlJam released ''Riot Act'', quite a few younger music fans accused the band of being a Music/{{Creed}} ripoff. (helps that Creed singer Scott Stapp has a voice which sounds ''exactly'' like Eddie Vedder's) ** Even Nirvana, and a number of other popular alt-rock/grunge groups, were highly influenced by Music/ThePixies. Kurt Cobain even admitted that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was his attempt at ripping-off of a Pixies song, specifically "Debaser" from ''Music/{{Doolittle}}''. [[AC: Heavy Metal]] * Music/BlackSabbath is often considered the first metal band. Take a moment and consider how weird that sounds. ** That title is often given to Music/KingCrimson, which just sounds all the weirder. ** It's kind of weird to hear that in the late '70s/early '80s, metal bands like Music/IronMaiden and Music/{{Metallica}} were mistaken for punk. This was because "heavy metal" in the late '70s was seen as the slow or midtempo fare of Music/BlackSabbath and Music/JudasPriest, and it was punk bands that were known for playing at fast tempos. Thus, the early '80s genre of "speed metal" doesn't seem that fast compared to later shred-metal, power-metal and extreme metal bands, but in its day, metal played at the speed of punk rock was a novelty. ** Music/IronMaiden suffers from this generally. ** A serious casualty of this trope was NWOBHM pioneer Diamond Head. They were barely famous, in comparison to Judas Priest, Iron Maiden and Saxon, but their influence on Metallica was profound. Metallica's earliest recordings were covers of ''Am I Evil'' and ''Blitzkrieg'' and much later on in the late 1990s, ''It's Electric''. However, Diamond Head never became as famous as the band they influenced, and ended up opening for them at the National Bowl event in 1993, and opened and ended their set with songs covered by Metallica to get accepted by the crowd. However, a relatively subdued performance and Diamond Head not being so famous made them look and sound like a band covering Metallica. They split up shortly afterwards. ** When listening to Music/OzzyOsbourne after bands like Music/MarilynManson and Music/{{Gwar}}, it's hard to believe he was at one time almost as controversial. ** Music/{{Pantera}} is probably the biggest offender of them all. In the midst of their numerous copycats (really, just about every metalcore and nu-metal band in existence), it's hard to believe that, at one time, their style of metal was both unique and interesting. *** In fact, Pantera are often accused to be a rip-off of Exhorder who already began to developp that sound on their demos while Pantera was still making glamish album. ** Music/JudasPriest can get this themselves. Their music can sound like a ClicheStorm these days, but one has to consider that they themselves ''[[TropeMaker invented]]'' nearly all of those clichés. It's not their fault their music has been so widely imitated since then (or maybe it is, for being so good). * Music/{{Helmet}} virtually invented the start-stop metal riff that dominated the late 90's. You'd never know it to hear their successors (e.g. Music/KoRn, {{Deftones}}, etc.) but the idea came from jazz. * Music/{{Isis}} and their blend of post-rock and SludgeMetal. One mixed review of their album ''In The Absence of Truth'' remarked "it's not Isis' fault that they sound unoriginal these days. All you have to do is pick up a copy of Decibel, open it to any page, and you'll find someone counting the group as an influence..." * {{Gorn}} lyrics in DeathMetal, or even in general. Once upon a time, it was controversial. Nowadays, arguments against the sub-genre are more towards the music itself rather than the lyrics. * Music/{{Suffocation}}. They were among the (if not ''the'') first bands to pioneer the brutal death metal subgenre, and consequently all of its variations, like slam death and so on. Their sound has been so endlessly copied that a lot of people who listen to Suffocation for the first time after already being exposed to other BDM acts, will likely find them generic. ** For that matter, Mike Smith's drumming (along with that of [[Music/MorbidAngel Pete Sandoval]] and [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]]) is likely to inspire this as well. At the time, all three were ''revolutionary''. Mike and Pete essentially created almost all of the tropes of death metal drumming (exceedingly fast blastbeats, rapid-fire double bass rolls, extensive usage of double strokes, etc.) and proved that you could play in a way designed to batter the listener into submission with speed beyond what any of the thrash drummers could pull off without sacrificing technique, clarity, or precision, while Flo took what they were doing and increased the speed and precision even further, in addition to helping lay the groundwork for what would become gravity blasts (he didn't use proper gravity blasts until ''Once Was Not'', but he did use the rim of the snare like a fulcrum to allow for blastbeat speeds that were well beyond what anyone was pulling at the time). To a current listener used to the work of players like [[Music/{{Nile}} George Kollias]], [[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/HateEternal Derek Roddy]], and Tim Yeung, however, they will sound outdated. ** Speaking of death metal drumming, gravity blasts have become this. While not particularly new (one-handed rolls using the rim of the snare as a fulcrum were being used by jazz drummers since at least the 1950s), the usage of the gravity roll within a death metal context (where steady kick and cymbal rhythms were added in to make it a blastbeat) was once an innovative technique used to create a sense of chaos or explosively release built-up tension within the song, but gratuitous overuse by slam, deathcore, and tech death drummers gradually gave the technique a reputation for being something that lazy drummers who had no grasp of dynamics abused, and the frequency with which they were quantized and sound-replaced in studio recordings due to sloppy technique only furthered this stigma. While the original purveyors ([[Music/{{Origin}} John Longstreth]], [[Music/DespisedIcon Alex Pelletier]], [[Music/{{Cryptopsy}} Flo Mounier]], and Marco Pitruzzella) are held in high regard, the technique is now generally viewed as just another thing that most fast death metal drummers should know, and the widespread misuse of the technique means that users have to be a lot more selective about when they employ it to avoid the "lazy drummer who couldn't think of anything better to fill the space" stigma. * Music/{{Darkthrone}} (specifically, their early black metal albums) have spawned so many clones that some confused people think Darkthrone themselves sound "generic". ** Ironically, Darkthrone themselves wanted to reproduce the music of their own influences. For example, they deliberately poorly produce their first Black Metal albums to capture the atmosphere of undeliberatley poorly produced Thrash Metal demos, EP and albums. * "Black Diamond" by Music/{{Kiss}} sounds like really primitive HairMetal, but it wasn't so primitive in 1974. It was unprecedented at the time for a rock song to not only be loud and angry, but to have a "symphonic" sound evocative of opera or classical music. It could be argued that AliceCooper pioneered this sound first, but he was never quite able to equal the Olympian grandeur of Kiss. * Music/LedZeppelin suffers heavily from this. In particular are John Bonham's drum beats. (Especially on "When The Levee Breaks" from ''Music/LedZeppelinIV'') His influence is so pervasive in modern rock that many younger listeners are legitimately baffled as to what's the big deal about him. ** Jimmy Page, aside from influencing many guitarists of the era, also is credited with changing the way producers would record in the studio. His technique of using multiple microphones and different distances created an "ambient sound" with more dimension than was conventional at the time. ** Just about ''everything'' associated with Zeppelin suffers from this. They practically created rock music as we recognize it today, and - without context - it's hard to imagine how revolutionary their entire style was in the late '60s and early '70s. While many British (and even some American) rock bands had dabbled a bit in Celtic folk music before, none of them had ever fused that style with hard rock, which is done on "Stairway to Heaven," "Over the Hills and Far Away," etc. Zeppelin also more or less invented the [[LooksLikeJesus "Jesus hair"]] fashion aesthetic for rock bands, which was pretty standard from the 1970s to the '90s; previous rock musicians may have had long hair, but it had not been as flamboyantly styled. The [[EightiesHair "poodle hair"]] of '80s HairMetal certainly could not have existed without Led Zeppelin. ** In particular, Led Zeppelin are considered progenitors of hard rock and even heavy metal - not only that, but they were one of the heaviest bands of their time, Black Sabbath aside. This sounds almost laughable now, given how easy it became to find songs that are heavier than anything they ever released. * Music/YngwieMalmsteen, while still respected by a lot of shred players, is generally viewed as an irritating, tuneless, masturbatory showoff who never grew out of the "cram in as many notes as possible" phase that most shredders go through and whose [[JerkAss obnoxious, repellent behavior]] is probably even more famous than his music. That being said, he created almost all of the tropes of shred guitar; while he definitely wasn't the one who laid the groundwork for it (and he'll admit as much), he ''was'' the one who took what his influences were doing and brought it all UpToEleven. With plenty of more focused, song-oriented peers like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony [=MacAlpine=], and Vinnie Moore, however, his proclivity for gratuitous overplaying began to grow tiresome, and with a new wave of modern guitar icons like Music/JeffLoomis, Music/ChristianMuenzner, [[Music/ScarSymmetry Per Nilsson]], [[Music/{{Revocation}} Dave Davidson]], and [[Music/AnimalsAsLeaders Tosin Abasi]], younger listeners will probably wonder why he's still seen as a big deal. * '''Music/{{Manowar}}''' is sometimes criticized for using [[ClicheStorm "cliché"]] [[HeavyMithril sword-and-sorcery themes in their lyrics]], despite the fact that their usage goes all the way back to 1983 on their ''Into Glory Ride'' album, which predates the PowerMetal genre by a couple of years, and that they were likely the first North American metal band to dare embrace these tropes. * In the four years since Music/{{Meshuggah}} released their breakout album ''Obzen'', an entire genre - progressive groove metal, or "djent" - has come to the forefront of the metal world, based almost entirely on expanding the Meshuggah sound (the word "djent", the colloquial name for the entire genre, started as onomatopoeia for Meshuggah's guitar tone). Some, including major metal blog Metal Sucks, speculate that, in the wake of what bands like Periphery, Tesseract and Vildhjarta have been creating, the now-upcoming new Meshuggah album Koloss is going to come off as very uninteresting and behind-the-times. * The Music/{{Sepultura}} album ''Roots''. Upon release, it was one of the most critically-acclaimed and commercially successful metal albums of the mid-90's. However, the legions of nu-metal bands that copied its sound (the album was, in fact, arguably the first true nu "metal" album - Korn's s/t being more of a rap/hardcore album with hints of metal) have led this album to gradually become far less acclaimed and celebrated as the years went by. ** ''Chaos A.D'' also suffers from this to some extent. * Music/AtTheGates's riffing style has been [[FollowTheLeader copied]] so much that their album ''Slaughter of the Soul'' might seem predictable to a first time listener who's already acquainted with the knockoffs. * MarilynManson, like Alice Cooper before him, doesn't seem quite as shocking nowadays, with fifty thousand bands from so many different genres trying to be him. At the time, though, the idea of a mostly naked man wearing makeup, a male bassist in kinderwhore getup and a stage show that incorporated everything from the bassist sucking his dick or the guitarist giving him a rimjob to Bibles being ripped up and thrown into the crowd was absolutely horrifying to the religious right. Metal that really was straight-up supported by Anton [=LaVey=], a frontman who was a reverend in the Church of Satan, drugs, sex and androgyny were all shocking to people. Luckily, there was also a terrifyingly complex foundation it was built on, with lyrics and albums [[http://www.nachtkabarett.com/Grotesque that have prompted more writing than one could imagine]]. Coupled with some inspiration from David Bowie to change sound from album to album (although leading to plenty of fandom infighting), the band is still going strong and the latest album, ''The Pale Emperor'' is a huge hit. [[AC:Punk Rock]] * Back in the 1970s wearing a colorful punk mohawk, leather jackets, safety pins, make-up and eyeliner scared off most people, even older rock fans. Praising "anarchy" and rebelling against the system were very audacious things to say too. Nowadays, with so many PopPunk bands imitating the dress code and the style, while actually playing mellowed down pop tunes it may be hard to realize how revolutionary the punk movement once was. * Music/TheSexPistols were considered shocking in 1977 for releasing a song criticizing the British Royal Family ("God Save The Queen", found on ''Music/NeverMindTheBollocksHeresTheSexPistols''). Many people saw them as dangerous and the British intelligence service even spied on them. A rock band! Nowadays you'd be hardpressed to find any band able to get such an overwhelming mainstream outrage as they did. ** Music/TheRamones and the Music/TheSexPistols were a reaction to the largely overproduced and masturbatory progressive rock genre, and decided to do the exact opposite by never really learning to play their instruments. The punk scene exploded into the mainstream in 1977, and to modern day listeners, both of the aforementioned bands sound either sloppy or overly melodic, depending on what you listen to. ** Audiences raised on modern-day PunkRock bands like Music/BadReligion and Music/{{NOFX}} will sometimes hear about how "fast" and "heavy" the Ramones' music was back in the day, only to find it sounding like a string of {{Power Ballad}}s in comparison. ** The ubiquitous Ramones t-shirt on every wannabe "edgy" C-list celeb is borderline example in its own right. Some Guardian music journalist claimed that "the kids" were turning to wearing previously shunned Nirvana/Grunge-era logos as a kind of backlash against '70s rock t-shirts. ** As mentioned above, the original punk rock was a rebellion against the traditional rock 'n' roll sound. But after hardcore punk came with its extremely short songs, simple music and aggressive lyrics, the original punk rock sounds a lot like 1950s rock 'n' roll (which, to be frank, was partly the point). Early punk music is now viable radio material, which it absolutely wasn't when it was current, and which it was never meant to be. ** In photos from before he retired from music, Music/RichardHell could be seen dressed in a very typical punk rock style, with spiked hair and ripped-up, drawn-on shirts held together with safety pins. For this reason, it can be sort of surprising to hear his band Richard Hell & The Voidoids, since they didn't really play conventional punk rock. The thing is, Hell is actually credited with inspiring much of the early punk rock look - Malcolm [=McLaren=] has cited him as the main influence on how Music/TheSexPistols were dressed for instance. ** Conversely, most of the punk bands before the Sex Pistols had SeventiesHair and dressed in perfectly ordinary street clothes. One member of one of the first punk bands, the Dictators, even had an Afro! ** Another factor is that punk -- especially in its formative years -- has always had an undercurrent of sociopolitical outrage, and many of the issues they sang about are [[ValuesDissonance no longer current]]. It was also part of a backlash against the [[WideEyedIdealist Wide-Eyed Idealism]] of the Sixties and early Seventies, when such biting cynicism was genuinely shocking; in the modern climate of [[ConditionedToAcceptHorror jaded acceptance that the world is a horrible place]] and constant exposure to {{Deadpan Snark|er}}, modern listeners tend to wonder why they took things so seriously. ** The Music/BlackFlag album ''Music/{{Damaged}}'' was groundbreaking when it came out in 1981, as it popularized the snarky-yet-socially-conscious attitude of many later-day punk bands. Now that its style has been not only frequently copied but also seriously cleaned up by other bands - including bands that are not and never were even in the punk genre - the album just sounds like an underproduced mess with seriously dated lyrical content to modern ears. (Or the later bands sound like LighterAndSofter versions of Black Flag.) * Music/TheMisfits, a 1980s punk band that was considered edgy for their lyrics inspired by horror films and other horror related imagery. Now this, and their pop punk sound, would be considered mainstream emo. [[AC:Visual Kei]] * VisualKei has developed a lot of these: ** The first is the split of subgenres. At the beginning, VisualKei ''was'' HardRock and HeavyMetal with a huge dose of inspiration from HairMetal. Something similar happened with the mid-90s Goth influence. Now, while some HR/HM VK bands still exist (in the Kote Kei subgenre and the Eroguro Kei subgenre for the most part, with still-active or reunited Visual Shock or Veteran Kei making up the rest), and some Gothic/Industrial bands do still exist (these are mostly those influenced by or connected to MoiDixMois and Mana), the largest portion of ''active'' Visual Kei bands are generally Oshare Kei or Host Kei, and Oshare dance-pop and similar is often more common than harder rock or metal. That said, this is cyclical - as of 2013, a harder rock/metal influence seems to be returning as ''many'' of the Oshare bands fell into the same trap. Still, ''equating'' VisualKei with HR/HM after around 2000 is almost laughable. ** HoYay fanservice. In TheEighties and until the middle of TheNineties, the YaoiFangirl was ''not'' seen as a target market for VisualKei (much less as specifically ''existing''), and quite a few of the artists engaging in most of the HoYay ''were'' actual bisexual or gay men using the stage as a way to express themselves and their sexuality in a culture and world that rejected it. The idea caught on as a [[FollowTheLeader bandwagon trend]] for {{fanservice}} directed at the fangirls ''only'' once some straight bandmen noticed how much the fangirls liked it and with it becoming somewhat socially acceptable (at least within the subculture) to be a YaoiFangirl. [[UnfortunateImplications Unfortunately]] this led to straight men using it as fanservice, and once some other fans found out about the {{Kayfabe}}, some fans insisting that no VK artist could actually be gay or bi for real. ** EightiesHair and the ImprobableHairstyle fell out of style around the mid 90s. When even {{Music/X Japan}} except for hide toned down their hairstyles, it pretty much called an end to the era of OTT VisualKei hair, which was, at the time it was done, something entirely new and awesome. While exotic hairstyles are still common, and this trend may well swing around too, doing an ImprobableHairstyle beyond the "medusa" cut or a typical host cut is often seen as a marker of a bygone time or a parody. ** ANYTHING that is almost exclusively tied to a specific artist will be, unless it is used as a ''direct'' tribute or ShoutOut, seen as this and derisively dismissed as a cheap attention grab or bad cosplay. Good examples were eyeliner swirls for much of the 2000s (anyone doing them was seen as a cheap Mana knockoff/wannabe), nosebands (Reita of the Gazette, and anyone wearing a noseband is seen as that), and almost ''anything'' connected to hide (if you go onstage with that yellow heart Fernandes and it's ''not'' a hide tribute and/or you're not a member of {{Music/X Japan}}, {{Music/Luna Sea}}, or an ex-member of Spread Beaver, you ''will'' get odd looks, and probably start a FlameWar) ** Oshare Kei developed one of its own: the Generic Sparkle Loop. By the time it made it to Maria Cross's PV, it was considered ''such'' an Oshare cliche that any band using it ''seriously'' was just asking to be mocked not only by fans of other genres but by Oshare fans as well. [[AC:Comedy Music]] * In an era where nearly anyone with a halfway decent singing voice and a copy of Garage Band can put up a comedic parody of popular music on Website/YouTube, the appeal of Music/WeirdAlYankovic and similar musicians who were parodists by trade can be lost on a younger generation. [[AC: Hiphop & Rap]] * Much of the old school rap of the late 1970s and 1980s sounds quite corny nowadays. "Rapper's Delight" by Music/TheSugarHillGang is almost a children's nursery rhyme and uses all the tropes that are now clichés in rap music: bragging about your sex life, about the cars you own and partying. Equally Music/RunDMC's albums ''[[Music/RunDMCAlbum Run DMC]]'', ''Music/KingOfRock'' and ''Music/RaisingHell'' sound very clean, safe and inoffensive. ** To be fair, they were pretty inoffensive even in the mid-80's. A lot of the initial backlash against rap was due to its African-American roots (in fact, Creator/{{MTV}} was ''very'' hesitant to play rap videos, out of fear of alienating its predominantly white audience - hence the creation of "Yo! MTV Raps" in 1988). It wouldn't be until GangstaRap took off a couple years later that the genre would become controversial for its lyrical content. * The Music/BeastieBoys' sampling, particularly on ''Music/PaulsBoutique'' - was a huge influence on rap producers and helped create the slicker, jazz-sampling style of rap music that would evolve into G-Funk. However, most new listeners will notice their high pitched rapping styles and the fact they are white, and not really see what has made them so popular. ** Likewise, ''Hello Nasty'' was considered a remarkable achievement upon release in 1998 as, until then, nobody had ever heard a hip hop album with so much variety. The album seemed destined to become a classic along the lines of Paul's Boutique and ''Music/LicensedToIll''. Over time, however, its critical standing has significantly diminished, thanks to the work of rappers like Music/KanyeWest (whose music has the same kind of variety but with more focus). It's now considered by most to be one of the band's weaker albums. * Trap rapper Ace Hood's once-distinctive flow (popular around 2010, when he had a single out with RickRoss and LilWayne called "Hustle Hard"), has since had a legion of imitators, most of whom have had considerably more successful careers than Ace himself. * Boyd Rice. Play an old record by him to someone today and they might think that it's someone trying to learn to make a loop. They might not realize that Boyd was one of the earliest pioneers of sampling and record scratching. * Music/DrDre's "Nothin' But a 'G' Thang". At the time, a hip-hip video with low riders, backyard parties and lots of posing in front of the camera was something new and different. Needless to say, it was certainly influential. * T.I. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area. [[AC: Technology]] * ''Stereo sound''. Up until the mid-to-late [[TheSixties 1960s]], AM radio was the go-to format for listening to popular music, FM was strictly for news, information and [[MnogoNukes well, to find out what to do should the nukes drop]], and hi-fi stereo sound was the province of the wealthy. Stereo records ''were'' manufactured, and pop songs mixed to stereo, but monaural (mono) sound was the default format of morst systems. Bands like Music/TheBeatles and Music/TheBeachBoys in fact were only involved in the mono mixes of their records, and pop songs were mixed and mastered mainly to sound good on cheap single-speaker transistor radios or car radios. The rise of underground rock and jazz radio, "[[WatchItStoned head music]]" and music labels determined to demonstrate their [[TechnologyMarchesOn new multi-track and stereo technology]] led to the popularity of stereo recordings (and headphones), and mono eventually was phased out. ** It should be noted that the early style of stereo was usually the vocal track and instrumental placed in the left and right channel respectively, rather than mixed together - so was effectively made from two mono tracks. Actual stereo recording didn't really come about till the late 60s, where the two tracks were similar sounding but with slight differences in the instruments or panning. Thus, the mono of the early 60s usually sounds more natural to headphone listeners today than the stereo does, as it is more similar to today's stereo. * Synthesizer and sampling technology, particularly from TheEighties can count. With modern, increasingly realistic and expressive all-in-one-box digital workstations now the norm, it can be jarring to know that many of the features now taken for granted in newer instruments were once the exclusive property of $5,000 to $100,000+ instruments like the Fairlight CMI, the E-mu Emulators I and II, the New England Digital Synclavier and the Kurzweil 250 thirty or so years ago. Even with the Yamaha DX-7, Roland D-50 and Korg M1 (and samplers like the Akai S900 and Ensoniq Mirage), it was relatively crude technology. Computer software has often taken over for hardware, and things like the $50 Peter Vogel CMI Pro app (based on Fairlight CMI technology, and designed by the Fairlight's co-inventor) are derided as slow and crude, if not amusing for its retro qualities. * The Compact Disc, introduced in 1982, was a revolutionary breakthrough in TheEighties, offering a cleaner, clearer way of listening to music than the vinyl formats of the previous sixty or seventy years. It brought, even in its 16-bit sound, more intimacy and detail, and captured the whole of the record, uninterrupted by record sides or weird formatting like the eight-tracks of TheSeventies. It may have influenced the way new music is recorded, mixed, mastered and produced, as well, as music grew in complexity and digital precision to cater to CD listeners. The 78-minute storage capabilities might have led to longer albums. Nowadays, it (and the mp3) are the industry standard, and the novelty of it seems lost to newer generations. ** In a [[{{Irony}} hilariously ironic]] twist, vinyl has [[PopularityPolynomial now become]] the "professional" "ideal" "hip new" "audiophile format", thanks to its lack of digital sampling and recording level limitations (the latter of which has been [[LoudnessWar infamously abused]] since the dawn of the 21st century) ----NeoclassicalP
21st Dec '15 4:04:12 PM DarkBee
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Larry Graham. When he first came out, his bass style of slapping and popping was new and refreshing. Now people (bass players excluded) complain it's boring and flashy.

* Larry Graham. When he first came out, his bass style of slapping and popping was new and refreshing. Now people (bass players excluded) complain it's boring and flashy.
30th Oct '15 11:37:08 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** [[WesternAnimation/HannahMontana Billy Ray Cyrus]] became popular in 1992, at a time when there was a trend toward "traditional country", and his very rock- and pop-influenced "crossover country" style (complete with the ubiquitous novelty hit "Achy Breaky Heart") and mulleted, musclebound, hip-wiggling pretty-boy stage presence was both very uncommon in the genre, and polarized many country purists who saw him as a {{Scrappy}}. His success, however, brought a younger, hipper, more rock-influenced audience to country music, and helped to give the genre more mainstream attention and airplay. You can see more exaggerated influences in stars like Blake Shelton or Kenny Chesney topping the charts, but Billy is still not acknowledged, and [[Music/MileyCyrus his daughter]] is now more well-known than he is.
to:
** [[WesternAnimation/HannahMontana Billy Ray Cyrus]] Cyrus became popular in 1992, at a time when there was a trend toward "traditional country", and his very rock- and pop-influenced "crossover country" style (complete with the ubiquitous novelty hit "Achy Breaky Heart") and mulleted, musclebound, hip-wiggling pretty-boy stage presence was both very uncommon in the genre, and polarized many country purists who saw him as a {{Scrappy}}. His success, however, brought a younger, hipper, more rock-influenced audience to country music, and helped to give the genre more mainstream attention and airplay. You can see more exaggerated influences in stars like Blake Shelton or Kenny Chesney topping the charts, but Billy is still not acknowledged, and [[Music/MileyCyrus his daughter]] is now more well-known than he is.
27th Sep '15 9:36:17 PM Magnets
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
* T.I. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area.
29th Aug '15 6:09:26 PM NightSpectre
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Though they've been the {{Butt Monkey}}s of metal for years now, there was actually a time when Music/KoRn's blend of said genre, hardcore and hip-hop was considered fresh and unique, rather than a pejorative called NuMetal. Ironic that their they titled their third album ''FollowTheLeader'', as a cynical nod to an industry that oversaturated their sound and drove it under.
11th Aug '15 6:06:29 AM Adept
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to TaylorSwift and CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent — albeit moreso with male artists.
to:
** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to TaylorSwift Music/TaylorSwift and CarrieUnderwood's Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent — albeit moreso with male artists.
14th Jul '15 6:26:02 AM MartyD82
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The 2001 album ''Is This It'' by Music/TheStrokes. In an era where popular music was dominated mostly by TeenPop and NuMetal, the album was seen as a major breath of fresh air: an authentic indie rock record with enough pop sensibilities for mainstream viability. In its wake, there was a gradual shift in the popular music landscape, with indie bands like Music/ModestMouse, Music/DeathCabForCutie and Music/TheKillers achieving at-the-time unheard of levels of success. Today, with low-fi/indie being the norm in rock, it might be hard for new listeners to understand what was so special about ''Is This It''.
to:
* The 2001 album ''Is This It'' by Music/TheStrokes. In an era where popular music was dominated mostly by TeenPop [[TeenIdol Teen Pop]] and NuMetal, the album was seen as a major breath of fresh air: an authentic indie rock record with enough pop sensibilities for mainstream viability. In its wake, there was a gradual shift in the popular music landscape, with indie bands like Music/ModestMouse, Music/DeathCabForCutie and Music/TheKillers achieving at-the-time unheard of levels of success. Today, with low-fi/indie being the norm in rock, it might be hard for new listeners to understand what was so special about ''Is This It''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 184. Show all.