History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Music

3rd Aug '16 1:19:27 PM lemonlime
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* Rapper Rakim completely changed the way people rapped by incorporating internal rhymes and complicated wordplay. If you compare his rhymes to those of any earlier artist, such as Music/RunDMC, they're worlds apart. However, many modern hip hop fans just hear his music as boring '80s hip hop.

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* Rapper Rakim of famed duo Music/EricBAndRakim completely changed the way people rapped by incorporating internal rhymes and complicated wordplay. If you compare his rhymes to those of any earlier artist, such as Music/RunDMC, they're worlds apart. However, many modern hip hop fans just hear his music as boring '80s hip hop.
3rd Aug '16 1:18:10 PM lemonlime
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* Rapper Music/Rakim completely changed the way people rapped by incorporating internal rhymes and complicated wordplay. If you compare his rhymes to those of any earlier artist, such as Music/RunDMC, they're worlds apart. However, many modern hip hop fans just hear his music as boring '80s hip hop.

to:

* Rapper Music/Rakim Rakim completely changed the way people rapped by incorporating internal rhymes and complicated wordplay. If you compare his rhymes to those of any earlier artist, such as Music/RunDMC, they're worlds apart. However, many modern hip hop fans just hear his music as boring '80s hip hop.
3rd Aug '16 1:17:35 PM lemonlime
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* Rapper Music/Rakim completely changed the way people rapped by incorporating internal rhymes and complicated wordplay. If you compare his rhymes to those of any earlier artist, such as Music/RunDMC, they're worlds apart. However, many modern hip hop fans just hear his music as boring '80s hip hop.
3rd Aug '16 1:13:02 PM lemonlime
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** Louis Armstrong in particular is an interesting example because his early work with the "Hot Five" and "Hot Seven" groups is even seen by some serious jazz fans as cliché, old-fashioned, cheesy, when in fact it completely revolutionized the way jazz musicians played. All his techniques have been copied by later players, and so you can't really appreciate what is so great about his solos until you compare them to those of other trumpet and cornet players of the '20s.
28th Jul '16 2:49:09 PM Jhonny
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* It's not even sure whether Music/DieArzte actually fit in this category (some of their music clearly ''is'' punk rock, but most isn't); however, their early work included some (at the time) "provocative" lyrics. So provocative that they were banned in 1980s Germany. Comparing those lyrics to today's rap (where "Isch ficke deine Muttah" is the equivalent of "Hello") this seems ridiculous. So ridiculous that all but one of those songs are now un-banned after a re-evaluation in TheNewMilennium.
28th Jul '16 2:28:37 PM UltimateLazer
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* Music/{{TI}}. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area.

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* Music/{{TI}}. suffers from this today. Hailing from UsefulNotes/{{Altanta}} UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} and representing the south at a time when any rapper that wasn't from the east coast or west coast was considered a novelty, he pioneered southern hip-hop in the mainstream. He was literally declared "King of the South"! Naturally, with the southern hip-hop explosion that happened in the mid-'00s, it's become ''very'' difficult for people to see what the big deal was about him today due to the countless amount of rappers from his area.
4th Jul '16 4:28:00 AM gewunomox
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** Similarly to Jaco's fretless bass sound, guitarist [[WesMontgomery Wes Montgomery's]] then-radical use of octaves on an L5 archtop, becoming a trademark with him and an influence on JimiHendrix, became something of a cliche in jazz guitar playing and arguably wore ''itself'' out as well in the smooth jazz scene.

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** Similarly to Jaco's fretless bass sound, guitarist [[WesMontgomery [[Music/WesMontgomery Wes Montgomery's]] then-radical use of octaves on an L5 archtop, becoming a trademark with him and an influence on JimiHendrix, Music/JimiHendrix, became something of a cliche in jazz guitar playing and arguably wore ''itself'' out as well in the smooth jazz scene.



* Music/EricClapton. Although he was never as experimental as his contemporary Music/JimiHendrix, Clapton was a major influence on all rock after 1966. He almost single-handedly resurrected the Gibson Les Paul, which remains one of the most ubiquitous guitar designs today. [[http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/Get%20That%20Tone_%20Blues%20Breakers/ Not only that, he created (or popularized) rock guitar as we know it]]. His playing during this era inspired the "Clapton is God" graffiti. Hendrix himself was an admirer. Today, although he's still a skilled guitarist, Clapton is mostly known for the light pop he recorded from TheSeventies onward. His watered-down acoustic version of "Layla" is arguably more familiar to younger generations than the original (and with some justice, as it was presented in a much more pop-friendly and thus memorable format). He influenced just as many guitarists as Hendrix (usually both are cited), so his playing is often considered tired and clichéd. But he used to be kind of cool.

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* Music/EricClapton. Although he was never as experimental as his contemporary Music/JimiHendrix, Jimi Hendrix, Clapton was a major influence on all rock after 1966. He almost single-handedly resurrected the Gibson Les Paul, which remains one of the most ubiquitous guitar designs today. [[http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/Get%20That%20Tone_%20Blues%20Breakers/ Not only that, he created (or popularized) rock guitar as we know it]]. His playing during this era inspired the "Clapton is God" graffiti. Hendrix himself was an admirer. Today, although he's still a skilled guitarist, Clapton is mostly known for the light pop he recorded from TheSeventies onward. His watered-down acoustic version of "Layla" is arguably more familiar to younger generations than the original (and with some justice, as it was presented in a much more pop-friendly and thus memorable format). He influenced just as many guitarists as Hendrix (usually both are cited), so his playing is often considered tired and clichéd. But he used to be kind of cool.
25th May '16 8:13:53 PM HypnoticMeerkat
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* MarilynManson, like Alice Cooper before him, doesn't seem quite as shocking nowadays, with fifty thousand bands from so many different genres trying to be him. At the time, though, the idea of a mostly naked man wearing makeup, a male bassist in kinderwhore getup and a stage show that incorporated everything from the bassist sucking his dick or the guitarist giving him a rimjob to Bibles being ripped up and thrown into the crowd was absolutely horrifying to the religious right. Metal that really was straight-up supported by Anton [=LaVey=], a frontman who was a reverend in the Church of Satan, drugs, sex and androgyny were all shocking to people. Luckily, there was also a terrifyingly complex foundation it was built on, with lyrics and albums [[http://www.nachtkabarett.com/Grotesque that have prompted more writing than one could imagine]]. Coupled with some inspiration from David Bowie to change sound from album to album (although leading to plenty of fandom infighting), the band is still going strong and the latest album, ''The Pale Emperor'' is a huge hit.

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* MarilynManson, Music/MarilynManson, like Alice Cooper before him, doesn't seem quite as shocking nowadays, with fifty thousand bands from so many different genres trying to be him. At the time, though, the idea of a mostly naked man wearing makeup, a male bassist in kinderwhore getup and a stage show that incorporated everything from the bassist sucking his dick or the guitarist giving him a rimjob to Bibles being ripped up and thrown into the crowd was absolutely horrifying to the religious right. Metal that really was straight-up supported by Anton [=LaVey=], a frontman who was a reverend in the Church of Satan, drugs, sex and androgyny were all shocking to people. Luckily, there was also a terrifyingly complex foundation it was built on, with lyrics and albums [[http://www.nachtkabarett.com/Grotesque that have prompted more writing than one could imagine]]. Coupled with some inspiration from David Bowie to change sound from album to album (although leading to plenty of fandom infighting), the band is still going strong and the latest album, ''The Pale Emperor'' is a huge hit.
14th May '16 4:11:43 PM hamza678
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** It may seem ''primitive'' compared to the modern stuff, but that's [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=VXa9tXcMhXQ not always a bad thing]].
*** Actually only their early work sound quite primitive. Almost anything since ''Music/{{Autobahn}}'' (released in 1974) still sounds fresh. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0tm-yTYZu4 Especially the live versions from ''Minimum-Maxiumum'']] seem really modern.
* Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example).
** Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco.

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** It may seem ''primitive'' compared to the modern stuff, but that's [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=VXa9tXcMhXQ not always a bad thing]].
*** Actually only their early work sound quite primitive. Almost anything since ''Music/{{Autobahn}}'' (released in 1974) still sounds fresh. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0tm-yTYZu4 Especially the live versions from ''Minimum-Maxiumum'']] seem really modern.

* Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example).
**
example). Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco.
13th May '16 10:34:29 AM MeAndMyNerdyBat
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* Speaking of southern hip-hop, Music/OutKast pretty much [[TropeMaker invented]] the sound that is still prevalent in hip-hop scene of the South today (heavily eschewing the electro-based party elements of then-popular Miami Bass in favor of far more substantial funk, soul, and gospel-based compositions), with ''Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik'', ''[=ATLiens=]'' and ''Aquemini'' often being considered some of the best and most important albums of rap's second decade. Nowadays, this funk/soul/gospel-based sound is so overused in mainstream hip-hop and pop music that many younger listeners may have some difficulty seeing how revolutionary the band was at the time.
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