History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Music

8th Nov '17 11:02:40 AM KizunaTallis
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* Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. In the 70's, they were mind-blowing, because few people had heard pure electronic music before. These days, the band's early work sounds primitive, simple, and just plain dated compared to the legions of bands it inspired.

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* Music/{{Kraftwerk}}. In the 70's, they were mind-blowing, because few people had heard pure electronic music before. These days, the band's early work sounds primitive, simple, and just plain dated compared to the legions of bands and artists it inspired.




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* Music/DavidGuetta was among the producers/[=DJs=] credited with helping to bring ElectronicMusic into the American public consciousness after years of previous attempts flopping. Singles like "Sexy Bitch", "Titanium" and "Turn Me On" were massive hits when they came out in the early 2010s, but as the decade progressed and the American EDM market became more diversified, Guetta's poppy-[[HouseMusic house]] sound feels rather quaint and [[SoOkayItsAverage middle-of-the-road]] compared to the material his peers have put out.
26th Oct '17 3:23:39 PM KizunaTallis
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* Dance music. Most of it falls victim to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's new is so easily taken up and copied by imitators that it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example). Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco.
* Eiffel 65 sounds a lot less fresh today after thousands of rappers ran the Autotune gimmick into the ground. Not to mention that their signature song "I'm Blue" has now become a frequent source for [[MemeticMutation jokes and memes]] on the internet.
* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in the early 2000s, it was not uncommon to hear this song at dance clubs, as it quickly became a global recognizable hit that was even featured in some television shows and played at sporting events, including the 2006 Winter Olympics, and it pretty much helped kick start the {{Trance}} genre in North America. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore, and pass it off as nothing but a "joke" song that isn't taken seriously like it used to.
** "Animals" by Martin Garrix also partly suffers from this. When it was first released, its use of heavy bass was seen as something original and revolutionary and its popularity basically catapulted the popularity of Big Room house. But now, since everyone in the EDM scene tried their hand in Big Room, it is now seen as an unoriginal and simplistic track.

to:

* Dance music. Most of it falls victim music in general moves at a much faster pace compared to this eventually. Not so long ago nobody had heard of acid house, rave, big beat, gabba, trip-hop, drum'n'bass, jungle... Anything that's other genres. Producers get new is so easily taken equipment, tempos speed up and copied by imitators slow down; a big single pulls some new sound from the aether and then everything that came before it soon sounds totally conventional and often technologically primitive. (Think of MARRS "Pump Up the Volume", "Out of Space" by the Prodigy, or anything by Fatboy Slim for example). Very few people nowadays might hear Suicide or Silver Apples, the two bands that arguably spawned electronic music, and guess that their origins are pre-disco.
hopelessly dated.
* Eiffel 65 sounds a lot less fresh today after thousands of singers and rappers ran the Autotune {{Autotune}} gimmick [[DeaderThanDisco into the ground. Not to mention that ground]]. Moreover, their signature song {{signature song}}[=/=]OneHitWonder "I'm Blue" Blue (Da Ba Dee)" has now become a frequent source for [[MemeticMutation jokes and memes]] on the internet.
* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in the early 2000s, it was not uncommon to hear this song at dance clubs, as it quickly became a global globally recognizable hit that was even featured in some television shows and played at sporting events, including the 2006 Winter Olympics, and it pretty much (along with a few others) helped kick start kickstart the {{Trance}} genre scene in North America. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore, and pass it off as nothing but a "joke" song that isn't taken seriously like it used to.
**
to be.
*
"Animals" by Martin Garrix also partly suffers from this. When it was first released, its use of heavy bass was seen as something original and revolutionary and its popularity basically catapulted the popularity of [[ElectroHouse Big Room house. House sound]] to astronomical popularity, becoming essentially the "Mainstage Sound" for many an EDM festival. But now, since everyone in the EDM scene tried their hand in Big Room, it just a few short years after its release, "Animals" is now seen as an unoriginal and simplistic track.
track due to the quick backlash against the Big Room sound.
26th Oct '17 12:15:37 PM slvstrChung
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Added DiffLines:

** The Beatles popularized the idea that "real" bands write their own songs and play their own instruments. (The labels were happy to promote this idea because it meant they had to split the profits amongst fewer parties.)
1st Sep '17 6:51:51 AM wuggles
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* Adina Howard's 1995 hit "Freak Like Me" seems rather tame by today's standards, but at the time it seemed very risque for an R&B song (as opposed to hip-hop, which at that time was already pretty sexual). At the time it came out, most R&B songs were fairly tame ballads. These days, "Freak Like Me" is barely as raunchy as your average Music/{{Rihanna}} song.



[[AC: R&B]]
* Adina Howard's 1995 hit "Freak Like Me" seems rather tame by today's standards, but at the time it seemed very risque for an R&B song (as opposed to hip-hop, which at that time was already pretty sexual). At the time it came out, most R&B songs were fairly tame ballads. These days, "Freak Like Me" is barely as raunchy as your average Music/{{Rihanna}} song.

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[[AC: R&B]]
* Adina Howard's 1995 hit "Freak Like Me" seems rather tame by today's standards, but at the time it seemed very risque for an R&B song (as opposed to hip-hop, which at that time was already pretty sexual). At the time it came out, most R&B songs were fairly tame ballads. These days, "Freak Like Me" is barely as raunchy as your average Music/{{Rihanna}} song.


21st Aug '17 9:51:10 AM RedScharlach
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** And it doesn`t stop there. When listening to the Kyrie movement from the D minor requiem of Music/{{Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart}}, have in mind he snatched the main theme from Händel`s "Messiah", and the musical style from Music/AntonioVivaldi. To make it worse, Bach made a fugue on the same theme. Vivaldi was reckoned quite innovative in his day, but he stole a chunk of musical tropes from Giovanni Gabrieli, present in Venice even hundred years before his time. And so on...
* Slightly odd example with Henry Purcell's chamber music for strings. His trio sonatas are in the most up-to-date style of his time (the tonal, Italian style of Corelli), but since that style became SO universal soon after his death, modern listeners will hear them as 'conventional'. His viol fantasias, on the other hand, are in the spicy, contrapuntal style popular in England a generation earlier (think Gibbons, Lawes and such), and since it's a style with which modern audience are less familiar, they sound shockingly innovative. Completely the reverse of how Purcell's contemporaries would have reacted to the music.
* Music/FranzLiszt, Music/RichardWagner and Music/RichardStrauss were ''loathed'' in their lifetime. Many reviews and newspaper cartoons depict them als makers of cacophonic noise that nobody would ever listen to. If you hear their music today you don't get why it sounds that much different from other easy listening classical music.
** Music/RichardWagner is one of the best examples of this in classical music/opera. There was nothing like what he was doing at the time. He pushed at the boundaries of tonality in a way no composer had done before; he invented the leitmotif (basically, a "theme song" for a character, object or concept), the staple of just about every film score ever; his writings about the ''Gesamtkunstwerk'' (the "total art work" that combined music and drama) had a huge influence on the development of not only opera but also musical theater. But these days, with over a century of increasingly weirder and more boundary-pushing work inbetween, Wagner's work sounds increasingly hackneyed and overwraught. Plus, pretty much every stereotype of opera in general - from fat ladies in horned helmets (though they were winged in the original), to the idea of opera as super-complex and daunting (previously, opera was divided into either lighthearted rom-coms or hammy melodrama) - comes largely from his work.
* {{Opera}}: During the 18th, 19th and early 20th century opera music was extremely popular with people of all ages and all layers of the population. Even regular people went to visit their local opera house and enjoyed the stories and music. Today opera is mostly associated with the elite and many people think its either too posh or too ridiculous to enjoy. In fact, whenever opera singers like the Three Tenors try to bring opera back to the common people they are criticized for being "commercial" and relying too much on the well known overtures, choruses and arias that everybody knows.

to:

** And it doesn`t stop there. When listening to the Kyrie movement from the D minor requiem of Music/{{Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart}}, have in mind he snatched the main theme from Händel`s Händel's "Messiah", and the musical style from Music/AntonioVivaldi. To make it worse, Bach made a fugue on the same theme. Vivaldi was reckoned quite innovative in his day, but he stole a chunk of musical tropes from Giovanni Gabrieli, present in Venice even hundred years before his time. And so on...
* Slightly odd example with Henry Purcell's chamber music for strings. His trio sonatas are in the most up-to-date style of his time (the tonal, Italian style of Corelli), but since that style became SO universal soon after his death, modern listeners will hear them as 'conventional'. His viol fantasias, on the other hand, are in the spicy, contrapuntal style popular in England a generation earlier (think Gibbons, Lawes and such), and since it's a style with which modern audience audiences are less familiar, they sound shockingly innovative. Completely the reverse of how Purcell's contemporaries would have reacted to the music.
* Music/FranzLiszt, Music/RichardWagner and Music/RichardStrauss were ''loathed'' in their lifetime. Many reviews and newspaper cartoons depict them als as makers of cacophonic noise that nobody would ever listen to. If you hear their music today you don't get why it sounds that much different from other easy listening classical music.
** Music/RichardWagner is one of the best examples of this in classical music/opera. There was nothing like what he was doing at the time. He pushed at the boundaries of tonality in a way no composer had done before; he invented the leitmotif (basically, a "theme song" for a character, object or concept), the staple of just about every film score ever; his writings about the ''Gesamtkunstwerk'' (the "total art work" that combined music and drama) had a huge influence on the development of not only opera but also musical theater. But these days, with over a century of increasingly weirder and more boundary-pushing work inbetween, Wagner's work sounds increasingly hackneyed and overwraught.overwrought. Plus, pretty much every stereotype of opera in general - from fat ladies in horned helmets (though they were winged in the original), to the idea of opera as super-complex and daunting (previously, opera was divided into either lighthearted rom-coms or hammy melodrama) - comes largely from his work.
* {{Opera}}: During In the 18th, 19th and early 20th century century, opera music was extremely popular with people of all ages and all layers of the population. Even regular people went to visit their local opera house and enjoyed the stories and music. Today opera is mostly associated with the elite and many people think its it's either too posh or too ridiculous to enjoy. In fact, whenever opera singers like the Three Tenors try to bring opera back to the common people they are criticized for being "commercial" and relying too much on the well known well-known overtures, choruses and arias that everybody knows.



* While accounts about how Music/IgorStravinsky's ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' caused riots at its premiere are probably exaggerated, it was still a very bold composition for its time. Today, it may be a little hard for some to understand why it was once considered so controversial, as it influenced the score of countless action/thriller movies, not to mention we've been used to much more aggressive music since. It says a lot that only twenty years after its recording it was already seen as one of the most groundbreaking pieces of music in history and even a StandardSnippet added to the Voyager Golden Record sent in space in 1977.

to:

* While accounts about how Music/IgorStravinsky's ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' caused riots at its premiere are probably exaggerated, it was still a very bold composition for its time. Today, it may be a little hard for some to understand why it was once considered so controversial, as it influenced the score of countless action/thriller movies, not to mention we've been used to much more aggressive music since. It says a lot that only twenty years after its recording it was already seen as one of the most groundbreaking pieces of music in history and even a StandardSnippet added to the Voyager Golden Record sent in into space in 1977.



* {{Jazz}}: At the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th jazz was seen as sleazy music played in nightclubs, brothels and bars to amuse people you wouldn't want to be associated with. It was considered radical and subversive and many of the pioneers of the genre managed to push the limits of what their instruments could do farther than it was thought possible. Now, the genre as a whole is often overlooked as "old people's music," and the once-groundbreaking work of the likes of Music/LouisArmstrong is basic stuff that every jazz student learns. (Student? They'd never ''teach'' this stuff, as recently as TheSeventies!)

to:

* {{Jazz}}: At the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th jazz was seen as sleazy music played in nightclubs, brothels and bars to amuse people you wouldn't want to be associated with. It was considered radical and subversive and many of the pioneers of the genre managed to push the limits of what their instruments could do farther than it beyond what was thought possible. Now, the genre as a whole is often overlooked as "old people's music," and the once-groundbreaking work of the likes of Music/LouisArmstrong is basic stuff that every jazz student learns. (Student? They'd never ''teach'' this stuff, as recently as TheSeventies!)



* Music/TheBeatles: Back in the early 1960s, their haircuts were actually seen as ''subversive''. Men with long hair were simply seen as ''rebellious''. Looking back on it now the hair length doesn't even seem that outrageously ''long''.

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* Music/TheBeatles: Back in the early 1960s, their haircuts were actually seen as ''subversive''. Men with long hair were simply seen as ''rebellious''. Looking back on it now the now, their hair length doesn't even seem that outrageously ''long''.



* Music/{{Oasis}} . Today they might seem like just another mainstream British rock band, but were fairly revolutionary when they first came out. They drew their influence from the North's indie scene and stood out amongst their edgier contemporaries like ''Suede''. People today have heard so much droning, anthemic pop-rock from bands like ''Music/{{Coldplay}}'' that they've lost perspective on the originality of Oasis.

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* Music/{{Oasis}} . Music/{{Oasis}}. Today they might seem like just another mainstream British rock band, but they were fairly revolutionary when they first came out. They drew their influence from the North's indie scene and stood out amongst their edgier contemporaries like ''Suede''.Suede. People today have heard so much droning, anthemic pop-rock from bands like ''Music/{{Coldplay}}'' that they've lost perspective on the originality of Oasis.



* Music/BarbraStreisand, Music/{{Cher}}, Music/{{Madonna}}, ...three leading ladies of the music industry, almost all possessing [[LGBTFanbase huge gay followings]], who also spent a fair bit of time doing things in the movie biz. Hard to believe they're some of the most innovative girls around, considering (at least in Madonna's case) every blonde pop singer from the nineties onward is compared to them or called their successor.

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* Music/BarbraStreisand, Music/{{Cher}}, Music/{{Madonna}}, ...Music/{{Madonna}}... three leading ladies of the music industry, almost all possessing [[LGBTFanbase huge gay followings]], who also spent a fair bit of time doing things in the movie biz. Hard to believe they're some of the most innovative girls around, considering (at least in Madonna's case) every blonde pop singer from the nineties onward is compared to them or called their successor.



** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to Music/TaylorSwift and Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent albeit moreso with male artists.

to:

** Gretchen Wilson seemed to spark not one, but two examples of this: besides being a rock-influenced creation of John Rich (one half of the gonzo, rock-influenced Big & Rich), her SignatureSong "Redneck Woman" sparked a wave of spunky women-with-attitude types and anthemic songs about southern pride. The former trope has died down considerably thanks in part to Music/TaylorSwift and Music/CarrieUnderwood's death grip on the genre, but the latter is still prevalent albeit moreso more so with male artists.



* It's not even sure whether Music/DieArzte actually fit in this category (some of their music clearly ''is'' punk rock, but most isn't); however, their early work included some (at the time) "provocative" lyrics. So provocative that they were banned in 1980s Germany. Comparing those lyrics to today's rap (where "Isch ficke deine Muttah" is the equivalent of "Hello") this seems ridiculous. So ridiculous that all but one of those songs are now un-banned after a re-evaluation in TheNewMilennium.

to:

* It's not even sure whether Music/DieArzte actually fit in this category (some of their music clearly ''is'' punk rock, but most isn't); however, their early work included some (at the time) "provocative" lyrics. So provocative that they were banned in 1980s Germany. Comparing those lyrics to today's rap (where "Isch ficke deine Muttah" is the equivalent of "Hello") this seems ridiculous. So ridiculous that all but one of those songs are now un-banned after a re-evaluation in TheNewMilennium.
TheNewMillennium.
11th Aug '17 7:35:51 PM DivineFlame100
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* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in the early 2000s, it was not uncommon to hear this song at dance clubs, as it quickly became a global recognizable hit that was even featured in some television shows and played at sporting events, including the 2006 Winter Olympics, and it pretty much helped kick start {{Trance}} in North America. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore, and just pass it off as nothing but a "joke" song that isn't taken seriously like it used to.

to:

* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in the early 2000s, it was not uncommon to hear this song at dance clubs, as it quickly became a global recognizable hit that was even featured in some television shows and played at sporting events, including the 2006 Winter Olympics, and it pretty much helped kick start the {{Trance}} genre in North America. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore, and just pass it off as nothing but a "joke" song that isn't taken seriously like it used to.
11th Aug '17 7:33:51 PM DivineFlame100
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* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in its day, it was THE most popular and awesome song to listen to at dance clubs. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore.

to:

* "Sandstorm" by Darude seems to have suffered from this the most. Back in its day, the early 2000s, it was THE most popular and awesome not uncommon to hear this song to listen to at dance clubs. clubs, as it quickly became a global recognizable hit that was even featured in some television shows and played at sporting events, including the 2006 Winter Olympics, and it pretty much helped kick start {{Trance}} in North America. Nowadays, after being overplayed and exposed to so much MemeticMutation on the internet, many modern EDM artists and enthusiasts just don't see the song as anything special or spectacular anymore.anymore, and just pass it off as nothing but a "joke" song that isn't taken seriously like it used to.
18th Jul '17 8:36:09 PM supernintendo128
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** The Stratocaster's big brother, the Fender Telecaster, also falls into this trope, albeit to a lesser extent. The Telecaster popularized solid-body electric guitars in a period where hollow/semi-hollow body guitars were the norm, and included a bolt-on replaceable neck when electric guitars always had the neck attached directly to the guitar. These features, like the features found on the Strat, would become mainstay in the electric guitar industry. In fact, these features were also found on the Stratocaster.

to:

** The Stratocaster's big brother, the Fender Telecaster, also falls into this trope, albeit to a lesser extent. The Telecaster popularized solid-body electric guitars in a period where hollow/semi-hollow body guitars were the norm, and included a bolt-on replaceable neck when electric guitars at the time always had the neck attached directly to the guitar.guitar (and some still do, like the well-respected Gibson Les Paul and all semi-hollow/hollow body guitars). These features, like the features found on the Strat, would become mainstay in the electric guitar industry. In fact, these features were also found on the Stratocaster.
18th Jul '17 8:32:57 PM supernintendo128
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to:

** The Stratocaster's big brother, the Fender Telecaster, also falls into this trope, albeit to a lesser extent. The Telecaster popularized solid-body electric guitars in a period where hollow/semi-hollow body guitars were the norm, and included a bolt-on replaceable neck when electric guitars always had the neck attached directly to the guitar. These features, like the features found on the Strat, would become mainstay in the electric guitar industry. In fact, these features were also found on the Stratocaster.
31st May '17 7:38:07 PM ramboost007
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to:

** "Animals" by Martin Garrix also partly suffers from this. When it was first released, its use of heavy bass was seen as something original and revolutionary and its popularity basically catapulted the popularity of Big Room house. But now, since everyone in the EDM scene tried their hand in Big Room, it is now seen as an unoriginal and simplistic track.
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