History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Music

31st May '17 7:38:07 PM ramboost007
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** "Animals" by Martin Garrix also partly suffers from this. When it was first released, its use of heavy bass was seen as something original and revolutionary and its popularity basically catapulted the popularity of Big Room house. But now, since everyone in the EDM scene tried their hand in Big Room, it is now seen as an unoriginal and simplistic track.
29th May '17 12:32:58 AM wuggles
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[AC: R&B]]
* Adina Howard's 1995 hit "Freak Like Me" seems rather tame by today's standards, but at the time it seemed very risque for an R&B song (as opposed to hip-hop, which at that time was already pretty sexual). At the time it came out, most R&B songs were fairly tame ballads. These days, "Freak Like Me" is barely as raunchy as your average Music/{{Rihanna}} song.
3rd May '17 8:10:48 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** On a similar note, ''digital recording'' has fallen victim to this trope. When Dire Straits' ''Brothers in Arms'', one of the first pop albums to be recorded digitally, was released in 1985, it was praised for it's amazingly clean sound quality, which was at the time thought to be un-achievable on analog tape. This is what lead to other artists recording their albums digitally and thus phasing out analog recording (and vinyl along with it). These days, the sonic clarity of digital recording has long lost its impact, and in its place has garnered a nasty reputation as sounding "overproduced", "lifeless", and just flat-out ''bad'' (in no small part due to the aforementioned LoudnessWar), with the general perception being that ''analog recordings'' sound better than digital (a complete inversion of how it was in the 80s and 90s). Nowadays, an increasing amount of independent artists are choosing to record their albums on analog equipment and releasing them on vinyl due to the supposed sonic benefits of recording on analog tape and the increasingly negative stigma against recording digitally.
* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded-edge contoured body (when other guitars from the period had hard edges and were not contoured to fit the player's body and were thus uncomfortable to play at times). [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.

to:

*** On a similar note, ''digital recording'' has fallen victim to this trope. When Dire Straits' ''Brothers in Arms'', ''Music/BrothersInArms'', one of the first pop albums to be recorded digitally, was released in 1985, it was praised for it's amazingly clean sound quality, which was at the time thought to be un-achievable on analog tape. This is what lead to other artists recording their albums digitally and thus phasing out analog recording (and vinyl along with it). These days, the sonic clarity of digital recording has long lost its impact, and in its place has garnered a nasty reputation as sounding "overproduced", "lifeless", and just flat-out ''bad'' (in no small part due to the aforementioned LoudnessWar), with the general perception being that ''analog recordings'' sound better than digital (a complete inversion of how it was in the 80s and 90s). Nowadays, an increasing amount of independent artists are choosing to record their albums on analog equipment and releasing them on vinyl due to the supposed sonic benefits of recording on analog tape and the increasingly negative stigma against recording digitally.
* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded-edge contoured body (when other guitars from the period had hard edges and were not contoured to fit the player's body and were thus uncomfortable to play at times). [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues [[FollowTheLeader (when not outright copying it) it)]] from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.
24th Apr '17 7:33:07 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.

to:

* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded rounded-edge contoured body (when other guitars from the period had hard edges) edges and were not contoured to fit the player's body and were thus uncomfortable to play at times). [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.
24th Apr '17 5:18:53 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period they had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.

to:

* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period they had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.
24th Apr '17 3:47:12 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for it's day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period they had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.

to:

* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for it's its day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period they had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.
24th Apr '17 3:37:00 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* The Fender Stratocaster. When it came out in 1954, it was an extremely revolutionary guitar for it's day. It was the first guitar to have ''three'' pickups (electric guitars from that era either had only one or two), a spring tremolo system (during a period when Bigsby tremolo systems were the industry standard), and a rounded body (when other guitars from the period they had hard edges) [[AllGuitarsAreStratocasters While it remains one of the most popular and recognizable electric guitars of all time,]] there have been many guitars since then that took design cues (when not outright copying it) from the Strat, and today it can be hard to see what made it so revolutionary in the first place.
8th Apr '17 9:20:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Beatles do, for the most part, ''avert'' this trope - while people may not always recognize today how groundbreaking they are, they continue to be one of the most popular and beloved bands of all time; their albums continue to sell 50+ years after they were originally released. Every generation of teenagers seems to re-discover The Beatles (the ''1'' GreatestHitsAlbum, ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the Beatles edition of ''RockBand'', etc.). And it's rare to find anyone who actually denies The Beatles' influence -- a lot of the HypeBacklash will still admit The Beatles were innovative, just that they weren't the only ones pioneering those things and don't like how they're often discussed as though they were.

to:

** The Beatles do, for the most part, ''avert'' this trope - while people may not always recognize today how groundbreaking they are, they continue to be one of the most popular and beloved bands of all time; their albums continue to sell 50+ years after they were originally released. Every generation of teenagers seems to re-discover The Beatles (the ''1'' GreatestHitsAlbum, ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the Beatles edition of ''RockBand'', ''VideoGame/RockBand'', etc.). And it's rare to find anyone who actually denies The Beatles' influence -- a lot of the HypeBacklash will still admit The Beatles were innovative, just that they weren't the only ones pioneering those things and don't like how they're often discussed as though they were.
16th Mar '17 8:53:45 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** On a similar note, ''digital recording'' has fallen victim to this trope. When Dire Straits' ''Brothers in Arms'', one of the first pop albums to be recorded digitally, was released in 1985, it was praised for it's amazingly clean sound quality, which was at the time thought to be un-achievable on analog tape. This is what lead to other artists recording their albums digitally and thus phasing out analog recording (and vinyl along with it). These days, instead of being regarded as the best-sounding and most affordable way to record music, digital recordings (and by extension, [=CDs=]) are often regarded as sounding "overproduced", "lifeless", and just flat-out ''bad'' (in no small part due to the aforementioned LoudnessWar), with the general perception being that ''analog recordings'' sound better than digital (a complete inversion of how it was in the 80s and 90s). Nowadays, an increasing amount of independent artists are choosing to record their albums on analog equipment and releasing them on vinyl due to the supposed sonic benefits of recording on analog tape and the increasingly negative stigma against recording digitally.

to:

*** On a similar note, ''digital recording'' has fallen victim to this trope. When Dire Straits' ''Brothers in Arms'', one of the first pop albums to be recorded digitally, was released in 1985, it was praised for it's amazingly clean sound quality, which was at the time thought to be un-achievable on analog tape. This is what lead to other artists recording their albums digitally and thus phasing out analog recording (and vinyl along with it). These days, instead of being regarded as the best-sounding and most affordable way to record music, sonic clarity of digital recordings (and by extension, [=CDs=]) are often regarded recording has long lost its impact, and in its place has garnered a nasty reputation as sounding "overproduced", "lifeless", and just flat-out ''bad'' (in no small part due to the aforementioned LoudnessWar), with the general perception being that ''analog recordings'' sound better than digital (a complete inversion of how it was in the 80s and 90s). Nowadays, an increasing amount of independent artists are choosing to record their albums on analog equipment and releasing them on vinyl due to the supposed sonic benefits of recording on analog tape and the increasingly negative stigma against recording digitally.
16th Mar '17 8:42:23 PM supernintendo128
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*** On a similar note, ''digital recording'' has fallen victim to this trope. When Dire Straits' ''Brothers in Arms'', one of the first pop albums to be recorded digitally, was released in 1985, it was praised for it's amazingly clean sound quality, which was at the time thought to be un-achievable on analog tape. This is what lead to other artists recording their albums digitally and thus phasing out analog recording (and vinyl along with it). These days, instead of being regarded as the best-sounding and most affordable way to record music, digital recordings (and by extension, [=CDs=]) are often regarded as sounding "overproduced", "lifeless", and just flat-out ''bad'' (in no small part due to the aforementioned LoudnessWar), with the general perception being that ''analog recordings'' sound better than digital (a complete inversion of how it was in the 80s and 90s). Nowadays, an increasing amount of independent artists are choosing to record their albums on analog equipment and releasing them on vinyl due to the supposed sonic benefits of recording on analog tape and the increasingly negative stigma against recording digitally.
This list shows the last 10 events of 220. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.Music