History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / LiveActionTV

21st Jul '17 12:31:57 PM gizmoman49
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/RuPaulsDragRace'' managed to do this to itself. The early seasons were notable simply for the fact that drag queens were being shown in a realistic light rather than just being shown as stereotypes. As the series went on, the quality of drag fashion has increased considerably, to the point where many of the looks on the earlier seasons look dated by comparison. For example, Tyra Sanchez won Season 2 wearing what was effectively a one-pice bathing suit with a cape around the waist, something queens get absolutely roasted for if they try to pull off today.
** Case in point: Raja. Her runway look during season 3 were revolutionary, and she was really the first queen to show that drag could be fashion-forward and creative. Nowadays there have been so many high-fashion queens on the show that Raja's looks aren't nearly as groundbreaking as they used to be.
17th Jul '17 12:44:37 PM jm9101983
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "In stereo where available" was used quite often in the 80s and early 90s when television sets were being produced with stereo speakers and it was considered groundbreaking at the time since more dynamic sound added to the immersion of the program or movie people were watching. "In surround sound" was also used when home theater sound systems took off. Nowadays, nobody bothers making announcements that their programs have stereo or surround sound since such features are a standard in televisions now.

to:

* "In stereo where available" Stereo Where Available" was used quite often in from the 80s and early 90s mid 1980s to the mid 1990s when television sets were being produced with stereo speakers and it was considered groundbreaking at the time since more dynamic sound added to the immersion of the program or movie people were watching. "In surround sound" Surround Sound" was also used when home theater sound systems took off. Nowadays, nobody bothers making announcements that their programs have stereo or surround sound since such features are a standard in televisions now.
4th Jul '17 6:37:16 AM 1nightonly
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The main issue for ''B5''[='=]s pioneering CGI was that it was early CGI. When compared screen-for-screen with the pure-CGI that turned up later in ''DS9'' and ''Voyager'', ''B5''[='=]s CGI [[ConspicuousCG looks poor]] (and even looked poor at the time, especially in any sequences involving human-scale interactions). This is the primary reason CGI was disregarded - it needed to come up in quality or the difference from miniature-led effects would've been far too jarring. ''B5'' was a pioneer, but came a little too early for its CGI imagery to be really anything impressive.

to:

*** The main issue for ''B5''[='=]s pioneering CGI was that it was early CGI. When compared screen-for-screen with the pure-CGI that turned up later in ''DS9'' ''[=DS9=]'' and ''Voyager'', ''B5''[='=]s CGI [[ConspicuousCG looks poor]] (and even looked poor at the time, especially in any sequences involving human-scale interactions). This is the primary reason CGI was disregarded - it needed to come up in quality or the difference from miniature-led effects would've been far too jarring. ''B5'' was a pioneer, but came a little too early for its CGI imagery to be really anything impressive.
16th Jun '17 11:10:56 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Of course, everything ''Friends'' did, ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' did ''first''. Sam and Diane are the TropeCodifier of BelligerentSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey of American sitcoms. The writing was so good it withstood being in ''last place'' in its time slot til it was discovered widely. (''Cheers'' was also built on the bones of ''{{Taxi}}'', and would spin off ''Series/{{Frasier}}''.)

to:

** Of course, everything ''Friends'' did, ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' did ''first''. Sam and Diane are the TropeCodifier of BelligerentSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey of American sitcoms. The writing was so good it withstood being in ''last place'' in its time slot til it was discovered widely. (''Cheers'' was also built on the bones of ''{{Taxi}}'', ''Series/{{Taxi}}'', and would spin off ''Series/{{Frasier}}''.)
9th Jun '17 3:55:01 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries The original series]] has a {{camp}} reputation, and has been endlessly parodied and mocked. People forget that ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' was THE trailblazer that has influenced ''every'' science fiction series after it (and even influenced non-sci-fi shows as well) up to this day. In 1967, three of the five nominees (including the winner) for the Hugo Award (awards for science fiction and fantasy) for Best Dramatic Presentation (which at the time included both television episodes ''and'' movies) were episodes of ''Star Trek''. In 1968, the show did even better: '''all five''' nominees for Best Dramatic Presentation were ''Star Trek'' episodes. In fact, society has changed so much that some of the most radical and innovative things it did are now almost entirely overlooked. A black woman, as a military officer? Said black woman, kissing a white man, at a time when that kind of thing would get you arrested (or worse) in large parts of the United States? [[note]]Though it helped that [[WilliamShatner Shatner]] at the time refused to do that scene any other way, intentionally screwing up the scene if he wasn't allowed to do it his way. He felt it was what Kirk would do.[[/note]] The show's portrayal of race was so far ahead of its time that when Nichelle Nichols considered leaving the show to return to musical theater, Martin Luther King Jr. himself insisted to her that she needed to stay, telling her that the show's depiction of ethnic relations was not only unprecedented, but exactly the kind future he dreamed of, and that ''Star Trek'' was the only show he and Coretta let their children stay up to watch. The original pilot had a FEMALE first officer. It also avoided (see ''Babylon 5'' above) "Cute Kids And Robots", at least among the regular cast, which was one reason science fiction fans at the time considered it a better, more serious show than [[Series/LostInSpace much of the science fiction]] on television.

to:

** [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries The original series]] has a {{camp}} reputation, and has been endlessly parodied and mocked. People forget that ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' was THE trailblazer that has influenced ''every'' science fiction series after it (and even influenced non-sci-fi shows as well) up to this day. In 1967, three of the five nominees (including the winner) for the Hugo Award (awards for science fiction and fantasy) for Best Dramatic Presentation (which at the time included both television episodes ''and'' movies) were episodes of ''Star Trek''. In 1968, the show did even better: '''all five''' nominees for Best Dramatic Presentation were ''Star Trek'' episodes. In fact, society has changed so much that some of the most radical and innovative things it did are now almost entirely overlooked. A black woman, as a military officer? Said black woman, kissing a white man, at a time when that kind of thing would get you arrested (or worse) in large parts of the United States? [[note]]Though it helped that [[WilliamShatner [[Creator/WilliamShatner Shatner]] at the time refused to do that scene any other way, intentionally screwing up the scene if he wasn't allowed to do it his way. He felt it was what Kirk would do.[[/note]] The show's portrayal of race was so far ahead of its time that when Nichelle Nichols considered leaving the show to return to musical theater, Martin Luther King Jr. himself insisted to her that she needed to stay, telling her that the show's depiction of ethnic relations was not only unprecedented, but exactly the kind future he dreamed of, and that ''Star Trek'' was the only show he and Coretta let their children stay up to watch. The original pilot had a FEMALE first officer. It also avoided (see ''Babylon 5'' above) "Cute Kids And Robots", at least among the regular cast, which was one reason science fiction fans at the time considered it a better, more serious show than [[Series/LostInSpace much of the science fiction]] on television.
15th Apr '17 11:07:35 PM KaworuS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/KamenRider''. There's a similar argument for this franchise as well, or maybe a subversion. The Showa era formula (cyborg destroys the terrorist organization that rebuilt him) has been done to death and is now avoided in the Heisei era shows, to the point that either part of the phrase "Masked Rider" sometimes doesn't apply to a specific series. Which makes the Showa Riders revival manga ''Manga/KamenRiderSpirits'' so appealing: it takes the phrase "Kicking it old school" and ''runs with it''.

to:

* ''Franchise/KamenRider''. There's a similar argument for this franchise as well, or maybe a subversion. The Showa era formula (cyborg destroys (cyborg/scientifically augmented human battles the terrorist organization that rebuilt altered him) has been done to death and is now avoided in the Heisei era shows, to the point that either part of the phrase "Masked Rider" sometimes doesn't apply to a specific series.series (though some of that is mroe resulting from the factor of Bandai needing to Shout "BUY OUR TOYS"). Which makes the Showa Riders revival manga ''Manga/KamenRiderSpirits'' so appealing: it takes the phrase "Kicking it old school" and ''runs with it''. Recent series have more palyed with Elements of Showa kamen Rider, with ''W'', ''Fourze'' and ''Drive'' In example being built from the ground up as modernizations of Shotaro Ishinomori's Motif's and ideals.
** Within the franchise itself : ''Ryuki''. it's Battle Royale "riders fighting each-other" Plot has been done in most series that followed it, and the fandom as a whole are sick of it as the Grand majority of them have been *AWFUL*. The irony in this case is most of the series to Follow Ryuki '"Actually did it better than Ryuki did'', mostly because Ryuki from Concept to execution was made in open contempt for the shows before it while the ones After Ryuki actually tried more to Respect the Franchises' Legacy and Core Ideology. Thus, For many, Ryuki's obsolete; especially in the face of the ''Super Hero Taisen'' movies where their watch-word seems to be "Make every character that was supposed to be a Paragon of heroism into a twisted reflection of their own Villains," which has only decreased many fan's enjoyment of that entry to all-new lows.
28th Mar '17 3:37:03 PM Golondrina
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

%%
%%
%%
%% This list of examples has been alphabetized. Please add your example in the proper place. Thanks!
%%
%%
%%
24th Mar '17 12:40:16 PM Golondrina
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When premium cable networks began to emerge in the 1980s, the idea of TV series featuring explicit sex scenes, nudity, extreme violence and language (and sometimes all of the above) were considered cutting-edge and "very, very adult". Today, with sex, violence and language all but universal on made-for-cable and streaming series (other than those specifically made for children), and with mainstream commercial networks occasionally exceeding the explicitness of broadcasters like HBO 20 years ago, viewers and critics have begun to note how such content is become rather blase and no longer as edgy as it used to appear.



* Reichen & Chip winning Season 4 of ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' might not seem like a big deal now, but in 2003 a pair of ManlyGay guys in a loving, stable relationship excelling at a physically and mentally based competition was a huge deal, to the point that it was one of the the main story lines of the season, especially near the end, and their kiss at the Finish Line was hugely controversial, and was even censored in many places. In comparison, when gay couple Brent & Josh kissed after winning Season 21 in 2012, people barely batted an eye at their relationship or their kiss at the Finish Line.
* While talent shows existed, none would reach the popularity of ''Series/AmericanIdol''. American Idol paved the way for many other talent shows, each with varying levels of success. Today, many people who didn't grow up watching American Idol don't see the appeal of a group of teenagers and young adults singing in front of judges.
* ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' allowed average people to send in funny home movies for all of America to see. Revolutionary in 1990 but as the Internet expanded throughout the decade, it made sending videos to the show seem dated in comparison to uploading them online. Bob Saget himself even mentioned this before he left the show in 1997, saying that people were finding websites (even before Website/YouTube) for sharing their funny home videos. Despite the show still being on the air to this date, he felt the show had become pointless by the time he left and he honestly didn't think it would last much longer.



* Of course, everything ''Friends'' did, ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' did ''first''. Sam and Diane are the TropeCodifier of BelligerentSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey of American sitcoms. The writing was so good it withstood being in ''last place'' in its time slot til it was discovered widely. (''Cheers'' was also built on the bones of ''{{Taxi}}'', and would spin off ''Series/{{Frasier}}''.)

to:

* ** Of course, everything ''Friends'' did, ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' did ''first''. Sam and Diane are the TropeCodifier of BelligerentSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey of American sitcoms. The writing was so good it withstood being in ''last place'' in its time slot til it was discovered widely. (''Cheers'' was also built on the bones of ''{{Taxi}}'', and would spin off ''Series/{{Frasier}}''.)



* The 1992 Australian RealityShow ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0121029/ Sylvania Waters]]'' suffers the same fate.
* Same thing has happened to ''RealPeople'', which became a Wednesday night staple on NBC between 1979 and 1984.

to:

* The 1992 Australian RealityShow ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0121029/ Sylvania Waters]]'' suffers the same fate.
*
** Same thing has happened to ''RealPeople'', which became a Wednesday night staple on NBC between 1979 and 1984.1984.
* ''Rich Man, Poor Man'' was the first miniseries, an exploration of long-form storytelling that's become completely standard today. As well, one of its biggest selling points was its frank depiction of sexuality, with the MoralGuardians up in arms over characters talking about "nailing" each other and a white woman considering an affair with a black man. Nowadays, of course, all that seems remarkably tame.



* ''Music/SClub7'' and their TV show popularised the idea of a modern musical TV series. While a BandToon was nothing new and The Monkees had a similar TV series, S Club 7's TV show was something quite new. In 1999 musicals were essentially for old folks and the idea of combining the genre with current music and tacking on sitcom hijinks was something different. And of course a cast of attractive young singers. The musical numbers in this amount to the band either performing their own songs on a stage or singing them during trippy scenes. Yet the likes of ''Series/{{Glee}}'' and ''Series/HighSchoolMusical'' who explored this format better were likely heavily influenced by it.



* The 1992 Australian RealityShow ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0121029/ Sylvania Waters]]'' suffers the same fate as ''Series/TheRealWorld''.



* With the barrage of crime comedy dramas set in quirky rural or urban (or really any highly localized) settings that have hit the airwaves in German television nowadays, it is hard to imagine that setting a crime drama in one specific place (and frequently alluding to the specifics of said place) was actually new and innovative when ''Series/{{Tatort}}'' first came up with it. Workplace banter and flawed private lives of the cops (to say the least) were also so controversial at first, that they were only very gradually introduced. Now some shows have to resort to the main character literally having been in a coma for twenty years to make at least some of those tropes new and original again. If someone who did not grow up in the Eighties watches a Schimansky Tatort today, they will ask how getting hit in the face and replying with [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] was such a big deal it basically built the movie career of Götz George.
** TheCoroner being a major character is now also a major It's been done that people won't realize how revolutionary (and downright wacky and illogical if you look at it) the team Thiel/Börne of the Münster Tatort was when it was introduced. They had to jump through some hoops to make it at least somewhat plausible. Börne and Thiel share a flat and the murders [[ContrivedCoincidence just so happen]] to involve quite a bit of forensics on a regular base (and if they don't Börne's high society skills come in handy). The writers ''still'' felt the need to give Thiel a regular cop sidekick initially, who has since been written out. Nowadays, there is even a series about the guy who cleans a murder site after the crimes.
* At the time ''Series/{{Taxi}}'' premiered, Creator/DannyDeVito's height wasn't well known, so he spent most of the pilot inside the dispatcher cage, and when he stepped down the stairs he got a ''big'' laugh from the audience.
* Many classical ''[[SoapOpera Telenovelas]]'' were kind of edgy at the time, like ''El Derecho de Nacer'' and its oblique references to abortion, the heroines empowering themselves by studying and working like ''Simplemente Maria'' instead of merely marrying into riches like every other one, villain protagonists like ''Rubí'', and "bedroom scenes" consisting on two characters merely embracing together with a ModestyBedsheet (quite scandalous in the era of SleepingSingle). Today, those stories are hardly edgy. Many remakes of old ''telenovelas'' have to place the action on rural settings instead of the urban ambient they originally were, because even the broadcasters have to acknowledge that nowadays those are the only places where people would be GenreBlind enough for the plot to work.



* ''Rich Man, Poor Man'' was the first miniseries, an exploration of long-form storytelling that's become completely standard today. As well, one of its biggest selling points was its frank depiction of sexuality, with the MoralGuardians up in arms over characters talking about "nailing" each other and a white woman considering an affair with a black man. Nowadays, of course, all that seems remarkably tame.
* Many classical ''[[SoapOpera Telenovelas]]'' were kind of edgy at the time, like ''El Derecho de Nacer'' and its oblique references to abortion, the heroines empowering themselves by studying and working like ''Simplemente Maria'' instead of merely marrying into riches like every other one, villain protagonists like ''Rubí'', and "bedroom scenes" consisting on two characters merely embracing together with a ModestyBedsheet (quite scandalous in the era of SleepingSingle). Today, those stories are hardly edgy. Many remakes of old ''telenovelas'' have to place the action on rural settings instead of the urban ambient they originally were, because even the broadcasters have to acknowledge that nowadays those are the only places where people would be GenreBlind enough for the plot to work.
* Reichen & Chip winning Season 4 of ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' might not seem like a big deal now, but in 2003 a pair of ManlyGay guys in a loving, stable relationship excelling at a physically and mentally based competition was a huge deal, to the point that it was one of the the main story lines of the season, especially near the end, and their kiss at the Finish Line was hugely controversial, and was even censored in many places. In comparison, when gay couple Brent & Josh kissed after winning Season 21 in 2012, people barely batted an eye at their relationship or their kiss at the Finish Line.
* While talent shows existed, none would reach the popularity of ''Series/AmericanIdol''. American Idol paved the way for many other talent shows, each with varying levels of success. Today, many people who didn't grow up watching American Idol don't see the appeal of a group of teenagers and young adults singing in front of judges.
* At the time ''Series/{{Taxi}}'' premiered, Danny [=DeVito's=] height wasn't well known, so he spent most of the pilot inside the dispatcher cage, and when he stepped down the stairs he got a ''big'' laugh from the audience.
* ''Music/SClub7'' and their TV show popularised the idea of a modern musical TV series. While a BandToon was nothing new and The Monkees had a similar TV series, S Club 7's TV show was something quite new. In 1999 musicals were essentially for old folks and the idea of combining the genre with current music and tacking on sitcom hijinks was something different. And of course a cast of attractive young singers. The musical numbers in this amount to the band either performing their own songs on a stage or singing them during trippy scenes. Yet the likes of ''Series/{{Glee}}'' and ''Series/HighSchoolMusical'' who explored this format better were likely heavily influenced by it.



** A major reason for the show's post-cancellation neglect is that a good number of its episodes were from an era when standards for political correctness were quite a bit looser. The show's 1981 season, especially, had jokes ranging from Native American stereotypes to kids getting cigarettes stuffed in their mouths by grown-ups. Needless to say, such jokes would not have flown by the increasingly [=PC=] landscape of the 80's and early 90's[[note]]in fact, the 1981 season was eventually dropped out of rotation altogether for this very reason[[/note]]. Even during the series' run, you'll notice the gags gradually became quite a bit tamer and more [=PC=] friendly (especially in the UnCancelled last two seasons).
* ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' allowed average people to send in funny home movies for all of America to see. Revolutionary in 1990 but as the Internet expanded throughout the decade, it made sending videos to the show seem dated in comparison to uploading them online. Bob Saget himself even mentioned this before he left the show in 1997, saying that people were finding websites (even before Website/YouTube) for sharing their funny home videos. Despite the show still being on the air to this date, he felt the show had become pointless by the time he left and he honestly didn't think it would last much longer.
* With the barrage of crime comedy dramas set in quirky rural or urban (or really any highly localized) settings that have hit the airwaves in German television nowadays, it is hard to imagine that setting a crime drama in one specific place (and frequently alluding to the specifics of said place) was actually new and innovative when Series/{{Tatort}} first came up with it. Workplace banter and flawed private lives of the cops (to say the least) were also so controversial at first, that they were only very gradually introduced. Now some shows have to resort to the main character literally having been in a coma for twenty years to make at least some of those tropes new and original again. If someone who did not grow up in the Eighties watches a Schimansky Tatort today, they will ask how getting hit in the face and replying with [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] was such a big deal it basically built the movie career of Götz George.
** TheCoroner being a major character is now also a major It's been done that people won't realize how revolutionary (and downright wacky and illogical if you look at it) the team Thiel/Börne of the Münster Tatort was when it was introduced. They had to jump through some hoops to make it at least somewhat plausible. Börne and Thiel share a flat and the murders [[ContrivedCoincidence just so happen]] to involve quite a bit of forensics on a regular base (and if they don't Börne's high society skills come in handy). The writers ''still'' felt the need to give Thiel a regular cop sidekick initially, who has since been written out. Nowadays, there is even a series about the guy who cleans a murder site after the crimes.
* When premium cable networks began to emerge in the 1980s, the idea of TV series featuring explicit sex scenes, nudity, extreme violence and language (and sometimes all of the above) were considered cutting-edge and "very, very adult". Today, with sex, violence and language all but universal on made-for-cable and streaming series (other than those specifically made for children), and with mainstream commercial networks occasionally exceeding the explicitness of broadcasters like HBO 20 years ago, viewers and critics have begun to note how such content is become rather blase and no longer as edgy as it used to appear.

to:

** A major reason for the show's post-cancellation neglect is that a good number of its episodes were from an era when standards for political correctness were quite a bit looser. The show's 1981 season, especially, had jokes ranging from Native American stereotypes to kids getting cigarettes stuffed in their mouths by grown-ups. Needless to say, such jokes would not have flown by the increasingly [=PC=] landscape of the 80's and early 90's[[note]]in fact, the 1981 season was eventually dropped out of rotation altogether for this very reason[[/note]]. Even during the series' run, you'll notice the gags gradually became quite a bit tamer and more [=PC=] friendly (especially in the UnCancelled last two seasons).
* ''Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos'' allowed average people to send in funny home movies for all of America to see. Revolutionary in 1990 but as the Internet expanded throughout the decade, it made sending videos to the show seem dated in comparison to uploading them online. Bob Saget himself even mentioned this before he left the show in 1997, saying that people were finding websites (even before Website/YouTube) for sharing their funny home videos. Despite the show still being on the air to this date, he felt the show had become pointless by the time he left and he honestly didn't think it would last much longer.
* With the barrage of crime comedy dramas set in quirky rural or urban (or really any highly localized) settings that have hit the airwaves in German television nowadays, it is hard to imagine that setting a crime drama in one specific place (and frequently alluding to the specifics of said place) was actually new and innovative when Series/{{Tatort}} first came up with it. Workplace banter and flawed private lives of the cops (to say the least) were also so controversial at first, that they were only very gradually introduced. Now some shows have to resort to the main character literally having been in a coma for twenty years to make at least some of those tropes new and original again. If someone who did not grow up in the Eighties watches a Schimansky Tatort today, they will ask how getting hit in the face and replying with [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] was such a big deal it basically built the movie career of Götz George.
** TheCoroner being a major character is now also a major It's been done that people won't realize how revolutionary (and downright wacky and illogical if you look at it) the team Thiel/Börne of the Münster Tatort was when it was introduced. They had to jump through some hoops to make it at least somewhat plausible. Börne and Thiel share a flat and the murders [[ContrivedCoincidence just so happen]] to involve quite a bit of forensics on a regular base (and if they don't Börne's high society skills come in handy). The writers ''still'' felt the need to give Thiel a regular cop sidekick initially, who has since been written out. Nowadays, there is even a series about the guy who cleans a murder site after the crimes.
* When premium cable networks began to emerge in the 1980s, the idea of TV series featuring explicit sex scenes, nudity, extreme violence and language (and sometimes all of the above) were considered cutting-edge and "very, very adult". Today, with sex, violence and language all but universal on made-for-cable and streaming series (other than those specifically made for children), and with mainstream commercial networks occasionally exceeding the explicitness of broadcasters like HBO 20 years ago, viewers and critics have begun to note how such content is become rather blase and no longer as edgy as it used to appear.
30th Dec '16 10:29:02 PM Spyspotter
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/HellsKitchen''. Originally, one of the greatest appeals of the show was that the main chef, Gordon Ramsay, was unafraid to yell at the contestants for screwing up, as opposed to the insufferably nice chefs that were common in the genre. Now, thanks to the popularity of the show, such rough chefs are now considered the default in the genre, and as a result, it can be difficult for a new viewer to see what once made the show unique.
7th Dec '16 5:02:21 PM Furienna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It gave CharacterDevelopment and character-driven drama unheard-of levels of focus for a science-fiction TV series. While there obviously was some of this in past series (e.g. in the two previous ''Star Trek'' iterations), none quite put as much focus as ''B5'' until ''[=DS9=]''--which ran concurrently and was its friendly rival for the same audience.

to:

** It gave CharacterDevelopment and character-driven drama unheard-of levels of focus for a science-fiction TV series. While there obviously was some of this in past series (e.g. in the two previous ''Star Trek'' iterations), none quite put as much focus as ''B5'' until ''[=DS9=]''--which ''[=DS9=]'' - which ran concurrently and was its friendly rival for the same audience.



*** The main issue for ''B5''[='=]s pioneering CGI was that it was early CGI. When compared screen-for-screen with the pure-CGI that turned up later in ''DS9'' and ''Voyager'', ''B5''[='=]s CGI [[ConspicuousCG looks poor]] (and even looked poor at the time, especially in any sequences involving human-scale interactions). This is the primary reason CGI was disregarded -- it needed to come up in quality or the difference from miniature-led effects would've been far too jarring. ''B5'' was a pioneer, but came a little too early for its CGI imagery to be really anything impressive.
* ''Series/{{Becker}}'' was about a cantankerous doctor... no, not that one... not that one, either. The character--and show--were eclipsed first by John C. [=McGinley=] as Perry Cox in ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'', then by Hugh Laurie as Gregory ''Series/{{House}}''. It's easy to forget that ''Becker'' had a respectable life span of six seasons and was one of the better sitcoms in a lean period after ''Seinfeld'' but before ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'', either version of ''Series/TheOffice'', ''Series/ThirtyRock'' or ''Series/{{Community}}''.

to:

*** The main issue for ''B5''[='=]s pioneering CGI was that it was early CGI. When compared screen-for-screen with the pure-CGI that turned up later in ''DS9'' and ''Voyager'', ''B5''[='=]s CGI [[ConspicuousCG looks poor]] (and even looked poor at the time, especially in any sequences involving human-scale interactions). This is the primary reason CGI was disregarded -- - it needed to come up in quality or the difference from miniature-led effects would've been far too jarring. ''B5'' was a pioneer, but came a little too early for its CGI imagery to be really anything impressive.
* ''Series/{{Becker}}'' was about a cantankerous doctor... no, not that one... not that one, either. The character--and show--were character - and show - were eclipsed first by John C. [=McGinley=] as Perry Cox in ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'', then by Hugh Laurie as Gregory ''Series/{{House}}''. It's easy to forget that ''Becker'' had a respectable life span of six seasons and was one of the better sitcoms in a lean period after ''Seinfeld'' but before ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'', either version of ''Series/TheOffice'', ''Series/ThirtyRock'' or ''Series/{{Community}}''.



* Creator/DavidLetterman. His whole comedic sensibility (Middle American pop-culture-obsessed smartass, with a dash of intellectualism) was incredibly fresh and innovative in the early '80s, and exactly the kick in the pants that the stale TV talk show format needed. These days it's hard to find a talk show '''not''' heavily influenced by Letterman (even his short-lived 1980 morning show has [{{Spiritual Adaptation}}s like ''Ellen''), so people really take him for granted now.

to:

* Creator/DavidLetterman. His whole comedic sensibility (Middle American pop-culture-obsessed smartass, with a dash of intellectualism) was incredibly fresh and innovative in the early '80s, and exactly the kick in the pants that the stale TV talk show format needed. These days it's hard to find a talk show '''not''' heavily influenced by Letterman (even his short-lived 1980 morning show has [{{Spiritual {{Spiritual Adaptation}}s like ''Ellen''), so people really take him for granted now.



** The Season 2 finale, "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E9TheTimeMeddler The Time Meddler]]", was a WhamEpisode at the time because it was the first story pitting the Doctor against another alien force in a historical period -- up until then, historical stories and science fiction stories had been entirely discrete, so TheReveal that the Monk is another time traveller was a huge twist that broke the established rules of the show. Of course, the 'historical' (a story taking place in a historical period with no sci-fi beyond that of the time travel itself) is a format all but abandoned after the Creator/WilliamHartnell era, so modern viewers checking out his stories often find it more surprising when the Doctor goes into the past and aliens ''don't'' show up.
** It's quite difficult for viewers whose only knowledge of ''Doctor Who'' comes from the revival series to understand why it was such a [[DarthWiki/RuinedFOREVER massive source of fandom rage]] when the Doctor had TheBigDamnKiss with his companion in [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie The TV Movie]]. Ever since the revival series, the show has been very romance-focused, and fans who grew up without the old series' NoHuggingNoKissing have real trouble imagining the show without sexuality. In fact, those fans may look at the romance between the Eighth Doctor and Grace as very subtle and low-key in comparison to what the show gets away with now, since it's transitory and based around heat-of-the-moment feelings -- compare to the character-arc-dominating romance between the Tenth Doctor and [[OneTrueLove Rose]], or how the Eleventh Doctor not only has a lot of offscreen sex with various female characters and leers over other ones but even gets ''married''...

to:

** The Season 2 finale, "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E9TheTimeMeddler The Time Meddler]]", was a WhamEpisode at the time because it was the first story pitting the Doctor against another alien force in a historical period -- - up until then, historical stories and science fiction stories had been entirely discrete, so TheReveal that the Monk is another time traveller was a huge twist that broke the established rules of the show. Of course, the 'historical' (a story taking place in a historical period with no sci-fi beyond that of the time travel itself) is a format all but abandoned after the Creator/WilliamHartnell era, so modern viewers checking out his stories often find it more surprising when the Doctor goes into the past and aliens ''don't'' show up.
** It's quite difficult for viewers whose only knowledge of ''Doctor Who'' comes from the revival series to understand why it was such a [[DarthWiki/RuinedFOREVER massive source of fandom rage]] when the Doctor had TheBigDamnKiss with his companion in [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie The TV Movie]]. Ever since the revival series, the show has been very romance-focused, and fans who grew up without the old series' NoHuggingNoKissing have real trouble imagining the show without sexuality. In fact, those fans may look at the romance between the Eighth Doctor and Grace as very subtle and low-key in comparison to what the show gets away with now, since it's transitory and based around heat-of-the-moment feelings -- - compare to the character-arc-dominating romance between the Tenth Doctor and [[OneTrueLove Rose]], or how the Eleventh Doctor not only has a lot of offscreen sex with various female characters and leers over other ones but even gets ''married''...



* ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', when it first premiered in the Fall of 1996, stood out among other family sitcoms in that its focus was more on the parents than on the children. In fact, the children were, in many episodes, just [[LivingProp Living Props]] (even the intro points this out, with Raymond assuring the audience "It's not about the kids"). Given that many family sitcoms thereafter have focused more on the parents than on the children, the series doesn't seem quite as unique now as it used to (being that, aside from this one crucial difference, it was actually a pretty run-of-the-mill sitcom for the most part). Another groundbreaking aspect was introducing the [[UglyGuyHotWife "fat guy with a gorgeous wife"]] scenario (until then only present on NewspaperComics and [[WesternAnimation cartoon shows]]) which quickly replaced the ModelCouple paradigm prevalent until then.

to:

* ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', when it first premiered in the Fall of 1996, stood out among other family sitcoms in that its focus was more on the parents than on the children. In fact, the children were, in many episodes, just [[LivingProp Living Props]] (even the intro points this out, with Raymond assuring the audience "It's not about the kids"). Given that many family sitcoms thereafter have focused more on the parents than on the children, the series doesn't seem quite as unique now as it used to (being that, aside from this one crucial difference, it was actually a pretty run-of-the-mill sitcom for the most part). Another groundbreaking aspect was introducing the [[UglyGuyHotWife "fat guy with a gorgeous wife"]] UglyGuyHotWife scenario (until then only present on NewspaperComics and [[WesternAnimation cartoon shows]]) which quickly replaced the ModelCouple paradigm prevalent until then.



** We find out in the pilot that Ross' ex-wife Carol is a lesbian. Their son Ben is raised mostly by Carol and her partner Susan. In the second season, Carol and Susan get married. At the time, 1996, same-sex marriage was illegal in every state,[[note]]Technically, it was legal in Hawaii under a court order, but the order was stayed. It was not immediately clear in 1996 that same-sex marriage would be illegal for very long, at least not in Hawaii... which, when it comes to places to get married, is a darn good one. Same-sex marriage would be banned in Hawaii in 1998 when voters passed a referendum amending the state constitution allowing the state legislature to limit marriage to heterosexual couples, which the legislature promptly did; marriage equality would not return to Hawaii until 2013, when the legislature repealed the law it had passed in 1998 and officially allowed same-sex marriages for the first time.[[/note]] and no ''country'' in the world yet had full marriage for same-sex couples (the first was the Netherlands in 2001), yet there were no references to this in the show. No characters, aside from Carol's unseen parents, object to the wedding save for Ross -- and he's only upset because he still loves Carol. (In a sweet moment, he ends up walking her down the aisle.) A few network affiliates refused to air the episode, but it was the highest-rated program that week. Today, same-sex weddings and couples raising children are becoming increasingly commonplace on TV, for example in ''Modern Family''.

to:

** We find out in the pilot that Ross' ex-wife Carol is a lesbian. Their son Ben is raised mostly by Carol and her partner Susan. In the second season, Carol and Susan get married. At the time, 1996, same-sex marriage was illegal in every state,[[note]]Technically, it was legal in Hawaii under a court order, but the order was stayed. It was not immediately clear in 1996 that same-sex marriage would be illegal for very long, at least not in Hawaii... which, when it comes to places to get married, is a darn good one. Same-sex marriage would be banned in Hawaii in 1998 when voters passed a referendum amending the state constitution allowing the state legislature to limit marriage to heterosexual couples, which the legislature promptly did; marriage equality would not return to Hawaii until 2013, when the legislature repealed the law it had passed in 1998 and officially allowed same-sex marriages for the first time.[[/note]] and no ''country'' in the world yet had full marriage for same-sex couples (the first was the Netherlands in 2001), yet there were no references to this in the show. No characters, aside from Carol's unseen parents, object to the wedding save for Ross -- - and he's only upset because he still loves Carol. (In a sweet moment, he ends up walking her down the aisle.) A few network affiliates refused to air the episode, but it was the highest-rated program that week. Today, same-sex weddings and couples raising children are becoming increasingly commonplace on TV, for example in ''Modern Family''.



* When ''Series/LawAndOrder'' first appeared in 1990, it was unthinkable to have a show so willing to discuss controversial topics such as abortion, racism, corruption, and child abuse. Since then, shows like ''Series/TheWire'' have gone further with the "Crime Drama as a social platform" concept than anyone could have imagined.

to:

* When ''Series/LawAndOrder'' first appeared in 1990, it was unthinkable to have a show so willing to discuss controversial topics such as abortion, racism, corruption, corruption and child abuse. Since then, shows like ''Series/TheWire'' have gone further with the "Crime Drama as a social platform" concept than anyone could have imagined.



* Same thing has happened to ''Series/RealPeople'', which became a Wednesday night staple on NBC between 1979 and 1984.

to:

* Same thing has happened to ''Series/RealPeople'', ''RealPeople'', which became a Wednesday night staple on NBC between 1979 and 1984.



* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive''. In its early days, it was considered revolutionary, groundbreaking, and taboo due to its willingness to just say and/or do anything crazy, stupid, and/or controversial and hope the censors don't crack down on them. Through modern eyes, those old episodes can seem terribly dull thanks to ''SNL''[='=]s many dueling shows that try to capture its humor (i.e., ''Series/{{Fridays}}'', ''Series/InLivingColor'', ''Series/{{MADtv}}'', ''Series/MrShow'', etc).
* ''Series/SavedByTheBell'': The show that started the whole "tween" show craze (heck, that word didn't even exist back then). Lizzie, Series/HannahMontana, Series/{{iCarly}}, even Power Rangers -- they all owe their existence to this show.
* ''Series/{{SCTV}}''. Speaking of network TV sketch shows that suffer from Seinfeld Is Unfunny syndrome, when it premiered in Canada (and later, the United States), the sketch comedy show was a critical and commercial hit. By mixing [[DeconstructiveParody deconstructive parodies]] of popular and lesser-known works with [[CanadaEh absurdly specific Canadian-centric humor]], the show won over a lot of fans (it also helped that ''SNL'' had plunged into SeasonalRot in the 1980s, so shows like ''SCTV'' and ''Fridays'' became favorite substitutes for ''SNL''). The show was lauded for having a stellar cast (who would all go on to successful movie and television careers, making it a who's-who of comedy talent, much like ''SNL''), and being a trailblazer for new concepts in sketch comedy (i.e. running gags that spanned the entire episode, long camera shots in sketches, and more absurdist humor than what one would find on ''SNL'' or even ''Monty Python''). Today, many viewers would look at the series and think it's either too quaint or boring (because the nature of the sketches and jokes--which reference late 1970s and early 1980s subculture--fly right over their heads), even though the series essentially created the foundation of modern Canadian comedy shows.

to:

* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive''. In its early days, it was considered revolutionary, groundbreaking, and taboo due to its willingness to just say and/or do anything crazy, stupid, and/or controversial and hope the censors don't crack down on them. Through modern eyes, those old episodes can seem terribly dull thanks to ''SNL''[='=]s many dueling shows that try to capture its humor (i.e., ''Series/{{Fridays}}'', ''Fridays'', ''Series/InLivingColor'', ''Series/{{MADtv}}'', ''Series/MrShow'', etc).
* ''Series/SavedByTheBell'': The show that started the whole "tween" show craze (heck, that word didn't even exist back then). Lizzie, Series/HannahMontana, Series/{{iCarly}}, even Power Rangers -- - they all owe their existence to this show.
* ''Series/{{SCTV}}''. Speaking of network TV sketch shows that suffer from Seinfeld Is Unfunny syndrome, when it premiered in Canada (and later, the United States), the sketch comedy show was a critical and commercial hit. By mixing [[DeconstructiveParody deconstructive parodies]] of popular and lesser-known works with [[CanadaEh absurdly specific Canadian-centric humor]], the show won over a lot of fans (it also helped that ''SNL'' had plunged into SeasonalRot in the 1980s, so shows like ''SCTV'' and ''Fridays'' became favorite substitutes for ''SNL''). The show was lauded for having a stellar cast (who would all go on to successful movie and television careers, making it a who's-who of comedy talent, much like ''SNL''), and being a trailblazer for new concepts in sketch comedy (i.e. running gags that spanned the entire episode, long camera shots in sketches, and more absurdist humor than what one would find on ''SNL'' or even ''Monty Python''). Today, many viewers would look at the series and think it's either too quaint or boring (because the nature of the sketches and jokes--which jokes - which reference late 1970s and early 1980s subculture--fly subculture - fly right over their heads), even though the series essentially created the foundation of modern Canadian comedy shows.



** Jerri Manthey references this phenomenon in the ''Heroes Vs Villains'' season. When Jerri first appeared in the ''Australia'' season, American viewers '''hated''' her -- she schemed against other players, and was the first certifiable "villain" of the show (so much so that when she appeared on that season's reunion show, she was booed off the stage). In the following seasons, other players would up the stakes in terms of villainy, culminating in Corrine Kaplan's run in ''Gabon''[[note]]She openly dissed another contestant's dead father, and refused to apologize during the reunion show, crossing the MoralEventHorizon beyond a point that ''any'' contestant can cross.[[/note]] and Russell Hantz's run in ''Samoa''[[note]]He insulted fellow players, sabotaged his own team multiple times, tricked everyone, and generally acted like an entitled savior[[/note]]. Even at her worst, Jerri was never as nasty as Corinne or Russell, and her "villainy" is now run-of-the-mill -- practically every player backstabs their fellow teammates at this point.

to:

** Jerri Manthey references this phenomenon in the ''Heroes Vs Villains'' season. When Jerri first appeared in the ''Australia'' season, American viewers '''hated''' her -- - she schemed against other players, and was the first certifiable "villain" of the show (so much so that when she appeared on that season's reunion show, she was booed off the stage). In the following seasons, other players would up the stakes in terms of villainy, culminating in Corrine Kaplan's run in ''Gabon''[[note]]She openly dissed another contestant's dead father, and refused to apologize during the reunion show, crossing the MoralEventHorizon beyond a point that ''any'' contestant can cross.[[/note]] and Russell Hantz's run in ''Samoa''[[note]]He insulted fellow players, sabotaged his own team multiple times, tricked everyone, and generally acted like an entitled savior[[/note]]. Even at her worst, Jerri was never as nasty as Corinne or Russell, and her "villainy" is now run-of-the-mill -- - practically every player backstabs their fellow teammates at this point.



** Before that, ''Soap'' also had Creator/BillyCrystal as a gay lead, in a much less cliche role. The character later went straight.

to:

** Before that, ''Soap'' also had Creator/BillyCrystal Billy Crystal as a gay lead, in a much less cliche role. The character later went straight.



* ''Series/RichManPoorMan'' was the first miniseries, an exploration of long-form storytelling that's become completely standard today. As well, one of its biggest selling points was its frank depiction of sexuality, with the MoralGuardians up in arms over characters talking about "nailing" each other and a white woman considering an affair with a black man. Nowadays, of course, all that seems remarkably tame.

to:

* ''Series/RichManPoorMan'' ''Rich Man, Poor Man'' was the first miniseries, an exploration of long-form storytelling that's become completely standard today. As well, one of its biggest selling points was its frank depiction of sexuality, with the MoralGuardians up in arms over characters talking about "nailing" each other and a white woman considering an affair with a black man. Nowadays, of course, all that seems remarkably tame.



* On American TV shows of the [[TheSixties mid/late 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies early 1970's]], boasts of "in color." Viewers who have grown up on color TV are likely to have a reaction of, "Um, okay?" In the mid-1960s, however, many shows were still in black-and-white, making the changeover to color significant. Reruns of shows from that period generally leave off the "in color" intro. The real motivation for this kind of thing was to let people who still had black and white [=TVs=] know just what they were missing -- at least, when the point had been reached when the "in color" boast continued to appear while ''everything'' was in color anyway.

to:

* On American TV shows of the [[TheSixties mid/late 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies early 1970's]], boasts of "in color." Viewers who have grown up on color TV are likely to have a reaction of, "Um, okay?" In the mid-1960s, however, many shows were still in black-and-white, making the changeover to color significant. Reruns of shows from that period generally leave off the "in color" intro. The real motivation for this kind of thing was to let people who still had black and white [=TVs=] know just what they were missing -- - at least, when the point had been reached when the "in color" boast continued to appear while ''everything'' was in color anyway.
This list shows the last 10 events of 239. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.LiveActionTV