History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Literature

26th Nov '16 5:20:28 PM nombretomado
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* ''Literature/TheNeverendingStory''. Similar to ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', it can seem an awful lot like a rather standard read, albeit a [[DoorStopper long one]] for children. A child finds a mysterious book that appears to be a gateway to another world. He appears to have found himself written into the story of this mysterious new world, and finds himself embarking on all sorts of adventures in a realm of fantasy powered by human imagination, becoming part of it all along the way, then finally departing home at the end after almost losing himself to his own fantasy and defeating the BigBad. Even if the entire story wasn't replicated ''too'' too much (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' comes close, however), a lot of the book's themes seem a bit... well, cliché. The plot itself doesn't seem to be anything new either.

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* ''Literature/TheNeverendingStory''. Similar to ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', it can seem an awful lot like a rather standard read, albeit a [[DoorStopper long one]] for children. A child finds a mysterious book that appears to be a gateway to another world. He appears to have found himself written into the story of this mysterious new world, and finds himself embarking on all sorts of adventures in a realm of fantasy powered by human imagination, becoming part of it all along the way, then finally departing home at the end after almost losing himself to his own fantasy and defeating the BigBad. Even if the entire story wasn't replicated ''too'' too much (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' comes close, however), a lot of the book's themes seem a bit... well, cliché. The plot itself doesn't seem to be anything new either.
16th Oct '16 10:58:32 AM Nightsky
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** He gave the first definitions of the stock races as mostly used today. Elves existed in many different forms in different mythologies, from little wingy [[Creator/{{Disney}} tinkerbells]] to modern fantasy '''dwarves'''; now, everyone thinks "pointy ears", archery, and intelligent beauty. Orcs were a new name, and possibly didn't exist in that form in folklore except in general as ''orcneas'', ogres. The elf-dwarf hostilities began in Tolkien. Dwarfs as bearded miners, while that did exist before, was codified. "Dwarves" was also a Tolkienism.

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** He gave the first definitions of the stock races as mostly used today. Elves existed in many different forms in different mythologies, from little wingy [[Creator/{{Disney}} tinkerbells]] to modern fantasy '''dwarves'''; now, everyone thinks "pointy ears", archery, and intelligent beauty. Orcs were a new name, and possibly didn't exist in that form in folklore except in general as ''orcneas'', ogres. The elf-dwarf hostilities began in Tolkien. Dwarfs as bearded miners, while that did exist before, was codified. "Dwarves" was also a Tolkienism.Tolkienism, as was the adjectival form "elven"; before Tolkien, the most accepted plural for "dwarf" was "dwarfs", and the adjectival form of "elf" was "elfin".
22nd Aug '16 6:38:17 PM Kartoonkid95
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'', a 1974 novel by Creator/StephenKing, is this for the way it depicts religion. For years, many horror stories centered around religion, like ''Film/RosemarysBaby'' and ''Literature/TheExorcist'', portrayed God-worshippers as the good guys who fight back heroically against the forces of the Devil; in the case of ''Carrie'', the religious individual, the title character's mother, is a ''villain'', abusive, delusional, and downright insane. These days, with the growing acceptance of atheism and controversies regarding religious extremism, the character's arc almost seems like an annoying, parodic tract.
** ''Carrie'' was also remarkable in the way it depicted the title character's bullies as psychopathic predators. It was truly shocking and outrageous when it was first published, but in the 21st century, with stories of vicious bullying permeating the headlines and anti-bullying movements in full swing, their behavior becomes less unlikely and eerily reminiscent of reality.
22nd Jun '16 9:58:32 PM PaulA
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* Everything written by [[Creator/KarlMay Karl May]] can seem this to modern readers, especially if they are German. The funny thing is not only did he create many of the tropes Germans now associate with Native Americans, his descriptions are so badly researched (he wrote most of his works before ever having been to the US) that much of what he writes is accepted as "common wisdom" in German speaking countries yet no American has ever heard of that. The fact that "Indianerfilme" were hugely popular from the 1960s onward in both East and West Germany and they all were based on each other and/or his works doesn't help. Just one example of his influence: May made his hero Winnetou an Apache because he had read a negative depiction of them in a lexicon - the result? Apaches are one of the most widely known native American groups and usually viewed positively in the German speaking world.

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* Everything written by [[Creator/KarlMay Karl May]] Creator/KarlMay can seem this to modern readers, especially if they are German. The funny thing is not only did he create many of the tropes Germans now associate with Native Americans, his descriptions are so badly researched (he wrote most of his works before ever having been to the US) that much of what he writes is accepted as "common wisdom" in German speaking countries yet no American has ever heard of that. The fact that "Indianerfilme" were hugely popular from the 1960s onward in both East and West Germany and they all were based on each other and/or his works doesn't help. Just one example of his influence: May made his hero Winnetou Literature/{{Winnetou}} an Apache because he had read a negative depiction of them in a lexicon - -- the result? Apaches are one of the most widely known native American groups and usually viewed positively in the German speaking world.
19th Jun '16 8:56:36 PM system
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19th Jun '16 3:00:53 PM WhatArtThee
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* ''Amadis of Gaul'' is the most important knight-errant ChivalricRomance of all time, but today it seems dated, to the point that it has been all but forgotten and replaced in importance by its extremely angry {{Deconstruction}}, ''Literature/DonQuixote''. Note, however, that ''Amadis of Gaul'' is saved from the fire for its merits in the chapter where the library of Don Quixote is being burned, indicating that Cervantes himself was aware of this trope to some degree.

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* ''Amadis of Gaul'' is the most important knight-errant ChivalricRomance of all time, but today now it seems dated, to the point that might not seem as groundbreaking as it has been all but forgotten and replaced in importance by its extremely angry {{Deconstruction}}, ''Literature/DonQuixote''. did way back them. Note, however, that ''Amadis of Gaul'' is saved from the fire for its merits in the chapter where the library of Don Quixote is being burned, indicating that Cervantes himself was aware of this trope to some degree.



* Creator/JDSalinger's ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'' started an {{Angst}} revolution in literature that it's never come out of. Angst has been a part of literature ever since ''Literature/WutheringHeights'', ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', and even ''Literature/TheIliad'' ([[AchillesInHisTent Achilles sitting in his tent sulking]], anyone?), but there it was presented in such eloquent language that it seemed more legitimately emotional. As a result, those who've read similar-style books before reading Salinger's book often write ''Catcher'' off as okay at best, and a poor man's Creator/ChuckPalahniuk at worst.\\

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* Creator/JDSalinger's ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'' started an {{Angst}} revolution in literature that it's never come out of. Angst has been a part of literature ever since ''Literature/WutheringHeights'', ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', and even ''Literature/TheIliad'' ([[AchillesInHisTent Achilles sitting in his tent sulking]], anyone?), but there it was presented in such eloquent language that it seemed more legitimately emotional. As a result, those who've read similar-style books before reading Salinger's book often write ''Catcher'' off might not think of it as okay at best, and a poor man's Creator/ChuckPalahniuk at worst.\\being that unique.



The use of a casual, first-person writing style also contributes heavily to making it dated. The use of slang and turns of phrase that are alien to newcomers makes it strange to a modern reader. On top of that, almost everybody admonishes Holden not to swear when the worst thing he says is... [[GoshDangItToHeck "goddamn"]]. This leads to modern readers, who hear words like [[ClusterFBomb "fuck"]] and [[PrecisionFStrike "shit"]] on a daily basis, seeing Holden as more of a RuleAbidingRebel when he was, for his time, quite a potty-mouth.

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\\
The use of a casual, first-person writing style also contributes heavily to making it dated.heavily. The use of slang and turns of phrase that are alien to newcomers makes it strange to a modern reader. On top of that, almost everybody admonishes Holden not to swear when the worst thing he says is... [[GoshDangItToHeck "goddamn"]]. This leads to modern readers, who hear words like [[ClusterFBomb "fuck"]] and [[PrecisionFStrike "shit"]] on a daily basis, seeing Holden as more of a RuleAbidingRebel when he was, for his time, quite a potty-mouth.



** While the works of Conan Doyle may seem a bit dated today, many of the mystery authors that succeeded him, and were hugely successful at the time, are almost unreadable today - their mysteries may have seemed innovative at the time, but have been imitated and done better so many times that they've lost their attraction. And, unlike the authors who remain popular today, such as Creator/AgathaChristie, their writing wasn't good enough to survive when their plots ceased to be novelties.



* ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' being the ultimate vampire TropeMaker, has been so thoroughly ripped off, parodied, retooled and revamped that even many {{Goth}}s are sick of him.

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* ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' being the ultimate vampire TropeMaker, has been so thoroughly ripped off, parodied, retooled and revamped that even many {{Goth}}s are sick of him.it might not seem original today.



* The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' books. People new to it (and in particular the TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms novels) and who scoff at [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Drizzt]] being the emo badass rebel from an evil society don't realize just what hot shit those books were in the early '90s--and that they inspired a lot of the clichés they deride the books for using. Author R. A. Salvatore has even had readers come up to him at conventions to say "A good dual-wielding Drow ranger? How cliche!"

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* The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' books. People new to it (and in particular the TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms novels) and who scoff at [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Drizzt]] being the emo badass rebel from an evil society don't realize just what hot shit those books were in the early '90s--and that they inspired a lot of the clichés they deride the books for using. Author R. A. Salvatore has even had readers come up to him at conventions to say "A good dual-wielding Drow ranger? How cliche!"



* Creator/ErnestHemingway. Read any other novel or watch a movie on wartime experiences before reading ''Literature/AFarewellToArms''. It'll end up looking like just another run-of-the-mill war story.
* [[Creator/HPLovecraft Howard P. Lovecraft]], widely recognized as the founder of the CosmicHorrorStory and the EldritchAbomination trope. Certain stories of his can now come across as charmingly old-fashioned and not necessarily all that horrifying. Or, in the case of his obvious racism, not-so-charming.

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* Creator/ErnestHemingway. Read any other novel or watch a movie on wartime experiences before reading ''Literature/AFarewellToArms''. It'll end up looking like just another run-of-the-mill war story.
seeming less original than it was.
* [[Creator/HPLovecraft Howard P. Lovecraft]], widely recognized as the founder of the CosmicHorrorStory and the EldritchAbomination trope. Certain stories of his can now come across as charmingly old-fashioned and not necessarily all that horrifying. Or, in the case of his obvious racism, not-so-charming.unoriginal.



* Creator/JaneAusten and to a lesser extent the Brontë sisters suffer from this. Their novels have had a massive influence on romance novels to the point that they may appear hopelessly clichéd and even a bit low brow because of the countless imitators.
* ''The Joy of Sex'' and ''Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Sex* * but Were Afraid to Ask'' weren't trite when they were published.

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* Creator/JaneAusten and to a lesser extent the Brontë sisters suffer from this. Their novels have had a massive influence on romance novels to the point that they may appear hopelessly clichéd and even a bit low brow because of the countless imitators.
* ''The Joy of Sex'' and ''Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Sex* * but Were Afraid to Ask'' weren't trite when they were published.
clichéd.



* Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'' suffer from this even harder, if only because she was more prolific than Brite and she's much more well-known in the mainstream. Lestat in particular is the poster child for this. The "sexy Eurotrash rebel-without-a-cause in literal leather pants" character is so cliche in modern vampire fiction that people groan when they see it. Somewhat hilariously, it was a major criticism of the ''Film/QueenOfTheDamned'' movie.
* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'': This book popularized most of the cliches found in fantasy today, but modern readers may well find it unspeakably boring, purely because everything in it has since been subverted, inverted, parodied, and otherwise done to death. Aside from that though, it also has lots of UnbuiltTrope which are actually not like what non-readers think the book contains.

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* Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'' suffer from this even harder, if only because she was more prolific than Brite and she's much more well-known in the mainstream. Lestat in particular is the poster child for this. The "sexy Eurotrash rebel-without-a-cause in literal leather pants" character is so cliche in modern vampire fiction that people groan when they see it.has since become very commonplace. Somewhat hilariously, it was a major criticism of the ''Film/QueenOfTheDamned'' movie.
* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'': This book popularized most of the cliches found in fantasy today, but modern readers may well find it unspeakably boring, purely because everything in it has since been subverted, inverted, parodied, and otherwise done to death.used. Aside from that though, it also has lots of UnbuiltTrope which are actually not like what non-readers think the book contains.



* Literature/NancyDrew can suffer from this a little bit. Post-feminism, it's kind of hard to realize how influential she was (almost every prominent female politician cites her as an inspiration.) She precedes Ellen Ripley and Wonder Woman and has been called one of the first feminists in American Fiction. Not to mention she was headstrong and adventurous, something that wasn't encouraged in children's literature (same goes for ''Literature/TheHardyBoys''.) Nowadays, YouMeddlingKids is a cliché in itself, and the books are seen as nostalgic at best and a little hokey at worst, while her utter perfection would have her written off as a MarySue if she was to appear for the first time today.
* ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' by William Gibson was hailed as a radical departure that overturned science fiction with its noir mood, gritty realism, and dystopian outlook. Now CyberPunk looks old-fashioned and passe to some, and ShinyLookingSpaceships are back in vogue as unironic extensions of modern consumer products.

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* Literature/NancyDrew can suffer from this a little bit. Post-feminism, it's kind of hard to realize how influential she was (almost every prominent female politician cites her as an inspiration.) She precedes Ellen Ripley and Wonder Woman and has been called one of the first feminists in American Fiction. Not to mention she was headstrong and adventurous, something that wasn't encouraged in children's literature (same goes for ''Literature/TheHardyBoys''.) Nowadays, YouMeddlingKids is a cliché in itself, and the books tropes she introduced are seen as nostalgic at best and a little hokey at worst, while her utter perfection would have her written off as a MarySue if she was to appear for the first time today.
now commonplace.
* ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' by William Gibson was hailed as a radical departure that overturned science fiction with its noir mood, gritty realism, and dystopian outlook. Now CyberPunk looks old-fashioned and passe to some, and ShinyLookingSpaceships are back in vogue as unironic extensions of modern consumer products.it's commonplace.



* ''Paul Clifford'', Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton's fifth novel, was an immense commercial success when first published. Today, it is remembered only as the origin of the notorious "ItWasADarkAndStormyNight".



* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe was one of the very first writers of horror and suspense fiction, and he helped to create many of the conventions of the genre. Said conventions are now so common that it's hard for a modern reader to find his work as compelling as his audience did. Poe's pioneering use of the UnreliableNarrator doesn't seem like a big deal anymore now that suspense and horror readers have come to ''expect'' their narrators to be unreliable.

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* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe was one of the very first writers of horror and suspense fiction, and he helped to create many of the conventions of the genre. Said conventions are now so common that it's hard for a modern reader to find his work as compelling unique as his audience did.they once were. Poe's pioneering use of the UnreliableNarrator doesn't seem like a big deal anymore now that suspense and horror readers have come to ''expect'' their narrators to be unreliable.



* "Literature/ASoundOfThunder", a short story by Creator/RayBradbury, was about time travelers who went back to prehistoric times, [[ButterflyOfDoom killed a butterfly]], and [[GodwinsLawOfTimeTravel accidently caused a fascist candidate to win the presidential elections]]. Which was a really original plot, when it was written. However, those story elements are so trite now that when the movie loosely based on the story was made, it was criticized for using old, tired cliches.

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* "Literature/ASoundOfThunder", a short story by Creator/RayBradbury, was about time travelers who went back to prehistoric times, [[ButterflyOfDoom killed a butterfly]], and [[GodwinsLawOfTimeTravel accidently caused a fascist candidate to win the presidential elections]]. Which was a really original plot, when it was written. However, those story elements are so trite now that when the movie loosely based on the story was made, it was criticized pretty much a given for using old, tired cliches.time-travel stories.



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* The ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' franchise, particularly ''Literature/TheSwordOfShannara''. People today tend to look at it and see a blatant rip-off of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. At the time, people wouldn't have, due to Brooks' other innovations, including Elves that were human and known to be fallible, a {{Mentor}} who was a whopping example of GoodIsNotNice, the aversion of AlwaysChaoticEvil, the AfterTheEnd setting and of course, the twist ending ([[spoiler:The Sword convinces the BigBad of his DeadAllAlong status]]). The series had the first high fantasy novel (''Sword'') not written for children to be a commercial success in its own time (that's right; ''The Lord of the Rings'' was not a commercial success until many years after it was published), and ''Elfstones'' and ''Wishsong'' were numbers two and three, respectively; all three spent weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. This was largely what convinced publishers that fantasy could be a commercially viable genre separate from sci-fi, causing an explosion in the publication of fantasy. Nowadays this is forgotten and the novel's innovations are so common that modern readers tend only to notice the flaws and the similarities to ''Lord of the Rings'', instead of the differences.

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* The ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' franchise, particularly ''Literature/TheSwordOfShannara''. People today tend to look at it and see a blatant rip-off of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. At the time, people wouldn't have, due to Brooks' other innovations, including Elves that were human and known to be fallible, a {{Mentor}} who was a whopping example of GoodIsNotNice, the aversion of AlwaysChaoticEvil, the AfterTheEnd setting and of course, the twist ending ([[spoiler:The Sword convinces the BigBad of his DeadAllAlong status]]). The series had the first high fantasy novel (''Sword'') not written for children to be a commercial success in its own time (that's right; ''The Lord of the Rings'' was not a commercial success until many years after it was published), and ''Elfstones'' and ''Wishsong'' were numbers two and three, respectively; all three spent weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. This was largely what convinced publishers that fantasy could be a commercially viable genre separate from sci-fi, causing an explosion in the publication of fantasy. Nowadays this is forgotten and the novel's innovations are so common that modern readers tend only to notice the flaws and the similarities to ''Lord of the Rings'', instead of the differences.common.



* ''Literature/AnnieOnMyMind''. The villains are one-dimensional, the romance develops in a short time (a month or so), and the heroes, {{Woobie}}s or not, make some stupid decisions. These tend to turn people off the to the book. They forget that this was ''the'' first book to portray lesbians in a positive light, without having them [[CureYourGays turn straight]] or [[BuryYourGays die]].



* Creator/WilliamMorris (1834-1896) attempted to revive the ChivalricRomance genre with novels ''The Wood Beyond the World'' (1894) and ''The Well at the World's End'' (1896), creating "an entirely invented fantasy world" as their setting. These works and his earlier HistoricalFantasy novels influenced writers such as Creator/LordDunsany, Eric Rücker Eddison, James Branch Cabell, Creator/JRRTolkien, and Creator/CSLewis. Problem is that they are among the founding works of MedievalEuropeanFantasy. They had a noticeable influence in the development of HeroicFantasy, HighFantasy, and even the CthulhuMythos. There is now nothing innovative about creating an invented world, and his works were considered dated by TheSeventies.

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* Creator/WilliamMorris (1834-1896) attempted to revive the ChivalricRomance genre with novels ''The Wood Beyond the World'' (1894) and ''The Well at the World's End'' (1896), creating "an entirely invented fantasy world" as their setting. These works and his earlier HistoricalFantasy novels influenced writers such as Creator/LordDunsany, Eric Rücker Eddison, James Branch Cabell, Creator/JRRTolkien, and Creator/CSLewis. Problem is that they are among the founding works of MedievalEuropeanFantasy. They had a noticeable influence in the development of HeroicFantasy, HighFantasy, and even the CthulhuMythos. There is now nothing innovative about creating an invented world, and his works were considered dated by TheSeventies.world.



* ''Literature/TheTaleOfGenji''. It's considered one of the first modern novels, if not ''the'' first. Nowadays, it can be ''quite'' hard to get into.
* Drizzt Do'Urden, the subversion of AlwaysChaoticEvil, was pretty groundbreaking in fantasy when released. However, Drizzt was the font from which the "Wangsty Exiled Drow" flowed, and is now held up as a shining example of everything that is wrong about the D&D fandom.
* ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' launched the PlanetaryRomance genre, and has been hugely influential on creators of fantasy/science fiction media, including the minds behind ''Franchise/StarWars'' and ''Film/{{Avatar}}''. This influence created problems for ''Film/JohnCarter'', in that while it was faithfully adapting the original novels, for those not familiar with the source works, it came across as a massive ClicheStorm.
* Many novels and stories by Creator/HGWells contain what seem like very dated, unambitious and dull uses of sci-fi devices. For example, in ''Literature/TheTimeMachine'', the time traveller simply goes to the future, has a look at what it's like... and then comes back home again. However, Wells was practically the first sci-fi writer of any kind (to the extent that the term 'science fiction' did not exist - Wells himself invented the term 'scientific romance' to describe his works). This can be applied equally to many other early sci-fi works. Also, Wells is famous for inventing ''nearly every other sci-fi trope'' and inputting them in his stories. Said devices are now part of nearly every novel, comic, video game, movie and anime that has science fiction elements.
* Literature/TheBible is widely considered by many as the go-to example of ValuesDissonance that keeps mysteriously proliferating itself, a fantasy novel masquerading as a self-help book or vice-versa. Never mind the fact that between the dated verses is moral philosophy that was well ahead of its time, some of which is taken for granted having now become the status quo, and some of which can still be considered "progressive" today.

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* ''Literature/TheTaleOfGenji''. It's considered one of the first modern novels, if not ''the'' first. Nowadays, it can be ''quite'' hard to get into.
* Drizzt Do'Urden, the subversion of AlwaysChaoticEvil, was pretty groundbreaking in fantasy when released. However, Drizzt was the font from which the "Wangsty Exiled Drow" flowed, and is now held up as a shining example of everything that is wrong about the D&D fandom.
see it's influence.
* ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' launched the PlanetaryRomance genre, and has been hugely influential on creators of fantasy/science fiction media, including the minds behind ''Franchise/StarWars'' and ''Film/{{Avatar}}''. This influence created problems for ''Film/JohnCarter'', in that while Today, though, it was faithfully adapting the original novels, for those not familiar with the source works, it came across as a massive ClicheStorm.
might seem commonplace.
* Many novels and stories by Creator/HGWells contain what might seem like very dated, unambitious and dull uses of sci-fi devices. For example, in ''Literature/TheTimeMachine'', the time traveller simply goes to the future, has a look at what it's like... and then comes back home again.ordinary today. However, Wells was practically the first sci-fi writer of any kind (to the extent that the term 'science fiction' did not exist - Wells himself invented the term 'scientific romance' to describe his works). This can be applied equally to many other early sci-fi works. Also, Wells is famous for inventing ''nearly every other sci-fi trope'' and inputting them in his stories. Said devices are now part of nearly every novel, comic, video game, movie and anime that has science fiction elements.
* Literature/TheBible is widely considered by many as the go-to example of ValuesDissonance that keeps mysteriously proliferating itself, a fantasy novel masquerading as a self-help book or vice-versa. Never mind the fact that between the dated verses is has moral philosophy that was well ahead of its time, some of which is taken for granted having now become the status quo, and some of which can still be considered "progressive" today.



* ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' is one-half this and one-half ValuesDissonance. By the standards of today, it's a generic ClicheStorm that doesn't have any tropes the reader hasn't seen before, because it was the first TropeCodifier for the RomanticComedy. In addition, Mr. Darcy is almost a cliché in his own right for being TroubledButCute... because he was the first major example of the TroubledButCute DeadpanSnarker as a male lead.

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* ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' is one-half this and one-half ValuesDissonance. By the standards of today, it's a generic ClicheStorm that it's doesn't have any tropes the reader hasn't seen before, before... because it was the first TropeCodifier for the RomanticComedy. In addition, Mr. Darcy is almost a cliché in his own right for being TroubledButCute... because he was the first major example of the TroubledButCute DeadpanSnarker as a male lead.



* [[Creator/JackLondon Jack London's]] ''Literature/TheIronHeel'' is arguably the first Futuristic Dystopia novel ever written. The central premise of the story - an evil MegaCorp takes over the government, takes control of the media, violently oppresses all free speech and thought, etc. - was novel and topical (and quite scarily plausible) at the time London was writing, but it has since been done to death and back so many times over that the original seems tame and dry by comparison (YMMV on the continued topicality).

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* [[Creator/JackLondon Jack London's]] ''Literature/TheIronHeel'' is arguably the first Futuristic Dystopia novel ever written. The central premise of the story - an evil MegaCorp takes over the government, takes control of the media, violently oppresses all free speech and thought, etc. - was novel and topical (and quite scarily plausible) at the time London was writing, but it has since been done to death and back so many times over that the original seems tame and dry by comparison (YMMV on the continued topicality).over.



* For about ten years or so, Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' was considered the ultimate in subversive epic fantasy. Little to no magic, no elves or dwarves (at least, not fantasy dwarves), profanity, uncensored sex, graphic violence and no PlotArmor for ''anyone''. But, it was also a heavily character-driven piece with genuine heart, even if that wasn't always recognized. By the 2010's, it had spawned so many imitators who mainly copied its surface qualities (extreme violence and death, explicit sex) that it no longer feels like anything really different, and is primarily thought of as "that series where everybody dies" due to its at-the-time-unheard-of tendency to kill characters that would usually survive to the end of similar books.
* Nowadays, ''Series/TheWheelOfTime'' by Creator/RobertJordan is considered a horrendously cliched example of how all fantasy books are too long, with series that go on seemingly without end and yet little happens in them. When the first volume was published, in 1991, most fantasy novels were actually quite short, and/or tended to be trilogies or quintets at the very longest. However, he inspired so many other writers to [[{{Padding}} pad out their volumes]] and stretch their stories over ten or twelve volumes that by the 2000's he gets lumped in with those he inspired, often cited as the UrExample, but rarely acknowledged as the man who started the trend.

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* For about ten years or so, Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' was considered the ultimate in subversive epic fantasy.very new when it first came out. Little to no magic, no elves or dwarves (at least, not fantasy dwarves), profanity, uncensored sex, graphic violence and no PlotArmor for ''anyone''. But, it was also a heavily character-driven piece with genuine heart, even if that wasn't always recognized. By the 2010's, it had spawned so many imitators who mainly copied its surface qualities (extreme violence and death, explicit sex) that it no longer feels like anything really different, and is primarily thought of as "that series where everybody dies" due to its at-the-time-unheard-of tendency to kill characters that would usually survive to the end of similar books.
* Nowadays, ''Series/TheWheelOfTime'' by Creator/RobertJordan is considered a horrendously cliched example of how all fantasy books are too long, with series that go on seemingly without end and yet little happens in them. When the first volume was published, in 1991, most fantasy novels were actually quite short, and/or tended to be trilogies or quintets at the very longest. However, he inspired so many other writers to [[{{Padding}} pad out their volumes]] and stretch their stories over ten or twelve volumes that by the 2000's he gets lumped in with those he inspired, often cited as the UrExample, but rarely acknowledged as the man who started the trend.
different.



* Dennis Wheatley was a British thriller writer who began his career in the 1920s and died in 1977. Many of his otherwise conventional adventure stories contained elements of black magic and Satanism, which (at the time) was considered highly cutting-edge and daring. Many of the today's cliches of such fiction were originally invented by him. Since many of his works feature characters astral travelling, it might also be said that modern cyberpunk also stems from his ideas. Today, however, due to the racism, homophobia, sexism, class-consciousness and Anglocentricity of his ideas, the novels appear quaint to most and offensive to many.
* [[TheLeatherstockingTales James Fenimore Cooper's]] works not only put America on the literary map, but also pioneered a positive portrayal of Native Americans in adventure fiction, which got Cooper quite a bit of flak from contemporary American politicians, who at the time were pursuing an active policy of driving Indians from land that white Americans wanted. But since the ''Leatherstocking Tales'' are written in the style of Romanticism, which dramatically fell out of fashion with the rise of literary Realism, since the "NobleSavage" is now often viewed with suspicion, and since so many of Cooper's plot elements were reused by other writers of Western and general adventure fiction he is now often viewed as trite, at least in his native America.

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* Dennis Wheatley was a British thriller writer who began his career in the 1920s and died in 1977. Many of his otherwise conventional adventure stories contained elements of black magic and Satanism, which (at the time) was considered highly cutting-edge and daring. Many of the today's cliches of such fiction were originally invented by him. Since many of his works feature characters astral travelling, it might also be said that modern cyberpunk also stems from his ideas. Today, however, due to the racism, homophobia, sexism, class-consciousness and Anglocentricity of his ideas, the novels appear quaint to most and offensive to many.
they might not seem that innovative.
* [[TheLeatherstockingTales James Fenimore Cooper's]] works not only put America on the literary map, but also pioneered a positive portrayal of Native Americans in adventure fiction, which got Cooper quite a bit of flak from contemporary American politicians, who at the time were pursuing an active policy of driving Indians from land that white Americans wanted. But since the ''Leatherstocking Tales'' are written in the style of Romanticism, which dramatically fell out of fashion with the rise of literary Realism, since the "NobleSavage" is now often viewed with suspicion, and since so many of Cooper's plot elements were reused by other writers of Western and general adventure fiction he is now often viewed as trite, not so unique, at least in his native America.



* ''Literature/TheMarvelousLandOfOz'' can come off as this - In the early 20th century, these books were ''the'' fantasy books enjoyed by a PeripheryDemographic, before ''Literature/HarryPotter'' came around in the late 90s. Nowadays, the books seem ''quite'' cartoonish.
13th Jun '16 7:16:56 PM PaulA
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** Holmes is a fleshed-out version of Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin. Dupin can extrapolate from tiny clues, scoffs at the clueless police and has a narrator friend who worships him. There's actually a LampshadeHanging on this in the very first Holmes story.

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** Holmes is a fleshed-out version of Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin.Literature/CAugusteDupin. Dupin can extrapolate from tiny clues, scoffs at the clueless police and has a narrator friend who worships him. There's actually a LampshadeHanging on this in the very first Holmes story.
15th May '16 2:53:30 PM Kartoonkid95
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Carrie'' was also one of the first works to thoroughly demonize Christian fanatics, as stories before it, like ''Film/RosemarysBaby'' and ''Literature/TheExorcist'', had glamorized the religion. These days, with various controversies regarding the actions of fundies, and a lot of writers attacking the faith in their works, it doesn't seem so shocking anymore.
3rd Apr '16 4:31:56 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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** It can be hard to see "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" as a brilliant bit of nonsense poetry when many of its {{Perfectly Cromulent Word}}s (most famously "chortle" and "galumph") have since [[{{Defictionalization}} become recognized as real English words]], and are no longer "nonsense". Also, divorced from its original context in the 19th century--when published translations of Old English poetry were first becoming widely available, and were widely read by English intellectuals--it can be hard to recognize "Jabberwocky" as an [[AffectionateParody affectionate send-up]] of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}''.

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** It can be hard to see "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" as a brilliant bit of nonsense poetry when many of its {{Perfectly Cromulent Word}}s (most famously "chortle" and "galumph") have since [[{{Defictionalization}} become recognized as real English words]], and are no longer "nonsense". Also, divorced from its original context in the 19th century--when published translations of Old English poetry were first becoming widely available, and were widely read by English intellectuals--it can be hard to recognize "Jabberwocky" the poem as an [[AffectionateParody affectionate send-up]] of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}''.
3rd Apr '16 10:43:30 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* When ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' was released, it was considered very innovative for not having [[AnAesop a clear moral to the story.]] Nowadays, when it's not considered necessary for every children's book to come with a moral, few readers even think about the fact that the ''Alice'' books lack one.

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* Creator/LewisCarroll:
**
When ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' was released, it was considered very innovative for not having [[AnAesop a clear moral to the story.]] Nowadays, when it's not considered necessary for every children's book to come with a moral, few readers even think about the fact that the ''Alice'' books lack one.one.
** It can be hard to see "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" as a brilliant bit of nonsense poetry when many of its {{Perfectly Cromulent Word}}s (most famously "chortle" and "galumph") have since [[{{Defictionalization}} become recognized as real English words]], and are no longer "nonsense". Also, divorced from its original context in the 19th century--when published translations of Old English poetry were first becoming widely available, and were widely read by English intellectuals--it can be hard to recognize "Jabberwocky" as an [[AffectionateParody affectionate send-up]] of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}''.
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