History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Literature

26th Dec '17 6:47:50 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** You could argue that not only was Salinger groundbreaking, he was also way, ''way'' ahead of his time. The sarcastic first-person narrator he pioneered has become so popular in fictional media involving teenagers that people tend to forget it only really took off as recently as TheNineties. Creator/JohnHughes could use it in ''FerrisBuellersDayOff'' three-and-a-half decades after ''Catcher in the Rye'' was published and still make it seem original; even ''Film/{{Clueless}}'', which was nearly a decade after ''that'', seemed fresh at the time.

to:

** You could argue that not only was Salinger groundbreaking, he was also way, ''way'' ahead of his time. The sarcastic first-person narrator he pioneered has become so popular in fictional media involving teenagers that people tend to forget it only really took off as recently as TheNineties. Creator/JohnHughes could use it in ''FerrisBuellersDayOff'' ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'' three-and-a-half decades after ''Catcher in the Rye'' was published and still make it seem original; even ''Film/{{Clueless}}'', which was nearly a decade after ''that'', seemed fresh at the time.
30th Nov '17 6:44:59 AM bitemytail
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Of course, part of the impression is created by people not having read the original novel and just assuming it must be cliched because it is so old/famous. Many of the tropes that are common in modern romance novels, such as the womanizer who falls in love, are present in Austen's novels, but the womanizing men are always the ''villains''.
26th Nov '17 8:33:17 AM Gowan
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Of course, part of the impression is created by people not having read the original novel and just assuming it must be cliched because it is so old/famous. Many of the tropes that are common in modern romance novels, such as the womanizer who falls in love, are present in Austen's novels, but the womanizing men are always the ''villains''.
26th Oct '17 12:24:06 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Literature/DragonLance'' suffers from this trope as well, alas. Reviews exist of the original Chronicles that tear them apart on the premise that it's such a cheesy/overdone/cliched setting and cast of characters.

to:

** ''Literature/DragonLance'' suffers from this trope as well, alas. Reviews well. It was the first series of books set in a gaming world to achieve popular acclaim. Today, reviews exist of the original Chronicles that tear them apart on the premise that it's such a cheesy/overdone/cliched setting and cast of characters.
10th Aug '17 1:36:39 PM Nicoaln
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/TheLandOfOz'' books are perhaps some of the ''earliest'' examples of WorldBuilding and TrappedInAnotherWorld, amongst many other tropes. Reading them today, they can come off as very simplistic, sometimes hard to digest due to how Baum wrote, and full of [[NewRulesAsThePlotDemands inconsistent logic]], [[DeusExMachina Deus ex Machinas]], and [[MarySueTopia a load of characters who never seem to struggle to get what they want]]. However it's important to note that these books were written in in the 1900s to the 1920s (by Baum at least) - ''long'' before many of the books that popularised fantasy were written. (The last one predates The Hobbit by ''a decade''.)


Added DiffLines:

** They also are perhaps some of the ''earliest'' examples of WorldBuilding and TrappedInAnotherWorld, amongst many other tropes. Reading them today, they can come off as very simplistic, sometimes hard to digest due to how Baum wrote, and full of [[NewRulesAsThePlotDemands inconsistent logic]], [[DeusExMachina Deus ex Machinas]], and [[MarySueTopia a load of characters who never seem to struggle to get what they want]]. However it's important to note that these books were written in in the 1900s to the 1920s (by Baum at least) - ''long'' before many of the books that popularised fantasy were written. (The last one predates The Hobbit by ''a decade''.)
28th Jul '17 4:25:31 PM Nicoaln
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheLandOfOz'' books are perhaps some of the ''earliest'' examples of WorldBuilding and TrappedInAnotherWorld, amongst many other tropes. Reading them today, they can come off as very simplistic, sometimes hard to digest due to how Baum wrote, and full of [[NewRulesAsThePlotDemands inconsistent logic]], [[DeusExMachina Deus ex Machinas]], and [[MarySueTopia a load of characters who never seem to struggle to get what they want]]. However it's important to note that these books were written in in the 1900s to the 1920s (by Baum at least) - ''long'' before many of the books that popularised fantasy were written. (The last one predates The Hobbit by ''a decade''.)
8th Jul '17 2:31:08 PM RareGiftFiend
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Carrie'' was also one of the first works to thoroughly demonize Christian fanatics, as stories before it, like ''Film/RosemarysBaby'' and ''Literature/TheExorcist'', had glamorized the religion. These days, with various controversies regarding the actions of fundies, and a lot of writers attacking the faith in their works, it doesn't seem so shocking anymore.

to:

** ''Carrie'' was also one of the first works to thoroughly demonize Christian fanatics, as stories before it, like ''Film/RosemarysBaby'' and ''Literature/TheExorcist'', had glamorized the religion. These days, with various controversies regarding the actions of fundies, surrounding fundamentalist and a lot of writers attacking the faith in their works, Catholic Christianity, it doesn't seem so shocking anymore.
31st May '17 8:21:57 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Nowadays, ''Series/TheWheelOfTime'' by Creator/RobertJordan is considered a horrendously cliched example of how all fantasy books are too long, with series that go on seemingly without end and yet little happens in them. When the first volume was published, in 1991, most fantasy novels were actually quite short, and/or tended to be trilogies or quintets at the very longest. However, he inspired so many other writers to [[{{Padding}} pad out their volumes]] and stretch their stories over ten or twelve volumes that by the 2000's he gets lumped in with those he inspired, often cited as the UrExample, but rarely acknowledged as the man who started the trend.

to:

* Nowadays, ''Series/TheWheelOfTime'' ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' by Creator/RobertJordan is considered a horrendously cliched example of how all fantasy books are too long, with series that go on seemingly without end and yet little happens in them. When the first volume was published, in 1991, most fantasy novels were actually quite short, and/or tended to be trilogies or quintets at the very longest. However, he inspired so many other writers to [[{{Padding}} pad out their volumes]] and stretch their stories over ten or twelve volumes that by the 2000's he gets lumped in with those he inspired, often cited as the UrExample, but rarely acknowledged as the man who started the trend.
17th May '17 2:56:06 PM lluewhyn
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

**YMMV, but the reputation can be somewhat exaggerated. Although plenty of minor characters die, not unexpected in a book of [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters so many characters]], only a few were major POV characters- Ned, Catelyn, Jon. After the first book, it would be easy to classify three main POV characters as Tyrion, Daenerys, and Jon Snow. Throughout the first five books, only the last one is killed and will likely be brought back to life (heavily speculated in the books, already occurred in the television show). It's more shocking how often the plot drastically changes with character deaths having major political impacts, which averts the more standard tendency to change the status quo slowly.
29th Apr '17 5:53:09 PM Rebu
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Imagine this; a low-class creative-type young man is secretly in love with the one of the richest, most popular girls around, along with most of the upper-class boys, who she keeps turning down. Her peers sneer at him, behind his back, but she invites him to her big fancy house in the country. He knows he doesn't have a chance, but goes anyway. They spend a lot of time together, getting to know each other. [[spoiler:He overhears her remarks to one of her many high-class suitors about how she'll to marry someone high-class, gets upset, and dresses her down for snobbery. When he cools down, he's so embarrassed that he decides to leave. She shows up and whoops, turns out it was just a misunderstanding. She was referring to him, metaphorically, and the story ends.]] Clearly this is some sort of wacky teen romantic comedy film. Except it's the poem ''Lady Geraldine's Courtship'', from the 19th century. Just put the narrator in a band, put the protagonists in high school, and set it during a weekend at her parents' house, and you'd basically have a Disney Channel Original Movie.
This list shows the last 10 events of 185. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.Literature