History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Film

9th Jun '16 1:16:28 AM erforce
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* ''Film/TheMagician'', a silent film from 1926 featuring a MadScientist Hypnotist. At the end of the movie, when the BigBad's castle blew up, you may think to yourself, "Hey, they stole that scene from ''Film/TheBrideOfFrankenstein''", but then you realize that ''Bride'' wouldn't be made for another nine years. While ''The Magician'' may seem like a hopeless ClicheStorm now (borrowing liberally as it does from Creator/MaryShelley, Svengali, and Victorian Melodrama), it ''did'' go on to influence many horror films that were to follow in the coming years.

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* ''Film/TheMagician'', a silent film from 1926 featuring a MadScientist Hypnotist. At the end of the movie, when the BigBad's castle blew up, you may think to yourself, "Hey, they stole that scene from ''Film/TheBrideOfFrankenstein''", ''Film/BrideOfFrankenstein''", but then you realize that ''Bride'' wouldn't be made for another nine years. While ''The Magician'' may seem like a hopeless ClicheStorm now (borrowing liberally as it does from Creator/MaryShelley, Svengali, and Victorian Melodrama), it ''did'' go on to influence many horror films that were to follow in the coming years.



* ''Film/TheUsualSuspects'' is seen by many as one of, if not the greatest PlotTwist film of all time. And is credited for starting the trend of many plot twist films after its success. The fact that almost scene in the film [[spoiler: turned out to be a lie told by a UnreliableNarrator wasn't commonly used back then.]] Keyser Soze became an iconic villain over the years after the film's release. However, for many people whom seen the film for the first time, knowing what to expect, claim they don't see what the big deal is, and claim they could guess [[spoiler: KevinSpacey]] was Keyser Soze after just five minutes watching the film. Keep in mind this actor wasn't as well known at the time of the film and neither was his track record of playing clever villian roles.

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* ''Film/TheUsualSuspects'' is seen by many as one of, if not the greatest PlotTwist film of all time. And is credited for starting the trend of many plot twist films after its success. The fact that almost scene in the film [[spoiler: turned out to be a lie told by a UnreliableNarrator wasn't commonly used back then.]] Keyser Soze became an iconic villain over the years after the film's release. However, for many people whom seen the film for the first time, knowing what to expect, claim they don't see what the big deal is, and claim they could guess [[spoiler: KevinSpacey]] Creator/KevinSpacey]] was Keyser Soze after just five minutes watching the film. Keep in mind this actor wasn't as well known at the time of the film and neither was his track record of playing clever villian roles.
6th Jun '16 2:57:36 PM Doug86
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* Many of the original UniversalHorror movies, particularly ''Film/{{Dracula 1931}}'', with its {{Melodrama}}tic style filled with SilentMovie conventions (despite being a talkie).

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* Many of the original UniversalHorror Franchise/UniversalHorror movies, particularly ''Film/{{Dracula 1931}}'', with its {{Melodrama}}tic style filled with SilentMovie conventions (despite being a talkie).
6th Jun '16 5:51:09 AM WhatArtThee
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* ''Film/{{Airplane}}'' was originally an intentionally corny, funny comedy, and was a huge hit in its time. However, its corny style of humor has been imitated and parodied so many times (often poorly) since that today it may be more likely to be seen as the bad kind of corny humor than the good kind. It even seems very straight-laced compared to the wilder, wackier spoof films that followed it in the 1980s and beyond.
** The film is also a parody of disaster movies of the time like "Airport" and "Zero Hour", which because of this movie's camp and because of how much airplane travel has changed, contemporary audiences aren't likely to catch certain elements that are being spoofed, as they are no longer in public consciousness.

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* ''Film/{{Airplane}}'' was originally an intentionally corny, funny comedy, and was a huge hit in its time. comedy. However, its corny style of humor has been imitated and parodied so many, many times (often poorly) since that today it may be more likely to be seen as the bad kind of corny humor than the good kind. It even seems very straight-laced compared to the wilder, wackier spoof films that followed it in the 1980s and beyond.
** The film is also a parody of disaster movies of the time like "Airport" and "Zero Hour", which because of this movie's camp and because of how much airplane travel has changed, contemporary audiences aren't likely to catch certain elements that are being spoofed, as they are no longer in public consciousness.
times.



** The film ''Film/WrongfullyAccused'' can also suffer from this. At the time, it was actually part of the joke that the film cast such a wide net in the material that it parodied. Nowadays, every parody movie is like that, and the worse for it.

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** The film ''Film/WrongfullyAccused'' can also suffer from this. At the time, it was actually part of the joke that the film cast such a wide net in the material that it parodied. Nowadays, every parody movie is like that, and the worse for it. that.



* Creator/AlfredHitchcock. This trope could just as easily be called ''Hitchcock Is Not Suspenseful.'' Anything of his was '''the''' defining work in suspense when originally produced, but looks sad and overdone now that it's been copied to death.
** Creator/AlfredHitchcock's suspense films have had much of the suspense removed due to the rampant parody. On the other hand, the ''Film/RearWindow'' trope has been parodied so many times that some viewers are taken by surprise when the old film plays it straight instead of turning into a case of StabTheSalad.

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* Creator/AlfredHitchcock. This trope could just as easily be called ''Hitchcock Is Not Suspenseful.'' Anything of his was '''the''' defining work in suspense when originally produced, but looks sad and overdone now that it's has been copied to death.
** Creator/AlfredHitchcock's suspense films have had much of the suspense removed due to the rampant parody. On the other hand, the ''Film/RearWindow'' trope has been parodied so many times that some viewers are taken by surprise when the old film plays it straight instead of turning into a case of StabTheSalad.
death.



** ''Film/NorthByNorthwest'' suffers from this. A modern viewer who has never seen it before can recognize trope after action movie trope and find the film boringly predictable as a generic action movie, perhaps unaware that it was a defining film in that genre and that films like ''Film/JamesBond'' and ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' were heavily influenced by it.

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** ''Film/NorthByNorthwest'' suffers from this. A modern viewer who has never seen it before can recognize trope after action movie trope and find the film boringly predictable as a generic action movie, trope, perhaps unaware that it was a defining film in that genre and that films like ''Film/JamesBond'' and ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' were heavily influenced by it.



* ''Film/AnimalHouse'' was the TropeMaker or TropeCodifier of many of the [[WackyFratboyHijinx frat-house comedies]] that followed it. Nowadays, it seems horribly cliched, but it was doing a lot of these jokes for the first time. The falling-ladder scene has little effect for the children of Generations X and Y, who saw it copied in countless cartoons and teen movies.

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* ''Film/AnimalHouse'' was the TropeMaker or TropeCodifier of many of the [[WackyFratboyHijinx frat-house comedies]] that followed it. Nowadays, it seems horribly cliched, but it was doing a lot of these jokes for the first time. The falling-ladder scene has little effect for the children of Generations X and Y, who saw it copied in countless cartoons and teen movies.



* ''Film/AustinPowers'', while not the first film to use an OverlyLongGag, was perhaps the first film to derive the ''majority'' of its humor from it. When it first came out, it was a sleeper hit that got VindicatedByCable and arguably became one of the most popular comedies of the '90s, primarily because its humor was in such sharp contrast to the type of slapstick comedy that was popular at the time. Nowadays, the OverlyLongGag has become such a comedy staple, it's become harder to tell why the ''Austin Powers'' films were such a big deal to begin with.
* Creator/TimBurton's 1989 take on ''Film/{{Batman}}'' was considered [[DarkerAndEdgier dark and edgy]] at its time: perhaps not compared to the Batman comic books of that era, which influenced it, but certainly compared to the {{camp}}y [[Series/{{Batman}} 1960s live action show]] or the 1970s animated ''WesternAnimation/{{Superfriends}},'' which was how most of the public was familiar with Batman. For a time, it was considered to be not only the definitive conceptualization of Batman but the greatest superhero film ever made. Now it seems tame, especially when compared with Creator/ChristopherNolan's [[Film/TheDarkKnightSaga Dark Knight saga]] and the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, which have greatly eclipsed it in terms of sheer epicness. Absurdly, Burton himself commented on the Nolan films by saying that things had changed from the days when he wasn't allowed to do a "dark" Batman as Nolan did, when in fact the whole point of Burton's version of Batman was that it ''was'' dark, and Nolan's interpretation would never have been possible if it hadn't been for Burton's!

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* ''Film/AustinPowers'', while not the first film to use an OverlyLongGag, was perhaps the first film to derive the ''majority'' of its humor from it. When it first came out, it was a sleeper hit that got VindicatedByCable and arguably became one of the most popular comedies of the '90s, primarily because its humor was in such sharp contrast to the type of slapstick comedy that was popular at the time. Nowadays, the OverlyLongGag has become such a comedy staple, it's become harder to tell why the ''Austin Powers'' films were such a big deal to begin with.
* Creator/TimBurton's 1989 take on ''Film/{{Batman}}'' was considered [[DarkerAndEdgier dark and edgy]] at its time: perhaps not compared to the Batman comic books of that era, which influenced it, but certainly compared to the {{camp}}y [[Series/{{Batman}} 1960s live action show]] or the 1970s animated ''WesternAnimation/{{Superfriends}},'' which was how most of the public was familiar with Batman. For a time, it was considered to be not only the definitive conceptualization of Batman but the greatest superhero film ever made. Now it seems tame, especially when compared with Creator/ChristopherNolan's [[Film/TheDarkKnightSaga Dark Knight saga]] and the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, which have greatly eclipsed it in terms of sheer epicness.darkness. Absurdly, Burton himself commented on the Nolan films by saying that things had changed from the days when he wasn't allowed to do a "dark" Batman as Nolan did, when in fact the whole point of Burton's version of Batman was that it ''was'' dark, and Nolan's interpretation would never have been possible if it hadn't been for Burton's!



* ''Film/TheBirthOfANation'' invented or popularized many features that are standard in modern cinema, such as cutting between different locations to increase suspense during action scenes. Someone watching the film nowadays won't think twice about these innovations, while the [[ValuesDissonance blatant racism and hero-worship of the Klan]] are unfortunately a lot more noticeable.

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* ''Film/TheBirthOfANation'' invented or popularized many features that are standard in modern cinema, such as cutting between different locations to increase suspense during action scenes. Someone watching the film nowadays won't think twice about these innovations, while the [[ValuesDissonance blatant racism and hero-worship of the Klan]] are unfortunately a lot more noticeable.innovations.



* ''Film/TheBlairWitchProject'' was the film that brought both {{found footage|Films}} and internet-based ViralMarketing into the mainstream, allowing the micro-budgeted indie horror flick to become a box-office smash and a cultural touchstone for the late '90s/early '00s. At the time, the idea that it really was was the "recovered footage" of a group of documentary filmmakers who went missing ''was'' the entire gimmick. Between the many, many, ''many'' found-footage horror films that have employed similar concepts, and the fact that the passage of time has distanced the film from its revolutionary marketing campaign, this can be lost on modern viewers, and can seem almost quaint. While it still enjoys a decent reputation, watching it today, without having been exposed to the torrent of hype in 1999, can make one wonder what was so scary about it.
** There's also the fact that, as the first successful found-footage film, it was something of an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre. It took its conceit very seriously -- the three lead actors were chosen for their improv experience, mainly because there was no script beyond a basic outline. As a result, it often takes on a rambling, conversational style, essentially 82 minutes of improv. While the fact that it's clearly not following a script lends the film an aura of authenticity that figured heavily into its success, it also means that, for somebody who's seen one of the more polished and "conventional" examples of the genre since, it can seem like nothing more than three people lost in the woods yelling at each other.

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* ''Film/TheBlairWitchProject'' was the film that brought both {{found footage|Films}} and internet-based ViralMarketing into the mainstream, allowing the micro-budgeted indie horror flick to become a box-office smash and a cultural touchstone for the late '90s/early '00s. At the time, the idea that it really was was the "recovered footage" of a group of documentary filmmakers who went missing ''was'' the entire gimmick. Between the many, many, ''many'' found-footage horror films that have employed similar concepts, and the fact that the passage of time has distanced the film from its revolutionary marketing campaign, this can be lost on modern viewers, and can seem almost quaint. While it still enjoys a decent reputation, watching it today, without having been exposed to the torrent of hype in 1999, can make one wonder what was so scary about it.
viewers.
** There's also the fact that, as the first successful found-footage film, it was something of an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre. It took its conceit very seriously -- the three lead actors were chosen for their improv experience, mainly because there was no script beyond a basic outline. As a result, it often takes on a rambling, conversational style, essentially 82 minutes of improv. While the fact that it's clearly not following a script lends the film an aura of authenticity that figured heavily into its success, it also means that, for somebody who's seen one of the more polished and "conventional" examples of the genre since, it can seem like nothing more than three people lost in the woods yelling at each other.



* ''Film/{{Bullitt}}'' was considered the definitive car chase movie in its time, but was soon supplanted by ''Film/TheFrenchConnection'' and others.
* ''Film/TheCabinetOfDrCaligari''. A lot of stuff regarding it. Many modern audiences have never even heard of it, but they've certainly felt its presence through imitation.

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* ''Film/{{Bullitt}}'' was considered the definitive car chase movie in its time, but was soon supplanted by ''Film/TheFrenchConnection'' and others.
* ''Film/TheCabinetOfDrCaligari''. A lot of stuff regarding it. Many modern audiences
others have never even heard of it, but they've certainly felt its presence through imitation.copied it.



* ''Film/CrouchingTigerHiddenDragon'', the first Chinese {{Wuxia}} (periodic Kung-Fu) movie to become truly successful in the West, suffers from this. It's much harder to screen such a movie nowadays because people can't look past the "tacky" kung-fu with its flying about and running on walls -- which has been imitated repeatedly in many "Hollywoodian" action films for the past ten years. Of course, it wasn't original per-se, as Wuxia films were already seen as dated in their homeland (China/Hong Kong), but in the West this was regarded as a new phenomenon and therefore taken with more respect. It won an Academy Award and still lingers around the middle of the IMDB's Top 250 list -- and for many good reasons other than the dazzling fights.
* ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'', the 2003 film, is today remembered for its shortcomings and disappointing box office performance. However, compared to each of its predecessors which give out a varying degree of surrealism throughout each scene (as if telling the viewers that they should never forget that they're watching a superhero movie), viewers who enjoyed watching ''Daredevil'' in the theaters noted that certain scenes made you almost forget that this is a superhero movie. This apparently became a measuring stick for the superhero movies that followed, which used higher levels of realism, thus overshadowing this movie that, so to speak, took a dare.

to:

* ''Film/CrouchingTigerHiddenDragon'', the first Chinese {{Wuxia}} (periodic Kung-Fu) movie to become truly successful in the West, suffers from this. It's much harder to screen such a movie nowadays because people can't look past the "tacky" kung-fu with its flying about and running on walls -- which It has been imitated repeatedly in many "Hollywoodian" action films for the past ten years. Of course, it wasn't original per-se, as Wuxia films were already seen as dated in their homeland (China/Hong Kong), but in the West this was regarded as a new phenomenon and therefore taken with more respect. It won an Academy Award and still lingers around the middle of the IMDB's Top 250 list -- and for many good reasons other than the dazzling fights.
* ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'', the 2003 film, is today remembered for its shortcomings and disappointing box office performance. However, compared to each of its predecessors which give out a varying degree of surrealism throughout each scene (as if telling the viewers that they should never forget that they're watching a superhero movie), viewers who enjoyed watching ''Daredevil'' in the theaters noted that certain scenes made you almost forget that this is a superhero movie. This apparently became a measuring stick for the superhero movies that followed, which used higher levels of realism, thus overshadowing this movie that, so to speak, took a dare.
fights.



* ''Film/TheExorcist''. At the time it was released, it was considered to be the most shocking and horrifying film ever created. There were stories of audience members fainting and having to leave the theater due to being so disturbed by the movie. Nowadays, many of the scenes in the film come across as more comical than scary, especially with how subdued later films with similar premises would take the idea.
* ''Film/LaDolceVita'' is a film where the "hero" is an amoral CasanovaWannabe journalist type who hangs around lots of decadent celebrity parties and [[Music/TheRollingStones can't get no satisfaction]]. Precisely what made it seem so racy and different in 1960 and so long and ordinary now. Indeed, film buffs were complaining about how tame it had become as early as the '70s.

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* ''Film/TheExorcist''. At the time it was released, it was considered to be the most shocking and horrifying film ever created. There were stories of audience members fainting and having to leave the theater due to being so disturbed by the movie. Nowadays, many of the scenes in the film come across as more comical than scary, especially with how subdued later films with similar premises would take the idea.
* ''Film/LaDolceVita'' is a film where the "hero" is an amoral CasanovaWannabe journalist type who hangs around lots of decadent celebrity parties and [[Music/TheRollingStones can't get no satisfaction]]. Precisely what made it seem so racy and different in 1960 and so long and ordinary now. Indeed, film buffs were complaining about how tame it had become as early as the '70s.



* ''Film/FinalDestination'': The [[Film/FinalDestination1 first film]] was considered genuinely frightening with audiences in suspense at what would finish off the characters or whether they would survive at all. Nowadays, everyone knows that the ''Final Destination'' characters are going to get bumped off creatively and, while there are still some films in the series that can create suspense (the [[Film/FinalDestination2 second]] and [[Film/FinalDestination5 fifth]] especially), they can't replicate the suspense of the original, which in turn is less scary these days because everyone knows what to expect from a ''Final Destination'' film.
* ''Film/GeorgyGirl''. When it was being made and premiered in the 1960s, the film was considered rather edgy and scandalous (almost earning an X rating) due to topics like the then-current sexual revolution, mentions of abortion, along with being part of a wave of British cinema that focused on the changes TheSixties have brought to Western society. Nowadays, it's considered rather tame and inoffensive fluff, especially when compared to more revolutionary films of the era.
* ''[[Film/{{Gojira}} Godzilla]]'', the original 1954 film. At the time of its release, it was groundbreaking for the Japanese film industry. Many people today ridicule older Franchise/{{Godzilla}} films for the reason of them being "[[PeopleInRubberSuits Man-in-suit!!!]]" made films. What they fail to realize is that had it not been for suitmation, most special effects as we know them today (such as motion capture CG, which utilizes similar techniques to suitmation) would not exist. This is despite the fact that ''Godzilla'' actually contained very few suitmation shots. Like other films at the time, it mostly made use of stop-motion and clever editing (although later films in the series were almost entirely suitmation). That said, the original may still shock modern audiences who expect something akin to the LighterAndSofter versions of the creature that were often aimed at children.
* ''Film/{{Grease}}'' is today considered almost unwatchably corny, or at the very least SoBadItsGood, whereas in TheSeventies it helped start a [[TwoDecadesBehind huge wave of nostalgia]] for TheFifties. It also counts musically. At the time, the idea of mixing (then) current music like disco with older styles (1950s RockAndRoll) was unheard of. It was also one of the first movies to both portray the Fifties sympathetically ''and'' to depict people living in that era as a lot more "cool" than they're usually credited.

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* ''Film/FinalDestination'': The [[Film/FinalDestination1 first film]] was considered genuinely frightening with audiences in suspense at what would finish off the characters or whether they would survive at all. Nowadays, everyone knows that the ''Final Destination'' characters are going to get bumped off creatively and, while there are still some films in the series that can create suspense (the [[Film/FinalDestination2 second]] and [[Film/FinalDestination5 fifth]] especially), they can't replicate the suspense of the original, which in turn is less scary these days because everyone knows what to expect from a ''Final Destination'' film.
* ''Film/GeorgyGirl''. When it was being made and premiered in the 1960s, the film was considered rather edgy and scandalous (almost earning an X rating) due to topics like the then-current sexual revolution, mentions of abortion, along with being part of a wave of British cinema that focused on the changes TheSixties have brought to Western society. Nowadays, it's considered rather tame and inoffensive fluff, inoffensive, especially when compared to more revolutionary films of the era.
* ''[[Film/{{Gojira}} Godzilla]]'', the original 1954 film. At the time of its release, it was groundbreaking for the Japanese film industry. Many people today ridicule older Franchise/{{Godzilla}} films for the reason of them being "[[PeopleInRubberSuits Man-in-suit!!!]]" made films. What they fail to realize is that had it not been for suitmation, most special effects as we know them today (such as motion capture CG, which utilizes similar techniques to suitmation) would not exist. This is despite the fact that ''Godzilla'' actually contained very few suitmation shots. Like other films at the time, it mostly made use of stop-motion and clever editing (although later films in the series were almost entirely suitmation). That said, the original may still shock modern audiences who expect something akin to the LighterAndSofter versions of the creature that were often aimed at children.
* ''Film/{{Grease}}'' is today considered almost unwatchably corny, or at the very least SoBadItsGood, whereas in TheSeventies it helped start a [[TwoDecadesBehind huge wave of nostalgia]] for TheFifties. It also counts musically. At the time, the idea of mixing (then) current music like disco with older styles (1950s RockAndRoll) was unheard of. It was also one of the first movies to both portray the Fifties sympathetically ''and'' to depict people living in that era as a lot more "cool" than they're usually credited.
era.



** ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' seems today a clichéd, formulaic slasher film. But it created the clichés and established the formulas.

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** ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' seems today a clichéd, formulaic clichéd slasher film. But it created the clichés and established the formulas.



* ''Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1959'' was terrifying when it came out in 1959, and its ending gimmick was revolutionary. Now the film can come across as just another old haunted house flick that's boring and/or campy and has inspired a Podcast/RiffTrax parody commentary.

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* ''Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1959'' was terrifying revolutionary when it came out in 1959, and its ending gimmick was revolutionary. out. Now the film can come across as just another old haunted house flick that's boring and/or campy and has inspired a Podcast/RiffTrax parody commentary. flick.



* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had. The fact that ''TIH'' made the least money out of all the MCU movies, coupled with Bruce Banner's [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]], probably didn't help matters much.

to:

* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had. The fact that ''TIH'' made the least money out of all the MCU movies, coupled with Bruce Banner's [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]], probably didn't help matters much.



* ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' is ''the'' TropeCodifier for most adventure movies - almost every AdventurerArchaeologist has at least some ShoutOut or {{Homage}} to Franchise/IndianaJones, whether done intentionally or not. However, Indiana Jones was not without his inspirations (including ''ComicBook/TheAdventuresOfTintin'') - and watching them now will probably result in people thinking they are quite cheesy.
* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Film/HalfALoafOfKungFu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can be pretty disappointing to people used to his later works where he felt much more comfortable throwing in jokes and wild stunts.

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* ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' is ''the'' TropeCodifier for most adventure movies - almost every AdventurerArchaeologist has at least some ShoutOut or {{Homage}} to Franchise/IndianaJones, whether done intentionally or not. However, Indiana Jones was not without his inspirations (including ''ComicBook/TheAdventuresOfTintin'') - and watching them now will probably result in people thinking they are quite cheesy.''ComicBook/TheAdventuresOfTintin'').
* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Film/HalfALoafOfKungFu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can be pretty disappointing to people used to his later works where he felt much more comfortable throwing in jokes and wild stunts.seem unoriginal.



** Creator/PierceBrosnan's portrayal of Bond. Better SpecialEffects. More subtle villains. Less camp. Self referential humor. More of a focus on the geo-political fallout of a mission. This legacy is fatally undermined by the Daniel Craig version doing all this better than the Brosnan version.



** And the reputation the film has for making people go out and hunt sharks to near-extinction hasn't helped either.
** Then again, it also was the movie that got scientists wanting to research sharks and combat the shark hunting.



* ''Film/JurassicPark''. First, this is often considered ''the'' movie that introduced CGI creature effects to its audiences on such a large scale. Before this time, CGI in movies tended to be one or two scenes out of a whole two-hour movie due to its expensive nature, with the rest being taken up by puppetry, stop motion animation and miniature work. JP was one of the first movies to use CGI in the majority of its creature special effects. Now-days, with films like ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' and ''Film/SkyCaptainAndTheWorldOfTomorrow'' being more CGI than real, a few of the effects look dated (though it still holds up better than in even earlier films, such as ''Film/TheAbyss''). Second, this was one of the very first feature films with a wide audience to do away with a lot of old dinosaur tropes, having bipedal dinosaurs stand horizontally and having them act more like birds and less like lizards. However, the film gets hit by a bad case of ScienceMarchesOn (most glaring of all, the Raptors lack feathers, which scientists are now certain they possessed.) A dinosaur fan might go back to watching that movie and laugh (or [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology cry]]) at the errors.

to:

* ''Film/JurassicPark''. First, this is often considered ''the'' movie that introduced CGI creature effects to its audiences on such a large scale. Before this time, CGI in movies tended to be one or two scenes out of a whole two-hour movie due to its expensive nature, with the rest being taken up by puppetry, stop motion animation and miniature work. JP was one of the first movies to use CGI in the majority of its creature special effects. Now-days, with films like ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' and ''Film/SkyCaptainAndTheWorldOfTomorrow'' being more CGI than real, a few of the effects look dated (though it still holds up better than in even earlier films, such as ''Film/TheAbyss''). Second, this was one of the very first feature films with a wide audience to do away with a lot of old dinosaur tropes, having bipedal dinosaurs stand horizontally and having them act more like birds and less like lizards. However, the film gets hit by a bad case of ScienceMarchesOn (most glaring of all, the Raptors lack feathers, which scientists are now certain they possessed.) A dinosaur fan might go back to watching that movie and laugh (or [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology cry]]) at the errors.).



* ''Film/{{Koyaanisqatsi}}''. SlowMotion / TimeLapse footage of things like factories and traffic and clouds, put to music, was a new thing in the early '80s.

to:

* ''Film/{{Koyaanisqatsi}}''. SlowMotion / TimeLapse footage of things like factories and traffic and clouds, put to music, was a new thing in the early '80s.'80s, but has since become standard.



* ''Film/TheLongestYard'' (1974) or ''Film/SlapShot'' (1977). Anyone who sat down and watched these today would immediately groan. "Oh no, not another [[UnderdogsNeverLose scrappy]] [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits underdog team]] struggling to overcome their personal issues as emphasized by their chosen sport and antagonized by [[OpposingSportsTeam a wealthier, better-equipped team]] of entitled (but excessively-pressured) jerks. I can't wait for the second act, when the team falls apart due to the captain's arrogance/the coach's inadequacy/[[TooManyCooksSpoilTheSoup the stars' rivalry]] and, in order to [[TeamSpirit fix]] [[SaveOurTeam everything]] and win the BigGame, the team needs to call in a ringer/go on a vacation/listen to a RousingSpeech/use the PowerOfFriendship."



* ''Film/TheMatrix'', heavily influenced by anime, religion, the western, and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E3TheDeadlyAssassin that one Doctor Who episode]] caused such a major shift in culture -- and SpecialEffects, with the proliferation of WireFu and BulletTime in action sequences, as well as stoic action heroes wearing black dusters and shades. It also reversed the decades-old trend of science-fiction films depicting a future full of colorful "futuristic" gimmicks and {{Zeerust}}. Looking at many sci-fi/fantasy films from as recently as TheNineties, it's amazing how hokey many of them already look, and ''The Matrix'' deserves the credit (or blame, depending on your attitude) for that. One reason the ''Matrix'' sequels were poorly received was that they continued playing all this stuff like it was just as revolutionary, after the first film had inspired so many imitations (particularly the BulletTime sequences).



* ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' once had a reputation for being a definitive sex-comedy, with its "shower scene" having a memetic level of hotness ascribed to it. In retrospect though, the film isn't really that funny or that sexy. This is strange as some of its contemporaries (eg ''AnimalHouse'') have held up very well.
* ''Film/ThePoseidonAdventure''. Just try to watch a DisasterMovie and ''not'' spot any scene, plot, or subplot that hasn't either been spoofed, homaged, recreated, or otherwise by even ''any'' action movie. It can be quite hard to believe that this movie was so novel back in the 70s (even today, it's an unlikely premise), or that several scenes in ''Film/TheToweringInferno'' had people on the edge of their seats. Heck, nowadays, people can probably point out how the elevator scene in ''The Towering Inferno'' is actually quite silly.

to:

* ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' once had a reputation for being a definitive sex-comedy, with its "shower scene" having a memetic level of hotness ascribed to it. In retrospect though, the film isn't really that funny or that sexy. This is strange as some of its contemporaries (eg ''AnimalHouse'') have held up very well.
* ''Film/ThePoseidonAdventure''. Just try to watch a DisasterMovie and ''not'' spot any scene, plot, or subplot that hasn't either been spoofed, homaged, recreated, or otherwise by even ''any'' action movie. It can be quite hard to believe that this movie was so novel back in the 70s (even today, it's an unlikely premise), or that several scenes in ''Film/TheToweringInferno'' had people on the edge of their seats. Heck, nowadays, people can probably point out how the elevator scene in ''The Towering Inferno'' is actually quite silly.premise).



* ''Film/RevengeOfTheNerds''. Being a nerd used to mean something. Originally seen as the first movie that was made specifically with the intention to empower nerds. Now the movie is seen as a weak analogy of nerdy social ostracism to the genuine prejudice faced by racial minorities. One could understand questioning how the films most memorable characters (the openly gay Lamar and the pothead pervert Booger) actually qualify as nerds. With passing time, it's been realized that "true nerds" (as opposed to the caricatures in this film) are still not considered any cooler. All of the so-called cool nerds were never true nerds to begin with.
** In almost a bizarre case of LifeImitatesArt and thanks to computers and the internet becoming not only mainstream but a way of life, it's this caricature of "nerds" that 'has' become cool. Unfortunately for "true nerds", this caricature is closer to being HollywoodNerd (Type 1) than an accurate depiction. The entire image of a shy, skinny pale guy with glasses doing cool things has started to get a bit of romanticism attached to it; however, even in those cases, those with that view fail to realize that the reason why a nerd can do all these cool things, is because of the sheer amount of time spent on learning and working on those things.



* ''[[Film/{{Solaris1972}} Solaris]]''. "Oh, so the aliens make clones of dead people and the guy decides to live in a [[LotusEaterMachine flawed fantasy world]]? What's the big deal?"
* ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'': The scene when Kirk and Scotty fly around the updated Enterprise is among the most widely-mocked scenes [[LeaveTheCameraRunning for lasting so long]], but it was a huge deal for Trekkies at the time, who were seeing it up-close and in live-action for the first time since TOS's cancellation in 1969.

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* ''[[Film/{{Solaris1972}} Solaris]]''. "Oh, so the aliens make clones of dead people and the guy decides to live in a [[LotusEaterMachine flawed fantasy world]]? What's the big deal?"
* ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'': The scene when Kirk and Scotty fly around the updated Enterprise is among the most widely-mocked scenes [[LeaveTheCameraRunning for lasting so long]], but it was a huge deal for Trekkies at the time, who were seeing it up-close and in live-action for the first time since TOS's cancellation in 1969.
It's been done."



** After having seen LukeIAmYourFather parodied a million times (which are, more often than not, more or less equal amount of [[DarthVaderClone Darth Vader clones]]) in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] (which has been officially declared defunct by new ''Star Wars'' owner Disney, perhaps in part because of this trope), and after getting to see villains like Exar Kun or [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic Darth Revan]], and particularly after the three-plus decades of pulp sci-fi blockbusters that the film (directly or indirectly) inspired, coupled with the largely polarizing response to the prequel trilogy, how many younger people are still able to watch the original movies completely seriously and see Darth Vader as an awesome villain?
*** With the prequels and the animated [[WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars Clone Wars]] series, kids now see him as a TragicVillain, which is ultimately what Lucas wanted.

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** After having seen LukeIAmYourFather parodied a million times (which are, more often than not, more or less equal amount of [[DarthVaderClone Darth Vader clones]]) in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] (which has been officially declared defunct by new ''Star Wars'' owner Disney, perhaps in part because of this trope), and after getting to see villains like Exar Kun or [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic Darth Revan]], and particularly after the three-plus decades of pulp sci-fi blockbusters that the film (directly or indirectly) inspired, coupled with the largely polarizing response to the prequel trilogy, how many younger people are still able to watch the original movies completely seriously and see Darth Vader as an awesome villain?
*** With the prequels and the animated [[WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars Clone Wars]] series, kids now see him as a TragicVillain, which is ultimately what Lucas wanted.
film might not seem so original.



**With some female fans complaining about the use of TheSmurfettePrinciple in the series, many forget that having a woman like Leia being just as heroic as the male heroes was a groundbreaking move in the first place.
* ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' was the first superhero blockbuster and its sequel, ''Film/SupermanII'' set the template for a superhero sequel. And yet, not only is it likely that younger audiences might find them boring, but many fans of the modern comics and animations blame the films -- which create "the Donnerverse" -- for the entirety of Superman's {{hatedom}}.

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**With ** With some female fans complaining about the use of TheSmurfettePrinciple in the series, many forget that having a woman like Leia being just as heroic as the male heroes was a groundbreaking move in the first place.
* ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' was the first superhero blockbuster and its sequel, ''Film/SupermanII'' set the template for a superhero sequel. And yet, not only is it likely that younger audiences might find them boring, but many fans of the modern comics and animations blame the films -- which create "the Donnerverse" -- for the entirety of Superman's {{hatedom}}.
place.



* {{Documentary}} ''Film/TheThinBlueLine'' was one of the first documentaries to actually dare to produce reenactments in order to provide greater information about events, not to include narration, and not to identify people speaking on camera. While revolutionary in its time (and, more importantly, its effect of having the case reviewed and eventually overturned) even the most basic of television non-fiction programs have since adopted many of its techniques making it seem trifling to some modern audiences. An acknowledged groundbreaking classic of the genre is now made to seem almost amateurish.

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* {{Documentary}} ''Film/TheThinBlueLine'' was one of the first documentaries to actually dare to produce reenactments in order to provide greater information about events, not to include narration, and not to identify people speaking on camera. While revolutionary in its time (and, more importantly, its effect of having the case reviewed and eventually overturned) even the most basic of television non-fiction programs have since adopted many of its techniques making it seem trifling to some modern audiences. An acknowledged groundbreaking classic of the genre is now made to seem almost amateurish.techniques.



** The famous "Star Gate" sequence, in which brilliant colors flash past the screen as the main character travels deep into space, required some extremely tricky cinematography and caused jaws to drop when the film was released in 1968. Thanks to the incredible advances in special effects since then, modern audiences often find the scene rather ''boring'' (not helped by the fact that the sequence goes on for something like ten minutes).
** At the time, actual space travel was such a new concept to everyone, and the breadth and danger of space was suspenseful all its own. After so many space movies in popular culture have completely evaporated this sense of wonder, many of the spacewalk scenes are downright tedious and boring to watch.
* ''Film/WarGames''. More than half the world's hacker films are sons of this one. Yet, some of those who see it now thinks "another hacker-boy-saving-the-world movie". No, he was '''the''' hacker boy who saved the world. ([[UnbuiltTrope After nearly precipitating its destruction]]. Way to save on major characters.) It doesn't help that much of what gave ''Film/WarGames'' its punch [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp is fading from collective memory]]. Having a plucky young hacker almost precipitate WorldWarIII was an allegory on how nonsensical the UsefulNotes/ColdWar was to the average person.

to:

** The famous "Star Gate" sequence, in which brilliant colors flash past the screen as the main character travels deep into space, required some extremely tricky cinematography and caused jaws to drop when the film was released in 1968. Thanks to the incredible advances in special effects since then, modern audiences often find the scene rather ''boring'' (not helped by the fact that the sequence goes on for something like ten minutes).
** At the time, actual space travel was such a new concept to everyone, and the breadth and danger of space was suspenseful all its own. After so many space movies in popular culture have completely evaporated this sense of wonder, many of the spacewalk scenes are downright tedious and boring to watch.
ordinary.
* ''Film/WarGames''. More than half the world's hacker films are sons of this one. Yet, some of those who see it now thinks "another hacker-boy-saving-the-world movie". No, he was '''the''' hacker boy who saved the world. ([[UnbuiltTrope After nearly precipitating its destruction]]. Way to save on major characters.) It doesn't help that much of what gave ''Film/WarGames'' its punch [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp is fading from collective memory]]. Having a plucky young hacker almost precipitate WorldWarIII was an allegory on how nonsensical the UsefulNotes/ColdWar was to the average person.).



* ''Film/{{Zombi 2}}'', after thirty years of zombie movies about scientists looking for the source of the zombie outbreak (and possibly [[FindTheCure a cure]]), people holed up in buildings with an assortment of guns and melee weapons, and {{Downer Ending}}s, can come off as derivative of every zombie movie ever made... even though this film, together with ''Film/DawnOfTheDead'' (which ''Zombi 2'' was an [[SpiritualSuccessor unofficial sequel]] to) helped [[TropeCodifier codify]] all of the tropes listed above. On the other hand, the [[SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome gore effects]] still hold up after all this time (the film wasn't released uncut [[VideoNasties in Britain]] until 2005).

to:

* ''Film/{{Zombi 2}}'', after thirty years of zombie movies about scientists looking for the source of the zombie outbreak (and possibly [[FindTheCure a cure]]), people holed up in buildings with an assortment of guns and melee weapons, and {{Downer Ending}}s, can come off as derivative of every zombie movie ever made... even though this film, together with ''Film/DawnOfTheDead'' (which ''Zombi 2'' was an [[SpiritualSuccessor unofficial sequel]] to) helped [[TropeCodifier codify]] all of the tropes listed above. On the other hand, the [[SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome gore effects]] still hold up after all this time (the film wasn't released uncut [[VideoNasties in Britain]] until 2005).



* Creator/BruceLee's martial arts movies. Today, his fights against opponents who [[MookChivalry attack one at a time]] can look hokey and cliche until you remember that at the time, he was pioneering not only the tropes of the genre, but the genre itself. ''Film/EnterTheDragon'' was ''Film/TheMatrix'' of its day.

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* Creator/BruceLee's martial arts movies. Today, his fights against opponents who [[MookChivalry attack one at a time]] can look hokey and cliche until you remember that at the time, he was pioneering not only the tropes of the genre, but the genre itself. ''Film/EnterTheDragon'' was ''Film/TheMatrix'' of its day.



* Early rock 'n' roll movies like ''Film/BlackboardJungle'' and ''Film/RockAroundTheClock''. In the 1950s these movies actually were banned in some places because teenagers ''rioted'' during the scenes when their favorite songs where playing. Many came and went to see them several times in a row, making them instant cult pictures for the youth. Modern viewers will probably find these pictures extremely lame and tame according to today's standards. A lot of it are just very family friendly stories about almost nerdy teenagers having fun at parties and often end with a heavy aesop about keeping away from gangs and being respectful towards their parents, teachers and guardians! Even worse is that the actual rock music isn't featured that heavily either. Only from ''Film/AHardDaysNight'' (1964) on did rock movies actually get a higher standard and more creative involvement from the artists themselves.



* A lot of slapstick comedy from the first half of the 20th century like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Film/TheKeystoneKops, Creator/HaroldLLoyd,... Back then it floored many audiences across the world with laughter. Today most of the gags, comedic archetypes and situations have been used by later comedians. As a result many of these slapstick comedies now look dated, old-fashioned, bland and corny by comparison, not to say unfunny. Chaplin in particular is admired more for his skill and talent as a mime and a director than filling movie theaters with crowds of fans roaring with laughter. It says a lot that the most iconic and recognizable comedian of all time isn't considered to be ''that'' hilarious anymore.
* Back in the mid 90s throughout the late 2000s, Creator/AdamSandler while not as big as Creator/JimCarrey or Creator/EddieMurphy had a relatively huge fanbase that would recite lines from ''Film/HappyGilmore'' and ''Film/BillyMadison'' on a regular day-to-day basis and mostly performed huge numbers at the box office. With the recent surge of Sandler following the same formula for almost more than a decade, many people question as to why Sandler's had the success he's had in the first place and are now seen as some of the lowest form of comedy in Hollywood.

to:

* A lot of slapstick comedy from the first half of the 20th century like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Film/TheKeystoneKops, Creator/HaroldLLoyd,... Back then it floored many audiences across the world with laughter. Today most of the gags, comedic archetypes and situations have been used by later comedians. As a result many of these slapstick comedies now don't look dated, old-fashioned, bland and corny by comparison, not to say unfunny. Chaplin in particular is admired more for his skill and talent as a mime and a director than filling movie theaters with crowds of fans roaring with laughter. It says a lot that the most iconic and recognizable comedian of all time isn't considered to be ''that'' hilarious anymore.
* Back in the mid 90s throughout the late 2000s, Creator/AdamSandler while not as big as Creator/JimCarrey or Creator/EddieMurphy had a relatively huge fanbase that would recite lines from ''Film/HappyGilmore'' and ''Film/BillyMadison'' on a regular day-to-day basis and mostly performed huge numbers at the box office. With the recent surge of Sandler following the same formula for almost more than a decade, many people question as to why Sandler's had the success he's had in the first place and are now seen as some of the lowest form of comedy in Hollywood.
so original.



* Film/{{Metropolis}} was one of the most expensive movies of its time and ''bankrupted'' [=UfA=]. It was seen as groundbreaking in its aesthetics and special effects for ''decades'' even though it tanked at the box office. Its reputation was enough almost a century later to make the re-release of an almost complete version global news, yet if you view the film with a critical modern eye it becomes SoOkayItsAverage.
* For some LongRunners, earlier episodes within the same franchise can be this. Many of the early Series/{{Tatort}}s are rather tame and boring compared to the newer ones. A crime in and of itself was exciting enough without any need to further dramatize it in the 1970s. In the 2010s, just a normal run of the mill murder whodunnit would not get anything but yawns. There has to be some banter between the inspectors, some deeper sociocultural implications or at the very least some [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] to make people watch. On the other hand, some people find the newer episodes over the top and prefer the more subdued storytelling of some of the older ones, which did not pretend to be anything but run of the mill murder whodunnit.
15th May '16 10:17:40 PM PaulA
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** Also, up till then, superhero films tended to be star-driven vehicles in order to avoid a perceived comic-book ghetto; you needed a $20-million headliner like Jack Nicholson, Val Kilmer, or Wesley Snipes to pull in a mass audience, and ones that didn't like ''Film/ThePhantom'' and ''Film/TheRocketeer'' got destroyed at the box office. Here, the two biggest under-50 names were Halle Berry and Anna Paquin, both supporting characters (and both ''women''!) and two of the three central leads were played by aged Shakespearean actors, while the other was an American unknown in Hugh Jackman. Nowadays, especially in TheNewTens movie landscape where star vehicles have given way to ensemble pieces driven by premise and spectacle, superhero films have no qualms about casting [[Film/{{Thor}} unknown actors]] or [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy ones who had never headlined before]], knowing that the license will do the selling and the movies will propel the actors to further heights instead of the other way around.

to:

** Also, up till then, superhero films tended to be star-driven vehicles in order to avoid a perceived comic-book ghetto; you needed a $20-million headliner like Jack Nicholson, Val Kilmer, or Wesley Snipes to pull in a mass audience, and ones that didn't like ''Film/ThePhantom'' ''Film/{{The Phantom|1996}}'' and ''Film/TheRocketeer'' got destroyed at the box office. Here, the two biggest under-50 names were Halle Berry and Anna Paquin, both supporting characters (and both ''women''!) and two of the three central leads were played by aged Shakespearean actors, while the other was an American unknown in Hugh Jackman. Nowadays, especially in TheNewTens movie landscape where star vehicles have given way to ensemble pieces driven by premise and spectacle, superhero films have no qualms about casting [[Film/{{Thor}} unknown actors]] or [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy ones who had never headlined before]], knowing that the license will do the selling and the movies will propel the actors to further heights instead of the other way around.
15th May '16 9:30:12 PM nombretomado
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* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had. The fact that ''TIH'' made the least money out of all the MCU movies, coupled with Bruce Banner's [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]], probably didn't help matters much.

to:

* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[MarvelCinematicUniverse [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had. The fact that ''TIH'' made the least money out of all the MCU movies, coupled with Bruce Banner's [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]], probably didn't help matters much.
2nd May '16 10:49:49 AM WhatArtThee
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* ''Film/AmericanPie''. Although all of its bits are household shtick today (just try to find more than a few individuals who ''don't'' know what a [[StacysMom "MILF"]] is), it is perhaps impossible for anyone under the age of 30 to appreciate what a milestone that film was, even the EndOfAnEra. Look no further than the scene in which the boys [[TheInternetIsForPorn upload Web links]] of [[SensualSlavs the sexy Czech exchange student]] stripping down to her underwear and then taking off her bra before putting on Jim's ''unbuttoned'' pajama top. Not only does the camera ''not'' cut away, but it lingers on Shannon Elizabeth's breasts for what seems like forever. For over a decade prior to 1999, makers of teen films had been terrified of exposing a single nipple for fear of losing the coveted PG-13 rating -- and along comes this R-rated teen comedy that's not afraid to be what it essentially is, and becomes surprisingly successful too. The mainstream media certainly took notice, comparing ''American Pie'' to the original (and R-rated) "teen-sex" movies of the late '70s and early '80s, like ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' and ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. You might even say that the ''Pie'' franchise, together with the internet and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', triggered a second sexual revolution in American popular culture.

to:

* ''Film/AmericanPie''. Although all of its bits are household shtick today (just try to find more than a few individuals who ''don't'' know what a [[StacysMom "MILF"]] is), it is perhaps impossible for anyone under the age of 30 35 to appreciate what a milestone that film was, even the EndOfAnEra. Look no further than the scene in which the boys [[TheInternetIsForPorn upload Web links]] of [[SensualSlavs the sexy Czech exchange student]] stripping down to her underwear and then taking off her bra before putting on Jim's ''unbuttoned'' pajama top. Not only does the camera ''not'' cut away, but it lingers on Shannon Elizabeth's breasts for what seems like forever. For over a decade prior to 1999, makers of teen films had been terrified of exposing a single nipple for fear of losing the coveted PG-13 rating -- and along comes this R-rated teen comedy that's not afraid to be what it essentially is, and becomes surprisingly successful too. The mainstream media certainly took notice, comparing ''American Pie'' to the original (and R-rated) "teen-sex" movies of the late '70s and early '80s, like ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' and ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. You might even say that the ''Pie'' franchise, together with the internet and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', triggered a second sexual revolution in American popular culture.



* ''Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1959'' was terrifying when it came out in 1959, and its ending gimmick was revolutionary. Now the film can come across as just another old haunted house flick that's boring and/or campy and has inspired a Podcast/RiffTrax parody commentary. However, VincentPrice keeps the film holding up decently, and its (very loose) [[Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1999 remake]] 40 years later was a critical failure in part for not living up to it.

to:

* ''Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1959'' was terrifying when it came out in 1959, and its ending gimmick was revolutionary. Now the film can come across as just another old haunted house flick that's boring and/or campy and has inspired a Podcast/RiffTrax parody commentary. However, VincentPrice keeps the film holding up decently, and its (very loose) [[Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1999 remake]] 40 years later was a critical failure in part for not living up to it.



* It also wasn't too long ago that ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was seen as the benchmark for what Superhero movies should try to achieve; mixing the fantasy/campiness of the comics with realism. Much like ''Superman'' before it. With the release of even more realistic and serious superhero movies (such as ''Film/IronMan'', ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'', and ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''), or less realistic but with ''huge'' action set pieces and witty dialogue like ''Film/TheAvengers2012'' and ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', the Sam Raimi trilogy has started to [[{{Narm}} show its age]], and is no longer held in as high esteem as they once were.

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* It also wasn't too long ago that ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was seen as the benchmark for what Superhero movies should try to achieve; mixing the fantasy/campiness of the comics with realism. Much like ''Superman'' before it. With the release of even more realistic and serious superhero movies (such as ''Film/IronMan'', ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'', and ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''), or less realistic but with ''huge'' action set pieces and witty dialogue like ''Film/TheAvengers2012'' and ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', the Sam Raimi trilogy has started to [[{{Narm}} show its age]], and is no longer held in isn't as high esteem as they once were.special.



*** On the other hand, it is worth noting that Wizard of Oz, as well as ''GoneWithTheWind'' aged quite well, and sometimes even surprised people to learn that they were made in the nineteen ''thirties'', some of those effects held up well into the fifties.
20th Apr '16 7:44:06 AM marbehraglaim
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*** The movie was also probably the first to feature a twist ending based on [[spoiler: two characters turning out to be one individual with multiple personalities]]. Hitch went to great lengths to keep the ending's secret from leaking out, but today the idea has been imitated so many times that it's come to be seen as a stock plot device in thrillers. In the 2002 movie ''Adaptation'', Nicolas Cage's character remarks at one point, [[spoiler:"The only idea more overused than serial killers is multiple personalities."]]
19th Apr '16 6:10:52 AM erforce
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** ''Film/NorthByNorthwest'' suffers from this. A modern viewer who has never seen it before can recognize trope after action movie trope and find the film boringly predictable as a generic action movie, perhaps unaware that it was a defining film in that genre and that films like Franchise/JamesBond and Franchise/IndianaJones were heavily influenced by it.

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** ''Film/NorthByNorthwest'' suffers from this. A modern viewer who has never seen it before can recognize trope after action movie trope and find the film boringly predictable as a generic action movie, perhaps unaware that it was a defining film in that genre and that films like Franchise/JamesBond ''Film/JamesBond'' and Franchise/IndianaJones ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' were heavily influenced by it.



* ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' is ''the'' TropeCodifier for most adventure movies - almost every AdventurerArchaeologist has at least some ShoutOut or {{Homage}} to Franchise/IndianaJones, whether done intentionally or not. However, IndianaJones was not without his inspirations (including ''ComicBook/TheAdventuresOfTintin'') - and watching them now will probably result in people thinking they are quite cheesy.

to:

* ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' is ''the'' TropeCodifier for most adventure movies - almost every AdventurerArchaeologist has at least some ShoutOut or {{Homage}} to Franchise/IndianaJones, whether done intentionally or not. However, IndianaJones Indiana Jones was not without his inspirations (including ''ComicBook/TheAdventuresOfTintin'') - and watching them now will probably result in people thinking they are quite cheesy.
29th Mar '16 2:40:56 PM Jhonny
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* For some LongRunners, earlier episodes within the same franchise can be this. Many of the early Film/{{Tatort}}s are rather tame and boring compared to the newer ones. A crime in and of itself was exciting enough without any need to further dramatize it in the 1970s. In the 2010s, just a normal run of the mill murder whodunnit would not get anything but yawns. There has to be some banter between the inspectors, some deeper sociocultural implications or at the very least some [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] to make people watch. On the other hand, some people find the newer episodes over the top and prefer the more subdued storytelling of some of the older ones, which did not pretend to be anything but run of the mill murder whodunnit.

to:

* For some LongRunners, earlier episodes within the same franchise can be this. Many of the early Film/{{Tatort}}s Series/{{Tatort}}s are rather tame and boring compared to the newer ones. A crime in and of itself was exciting enough without any need to further dramatize it in the 1970s. In the 2010s, just a normal run of the mill murder whodunnit would not get anything but yawns. There has to be some banter between the inspectors, some deeper sociocultural implications or at the very least some [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] to make people watch. On the other hand, some people find the newer episodes over the top and prefer the more subdued storytelling of some of the older ones, which did not pretend to be anything but run of the mill murder whodunnit.
29th Mar '16 2:40:13 PM Jhonny
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* For some LongRunners, earlier episodes within the same franchise can be this. Many of the early Film/{{Tatort}}s are rather tame and boring compared to the newer ones. A crime in and of itself was exciting enough without any need to further dramatize it in the 1970s. In the 2010s, just a normal run of the mill murder whodunnit would not get anything but yawns. There has to be some banter between the inspectors, some deeper sociocultural implications or at the very least some [[PrecisionFStrike Scheiße]] to make people watch. On the other hand, some people find the newer episodes over the top and prefer the more subdued storytelling of some of the older ones, which did not pretend to be anything but run of the mill murder whodunnit.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.Film