History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Film

12th Feb '17 5:49:06 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/JohnWoo. In a similar vein to Creator/JackieChan, he effectively created the HeroicBloodshed genre with his Hong Kong film ''Film/ABetterTomorrow'', pioneering the idea of [[GunFu highly stylized]], intricately choreographed [[GunsAkimbo two-gun]] action scenes and popularizing slow motion gun fight sequences in the west. However, after coming to Hollywood his career proceeded to hit the rocks somewhat, and he became associated with B-grade action fare. Today, the usage of the stylized gunfighting Woo helped to popularize tend to be derided as unrealistic and cliche in no small part due to the [[FollowTheLeader numerous imitations]] of Woo's work. His Hollywood films like ''Film/FaceOff'' are now regularly compared to ''Film/TheMatrix'' style of gun fights ([[OlderThanTheyThink even though Face/Off pre-dates the Matrix by two years]], and the Wachowskis explicitly named Woo as an influence), and the stylized violence and other tropes that used to be associated with him, such as the MexicanStandoff, are now credited to Creator/QuentinTarantino.

to:

* Creator/JohnWoo. In a similar vein to Creator/JackieChan, he He effectively created the HeroicBloodshed genre with his Hong Kong film ''Film/ABetterTomorrow'', pioneering the idea of [[GunFu highly stylized]], intricately choreographed [[GunsAkimbo two-gun]] action scenes and popularizing slow motion gun fight sequences in the west. However, after coming to Hollywood his career proceeded to hit the rocks somewhat, and he became associated with B-grade action fare. Today, the usage of the stylized gunfighting Woo helped to popularize tend to be derided as unrealistic and cliche in no small part due to the [[FollowTheLeader numerous imitations]] of Woo's work. His Hollywood films like ''Film/FaceOff'' are now regularly compared to ''Film/TheMatrix'' style of gun fights ([[OlderThanTheyThink even though Face/Off pre-dates the Matrix by two years]], and the Wachowskis explicitly named Woo as an influence), years]]), and the stylized violence and other tropes that used to be associated with him, such as the MexicanStandoff, are now credited to Creator/QuentinTarantino.



* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, vampires were almost always either [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]]. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properies as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.

to:

* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, vampires were almost always either [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]]. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properies properties as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheMatrix''. Heavily influenced by anime, religion and cyberpunk, the first film was such a success and caused such a major shift in culture and SpecialEffects, with the proliferation of WireFu and BulletTime in action sequences that it was imitated constantly. Many elements of the film, like the martial arts fighting, the slow-motion gunfights, and the "bullet dodge" scene, were so frequently copied and parodied throughout the TurnOfTheMillennium that audiences [[DeadHorseTrope grew tired of them]]. Viewers today can find it very difficult to see how fresh and exciting the film was when it first released.
12th Feb '17 4:08:57 AM NiGHTS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' introduced the concept of cyberspace (a virtual world) to most audience members for the first time, something that subsequently became entirely routine, such that by the time of ''Film/TheMatrix'' (1999), it only needed to be explained THAT Neo was inside a virtual world, not what a virtual world was. Tron's use of computer-generated graphics was revolutionary, and served as midwife to the modern visual effects industry. The film even helped popularize the word "user" for a computer operator. (There was no consensus of terminology at the time; the word "computerist" was another popular term.)

to:

* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' introduced the concept of cyberspace (a virtual world) to most audience members for the first time, something that subsequently became entirely routine, such that by the time of ''Film/TheMatrix'' (1999), it only needed to be explained THAT that Neo was inside a virtual world, not what ''what'' a virtual world was. Tron's use of computer-generated graphics was revolutionary, and served as midwife to the modern visual effects industry. The film even helped popularize the word "user" for a computer operator. (There was no consensus of terminology at the time; the word "computerist" was another popular term.)
9th Feb '17 3:00:07 PM CheeseDogX
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Other purely FX scenes, like the docking sequence early in the film, had audiences riveted. By today's standards, they're downright boring.
19th Jan '17 6:59:51 AM E1craZ4life
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/CitizenKane'', often times trumpeted as "The Greatest Movie of All Time," tends to inspire "what's the big deal?" responses from first time viewers, especially since PostModern movies have become the norm and the cinematography has influenced so many other films.

to:

* ''Film/CitizenKane'', often times trumpeted as "The Greatest Movie of All Time," tends to inspire "what's the big deal?" responses from first time viewers, especially since PostModern movies have become the norm and the cinematography has influenced so many other films. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking And everyone knows]] [[ItWasHisSled what the twist at the end is]].
1st Jan '17 7:15:39 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[InvertedTrope In the other direction]], the original trilogy in particular had this effect on many of the older SpaceOpera tales that inspired them, such as ''Film/FlashGordon'' and ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers''. It didn't help that both of those series were revived (the former as a movie, the latter as a [=TV=] series) to [[Main/FollowTheLeader cash in]] on the post-''Star Wars'' sci-fi craze.

to:

** [[InvertedTrope In the other direction]], the original trilogy in particular had this effect on many of the older SpaceOpera tales that inspired them, such as ''Film/FlashGordon'' ''Franchise/FlashGordon'' and ''ComicStrip/BuckRogers''. It didn't help that both of those series were revived (the former as [[Film/FlashGordon1980 a movie, movie]], the latter as [[Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury a [=TV=] series) TV series]]) to [[Main/FollowTheLeader cash in]] on the post-''Star Wars'' sci-fi craze.
14th Dec '16 5:38:59 PM Darthrai
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** With some female fans complaining about the use of TheSmurfettePrinciple in the series, many forget that having a woman like Leia being just as heroic as the male heroes was a groundbreaking move in the first place.

to:

** With some female fans complaining about the use of TheSmurfettePrinciple in the series, many forget that having a woman like Leia being just as heroic as the male heroes was a groundbreaking move in the first place. Like the Vader example, this was addressed in ''Film/TheForceAwakens'' by having Rey, a woman, as the surprise main character, giving her [[BreakoutCharacter a surge in popularity]] and serving as a breakthrough for the aging franchise.
14th Dec '16 5:35:33 PM Darthrai
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** After having seen LukeIAmYourFather parodied a million times (which are, more often than not, more or less equal amount of [[DarthVaderClone Darth Vader clones]]) in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] (which has been officially declared defunct by new ''Star Wars'' owner Disney, perhaps in part because of this trope), and after getting to see villains like Exar Kun or [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic Darth Revan]], and particularly after the three-plus decades of pulp sci-fi blockbusters that the film (directly or indirectly) inspired, the film might not seem so original.

to:

** After Darth Vader was noted in 1977 for being one of the scariest villains on-screen at the time. However, after becoming a heavily-marketed SeriesMascot (even [[MisaimedMarketing to kids]]), having seen LukeIAmYourFather parodied a million times (which are, more often than not, more or less equal amount of [[DarthVaderClone Darth Vader clones]]) in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] (which Universe]],[[note]]which has been officially declared defunct by new ''Star Wars'' owner Disney, perhaps in part because of this trope), trope[[/note]] and after getting to see villains like Exar Kun or Kun, [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic Darth Revan]], Revan]] or [[Film/TheForceAwakens Kylo Ren]], Vader is no longer perceived as the sinister force he once was, and particularly after instead has a reputation as a "[[EvilIsCool cool]]" character akin to a superhero. ''Film/RogueOne'' addresses this by depicting Vader, a OneSceneWonder here, at his most sinister and brutal - making him NightmareFuel ''by 2016 standards'' and reminding audiences of why he's such a fearsome character.
** After
the three-plus decades of pulp sci-fi blockbusters that the film (directly or indirectly) inspired, the film might not seem so original.
12th Dec '16 9:20:13 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ContractualPurity was a big deal back in the Golden Age of Hollywood, and it was an even bigger deal for [[DoubleStandard females]]. They were expected to be glamorous, fashionable and attractive - or at least wholesome and respectable. Two performances from that era don't look as influential these days but were key in codifying the BeautyInversion trope. The first was Creator/BetteDavis in ''Literature/OfHumanBondage''. Her character Mildred is a manipulative floozy who has a baby out of wedlock and imposes on the DoggedNiceGuy of a hero - eventually ending up on the streets as a prostitute [[spoiler: that dies of tuberculosis months after her baby has also died]]. Numerous female stars of the day wanted nothing to do with the role, and people advised Bette against taking it, terrified it would destroy her glamorous image. Warner Brothers only loaned her out to do it because they were convinced [[AndYouThoughtItWouldFail it would sink without a trace]]. Needless to say they were shocked when she was petitioned for an Oscar. The WhamShot of [[spoiler: Mildred's dead body lying against the bed]] would have been shocking at the time. Closely related is Kathleen Byron as Sister Ruth in ''Film/BlackNarcissus'' - who begins the film as a devout nun that suffers SanitySlippage and [[spoiler: tries to murder the sister superior]]. These days it's a given that the BeautyInversion is almost guaranteed to get an aspiring actress some respect, so the efforts of those two don't look as effective as they once did.



* ''Film/BlackNarcissus'' mentioned above also was revolutionary for its use of striking colour at the time. Crowds went nuts for one particular shot showing a field of pink flowers. This is a film made in post-war England in 1947. That being said, the film does hold up quite well in other parts, and viewers are often astonished to discover none of it was shot on location; sets and various optical tricks were used to transform Pinewood Studios into the Himalayas.



* The scene in ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'' where Dorothy opened the front door of her house to the Land Of Oz, which brought the film from a sepia tone to color for most of the rest of the movie, was radical for its time in 1939. Although the color comes out crude by today's standards, the fact that it was there ''at all'' was quite an achievement for the late [[TheThirties '30's]]. Remember that only a decade before, movies started to be released [[TheJazzSinger with sound]].
** Also, some of the effects and makeup used in the film were complex and realistic for its time, but can be [[SpecialEffectsFailure laughable]] by the standards of what could be achieved even in TheSeventies. Some effects such as the tornado still do hold up today, though.

to:

* The scene in ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'' where Dorothy opened the front door of her house to the Land Of Oz, which brought the film from a sepia tone to color for most of the rest of the movie, was radical for its time in 1939. Although the color comes out crude by today's standards, the fact that it was there ''at all'' was quite an achievement for the late [[TheThirties '30's]]. Remember that only a decade before, movies started to be released [[TheJazzSinger with sound]].
**
sound]]. Also, some of the effects and makeup used in the film were complex and realistic for its time, but can be [[SpecialEffectsFailure laughable]] by the standards of what could be achieved even in TheSeventies. Some effects such as the tornado still do hold up today, though.though, and viewers are often surprised to hear the film came out as far back as 1939.
7th Dec '16 3:26:44 PM Furienna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/AmericanPie''. Although all of its bits are household shtick today (just try to find more than a few individuals who ''don't'' know what a [[StacysMom "MILF"]] is), it is perhaps impossible for anyone under the age of 35 to appreciate what a milestone that film was, even the EndOfAnEra. Look no further than the scene in which the boys [[TheInternetIsForPorn upload Web links]] of [[SensualSlavs the sexy Czech exchange student]] stripping down to her underwear and then taking off her bra before putting on Jim's ''unbuttoned'' pajama top. Not only does the camera ''not'' cut away, but it lingers on Shannon Elizabeth's breasts for what seems like forever. For over a decade prior to 1999, makers of teen films had been terrified of exposing a single nipple for fear of losing the coveted PG-13 rating -- and along comes this R-rated teen comedy that's not afraid to be what it essentially is, and becomes surprisingly successful too. The mainstream media certainly took notice, comparing ''American Pie'' to the original (and R-rated) "teen-sex" movies of the late '70s and early '80s, like ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' and ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. You might even say that the ''Pie'' franchise, together with the internet and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', triggered a second sexual revolution in American popular culture.

to:

* ''Film/AmericanPie''. Although all of its bits are household shtick today (just try to find more than a few individuals who ''don't'' know what a [[StacysMom "MILF"]] is), it is perhaps impossible for anyone under the age of 35 to appreciate what a milestone that film was, even the EndOfAnEra. Look no further than the scene in which the boys [[TheInternetIsForPorn upload Web links]] of [[SensualSlavs the sexy Czech exchange student]] stripping down to her underwear and then taking off her bra before putting on Jim's ''unbuttoned'' pajama top. Not only does the camera ''not'' cut away, but it lingers on Shannon Elizabeth's breasts for what seems like forever. For over a decade prior to 1999, makers of teen films had been terrified of exposing a single nipple for fear of losing the coveted PG-13 rating -- - and along comes this R-rated teen comedy that's not afraid to be what it essentially is, and becomes surprisingly successful too. The mainstream media certainly took notice, comparing ''American Pie'' to the original (and R-rated) "teen-sex" movies of the late '70s and early '80s, like ''Film/{{Porkys}}'' and ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. You might even say that the ''Pie'' franchise, together with the internet and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', triggered a second sexual revolution in American popular culture.



* The early Beatles movies, like ''Film/AHardDaysNight'' and ''Film/{{Help}}'', were very innovative in terms of cutting scenes to the beat of music, using quick cut camera work and inventive angles that perfectly matched the energy of the music. Creator/RichardLester's work has been imitated so much ever since that even twenty years later, when MTV arrived, a lot of it looks not that spectacular today.
* In the early 1930s, and for many years thereafter, ''The Big House'' (1930) was hailed as a masterpiece of authentic, gritty, edgy (there's even a blatant cocaine reference in the very first scene), and anti-establishment American cinema, complete with a near VillainProtagonist (who's a sociopathic murderer) portrayed as a LoveableRogue, [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority rebellion just for the sake of rebellion condoned and even encouraged]], and a DownerEnding for a film produced at the start of UsefulNotes/GreatDepression! What's even more incredible is that the studio willing to take a chance on ''The Big House'' was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the most socially conservative of the five major studios. But it was so popular that it inspired countless imitators over the next decade, some of them [[PlayedForLaughs outright parodies]]. As a result, any film critic can walk you through it and point out all the "prison-film" stereotypes that have been done to death in the eight decades since (and it also doesn't help that the aforementioned SociopathicHero is portrayed by Wallace Beery, an actor who is pretty much a walking ClicheStorm).

to:

* The early Beatles movies, like ''Film/AHardDaysNight'' and ''Film/{{Help}}'', were very innovative in terms of cutting scenes to the beat of music, using quick cut camera work and inventive angles that perfectly matched the energy of the music. Creator/RichardLester's Richard Lester's work has been imitated so much ever since that even twenty years later, when MTV arrived, a lot of it looks not that spectacular today.
* In the early 1930s, and for many years thereafter, ''The Big House'' (1930) was hailed as a masterpiece of authentic, gritty, edgy (there's even a blatant cocaine reference in the very first scene), and anti-establishment American cinema, complete with a near VillainProtagonist (who's a sociopathic murderer) portrayed as a LoveableRogue, [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority rebellion just for the sake of rebellion condoned and even encouraged]], and a DownerEnding for a film produced at the start of UsefulNotes/GreatDepression! the Great Depression ! What's even more incredible is that the studio willing to take a chance on ''The Big House'' was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the most socially conservative of the five major studios. But it was so popular that it inspired countless imitators over the next decade, some of them [[PlayedForLaughs outright parodies]]. As a result, any film critic can walk you through it and point out all the "prison-film" stereotypes that have been done to death in the eight decades since (and it also doesn't help that the aforementioned SociopathicHero is portrayed by Wallace Beery, an actor who is pretty much a walking ClicheStorm).



** There's also the fact that, as the first successful found-footage film, it was something of an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre. It took its conceit very seriously -- the three lead actors were chosen for their improv experience, mainly because there was no script beyond a basic outline. As a result, it often takes on a rambling, conversational style, essentially 82 minutes of improv.

to:

** There's also the fact that, as the first successful found-footage film, it was something of an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre. It took its conceit very seriously -- - the three lead actors were chosen for their improv experience, mainly because there was no script beyond a basic outline. As a result, it often takes on a rambling, conversational style, essentially 82 minutes of improv.



* ''Film/BroadwayMelody'', the second film to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for Best Picture and the first all-sound musical, was a '''huge''' deal when it was released. However, its look at the goings-on on a Broadway musical became clichéd by the mid-'40s, thanks to nearly every movie about Broadway copying its basic set-up. Add the fact that, as it was the first movie musical, Hollywood still had a lot to learn about blocking musical numbers to avoid looking 'stagey'.

to:

* ''Film/BroadwayMelody'', ''Broadway Melody'', the second film to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for Best Picture and the first all-sound musical, was a '''huge''' deal when it was released. However, its look at the goings-on on a Broadway musical became clichéd by the mid-'40s, thanks to nearly every movie about Broadway copying its basic set-up. Add the fact that, as it was the first movie musical, Hollywood still had a lot to learn about blocking musical numbers to avoid looking 'stagey'.



* ''Film/CrouchingTigerHiddenDragon'', the first Chinese {{Wuxia}} (periodic Kung-Fu) movie to become truly successful in the West, suffers from this. It has been imitated repeatedly in many "Hollywoodian" action films for the past ten years. Of course, it wasn't original per-se, as Wuxia films were already seen as dated in their homeland (China/Hong Kong), but in the West this was regarded as a new phenomenon and therefore taken with more respect. It won an Academy Award and still lingers around the middle of the IMDB's Top 250 list -- and for many good reasons other than the dazzling fights.

to:

* ''Film/CrouchingTigerHiddenDragon'', the first Chinese {{Wuxia}} (periodic Kung-Fu) movie to become truly successful in the West, suffers from this. It has been imitated repeatedly in many "Hollywoodian" action films for the past ten years. Of course, it wasn't original per-se, as Wuxia films were already seen as dated in their homeland (China/Hong Kong), but in the West this was regarded as a new phenomenon and therefore taken with more respect. It won an Academy Award and still lingers around the middle of the IMDB's Top 250 list -- - and for many good reasons other than the dazzling fights.



* ''Literature/GreatExpectations''. Modern viewers watching Creator/DavidLean's adaptation of the Dickens classic might roll their eyes upon seeing [[JumpScare Magwitch pop out of the frame at Pip in the graveyard like a cheap horror movie jack-in-the-box]], genuinely startling though it is -- because they won't know that this was the first time that ever happened in a movie. The same thing might occur with [[spoiler: a seemingly dead Alan Arkin [[OnlyMostlyDead suddenly lunging out]] at Audrey Hepburn]] in ''Film/WaitUntilDark''. It shocked everyone at the time because they weren't used to [[spoiler: the villain doing that after he'd been apparently killed off]], but today most people will likely see it coming.

to:

* ''Literature/GreatExpectations''. Modern viewers watching Creator/DavidLean's adaptation of the Dickens classic might roll their eyes upon seeing [[JumpScare Magwitch pop out of the frame at Pip in the graveyard like a cheap horror movie jack-in-the-box]], genuinely startling though it is -- - because they won't know that this was the first time that ever happened in a movie. The same thing might occur with [[spoiler: a seemingly dead Alan Arkin [[OnlyMostlyDead suddenly lunging out]] at Audrey Hepburn]] in ''Film/WaitUntilDark''. It shocked everyone at the time because they weren't used to [[spoiler: the villain doing that after he'd been apparently killed off]], but today most people will likely see it coming.



** You can make the argument that ''The Incredible Hulk'' was the first to do the WorldBuilding and ArcWelding of the MCU. For instance, the Hulk was a product of a modern-day revival of the [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Super-Soldier Serum]]. Furthermore, the movie was the first MCU film to use the ComicBook/{{SHIELD}} logo, and some of the technology used to defeat the Hulk was from [[Film/IronMan Stark Industries]]. Again, the Incredible Hulk's reputation has been ignored by later movies in the franchise who have made more blatant examples of {{WorldBuilding}}.

to:

** You can make the argument that ''The Incredible Hulk'' was the first to do the WorldBuilding and ArcWelding of the MCU. For instance, the Hulk was a product of a modern-day revival of the [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Super-Soldier Serum]]. Furthermore, the movie was the first MCU film to use the ComicBook/{{SHIELD}} logo, and some of the technology used to defeat the Hulk was from [[Film/IronMan Stark Industries]]. Again, the Incredible Hulk's reputation has been ignored by later movies in the franchise who have made more blatant examples of {{WorldBuilding}}.WorldBuilding.



* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Film/HalfALoafOfKungFu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can seem unoriginal.

to:

* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Film/HalfALoafOfKungFu'', ''Half A Loaf Of Kung Fu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can seem unoriginal.



* Creator/PeeWeeHerman. In 1985, the notion of having a child - or ManChild - character who [[TheUnfettered is completely uninhibited and does whatever he wants without regard to how annoying or disrespectful his behavior comes across]] was still pretty novel. Traditionally, this type of character had been cast either as a villain or as extremely unsympathetic (Lampwick in Disney's version of ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'', for example); the most heroic (or at least sympathetic) such character up to that time had probably been [[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS Dennis the Menace]]. Now, after [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bart Simpson]], [[Film/HomeAlone Kevin McAllister]], [[Film/MaxKeeblesBigMove Max Keeble]], and just about every character Creator/AdamSandler has played, Pee-wee is par for the course.

to:

* Creator/PeeWeeHerman.''Pee Wee Herman''. In 1985, the notion of having a child - or ManChild - character who [[TheUnfettered is completely uninhibited and does whatever he wants without regard to how annoying or disrespectful his behavior comes across]] was still pretty novel. Traditionally, this type of character had been cast either as a villain or as extremely unsympathetic (Lampwick in Disney's version of ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'', for example); the most heroic (or at least sympathetic) such character up to that time had probably been [[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS Dennis the Menace]]. Now, after [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bart Simpson]], [[Film/HomeAlone Kevin McAllister]], [[Film/MaxKeeblesBigMove Max Keeble]], and just about every character Creator/AdamSandler has played, Pee-wee is par for the course.



* A lot of slapstick comedy from the first half of the 20th century like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Film/TheKeystoneKops, Creator/HaroldLLoyd,... Today most of the gags, comedic archetypes and situations have been used by later comedians. As a result many of these slapstick comedies now don't look so original.

to:

* A lot of slapstick comedy from the first half of the 20th century like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Film/TheKeystoneKops, "The Keystone Kops", Creator/HaroldLLoyd,... Today most of the gags, comedic archetypes and situations have been used by later comedians. As a result many of these slapstick comedies now don't look so original.
21st Nov '16 5:06:00 AM MrCandle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most avant-garde and experimental films from TheTwenties thru TheEighties are tame by today's standards that even Hollywood adapted it's techniques.

to:

* Most avant-garde and experimental films from TheTwenties thru TheEighties are tame by today's standards that even Hollywood adapted it's its techniques.
This list shows the last 10 events of 356. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeinfeldIsUnfunny.Film