History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / Film

5th Apr '17 3:12:41 AM Hjortron18
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** The big draw for ''Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}}'' was that it was going to be the first movie where superheroes who were popular enough to carry their own films (Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, and the Hulk) would crossover in a single film and interact with each other while fighting a common foe. Nowadays, with each successive MCU film featuring cameos from the other heroes or even having them play supporting roles, the characters are now ''expected'' to show up in each other's movies. ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' , which was ostensibly supposed to be the character's third solo film, had nearly every superhero in the franchise play a role in the plot and the upcoming ''Film/ThorRagnarok'' is confirmed to have the Hulk and Doctor Strange appear even though it's primarily taking place away from Earth. As this trend continues, it will be difficult for new audiences to understand just how much of a big deal ''The Avengers'' was.

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** The big draw for ''Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}}'' ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' was that it was going to be the first movie where superheroes who were popular enough to carry their own films (Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, and the Hulk) would crossover in a single film and interact with each other while fighting a common foe. Nowadays, with each successive MCU film featuring cameos from the other heroes or even having them play supporting roles, the characters are now ''expected'' to show up in each other's movies. ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' , which was ostensibly supposed to be the character's third solo film, had nearly every superhero in the franchise play a role in the plot and the upcoming ''Film/ThorRagnarok'' is confirmed to have the Hulk and Doctor Strange appear even though it's primarily taking place away from Earth. As this trend continues, it will be difficult for new audiences to understand just how much of a big deal ''The Avengers'' was.
4th Apr '17 5:12:16 PM Saveelich
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* EarlyFilms: A lot of them are very short (only a few seconds) and often feature rather mundane scenes (a train arriving, people leaving from a factory, a man feeding his baby). But back in the late 19th century people crowded to see these things because the fact that these images moved was a novelty then.

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* EarlyFilms: A lot of them are very short (only a few seconds) and often feature rather mundane scenes (a train arriving, people leaving from a factory, a man feeding his baby). But back in the late 19th century people crowded to see these things because the fact that these images moved ''moved'' was a novelty then.
30th Mar '17 5:20:00 PM kquinn0830
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* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Tony Stark's cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had.

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* Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse
**
When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Tony Stark's cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had.
** The big draw for ''Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}}'' was that it was going to be the first movie where superheroes who were popular enough to carry their own films (Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, and the Hulk) would crossover in a single film and interact with each other while fighting a common foe. Nowadays, with each successive MCU film featuring cameos from the other heroes or even having them play supporting roles, the characters are now ''expected'' to show up in each other's movies. ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' , which was ostensibly supposed to be the character's third solo film, had nearly every superhero in the franchise play a role in the plot and the upcoming ''Film/ThorRagnarok'' is confirmed to have the Hulk and Doctor Strange appear even though it's primarily taking place away from Earth. As this trend continues, it will be difficult for new audiences to understand just how much of a big deal ''The Avengers'' was.
17th Mar '17 1:35:11 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/JacobsLadder'' was the first notable film to use the visual effect of {[undercrank}}ing an actor shaking his head to make his face a creepy blur of motion. Today, that effect has become a bit cliche.

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* ''Film/JacobsLadder'' was the first notable film to use the visual effect of {[undercrank}}ing {{undercrank}}ing an actor shaking his head to make his face a creepy blur of motion. Today, that effect has become a bit cliche.
17th Mar '17 1:33:17 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** To a lesser extent, even John [=McClane's=] famous CatchPhrase ("Yippee-ki-yay, motherfucker!") suffers from this a bit. If you already know it as [=McClane's=] CatchPhrase before you see the first movie, it can be hard to realize that it was originally just a well-placed ShutUpHannibal to Hans Gruber when he tried to break [=McClane's=] spirit by mockingly suggesting that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he watched too many cowboy movies]]. Divorced from its original context, it's still an awesome line, but not quite the ballsy TakeThat that it originally was.



* When ''Film/HouseOfGames'' came out in 1987, the idea that [[spoiler:everything that happens in the movie is [[MassiveMultiplayerScam a huge con]]]] was still relatively fresh. (Though similar plots had been used in earlier movies, such as ''Film/{{Sleuth}}''.) Since then it has become such an established cliche of con artist movies that the viewers pretty much expect it, which is why [[spoiler: the PlotTwist]] is much easier to guess now than it was in 1987.
* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had.
** You can make the argument that ''The Incredible Hulk'' was the first to do the WorldBuilding and ArcWelding of the MCU. For instance, the Hulk was a product of a modern-day revival of the [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Super-Soldier Serum]]. Furthermore, the movie was the first MCU film to use the ComicBook/{{SHIELD}} logo, and some of the technology used to defeat the Hulk was from [[Film/IronMan Stark Industries]]. Again, the Incredible Hulk's reputation has been ignored by later movies in the franchise who have made more blatant examples of WorldBuilding.

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* When ''Film/HouseOfGames'' came out in 1987, the idea that [[spoiler:everything that happens in the movie is [[MassiveMultiplayerScam a huge con]]]] con]] was still relatively fresh. (Though similar plots had been used in earlier movies, such as ''Film/{{Sleuth}}''.) Since then it has become such an established cliche of con artist movies that the viewers pretty much expect it, which is why [[spoiler: the PlotTwist]] PlotTwist is much easier to guess now than it was in 1987.
* When ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' came out in 2008, many people were awestruck by [[spoiler:Film/IronMan Tony Stark]]'s [[TheCameo [[spoiler:Tony Stark's cameo]] in TheStinger. This was Marvel's intent, as they were attempting to build a [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse shared universe of movies]] that would lead to, in Stark's words, [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "a team"]]. After ''other'' movies in the MCU, namely ''Film/{{Thor}}'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', and of course, ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' - which was a culmination of the previous movies - ''TIH'''s Stinger no longer has the same awe that it once had. \n** You can make the argument that ''The Incredible Hulk'' was the first to do the WorldBuilding and ArcWelding of the MCU. For instance, the Hulk was a product of a modern-day revival of the [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Super-Soldier Serum]]. Furthermore, the movie was the first MCU film to use the ComicBook/{{SHIELD}} logo, and some of the technology used to defeat the Hulk was from [[Film/IronMan Stark Industries]]. Again, the Incredible Hulk's reputation has been ignored by later movies in the franchise who have made more blatant examples of WorldBuilding.



* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Half A Loaf Of Kung Fu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can seem unoriginal.
** Jackie Chan's style came as a direct result of being compared to Bruce Lee after Lee's death. After getting tired of being touted as "the next Bruce Lee", he instead aimed to become "the first Jackie Chan", mostly by being the exact opposites of Bruce Lee. Lee's motions were long and smooth; Chan's were short and choppy. Lee almost never got hit; Chan got hit regularly. Lee was always in control of the fight, counting on his skill to win fights; Chan was never in control and had to rely on luck and improvisations to win fights.
** Also, Jackie Chan pioneered many filming techniques to add excitement to the action scenes. The majority of these techniques have been used so much they are considered horrible cliches at this point.

to:

* Creator/JackieChan. Through the 1970s, Chinese martial arts films were a deadly serious business, with grim plots and frequent {{Downer Ending}}s probably best known today from the films of Creator/BruceLee. Then Chan came along with the idea that you could make a martial arts film that was supposed to be fun, or even a straight-out ''comedy''. Chan's autobiography gives a fascinating view of just how powerful a mindset he was up against when making his early comedy films like ''Half A Loaf Of Kung Fu'', with the public at large pretty much calling him a heretic. Today, these films can seem unoriginal.
** Jackie Chan's style came as a direct result of being compared to Bruce Lee after Lee's death. After getting tired of being touted as "the next Bruce Lee", he instead aimed to become "the first Jackie Chan", mostly by being the exact opposites of Bruce Lee. Lee's motions were long and smooth; Chan's were short and choppy. Lee almost never got hit; Chan got hit regularly. Lee was always in control of the fight, counting on his skill to win fights; Chan was never in control and had to rely on luck and improvisations to win fights.
**
Also, Jackie Chan pioneered many filming techniques to add excitement to the action scenes. The majority of these techniques have been used so much they are considered horrible cliches at this point.


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* ''Film/JacobsLadder'' was the first notable film to use the visual effect of {[undercrank}}ing an actor shaking his head to make his face a creepy blur of motion. Today, that effect has become a bit cliche.
17th Mar '17 1:26:43 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, vampires were almost always either [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]]. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properties as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.

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* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, While they were hardly the first to set vampires in modern society, they were almost always either the first to influentially strip the "gothic" aspects [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]].monsters]] from the creatures. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properties as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.
12th Feb '17 5:49:06 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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* Creator/JohnWoo. In a similar vein to Creator/JackieChan, he effectively created the HeroicBloodshed genre with his Hong Kong film ''Film/ABetterTomorrow'', pioneering the idea of [[GunFu highly stylized]], intricately choreographed [[GunsAkimbo two-gun]] action scenes and popularizing slow motion gun fight sequences in the west. However, after coming to Hollywood his career proceeded to hit the rocks somewhat, and he became associated with B-grade action fare. Today, the usage of the stylized gunfighting Woo helped to popularize tend to be derided as unrealistic and cliche in no small part due to the [[FollowTheLeader numerous imitations]] of Woo's work. His Hollywood films like ''Film/FaceOff'' are now regularly compared to ''Film/TheMatrix'' style of gun fights ([[OlderThanTheyThink even though Face/Off pre-dates the Matrix by two years]], and the Wachowskis explicitly named Woo as an influence), and the stylized violence and other tropes that used to be associated with him, such as the MexicanStandoff, are now credited to Creator/QuentinTarantino.

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* Creator/JohnWoo. In a similar vein to Creator/JackieChan, he He effectively created the HeroicBloodshed genre with his Hong Kong film ''Film/ABetterTomorrow'', pioneering the idea of [[GunFu highly stylized]], intricately choreographed [[GunsAkimbo two-gun]] action scenes and popularizing slow motion gun fight sequences in the west. However, after coming to Hollywood his career proceeded to hit the rocks somewhat, and he became associated with B-grade action fare. Today, the usage of the stylized gunfighting Woo helped to popularize tend to be derided as unrealistic and cliche in no small part due to the [[FollowTheLeader numerous imitations]] of Woo's work. His Hollywood films like ''Film/FaceOff'' are now regularly compared to ''Film/TheMatrix'' style of gun fights ([[OlderThanTheyThink even though Face/Off pre-dates the Matrix by two years]], and the Wachowskis explicitly named Woo as an influence), years]]), and the stylized violence and other tropes that used to be associated with him, such as the MexicanStandoff, are now credited to Creator/QuentinTarantino.



* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, vampires were almost always either [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]]. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properies as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.

to:

* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' (1986) and ''Film/NearDark'' (1987) were notable for contemporizing the vampire. Before these films, vampires were almost always either [[OurVampiresAreDifferent erudite seducers or grotesque monsters]]. In ''Lost Boys'', the vampires are a bunch of hip punk teens, while in ''Near Dark'' they're vagabond badasses in a van. By bringing modern culture into the vampire mythos, these films paved the way for such properies properties as ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', ''Series/TrueBlood'' and ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness''.


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* ''Film/TheMatrix''. Heavily influenced by anime, religion and cyberpunk, the first film was such a success and caused such a major shift in culture and SpecialEffects, with the proliferation of WireFu and BulletTime in action sequences that it was imitated constantly. Many elements of the film, like the martial arts fighting, the slow-motion gunfights, and the "bullet dodge" scene, were so frequently copied and parodied throughout the TurnOfTheMillennium that audiences [[DeadHorseTrope grew tired of them]]. Viewers today can find it very difficult to see how fresh and exciting the film was when it first released.
12th Feb '17 4:08:57 AM NiGHTS
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* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' introduced the concept of cyberspace (a virtual world) to most audience members for the first time, something that subsequently became entirely routine, such that by the time of ''Film/TheMatrix'' (1999), it only needed to be explained THAT Neo was inside a virtual world, not what a virtual world was. Tron's use of computer-generated graphics was revolutionary, and served as midwife to the modern visual effects industry. The film even helped popularize the word "user" for a computer operator. (There was no consensus of terminology at the time; the word "computerist" was another popular term.)

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* ''Film/{{Tron}}'' introduced the concept of cyberspace (a virtual world) to most audience members for the first time, something that subsequently became entirely routine, such that by the time of ''Film/TheMatrix'' (1999), it only needed to be explained THAT that Neo was inside a virtual world, not what ''what'' a virtual world was. Tron's use of computer-generated graphics was revolutionary, and served as midwife to the modern visual effects industry. The film even helped popularize the word "user" for a computer operator. (There was no consensus of terminology at the time; the word "computerist" was another popular term.)
9th Feb '17 3:00:07 PM CheeseDogX
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** Other purely FX scenes, like the docking sequence early in the film, had audiences riveted. By today's standards, they're downright boring.
19th Jan '17 6:59:51 AM E1craZ4life
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* ''Film/CitizenKane'', often times trumpeted as "The Greatest Movie of All Time," tends to inspire "what's the big deal?" responses from first time viewers, especially since PostModern movies have become the norm and the cinematography has influenced so many other films.

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* ''Film/CitizenKane'', often times trumpeted as "The Greatest Movie of All Time," tends to inspire "what's the big deal?" responses from first time viewers, especially since PostModern movies have become the norm and the cinematography has influenced so many other films. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking And everyone knows]] [[ItWasHisSled what the twist at the end is]].
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