History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / ComicBooks

22nd Jan '16 7:51:48 AM hullflyer
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* Marvel's [[UltimateMarvel Ultimate Universe]] was a massive hit in the early 00's in large part thanks to its cinematic storytelling. Once Marvel applied that kind of storytelling to all its books, the line ended un with no distinct selling points of its own and its sales slowly eroded because of that.
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* Marvel's [[UltimateMarvel Ultimate Universe]] was a massive hit in the early 00's in large part thanks to its cinematic storytelling. Once Marvel applied that kind of storytelling to all its books, the line ended un up with no distinct selling points of its own and its sales slowly eroded because of that.that, and in 2015 the line was ended and the popular points folded into the standard Marvel Universe.
22nd Jan '16 7:48:57 AM hullflyer
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* ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' was a unique deconstruction of superheroes when he was first created. The idea of a superhero who was a normal teenager like the readers and [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld who had a normal life]] hadn't been done before. Nowadays, this is nothing special.
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* ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' was a unique deconstruction of superheroes when he was first created. The idea of a superhero who was a normal teenager like the readers and [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld who had a normal life]] hadn't been done before.before, along with the idea that superpowers not only couldn't solve your personal problems, but could make your life ''worse''. Nowadays, this is nothing special.
28th Dec '15 7:17:04 PM creatordest
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* Most UndergroundComics fall in this category as well. Back in the 1960s and 1970s, these comics were seen as edgy and subversive, dealing with topics most other comics didn't deal with, including sex, politics, swearing and drugs. Nowadays, in a time where even animated sitcoms like ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' feature extreme violence, sex jokes and political topics, one might wonder what made these comics so special in the first place?
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\n\n * Most UndergroundComics fall in this category as well. Back in the 1960s and 1970s, these comics were seen as edgy and subversive, dealing with topics most other comics didn't deal with, including sex, politics, swearing and drugs. Nowadays, in a time where even animated sitcoms like ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' feature extreme violence, sex jokes and political topics, one might wonder what made these comics so special in the first place?
28th Dec '15 7:16:40 PM creatordest
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* ''[[Franchise/{{Tintin}} The Adventures of Tintin]]'' shaped the old comic book scene as we knew it. Creator/{{Herge}} was far from the first European comic strip artist, but he did combine elements from American comics (SpeechBalloon, dynamic drawing styles) with lots of documentation, impeccable art work, page turning suspense, {{satire}} and compelling atmosphere. There is still an entire school of comic book artists (''Ligne Claire'') dedicated to imitating Herge. In modern day France however many would find his comics to be this. No less because his writing is [[ThemeParkVersion very stereotypical]] in the eyes of many of them. Just compare it to stuff such as ComicBook/BlakeAndMortimer (which is still running in current-day France) and you get the point easily. His artwork also looks like if it was of ancient times nowadays if you compare it to your average modern French comic book due to the huge influence that Japanese {{anime}} and {{manga}} had on lots of current French comic book artists (some editors going as far as to make special versions of their comic books that read and are shaded like in manga). His slapstick also looks very unimpressive in a place where [[InsultBackfire slapstick commonly gets subverted]] for comedy gold in the huge library of French comic books. In other regions where ''Tintin'' has been a success he has not been as affected by this, mainly because [[NoExportForYou most French comic books are never exported]].
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* ''[[Franchise/{{Tintin}} The Adventures of Tintin]]'' shaped the old comic book scene as we knew it. Creator/{{Herge}} was far from the first European comic strip artist, but he did combine elements from American comics (SpeechBalloon, dynamic drawing styles) with lots of documentation, impeccable art work, page turning suspense, {{satire}} and compelling atmosphere. There is still an entire school of comic book artists (''Ligne Claire'') dedicated to imitating Herge. In As a result it can come across as cliché to young modern day France however many would find his comics to be this. No less because his writing readers who've read other adventure comics. Much of the comedy is [[ThemeParkVersion very stereotypical]] also {{Slapstick}}, which was popular in the eyes of many of them. Just compare it to stuff such as ComicBook/BlakeAndMortimer (which is still running in current-day France) 1920s and you get the point easily. His artwork also looks like if it was of ancient times nowadays if you compare it to your average modern French comic book due to the huge influence that Japanese {{anime}} and {{manga}} had on lots of current French comic book artists (some editors going 1930s, when Hergé debuted, but can come across as far as to make special versions of their comic books that read and are shaded like in manga). His slapstick also looks very unimpressive in a place where [[InsultBackfire slapstick commonly gets subverted]] for comedy gold in the huge library of French comic books. In other regions where ''Tintin'' has been a success he has not been as affected by this, mainly because [[NoExportForYou most French comic books are never exported]].corny today.
28th Dec '15 4:10:28 PM Anddrix
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* The ComicBook/FantasticFour are considered by some to be the lamest Marvel superheroes out there. But they were also the characters who introduced the concepts that revolutionized the genre in the early 1960s. It was unimaginable for readers back then to have a superhero with a monstrous appearance like the Thing, or dysfunctional team dynamics (that became so popular, the FF looks normal in comparison with most other groups). That's not to mention the villains, which included [[DoctorDoom a dangerous leader of a foreign country]] and [[ComicBook/{{Galactus}} a planet eater entity bound to destroy the universe]]. And they ''didn't have secret identities'', which were a staple for all superheroes then (and are still common even today).
to:
* The ComicBook/FantasticFour are considered by some to be the lamest Marvel superheroes out there. But they were also the characters who introduced the concepts that revolutionized the genre in the early 1960s. It was unimaginable for readers back then to have a superhero with a monstrous appearance like the Thing, or dysfunctional team dynamics (that became so popular, the FF looks normal in comparison with most other groups). That's not to mention the villains, which included [[DoctorDoom a dangerous leader of a foreign country]] country and [[ComicBook/{{Galactus}} a planet eater entity bound to destroy the universe]]. And they ''didn't have secret identities'', which were a staple for all superheroes then (and are still common even today).
23rd Dec '15 4:32:55 PM La_Ninje
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Added DiffLines:
* Marvel's [[UltimateMarvel Ultimate Universe]] was a massive hit in the early 00's in large part thanks to its cinematic storytelling. Once Marvel applied that kind of storytelling to all its books, the line ended un with no distinct selling points of its own and its sales slowly eroded because of that.
16th Dec '15 3:29:45 AM VVK
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** Throw in ''ComicBook/SquadronSupreme'' as well. It actually beat ''Watchmen'' to the superhero deconstruction idea. *** Or Bill Willingham's series ''The Elementals'', which came out a year before ''Watchmen'' and ''The Dark Knight Returns''.
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** Throw in ''ComicBook/SquadronSupreme'' as well. It actually beat ''Watchmen'' to the superhero deconstruction idea. *** idea. Or Bill Willingham's series ''The Elementals'', which came out a year before ''Watchmen'' and ''The Dark Knight Returns''.Returns''. Or even the 1953 ''ComicBook/{{MAD}}'' parody [[http://whatwoodwallydo.blogspot.fi/2009/02/superduperman.html "Superduperman"]], which is basically just Superman acting like a jerk. Not very impressive after, like, every ''MAD'' parody since then, not to mention something like ''Watchmen''. Of course, it's the ancestor of both -- yes, it was an explicit inspiration for ''Watchmen'' too.
11th Dec '15 8:11:49 AM MasterNecromancer
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* "The Green Turtle" - An otherwise forgettable comic were it not for a few things: Back in the day, this comic was pushing it. Howso? For one, WordOfGod states that, despite ExecutiveMeddling, The Green Turtle is in fact asian - his face was never shown and his skin tone somewhat exaggerated towards pink as a form of WriterRevolt. And a lot of people didn't realize it. It's hard to appreciate just how much this comic was pushing the limits of what was acceptable for the time.
to:
* "The Green Turtle" - An otherwise forgettable comic were it not for a few things: Back in the day, this comic was pushing it. Howso? How so? For one, WordOfGod states that, despite ExecutiveMeddling, The the Green Turtle is in fact asian Asian - his face was never shown and his skin tone somewhat exaggerated towards pink as a form of WriterRevolt. And a lot of people didn't realize it. It's hard to appreciate just how much this comic was pushing the limits of what was acceptable for the time.
11th Dec '15 8:09:44 AM MasterNecromancer
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* Most UndergroundComics fall in this category as well. Back in the 1960s and 1970s these comics were seen as edgy, subversive and dealing with topics most other comics didn't deal with, including sex, politics, swearing and drugs. Nowadays, in a time where even animated sitcoms like ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' feature extreme violence, sex jokes and political topics, one might wonder what made these comics so special in the first place? ** Then again some of these comics namely Justin Green's Binky Brown and some of Robert Crumb's stuff are still way ahead of Simpsons and what network TV can do.
to:
* Most UndergroundComics fall in this category as well. Back in the 1960s and 1970s 1970s, these comics were seen as edgy, subversive edgy and subversive, dealing with topics most other comics didn't deal with, including sex, politics, swearing and drugs. Nowadays, in a time where even animated sitcoms like ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' feature extreme violence, sex jokes and political topics, one might wonder what made these comics so special in the first place? ** Then again again, some of these comics namely (namely Justin Green's Binky Brown and some of Robert Crumb's stuff stuff) are still way ahead of Simpsons and what network TV can do.

* ''Comicbook/DoomPatrol''. Very shortly after ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' debuted, Creator/DetectiveComics tried their hand at "superhero angst". It was also the first title to pull a KillThemAll ending for the ''entire team''. Now, it's more or less known for the youngest (surviving) member, who went into the ComicBook/TeenTitans, and for Grant Morrison's surreal early 1990s run. * The ComicBook/FantasticFour are considered by some to be the lamest Marvel superheroes out there. But, they were also the characters who introduced the concepts that revolutionized the genre in the early 1960s. It was unimaginable for readers back then to have a superhero with a monstrous appearance like the Thing, or dysfunctional team dynamics (that became so popular, the FF looks normal in comparison with most other groups). That's not to mention the villains, which included [[DoctorDoom a dangerous leader of a foreign country]] and [[ComicBook/{{Galactus}} a planet eater entity bound to destroy the universe]]. And they ''didn't have secret identities'', which were a staple for all superheroes then (and are still common even today).
to:
* ''Comicbook/DoomPatrol''. Very shortly after ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' debuted, Creator/DetectiveComics tried their hand at "superhero angst". angst." It was also the first title to pull a KillThemAll ending for the ''entire team''. Now, it's more or less known for the youngest (surviving) member, who went into the ComicBook/TeenTitans, and for Grant Morrison's surreal early 1990s run. * The ComicBook/FantasticFour are considered by some to be the lamest Marvel superheroes out there. But, But they were also the characters who introduced the concepts that revolutionized the genre in the early 1960s. It was unimaginable for readers back then to have a superhero with a monstrous appearance like the Thing, or dysfunctional team dynamics (that became so popular, the FF looks normal in comparison with most other groups). That's not to mention the villains, which included [[DoctorDoom a dangerous leader of a foreign country]] and [[ComicBook/{{Galactus}} a planet eater entity bound to destroy the universe]]. And they ''didn't have secret identities'', which were a staple for all superheroes then (and are still common even today).
18th Oct '15 5:41:58 PM SpaghettiBoy
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Added DiffLines:
* "The Green Turtle" - An otherwise forgettable comic were it not for a few things: Back in the day, this comic was pushing it. Howso? For one, WordOfGod states that, despite ExecutiveMeddling, The Green Turtle is in fact asian - his face was never shown and his skin tone somewhat exaggerated towards pink as a form of WriterRevolt. And a lot of people didn't realize it. It's hard to appreciate just how much this comic was pushing the limits of what was acceptable for the time.
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