History SeasonalRot / LiveActionTV

16th Oct '17 5:03:36 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the nadir of the classic series, although different fans pick different ones of those seasons as the worst. Season 22 saw Eric Saward going overboard with the DarkerAndEdgier, with the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) acting like an arsehole most of the time (including to his own companion), grim plots, and enough FamilyUnfriendlyViolence to, for the only time ever, cause the fans themselves to start getting uncomfortable. Season 23 had the unpopular "Trial of a Time Lord" extended arc, some very lacklustre writing, and an ending that revealed the behind-the-scenes chaos the show had descended into by being almost incomprehensible, unintentionally. Both seasons are also notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 suffers from a LighterAndSofter shift that many fans considered to go too far into glitzy {{Camp}}, Sylvester [=McCoy=] playing the Doctor as an actual [[TheDitz Ditz]] instead of his later, more popular performance as a world-weary ManipulativeBastard who occasionally engaged in ObfuscatingStupidity, and Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music. The seasons also suffered from having two of the most widely unpopular companions in the show's history: Peri who was one of the few pre-1989 companions to genuinely be as [[DamselScrappy hapless]] and frequently-demeaned as post-2005-only fans and lazy media commentators claim all of them were; and Mel who was [[TheScrappy just annoying]] and played by an actor who had an irritating public image and a lot of baggage from earlier roles.

to:

** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 (1985-7) were the nadir of the classic series, although different fans pick different ones of those seasons as the worst. Season 22 saw Eric Saward going overboard with the DarkerAndEdgier, with the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) acting like an arsehole most of the time (including to his own companion), grim plots, and enough FamilyUnfriendlyViolence to, for the only time ever, cause the fans themselves to start getting uncomfortable. Season 23 had the unpopular "Trial of a Time Lord" extended arc, some very lacklustre writing, and an ending that revealed the behind-the-scenes chaos the show had descended into by being almost incomprehensible, unintentionally. Both seasons are also notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 suffers from a LighterAndSofter shift that many fans considered to go too far into glitzy {{Camp}}, Sylvester [=McCoy=] playing the Doctor as an actual [[TheDitz Ditz]] instead of his later, more popular performance as a world-weary ManipulativeBastard who occasionally engaged in ObfuscatingStupidity, and Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music. The seasons also suffered from having two of the most widely unpopular companions in the show's history: Peri who was one of the few pre-1989 companions to genuinely be as [[DamselScrappy hapless]] and frequently-demeaned as post-2005-only fans and lazy media commentators claim all of them were; and Mel who was [[TheScrappy just annoying]] and played by an actor who had an irritating public image and a lot of baggage from earlier roles.
16th Oct '17 5:02:22 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The consensus is that the fifth and final season suffered this badly, particularly during the "Telepath Arc". Mainly due to the show's original cancellation at the end of the fourth season, which caused many plot arcs destined for the fifth season to be crammed in early, leaving relatively little for the last season to work with.

to:

** The consensus is that the fifth and final season suffered this badly, particularly during the "Telepath Arc". Mainly Arc", which suffered from being overlong and centering around a new character widely considered to be [[TheScrappy dull and uncharismatic]]. The "overlong" part was mainly due to the show's original potential cancellation at the end of the fourth season, which caused many plot arcs destined for the fifth season to be crammed in early, leaving relatively little for the last season to work with.
9th Oct '17 8:19:29 PM Dancedom
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When ''Series/TheOC'' premiered in 2004 it became a pop culture sensation overnight. Critics praised the show for its clever dialogue, excellent writing, and interesting characters, and it was one of the highest-rated television shows in its time slot. For its second season Fox moved the show to a competitive Thursday night time slot, which ended up costing it viewers. There's also a general agreement among fans that the quality of the show declined in the second season, although it was still pretty good. Season 3 is almost universally considered to be the show's worst season due to it introducing several new characters who were disliked by fans as well as the overall tone becoming more serious and angsty, thus causing the ratings to drop even further. When Season 4 rolled around the show began to improve in quality, returning the focus to the main cast members and bringing back the comedy. Unfortunately, by that point most people had given up on ''The OC'' and it was cancelled due to low ratings.

to:

* When ''Series/TheOC'' premiered in 2004 2003 it became a pop culture sensation overnight. Critics praised the show for its clever dialogue, excellent writing, and interesting characters, and it was one of the highest-rated television shows in its time slot. For its second season Fox moved the show to a competitive Thursday night time slot, which ended up costing it viewers. There's also a general agreement among fans that the quality of the show declined in the second season, although it was still pretty good. Season 3 is almost universally considered to be the show's worst season due to it introducing several new characters who were disliked by fans as well as the overall tone becoming more serious and angsty, thus causing the ratings to drop even further. When Season 4 rolled around the show began to improve in quality, returning the focus to the main cast members and bringing back the comedy. Unfortunately, by that point most people had given up on ''The OC'' and it was cancelled due to low ratings.
28th Sep '17 5:15:47 PM RoarkTenjouin
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/ChikyuuSentaiFiveman'' was the first Sentai series to really suffer from this, and it [[FranchiseKiller almost proved fatal]] - [[http://tokusatsunetwork.com/2016/06/fact-checked-did-carranger-save-sentai/ as noted here]], the series was seen as very stale amongst fans, and ratings were some of the worst at the time[[note]]''Flashman'', the 4th highest rated Sentai, had average ratings of 12.29%; ''Fiveman'' had average ratings of 6.49%[[/note]]. The staleness was attributed to head writer Hirohisa Soda, who had been in charge since ''Series/DaiSentaiGoggleV'', having seemingly been burned out[[note]]although some fans would argue that it began with ''Series/KousokuSentaiTurboranger'', it's generally agreed that he was fully burned out by the time of ''Fiveman''[[/note]] by the time he began writing ''Fiveman''. Low ratings, in combination with poor toy sales, would have led Toei to pull the plug on the franchise...had it not been for the success of the next series, ''Series/ChoujinSentaiJetman''[[note]]although later series would end up having lower ratings - most notably ''Ohranger'' - toy sales in those series have generally offset the low ratings[[/note]].
17th Sep '17 2:04:52 PM Tropetastic1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Whether or not Season 4 is any better is a [[ContestedSequel point of contention among critics and fans]]. While it did make some notable improvements to Season 3, such as providing a more compelling villain with Damien Dahrk, changing the status quo for its cast and giving compelling story arcs to characters such as Diggle and Thea, it was also criticized for [[RomanticPlotTumor further dragging out the Oliver/Felicity angst]], which led to Felicity going from the series' EnsembleDarkhorse to the show's [[CreatorsPet most overused character]]. Also, like Season 3, the second half is said to have lost momentum, as the show once again indulged in poorly-integrated flashback sequences and introduced a contrived and easily resolved nuclear apocalypse threat, not to mention suffered from deteriorating fight choreography. The season finale, ''Schism'', had ended the season on a sour note, with some going so far as to call it one of the series' worst episodes.

to:

** Whether or not Season 4 is any better is a [[ContestedSequel point of contention among critics and fans]]. While it did make some notable improvements to Season 3, such as providing a more compelling villain with Damien Dahrk, changing the status quo for its cast and giving compelling story arcs to characters such as Diggle and Thea, it was also criticized for [[RomanticPlotTumor further dragging out the Oliver/Felicity angst]], which led to Felicity going from the series' EnsembleDarkhorse to the show's [[CreatorsPet most overused character]]. Also, like Season 3, the second half is said to have lost momentum, as the show once again indulged in poorly-integrated flashback sequences and introduced a contrived and easily resolved nuclear apocalypse threat, not to mention suffered from deteriorating fight choreography. The season finale, ''Schism'', had ended the season on a sour note, with some going so far as to call it one of the series' worst episodes. Season 4 was so derided, in fact, that when the show's star Stephen Amell [[http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/09/17/arrow-seasons-ranked-stephen-amell/ had to rank the show's seasons]] from best to worst he did ''not even include'' Season 4 in his list.
6th Sep '17 1:44:02 PM Yeow95
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Alas, the real seasonal rot first kicked in the final two seasons--a result of the original black writers and producers for the show leaving and being replaced with Jewish writers and producers. This resulted in the show losing the urban edge and ethnic vibe that set it apart from contemporary sitcoms, which was unsuccessfully replaced with generic sitcom scenarios, an increased focus on AsHimself guest stars (who inexplicably showed up at the junk yard); both of which contributed to the show arguably being [[DenserAndWackier less grounded in reality]] afterwards. With that said, a fair amount of fans give the fifth season a pass for still having a handful of good episodes; the same cannot be said for the sixth and final season, which took the increased silliness, guest star cameos, and standard-fare plots even further than the fifth season did. These changes reached their most egregious point through a two-part VacationEpisode to Hawaii that had Fred and Lamont mixed up in a jewel heist, and a bizarre episode that featured Fred entering a [[CelebrityParadox Redd Foxx look alike contest]]--needless to say, both episodes served as ''very'' out-of-character moments for the show as a whole, and made it evident that by that point the show was creatively running on fumes. On top of that, Foxx and costar Demond Wilson were both engaged in contract battles with the network that hurt their work on camera and ultimately caused both to leave the show thus ending it. The less said about the AfterShow ''The Sanford Arms'' ([[TheBandMinusTheFace sans Foxx and Wilson]]) and the {{Revival}} ''Series/{{Sanford}}'' (sans Wilson) that NBC tried to cash in with, the better.

to:

Alas, the real seasonal rot first kicked in the final two seasons--a result of the original black writers and producers for the show leaving and being replaced with Jewish writers and producers. This resulted in the show losing the trading away its down-to-earth urban edge roots and ethnic vibe that set it apart from contemporary sitcoms, which was unsuccessfully replaced with minority-focused stories in favor of generic sitcom scenarios, an increased focus on AsHimself guest stars (who inexplicably showed up at the junk yard); both of which contributed to the show arguably being [[DenserAndWackier less grounded in reality]] afterwards. With that said, a fair amount of fans give the fifth season a pass for still having a handful of good episodes; the same cannot be said for the sixth and final season, which took the increased silliness, guest star cameos, and standard-fare plots even further than the fifth season did. These changes reached to their most egregious point through point--including but not limited to a two-part VacationEpisode to Hawaii that had Fred and Lamont mixed up in a jewel heist, and a bizarre episode that featured Fred entering a [[CelebrityParadox Redd Foxx look alike contest]]--needless contest]]. Needless to say, both episodes served as ''very'' out-of-character moments for the show as a whole, and made it evident that by that point the show was creatively running on fumes. On top of that, Foxx and costar Demond Wilson were both engaged in contract battles with the network that hurt their work on camera and ultimately caused both to leave the show thus ending it. The less said about the AfterShow ''The Sanford Arms'' ([[TheBandMinusTheFace sans Foxx and Wilson]]) and the {{Revival}} ''Series/{{Sanford}}'' (sans Wilson) that NBC tried to cash in with, the better.
24th Aug '17 2:03:48 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the nadir of the classic series, although different fans pick different ones of those seasons as the worst. Season 22 saw Eric Saward going overboard with the DarkerAndEdgier, with the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) acting like an arsehole most of the time (including to his own companion), grim plots, and enough FamilyUnfriendlyViolence to, for the only time ever, cause the fans themselves to start getting uncomfortable. Season 23 had the unpopular "Trial of a Time Lord" extended arc, some very lacklustre writing, and an ending that revealed the behind-the-scenes chaos the show had descended into by being almost incomprehensible, unintentionally. Both seasons are also notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 suffers from a LighterAndSofter shift that many fans considered to go too far into glitzy {{Camp}}, Sylvester [=McCoy=] playing the Doctor as an actual [[TheDitz Ditz]] instead of his later, more popular performance as a world-weary ManipulativeBastard who occasionally engaged in ObfuscatingStupidity, and Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music.

to:

** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the nadir of the classic series, although different fans pick different ones of those seasons as the worst. Season 22 saw Eric Saward going overboard with the DarkerAndEdgier, with the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) acting like an arsehole most of the time (including to his own companion), grim plots, and enough FamilyUnfriendlyViolence to, for the only time ever, cause the fans themselves to start getting uncomfortable. Season 23 had the unpopular "Trial of a Time Lord" extended arc, some very lacklustre writing, and an ending that revealed the behind-the-scenes chaos the show had descended into by being almost incomprehensible, unintentionally. Both seasons are also notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 suffers from a LighterAndSofter shift that many fans considered to go too far into glitzy {{Camp}}, Sylvester [=McCoy=] playing the Doctor as an actual [[TheDitz Ditz]] instead of his later, more popular performance as a world-weary ManipulativeBastard who occasionally engaged in ObfuscatingStupidity, and Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music. The seasons also suffered from having two of the most widely unpopular companions in the show's history: Peri who was one of the few pre-1989 companions to genuinely be as [[DamselScrappy hapless]] and frequently-demeaned as post-2005-only fans and lazy media commentators claim all of them were; and Mel who was [[TheScrappy just annoying]] and played by an actor who had an irritating public image and a lot of baggage from earlier roles.
22nd Aug '17 1:56:34 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the worst of the classic series. Season 22 was the first full season featuring the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) and suffered from a lot of problematic storytelling. Season 23 is derided as much as season 22, due to it being {{mindscrew}}y. Both seasons are notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 introduced the Seventh Doctor (Sylvester [=McCoy=]), who was clownish and goofy. ([[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap At first.]]) It also ramped the {{Camp}} UpToEleven and introduced the world to Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music.
** [[BrokenBase While there's no general consensus]], many fans found Season 17 (the season Creator/DouglasAdams script edited) to be lackluster. Yes, ''City of Death'' is one of the best episodes out there, but it doesn't make up for ''Destiny of the Daleks'', ''The Horns of Nimon'', the innuendo-laden ''The Creature from the Pit'', the {{Anvilicious}} ''Nightmare of Eden'', or the fact that the entire season was cut short by a poorly-timed crew workers strike.

to:

** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the worst of the classic series. Season 22 was the first full season featuring the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) and suffered from a lot of problematic storytelling. Season 23 is derided as much as season 22, due to it being {{mindscrew}}y. Both seasons are notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 introduced the Seventh Doctor (Sylvester [=McCoy=]), who was clownish and goofy. ([[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap At first.]]) It also ramped the {{Camp}} UpToEleven and introduced the world to Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music.
** [[BrokenBase While there's no general consensus]], many fans found Season 17 (the season Creator/DouglasAdams script edited) to be lackluster. Yes, ''City of Death'' is almost universally considered to be one of the best episodes out there, stories of all time, but it doesn't make up for ''Destiny of the Daleks'', ''The Horns of Nimon'', the innuendo-laden ''The Creature from the Pit'', the {{Anvilicious}} ''Nightmare of Eden'', or the fact that the entire season was cut short by a poorly-timed crew workers strike.strike.
** One thing nearly everyone seems to agree on is that seasons 22 through 24 were the nadir of the classic series, although different fans pick different ones of those seasons as the worst. Season 22 saw Eric Saward going overboard with the DarkerAndEdgier, with the [[LoveItOrHateIt Sixth Doctor]] (Colin Baker) acting like an arsehole most of the time (including to his own companion), grim plots, and enough FamilyUnfriendlyViolence to, for the only time ever, cause the fans themselves to start getting uncomfortable. Season 23 had the unpopular "Trial of a Time Lord" extended arc, some very lacklustre writing, and an ending that revealed the behind-the-scenes chaos the show had descended into by being almost incomprehensible, unintentionally. Both seasons are also notable for bothersome amounts of ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. Season 24 suffers from a LighterAndSofter shift that many fans considered to go too far into glitzy {{Camp}}, Sylvester [=McCoy=] playing the Doctor as an actual [[TheDitz Ditz]] instead of his later, more popular performance as a world-weary ManipulativeBastard who occasionally engaged in ObfuscatingStupidity, and Keff [=McCulloch=] and his disco-aerobics brand of incidental music.
16th Aug '17 4:01:44 AM ClintEastwood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Season 11 (1985-1986) counts as Seasonal Rot and an OldShame, in the eyes of NBC, Creator/AlFranken, and ''Simpsons'' writer George Meyer. One would think that a season in which one of the original producers (Creator/LorneMichaels) returns to try and rebuild the show to its former glory would be welcomed with open arms by fans, right? Not really. The writing was okay (a little weird for its time, but critics didn't complain about the writing), but the cast was filled with semi-famous people who may have given good performances, but really didn't gel into that ensemble cast that ''SNL'' had in its early days. This, coupled with the mediocre premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}} and the fact that critics and fans alike were getting sick of ''SNL'', and you had all the ingredients needed for Brandon Tartikoff to plan ''SNL'''s cancellation. (At the very least, unlike season six, season 11's "Weekend Update" was somewhat enjoyable, thanks to the hiring of Creator/DennisMiller, whose [[DeadpanSnarker snarky delivery]] brought back memories of Creator/ChevyChase as the show's very first Weekend Update anchor.) (Un)Fortunately, this didn't happen, as Lorne Michaels fired most of his season 11 cast (leaving behind Jon Lovitz, Nora Dunn, and Dennis Miller) and hired a new crew of up-and-coming cast members (Dana Carvey, Phil Hartman, Jan Hooks, Kevin Nealon, and Victoria Jackson). Those who weren't ''completely'' turned off by ''SNL'' in its 11th season rejoiced.

to:

** Season 11 (1985-1986) counts as Seasonal Rot and an OldShame, in the eyes of NBC, Creator/AlFranken, and ''Simpsons'' writer George Meyer. One would think that a season in which one of the original producers (Creator/LorneMichaels) returns to try and rebuild the show to its former glory would be welcomed with open arms by fans, right? Not really. The writing was okay (a little weird for its time, but critics didn't complain about the writing), but the cast was filled with semi-famous people who may have given good performances, but really didn't gel into that ensemble cast that ''SNL'' had in its early days. This, coupled with the mediocre premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}} and the fact that critics and fans alike were getting sick of ''SNL'', and you had all the ingredients needed for Brandon Tartikoff to plan ''SNL'''s cancellation. (At the very least, unlike season six, season 11's "Weekend Update" was somewhat enjoyable, thanks to the hiring of Creator/DennisMiller, whose [[DeadpanSnarker snarky delivery]] brought back memories of Creator/ChevyChase as the show's very first Weekend Update anchor.) (Un)Fortunately, this didn't happen, as Lorne Michaels fired most of his season 11 cast (leaving behind Jon Lovitz, Creator/JonLovitz, Nora Dunn, and Dennis Miller) and hired a new crew of up-and-coming cast members (Dana Carvey, Phil Hartman, Jan Hooks, Kevin Nealon, and Victoria Jackson). Those who weren't ''completely'' turned off by ''SNL'' in its 11th season rejoiced.



* For many fans, ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' seems to have peaked in series 2. Series 3 is seen as a (slight) let down [[ToughActToFollow compared to what came before it]], while the Christmas Special, "The Abominable Bride", is [[BrokenBase split among the fandom]]. Series 4 had broken the base even further, particularly the final episode, "The Final Problem." Weaker plotlines and writing, the introduction of the extremely divisive Eurus, increasingly unbelievable one-upping plot twists and a controversial potential final episode made it fail to live up to its beloved predecessors, which even some supporters of the season admit.
* ''[[Series/SherlockHolmes The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes]]'' and ''[[Series/SherlockHolmes The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes]]'', the sixth and seventh series from the Granada ''Franchise/SherlockHolmes'' adaptations were marked by increasing deviations from the Canon. This was mostly due to Jeremy Brett's worsening health, and the planned filming of the entire Canon was cut short by [[AuthorExistenceFailure Actor Existence Failure]].

to:

* For many fans, ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' seems to have peaked in series 2. Series 3 is seen as a (slight) let down [[ToughActToFollow compared to what came before it]], while the Christmas Special, "The "[[Recap/SherlockSpecialTheAbominableBride The Abominable Bride", Bride]]", is [[BrokenBase split among the fandom]]. Series 4 had broken the base even further, particularly the final episode, "The "[[Recap/SherlockS04E03TheFinalProblem The Final Problem.Problem]]." Weaker plotlines and writing, the introduction of the extremely divisive Eurus, increasingly unbelievable one-upping plot twists and a controversial potential final episode made it fail to live up to its beloved predecessors, which even some supporters of the season admit.
* ''[[Series/SherlockHolmes The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes]]'' and ''[[Series/SherlockHolmes The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes]]'', the sixth and seventh series from the Granada ''Franchise/SherlockHolmes'' adaptations were marked by increasing deviations from the Canon. This was mostly due to Jeremy Brett's Creator/JeremyBrett's worsening health, and the planned filming of the entire Canon was cut short by [[AuthorExistenceFailure Actor Existence Failure]].
16th Aug '17 3:54:08 AM ClintEastwood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Any'' season of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' can fall into this depending on who you ask, with the popular answers being a) that the show [[FirstInstallmentWins hasn't been good since the original cast was on it]] in TheSeventies, or b), if viewers were [[JustHereForGodzilla just watching it for one sketch or cast member]], they will blame the seasonal rot on the cast member's departure. Popular cast members cited include: Creator/DanAykroyd, Creator/JohnBelushi, Creator/EddieMurphy, Dana Carvey, Creator/PhilHartman, Creator/ChrisFarley, Creator/JimmyFallon, Creator/TinaFey, Creator/AmyPoehler, [[Music/TheLonelyIsland Andy Samberg]], and, as of 2013, Creator/BillHader.

to:

* ''Any'' season of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' can fall into this depending on who you ask, with the popular answers being a) that the show [[FirstInstallmentWins hasn't been good since the original cast was on it]] in TheSeventies, or b), if viewers were [[JustHereForGodzilla just watching it for one sketch or cast member]], they will blame the seasonal rot on the cast member's departure. Popular cast members cited include: Creator/DanAykroyd, Creator/JohnBelushi, Creator/EddieMurphy, Dana Carvey, Creator/DanaCarvey, Creator/PhilHartman, Creator/ChrisFarley, Creator/JimmyFallon, Creator/TinaFey, Creator/AmyPoehler, [[Music/TheLonelyIsland Andy Samberg]], and, as of 2013, Creator/BillHader.



** Season 11 (1985-1986) counts as Seasonal Rot and an OldShame, in the eyes of NBC, Creator/AlFranken, and ''Simpsons'' writer George Meyer. One would think that a season in which one of the original producers (Lorne Michaels) returns to try and rebuild the show to its former glory would be welcomed with open arms by fans, right? Not really. The writing was okay (a little weird for its time, but critics didn't complain about the writing), but the cast was filled with semi-famous people who may have given good performances, but really didn't gel into that ensemble cast that ''SNL'' had in its early days. This, coupled with the mediocre premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}} and the fact that critics and fans alike were getting sick of ''SNL'', and you had all the ingredients needed for Brandon Tartikoff to plan ''SNL'''s cancellation. (At the very least, unlike season six, season 11's "Weekend Update" was somewhat enjoyable, thanks to the hiring of Creator/DennisMiller, whose [[DeadpanSnarker snarky delivery]] brought back memories of Creator/ChevyChase as the show's very first Weekend Update anchor.) (Un)Fortunately, this didn't happen, as Lorne Michaels fired most of his season 11 cast (leaving behind Jon Lovitz, Nora Dunn, and Dennis Miller) and hired a new crew of up-and-coming cast members (Dana Carvey, Phil Hartman, Jan Hooks, Kevin Nealon, and Victoria Jackson). Those who weren't ''completely'' turned off by ''SNL'' in its 11th season rejoiced.

to:

** Season 11 (1985-1986) counts as Seasonal Rot and an OldShame, in the eyes of NBC, Creator/AlFranken, and ''Simpsons'' writer George Meyer. One would think that a season in which one of the original producers (Lorne Michaels) (Creator/LorneMichaels) returns to try and rebuild the show to its former glory would be welcomed with open arms by fans, right? Not really. The writing was okay (a little weird for its time, but critics didn't complain about the writing), but the cast was filled with semi-famous people who may have given good performances, but really didn't gel into that ensemble cast that ''SNL'' had in its early days. This, coupled with the mediocre premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}} and the fact that critics and fans alike were getting sick of ''SNL'', and you had all the ingredients needed for Brandon Tartikoff to plan ''SNL'''s cancellation. (At the very least, unlike season six, season 11's "Weekend Update" was somewhat enjoyable, thanks to the hiring of Creator/DennisMiller, whose [[DeadpanSnarker snarky delivery]] brought back memories of Creator/ChevyChase as the show's very first Weekend Update anchor.) (Un)Fortunately, this didn't happen, as Lorne Michaels fired most of his season 11 cast (leaving behind Jon Lovitz, Nora Dunn, and Dennis Miller) and hired a new crew of up-and-coming cast members (Dana Carvey, Phil Hartman, Jan Hooks, Kevin Nealon, and Victoria Jackson). Those who weren't ''completely'' turned off by ''SNL'' in its 11th season rejoiced.
This list shows the last 10 events of 501. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeasonalRot.LiveActionTV