History RefugeInAudacity / WebOriginal

15th May '16 10:24:40 PM gophergiggles
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* If "Refuge in Audacity" was a religion, then David Thorne of [[http://www.27bslash6.com/ 27b/6]] would be the pope. Most times he ends up just messing with people via e-mail for fun, but he's actually had [[http://www.27bslash6.com/massanutten.html fines]] and [[http://www.27bslash6.com/blockbuster.html late video fees]] completely waived by just going off on tangents. In one of his books he responds to a simple "where were you on Tuesday" from his boss with a multi-paragraph essay that spans three pages graphically detailing the most-likely-false events that conspired to keep him home, warranting only a dumbfounded "ok" as a response.
30th Apr '16 6:13:12 AM res20stupid
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.

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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker.maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.
30th Apr '16 6:11:59 AM res20stupid
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, including VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.

to:

* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, including VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.
30th Apr '16 6:11:44 AM res20stupid
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using %%ContentID%% claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how %%ContentID%% used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most %%ContentID%% claims, including VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video %%ContentID%% refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.

to:

* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using %%ContentID%% ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how %%ContentID%% ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most %%ContentID%% ContentID claims, including VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video %%ContentID%% ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.
30th Apr '16 6:10:56 AM res20stupid
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using %%ContentID%% claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how %%ContentID%% used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker. Luckily YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most %%ContentID%% claims, including VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor - because of how many claims were made on his video %%ContentID%% refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.
7th Aug '15 1:52:35 AM Lockedbox
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*[[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment The Spoony One]] extols such methods as last resorts in an episode of Counter Monkey “The Bardic Knock Spell.” He recommends elaborate bluffs and performance improvisations when infiltrating or stuck in other difficult situations, particularly with Bard characters. Some favourite examples include simply knocking on the door of enemy hideouts (the aforementioned bardic knock spell,) and running into a guard barracks with his character dressed in nothing but glitter and feathers, covering his face and begging them not to look at him, as it had been a rough night.
19th May '15 10:35:40 PM ElegantVamp
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* A lot of the dialogue in WebVideo/ASlapOnTitan can be considered this.
10th Dec '14 1:22:46 PM BibsDibs
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* Many of the videos from ''[[http://thosearentmuskets.com/index.php Those Aren't Muskets]]'' tend to have a ridiculous, over-the-top sense of humor. This includes BlackComedy and dirty humor. For example, in [[http://thosearentmuskets.com/sketches/techsupport.php "Tech Support"]], the automated voice from tech support goes crazy and deploys an invisible assassin among other things.

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* Many of the videos from ''[[http://thosearentmuskets.com/index.php Those Aren't Muskets]]'' tend to have a ridiculous, over-the-top sense of humor. This includes BlackComedy and dirty humor. For example, in [[http://thosearentmuskets.com/sketches/techsupport.php "Tech Support"]], the tech support's automated voice from tech support goes crazy and deploys an invisible assassin among other things.
10th Dec '14 1:22:08 PM BibsDibs
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* Many of the videos from ''[[http://thosearentmuskets.com/index.php Those Aren't Muskets]]'' tend to have a ridiculous, over-the-top sense of humor. This includes BlackComedy and dirty humor. For example, in [[http://thosearentmuskets.com/sketches/techsupport.php "Tech Support"]], the automated voice from tech support goes crazy and deploys an invisible assassin among other things.
5th Oct '14 3:11:40 PM Loekman3
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* This [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzOLF0F77d4]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=RefugeInAudacity.WebOriginal