History RefugeInAudacity / WebOriginal

4th Feb '18 9:42:37 AM Mickoonsley19
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* For their ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' a fan gave the ''WebOriginal/GameGrumps'' a list of the best badges they could be using which, albeit in a very friendly and helpful way, pointed out that most of their own badge choices were poor. Cue Arin going off on an episode-long rant about how how playing a game is about the journey rather than a destination, and part of the fun is them figuring out which own badges work for them rather than simply being instructed on "which is best". It goes from a genuinely funny rant that has a point, to an UngratefulBastard TakeThat that even seems to make Danny uncomfortable, and back to ActuallyPrettyFunny just because he simply will ''not'' stop ranting about it.

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* For their ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' a fan gave the ''WebOriginal/GameGrumps'' ''WebVideo/GameGrumps'' a list of the best badges they could be using which, albeit in a very friendly and helpful way, pointed out that most of their own badge choices were poor. Cue Arin going off on an episode-long rant about how how playing a game is about the journey rather than a destination, and part of the fun is them figuring out which own badges work for them rather than simply being instructed on "which is best". It goes from a genuinely funny rant that has a point, to an UngratefulBastard TakeThat that even seems to make Danny uncomfortable, and back to ActuallyPrettyFunny just because he simply will ''not'' stop ranting about it.
24th Nov '17 6:31:38 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* ''Website/Clickhole'' published an [[http://www.clickhole.com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994 article]] titled "Shots Fired: Quiznos Has Hired Subway’s Jared Fogle For A New Ad Campaign Claiming That Quiznos Sandwiches Cured His Pedophilia". If the title doesn't speak for itself, Quiznos started an ad campaign that banked on Jared Fogle's crimes and publicity as Subway's spokesperson to "throw shade" towards Subway.

to:

* ''Website/Clickhole'' ''Website/{{Clickhole}}'' published an [[http://www.clickhole.com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994 article]] titled "Shots Fired: Quiznos Has Hired Subway’s Jared Fogle For A New Ad Campaign Claiming That Quiznos Sandwiches Cured His Pedophilia". If the title doesn't speak for itself, Quiznos started an ad campaign that banked on Jared Fogle's crimes and publicity as Subway's spokesperson to "throw shade" towards Subway.
24th Nov '17 6:31:02 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* ''Website/Clickhole'' published an [[article http://www.clickhole.com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994]] titled "Shots Fired: Quiznos Has Hired Subway’s Jared Fogle For A New Ad Campaign Claiming That Quiznos Sandwiches Cured His Pedophilia". If the title doesn't speak for itself, Quiznos started an ad campaign that banked on Jared Fogle's crimes and publicity as Subway's spokesperson to "throw shade" towards Subway.

to:

* ''Website/Clickhole'' published an [[article http://www.[[http://www.clickhole.com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994]] com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994 article]] titled "Shots Fired: Quiznos Has Hired Subway’s Jared Fogle For A New Ad Campaign Claiming That Quiznos Sandwiches Cured His Pedophilia". If the title doesn't speak for itself, Quiznos started an ad campaign that banked on Jared Fogle's crimes and publicity as Subway's spokesperson to "throw shade" towards Subway.
24th Nov '17 6:23:00 PM DastardlyDemolition
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Website/Clickhole'' published an [[article http://www.clickhole.com/article/shots-fired-quiznos-has-hired-subways-jared-fogle--6994]] titled "Shots Fired: Quiznos Has Hired Subway’s Jared Fogle For A New Ad Campaign Claiming That Quiznos Sandwiches Cured His Pedophilia". If the title doesn't speak for itself, Quiznos started an ad campaign that banked on Jared Fogle's crimes and publicity as Subway's spokesperson to "throw shade" towards Subway.
16th Nov '17 6:12:46 PM gophergiggles
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Added DiffLines:

* For their ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' a fan gave the ''WebOriginal/GameGrumps'' a list of the best badges they could be using which, albeit in a very friendly and helpful way, pointed out that most of their own badge choices were poor. Cue Arin going off on an episode-long rant about how how playing a game is about the journey rather than a destination, and part of the fun is them figuring out which own badges work for them rather than simply being instructed on "which is best". It goes from a genuinely funny rant that has a point, to an UngratefulBastard TakeThat that even seems to make Danny uncomfortable, and back to ActuallyPrettyFunny just because he simply will ''not'' stop ranting about it.
14th Jul '17 1:33:23 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]'s "[[LoopholeAbuse Copyright Deadlock]]" method of blocking [[=ContentID=]] claims. Sterling was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using [[=ContentID=]] claims to run ads on videos with clips from their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how [[=ContentID=]] used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most [[=ContentID=]] claims from different owners, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' (published by Konami) and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' (published by Quantic Dream and distributed by Sony). He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to the pop song "Chains of Love" by Music/{{Erasure}} as well, as song which is also frequently flagged, just for added effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, [[=ContentID=]] refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''. Since the series itself was funded through donations on a Patreon account, he didn't lose any money either. From then on forth, he would use "Chains of Love" (and dance to it in an over the top fashion) and repeat those and similar clips whenever he wanted to deploy this 'copyright deadlock' method.

to:

* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]'s "[[LoopholeAbuse Copyright Deadlock]]" method of blocking [[=ContentID=]] [=ContentID=] claims. Sterling was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using [[=ContentID=]] [=ContentID=] claims to run ads on videos with clips from their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how [[=ContentID=]] [=ContentID=] used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], settled, a change which was in part due to Sterling's actions.[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most [[=ContentID=]] [=ContentID=] claims from different owners, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' (published by Konami) and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' (published by Quantic Dream and distributed by Sony). He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to the pop song "Chains of Love" by Music/{{Erasure}} as well, as song which is also frequently flagged, just for added effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, [[=ContentID=]] [=ContentID=] refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''. Since the series itself was funded through donations on a Patreon account, he didn't lose any money either. From then on forth, he would use "Chains of Love" (and dance to it in an over the top fashion) and repeat those and similar clips whenever he wanted to deploy this 'copyright deadlock' method.
14th Jul '17 1:32:09 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]'s "Copyright Deadlock" method of blocking [[=ContentID=]] claims. Sterling was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using [[=ContentID=]] claims to run ads on videos with clips from their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how [[=ContentID=]] used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most [[=ContentID=]] claims from different owners, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' (published by Konami) and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' (published by Quantic Dream and distributed by Sony). He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to the pop song "Chains of Love" by Music/{{Erasure}} as well, as song which is also frequently flagged, just for added effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, [[=ContentID=]] refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''. Since the series itself was funded through donations on a Patreon account, he didn't lose any money either. From then on forth, he would use "Chains of Love" (and dance to it in an over the top fashion) and repeat those and similar clips whenever he wanted to deploy this 'copyright deadlock' method.


to:

* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]'s "Copyright Deadlock" "[[LoopholeAbuse Copyright Deadlock]]" method of blocking [[=ContentID=]] claims. Sterling was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using [[=ContentID=]] claims to run ads on videos with clips from their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how [[=ContentID=]] used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most [[=ContentID=]] claims from different owners, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' (published by Konami) and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' (published by Quantic Dream and distributed by Sony). He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to the pop song "Chains of Love" by Music/{{Erasure}} as well, as song which is also frequently flagged, just for added effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, [[=ContentID=]] refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''. Since the series itself was funded through donations on a Patreon account, he didn't lose any money either. From then on forth, he would use "Chains of Love" (and dance to it in an over the top fashion) and repeat those and similar clips whenever he wanted to deploy this 'copyright deadlock' method.

method.
--> ''It's a petty little trick at its core but one which gives me no small amount of smug self-satisfaction.''
14th Jul '17 1:24:30 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID claims to run ads on videos with their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a pop song as well, just for effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, ContentID refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.

to:

* [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] Sterling]]'s "Copyright Deadlock" method of blocking [[=ContentID=]] claims. Sterling was sick and tired of Nintendo's policies of using ContentID [[=ContentID=]] claims to run ads on videos with clips from their properties, especially since they're often violating Fair Use laws while doing so and thus taking money from YouTube users who use the material for their jobs[[note]]Because of how ContentID [[=ContentID=]] used to work if a claim was made on a video, any money from ads that ran on the video, or the payout from views to the video, would've gone to the claimant until the matter was resolved by a Fair Use claim, but since most of the views are from when the video is first posted, then the primary amount that would've been earned for that video would've been lost to the video maker since they couldn't claim the money that was already paid to the claimant. Luckily, YouTube have fixed this by making it that the money won't be awarded to either the claimant or the video poster until the matter is completely settled[[/note]], yet he wanted to do an episode on ''VideoGame/StarFoxZero''. So, what did he do? He did the episode... and included not only footage from ''Star Fox'' but also the games which have the most ContentID claims, [[=ContentID=]] claims from different owners, including ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'' (published by Konami) and ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls''. ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' (published by Quantic Dream and distributed by Sony). He also included a minute of footage of himself dancing to a the pop song "Chains of Love" by Music/{{Erasure}} as well, as song which is also frequently flagged, just for added effect. It worked in his favor -- because of how many claims were made on his video, ContentID [[=ContentID=]] refused to give the right to claim to ''anyone''.''anyone''. Since the series itself was funded through donations on a Patreon account, he didn't lose any money either. From then on forth, he would use "Chains of Love" (and dance to it in an over the top fashion) and repeat those and similar clips whenever he wanted to deploy this 'copyright deadlock' method.

8th Jun '17 9:18:21 PM nombretomado
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* The NostalgiaCritic tries to pull this off in his review of Film/GhostDad. After pretending to be a ghost that stays in the material plane if his assistants to role play as a Newsboy and Dorthy for him, they call the Critic out when they realize that he isn't dead. Nostalgia Critic then shames them for believing him and following through on his inane orders, openly stating that he hopes their embarrassment and confusion will buy him enough time to make his escape.

to:

* The NostalgiaCritic WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic tries to pull this off in his review of Film/GhostDad.''Film/GhostDad''. After pretending to be a ghost that stays in the material plane if his assistants to role play as a Newsboy and Dorthy for him, they call the Critic out when they realize that he isn't dead. Nostalgia Critic then shames them for believing him and following through on his inane orders, openly stating that he hopes their embarrassment and confusion will buy him enough time to make his escape.
25th May '17 12:44:56 PM Freezer
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* ''Podcast/TheBlackGuyWhoTips'': Their motto is "It's okay if it's funny." The show's signature segment is "Guess The Race", where host Rod reads an article regarding a crime, and challenges the show's chat room and the episodes special guest (if applicable) to guess which race (usually) the perpetrator is. Creative racism is encouraged: Simply calling the subject "nigger" or "cracker" is frowned on. But obscure and archaic slurs (like "Moon Cricket" for black people) are encouraged, as well as "as black.../white as..." answers.

to:

* ''Podcast/TheBlackGuyWhoTips'': Their motto is "It's okay if it's funny." The show's signature segment is "Guess The Race", where host Rod reads an article regarding a crime, and challenges the show's chat room and the episodes special guest (if applicable) to guess which race (usually) the perpetrator is. Creative racism is encouraged: Simply calling the subject "nigger" or "cracker" is frowned on.on ("Honky" is okay, because that's an InherentlyFunnyWord). But obscure and archaic slurs (like "Moon Cricket" for black people) are encouraged, as well as "as black.../white as..." answers.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=RefugeInAudacity.WebOriginal