History Recap / TintinTintinInTheCongo

25th Jul '17 7:10:04 AM fruitstripegum
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** Tintin being carried around and worshipped as some kind of MightyWhitey by black Africans is less innocent today than it was when the story was first published.

to:

** Tintin being carried around and worshipped worshiped as some kind of MightyWhitey by black Africans is less innocent today than it was when the story was first published.



* SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology: The natives turn away from their witch doctor when they discover Tintin brought a grammophone and a film projector which proves their wizard lied and desecrated the tribe's fetish).

to:

* SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology: The natives turn away from their witch doctor when they discover Tintin brought a grammophone and a film projector which proves their wizard lied and desecrated the tribe's fetish).fetish.
25th Jul '17 7:08:26 AM fruitstripegum
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* RevealingCoverup: :Al Capone suspected Tintin might be wise to his diamond smuggling operation, so he tried to arrange for his assassination. If he had just left Tintin alone, Tintin would never have found out about anything.

to:

* RevealingCoverup: :Al Al Capone suspected Tintin might be wise to his diamond smuggling operation, so he tried to arrange for his assassination. If he had just left Tintin alone, Tintin would never have found out about anything.
25th Jul '17 7:07:43 AM fruitstripegum
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* NoAnimalsWereHarmed: Errr.... Apart from Snowy almost every animal in this story is harmed or killed. Tintin shoots fourteen antilopes in the belief its just one whom he missed several times. He shoots a chimpansee just to shed off his skin and wear it as a disguise. He beats up another chimpansee, tries to shoot an elephant, cuts a large snake open and has it swallow its own tail, shoots down another snake, has a leopard eat a sponge giving it digestive problems,... Snowy bites off a lion's tail. A priest shoots several crocodiles dead. There's a rhinoceros Tintin planned to shoot, but luckily it escaped. In the original story however Tintin put a stick of dynamite inside its skin and blew the animal up. Danish publishers felt this was both too unrealistic and very harsh and asked Hergé to change it into the more animal friendly scene still found in the story today.

to:

* NoAnimalsWereHarmed: Errr.... Apart from Snowy almost every animal in this story is harmed or killed. Tintin shoots fourteen antilopes antelopes in the belief its just one whom he missed several times. He shoots a chimpansee chimpanzee just to shed cut off his its skin and wear it as a disguise. He beats up another chimpansee, chimpanzee, tries to shoot an elephant, cuts a large snake open and has it swallow its own tail, shoots down another snake, has a leopard eat a sponge giving it digestive problems,... Snowy bites off a lion's tail. A priest shoots several crocodiles dead. There's a rhinoceros Tintin planned to shoot, but luckily it escaped. In the original story however Tintin put a stick of dynamite inside its skin and blew the animal up. Danish publishers felt this was both too unrealistic and very harsh and asked Hergé to change it into the more animal friendly scene still found in the story today.
25th Jul '17 7:06:03 AM fruitstripegum
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** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in most European versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.

to:

** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of off of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in most European versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.
25th Jul '17 7:05:44 AM fruitstripegum
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* BondVillainStupidity: At one point, Tintin is captured by the hired killer, who instead of just shooting Tintin ties him up over the river and leaves him to be eaten by crocodiles. Somewhat justified in that we late find out that the guy had been instructed to make Tintin's death look like an accident, but that doesn't excuse his not sticking around to actually make sure he'd die.

to:

* BondVillainStupidity: At one point, Tintin is captured by the hired killer, who instead of just shooting Tintin ties him up over the river and leaves him to be eaten by crocodiles. Somewhat justified in that we late later find out that the guy had been instructed to make Tintin's death look like an accident, but that doesn't excuse his not sticking around to actually make sure he'd die.
27th Apr '17 11:00:23 AM fruitstripegum
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* SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology: The natives turn away from their witch doctor when they discover Tintin brought a grammophone and a film projector which proves their wizard lied and desecrated the tribe's fetish).


Added DiffLines:

* SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology: The natives turn away from their witch doctor when they discover Tintin brought a grammophone and a film projector which proves their wizard lied and desecrated the tribe's fetish).
11th Mar '17 4:41:31 PM Cieloazul
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** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in the francophone versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.

to:

** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in the francophone most European versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.
23rd Jan '17 5:48:29 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, States (this would eventually happen in the next story ''[[Recap/TintinTintinInAmerica Tintin in America]]''), but Norbert Wallez, the chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
23rd Jan '17 5:44:50 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
23rd Jan '17 5:42:40 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. Hergé himself [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
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