History Recap / TintinTintinInTheCongo

11th Mar '17 4:41:31 PM Cieloazul
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** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in the francophone versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.

to:

** Tintin is unable to shoot a rhinoceros in the original black-and-white story, because it's skin is so strong that bullets just bounce of of it. He makes a small hole in the skin, drops a stick of dynamite inside it and then blows the animal up from a distance. This is kept in the francophone most European versions, where it's seen as cartoonish humour.
23rd Jan '17 5:48:29 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, States (this would eventually happen in the next story ''[[Recap/TintinTintinInAmerica Tintin in America]]''), but Norbert Wallez, the chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
23rd Jan '17 5:44:50 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor chief-in-editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
23rd Jan '17 5:42:40 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. Hergé himself [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. It is notable that Hergé himself originally had not planned the story; he had wished to send Tintin to the United States, but Norbert Wallez, the editor of ''Le Petit Vingtième'' in which Tintin was serialized, wanted to inspire support for the Belgian colonial administration and Christian mission in Congo, and so some ExecutiveMeddling took place and Hergé was convinced to do a story about Congo instead. Hergé [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] look back at the story with embarrassment]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
12th Jan '17 9:10:24 AM buihuuduyet
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** The book is much more well received in the francophone world, including francophone Africa. It's seen as too farcical and irrealistic to be able to do any harm, and even as a good mean to ridicule colonialism.

to:

** The book is much more well received in the francophone world, including francophone Africa. It's seen as too farcical and irrealistic to be able to do any harm, and even as a good mean to [[PoesLaw ridicule colonialism.colonialism]].
8th Oct '16 3:27:58 AM Saveelich
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** Tintin shooting animals in the wild was less controversial in 1930 than it is now.

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** Tintin shooting killing lots of animals in the wild was less controversial in 1930 than it is now.
8th Oct '16 3:26:58 AM Saveelich
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* MarketBasedTitle: Its Portuguese edition is called ''Tintim em Angola'' ("Tintin in Angola"). In Netherlands and Finland it was called what translates to "Tintin in Africa."
8th Oct '16 3:25:57 AM Saveelich
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Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. Hergé himself [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.

to:

Today, ''Tintin in the Congo'' is rather infamous in some countries for its racist portrayal of the Congolese natives, its pro-colonialist themes and its utter disregard for animal welfare. Hergé himself [[OldShame would later become embarrassed by it]] and cited it as "bourgeois" and "paternalistic". Attempts have been made to ban the book entirely at times.times in some countries. It currently tends to be sold with a warning label informing potential readers about the controversial content (at least in Anglophone countries). It was also actually reprinted by a Congolese newspaper in the Seventies.
8th Oct '16 3:25:12 AM Saveelich
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptedOut: The Ellipse / Nelvana animated series didn't adapt this album, [[OldShame for obvious reasons]].
21st May '16 10:32:40 PM C2
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* BiggerBad: UsefulNotes/AlCapone. No, really.

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* BiggerBad: UsefulNotes/AlCapone. No, really. This is carried into ''Tintin in America''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Recap.TintinTintinInTheCongo