History Recap / LawAndOrderS17E16MurderBook

25th Oct '12 11:41:17 AM tennessean
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[=McCoy=] says that she thought Neville would be an asset; the case had forensic evidence and Neville had a PhD. Rubirosa says that Neville paid off $75,000 in student loans shortly after the trial. Turns out that Darby gave her a book contract -- and it was drafted before the case was over. Darby's contract with Lang would have been worthless if Lang were convicted, since Son of Sam laws would stop him from making any money off of it. Darby had to get Lang found innocent.

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[=McCoy=] says that she thought Neville would be an asset; the case had forensic evidence and Neville had a PhD.[=PhD=]. Rubirosa says that Neville paid off $75,000 in student loans shortly after the trial. Turns out that Darby gave her a book contract -- and it was drafted before the case was over. Darby's contract with Lang would have been worthless if Lang were convicted, since Son of Sam laws would stop him from making any money off of it. Darby had to get Lang found innocent.
29th Aug '10 8:05:19 PM GliderGuy
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Cassidy reports that the doorman didn't see anything as Green finds an ID. The dead body is Serena Darby, and she worked at Darby Books. Cassidy recognizes the company, but can't place where she heard it before. The medic says that Darby was probably slammed against the wall several times; she's missing teeth and has blunt force trauma wounds in her head. The medic adds that, after the beating, Darby was strangled to death. Cassidy comes back with Darby's company's latest book -- "If I Killed Her," by James Paul " J. P." Lang. Lang, a famous baseball player, had been accused of murdering his wife but was found not guilty; the book is him telling how he would have killed her had he been the guilty one. Cassidy remembers that the book had been pulled due to publicity backlash.

At the precinct, Cassidy says that CSU found dozens of fingerprints, enough that it will take a long time to process them, and Green says that there's no local family -- just a brother from Boston who will come in to make an identification. Van Buren says she'll hold off the tabloids, and wonders how the killers got out without the doorman seeing him. Green says there's a fire escape and the door was unlocked. Discussing witnesses, they have one person who heard an argument and slamming, which could have been Darby hitting the wall, but no one saw or heard anything more specific. Green thinks that the crime was too violent to be random, and Cassidy couldn't find anything in Darby's apartment to indicate that she had boyfriends or ex's. They decide to check out the publishing office that was going to publish Lang's book.

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Cassidy Cassady reports that the doorman didn't see anything as Green finds an ID. The dead body is Serena Darby, and she worked at Darby Books. Cassidy Cassady recognizes the company, but can't place where she heard it before. The medic says that Darby was probably slammed against the wall several times; she's missing teeth and has blunt force trauma wounds in her head. The medic adds that, after the beating, Darby was strangled to death. Cassidy Cassady comes back with Darby's company's latest book -- "If I Killed Her," by James Paul " J. P." Lang. Lang, a famous baseball player, had been accused of murdering his wife but was found not guilty; the book is him telling how he would have killed her had he been the guilty one. Cassidy Cassady remembers that the book had been pulled due to publicity backlash.

At the precinct, Cassidy Cassady says that CSU found dozens of fingerprints, enough that it will take a long time to process them, and Green says that there's no local family -- just a brother from Boston who will come in to make an identification. Van Buren says she'll hold off the tabloids, and wonders how the killers got out without the doorman seeing him. Green says there's a fire escape and the door was unlocked. Discussing witnesses, they have one person who heard an argument and slamming, which could have been Darby hitting the wall, but no one saw or heard anything more specific. Green thinks that the crime was too violent to be random, and Cassidy Cassady couldn't find anything in Darby's apartment to indicate that she had boyfriends or ex's. They decide to check out the publishing office that was going to publish Lang's book.



In Lang's apartment, he says that he wanted to write about baseball, but Darby insisted on a book about the murder. Lang says they argued the other day about the book -- he wanted to drop it, she wanted to try another publisher. He says that a 20 million civil judgment against him means he'll never make another penny, so he had no profit motive to see the book in print. He can only keep the apartment thanks to his baseball pension. Cassidy is unconvinced that he's really innocent of killing his wife.

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In Lang's apartment, he says that he wanted to write about baseball, but Darby insisted on a book about the murder. Lang says they argued the other day about the book -- he wanted to drop it, she wanted to try another publisher. He says that a 20 million civil judgment against him means he'll never make another penny, so he had no profit motive to see the book in print. He can only keep the apartment thanks to his baseball pension. Cassidy Cassady is unconvinced that he's really innocent of killing his wife.



--Nina Cassidy and J. P. Lang

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--Nina Cassidy Cassady and J. P. Lang



Savinsky says that he didn't know what was going on until it was too late. He was going to fire Darby at lunch that day. He adds that Lampard had pretended to be amenable to a settlement proposed by Darby, but stood her up when it came time to finalize. They talked the night of the murder and Lampard refused to drop the lawsuit, even once Savinsky said Darby was fired. But at the precinct, Van Buren points out that Lampard missed his time to attack Darby by missing their appointment, and that neither his prints nor Lang's were at the scene. Green says Lampard might have been wearing gloves. Cassidy says that the phone company confirms that Savinsky did talk to Lampard the night of the crime, but the restaurant said that Darby's bill was almost $200. They theorize that she was dining with someone. A waiter at the restaurant confirms that it was Lang, and that he argued with Darby and stuck her with the bill.

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Savinsky says that he didn't know what was going on until it was too late. He was going to fire Darby at lunch that day. He adds that Lampard had pretended to be amenable to a settlement proposed by Darby, but stood her up when it came time to finalize. They talked the night of the murder and Lampard refused to drop the lawsuit, even once Savinsky said Darby was fired. But at the precinct, Van Buren points out that Lampard missed his time to attack Darby by missing their appointment, and that neither his prints nor Lang's were at the scene. Green says Lampard might have been wearing gloves. Cassidy Cassady says that the phone company confirms that Savinsky did talk to Lampard the night of the crime, but the restaurant said that Darby's bill was almost $200. They theorize that she was dining with someone. A waiter at the restaurant confirms that it was Lang, and that he argued with Darby and stuck her with the bill.



-- Nina Cassidy and J. P. Lang

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-- Nina Cassidy Cassady and J. P. Lang



Later, Cassidy points out that no one ever saw the two together, but the secretary did know that Darby had a copy of the book. Green says they didn't find it at the scene -- the killer walked away with it, unless it didn't exist. Cassidy says that they don't think Lampard would have taken the book, but Van Buren points out that they don't even know if Lang actually signed it. They decide to search for it online.

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Later, Cassidy Cassady points out that no one ever saw the two together, but the secretary did know that Darby had a copy of the book. Green says they didn't find it at the scene -- the killer walked away with it, unless it didn't exist. Cassidy Cassady says that they don't think Lampard would have taken the book, but Van Buren points out that they don't even know if Lang actually signed it. They decide to search for it online.



--Nina Cassidy and memorabilia collector

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--Nina Cassidy Cassady and memorabilia collector



Waiting outside his place, the detectives surprise Stockwell entering. Stockwell tries to flee but is caught and arrested. At the precinct, Cassidy says that Stockwell was Lang's ghostwriter, but Darby fired him after his first draft. Furthermore, she reneged on her promise to publish his novel, but wouldn't return the rights. Blood on the book matches spatter from the crime scene.

In interrogation, Stockwell maintains his innocence. He thought Cassidy and Green were loan shark agents; he owes money to unsavory people. He says he was home the night of the murder. He found the book on his doorstep; he thought Darby had messengered it to him. He says that Lang hates him, so he assumed the inscription was directed at him. He adds that he sold the book so he could have money to eat. Green says that they found his fingerprints at the crime scene; Stockwell says he doesn't know how they got there. They arrest him.

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Waiting outside his place, the detectives surprise Stockwell entering. Stockwell tries to flee but is caught and arrested. At the precinct, Cassidy Cassady says that Stockwell was Lang's ghostwriter, but Darby fired him after his first draft. Furthermore, she reneged on her promise to publish his novel, but wouldn't return the rights. Blood on the book matches spatter from the crime scene.

In interrogation, Stockwell maintains his innocence. He thought Cassidy Cassady and Green were loan shark agents; he owes money to unsavory people. He says he was home the night of the murder. He found the book on his doorstep; he thought Darby had messengered it to him. He says that Lang hates him, so he assumed the inscription was directed at him. He adds that he sold the book so he could have money to eat. Green says that they found his fingerprints at the crime scene; Stockwell says he doesn't know how they got there. They arrest him.



--Nina Cassidy

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--Nina Cassidy
Cassady



Green and Cassidy arrest Lang in a crowd of media. His attorney, Carsley, says that the case is trumped up and [=McCoy=] just wants revenge. Later, the lawyers watch Carsley on TV. Branch again points out that [=McCoy=] really does want Lang back in jail, and [=McCoy=] maintains that he can differentiate between his emotions and the facts. Branch warns him against getting stuck in a personal fight. Rubirosa comes in -- Lang made bail, and Carsley is moving to exclude Neville's testimony.

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Green and Cassidy Cassady arrest Lang in a crowd of media. His attorney, Carsley, says that the case is trumped up and [=McCoy=] just wants revenge. Later, the lawyers watch Carsley on TV. Branch again points out that [=McCoy=] really does want Lang back in jail, and [=McCoy=] maintains that he can differentiate between his emotions and the facts. Branch warns him against getting stuck in a personal fight. Rubirosa comes in -- Lang made bail, and Carsley is moving to exclude Neville's testimony.
6th Aug '10 3:47:31 PM 76.99.63.227
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Rubirosa says that a surveillance camera caught Lang in Stockwell's neighborhood, far from his home. They think he was dropping the book off at Stockwell's to frame him.

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Rubirosa says that a surveillance camera caught Lang in Stockwell's neighborhood, far from his home.the penthouse. They think he was dropping the book off at Stockwell's to frame him.
6th Aug '10 3:46:48 PM 76.99.63.227
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In [=McCoy's=] office, Neville tries to pretend that she didn't do anything wrong, but [=McCoy=] calls her on it. He threatens her with seven years unless she comes clean. She says that it was supposed to be a hung jury. Darby promised her a best-selling book if she was the only holdout. Lang didn't know about the fix until Neville began blackmailing him. He paid her once, so she tried again -- right before Darby was killed. Lang didn't know who Neville was; only Darby dead.

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In [=McCoy's=] office, Neville tries to pretend that she didn't do anything wrong, but [=McCoy=] calls her on it. He threatens her with seven years unless she comes clean. She says that it was supposed to be a hung jury. Darby promised her a best-selling book if she was the only holdout. Lang didn't know about the fix until Neville began blackmailing him. He paid her once, so she tried again -- right before Darby was killed. Lang didn't know who Neville was; only Darby dead.
did.
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