History RealityIsUnrealistic / General

17th Aug '17 9:35:49 PM spydre
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* Only one frog in the world, the Pacific treefrog, actually says "ribbit". But, since it happens to be a common frog in the vicinity of Hollywood, where directors recorded it to score their night scenes, its call has spread around the glob.
17th Aug '17 9:34:09 PM spydre
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* Only one frog in the world, the Pacific treefrog, actually says "ribbit". But, since it happens to be a common frog in the vicinity of Hollywood, where directors recorded it to score their night scenes, its call has spread around the glob.
11th Aug '17 9:04:35 AM Jhonny
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*** It also should be remembered that, for most of Western history, Jews were ''not'' thought of as a separate race of people, at least insofar as they could intermix with native Europeans. Jews were simply ordinary people who followed the "wrong" religion, and killing them would have unjustly deprived them of the "salvation" they could achieve by becoming Christians; indeed, this was precisely why St. Augustine wrote that non-Christians should not be slain without good reason. ''Racial'' anti-Semitism wasn't recorded until the ''limpieza de sangre'' doctrine of fifteenth-century Spain (, and after that Jews continued to be mistrusted and hated for religious, political, and class-based reasons as least as much as racial ones.

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*** It also should be remembered that, for most of Western history, Jews were ''not'' thought of as a separate race of people, at least insofar as they could intermix with native Europeans. Jews were simply ordinary people who followed the "wrong" religion, and killing them would have unjustly deprived them of the "salvation" they could achieve by becoming Christians; indeed, this was precisely why St. Augustine wrote that non-Christians should not be slain without good reason. ''Racial'' anti-Semitism antisemitism wasn't recorded until the ''limpieza de sangre'' doctrine of fifteenth-century Spain (, Spain, and after that Jews continued to be mistrusted and hated for religious, political, and class-based reasons as least as much as racial ones.
11th Aug '17 9:04:01 AM Jhonny
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** Conversely, it's difficult to explain previous generational racism accurately without being accused of being "soft" on racism at times. For instance, anti-Semitism was pervasive in Europe and for over a millennium prior to World War II, but engaging in genocide would have been considered monstrous and unthinkable. This is, sadly, exactly why Nazi Germany came so close to succeeding -- virtually nobody believed they would do it, dismissing the evidence and survivors until the advancing lines uncovered the death camps.
*** Seeing how ''pogroms'' were already a thing, this doubles up as a very real life example of what could be found a very cartoonish case of EvenEvilHasStandards: people were not averse to the idea of violent anti-Semitism. It's just the whole institutionalized "final solution" business didn't strike them as a logical next step...
*** It also should be remembered that, for most of Western history, Jews were ''not'' thought of as a separate race of people, at least insofar as they could intermix with native Europeans (and, in fact, a great many Jews were actually former Christian or pagan Europeans who'd converted). Jews were simply ordinary people who followed the "wrong" religion, and killing them would have unjustly deprived them of the "salvation" they could achieve by becoming Christians; indeed, this was precisely why St. Augustine wrote that non-Christians should not be slain without good reason. ''Racial'' anti-Semitism wasn't recorded until the ''limpieza de sangre'' doctrine of fifteenth-century Spain (Sephardic Jews being largely immigrants from North Africa rather than the Nordic and Slavic converts seen elsewhere in Europe), and after that Jews continued to be mistrusted and hated for religious, political, and class-based reasons as least as much as racial ones.

to:

** Conversely, it's difficult to explain previous generational racism accurately without being accused of being "soft" on racism at times. For instance, anti-Semitism antisemitism was pervasive in Europe and for over a millennium prior to World War II, but engaging in genocide would have been considered monstrous and unthinkable. This is, sadly, exactly why Nazi Germany came so close to succeeding -- virtually nobody believed they would do it, dismissing the evidence and survivors until the advancing lines uncovered the death camps.
*** Seeing how ''pogroms'' were already a thing, this doubles up as a very real life example of what could be found a very cartoonish case of EvenEvilHasStandards: people were not averse to the idea of violent anti-Semitism.antisemitism. It's just the whole institutionalized "final solution" business didn't strike them as a logical next step...
*** It also should be remembered that, for most of Western history, Jews were ''not'' thought of as a separate race of people, at least insofar as they could intermix with native Europeans (and, in fact, a great many Jews were actually former Christian or pagan Europeans who'd converted).Europeans. Jews were simply ordinary people who followed the "wrong" religion, and killing them would have unjustly deprived them of the "salvation" they could achieve by becoming Christians; indeed, this was precisely why St. Augustine wrote that non-Christians should not be slain without good reason. ''Racial'' anti-Semitism wasn't recorded until the ''limpieza de sangre'' doctrine of fifteenth-century Spain (Sephardic Jews being largely immigrants from North Africa rather than the Nordic and Slavic converts seen elsewhere in Europe), (, and after that Jews continued to be mistrusted and hated for religious, political, and class-based reasons as least as much as racial ones.
11th Aug '17 8:56:59 AM Jhonny
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** Look at the picture of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arlen_Siu Arlen Siu]] - would your first though be "Nicaraguan"? Furthermore, would you have guessed she was a martyr for the Sandinista cause? Many Latin American countries actually have a sizable "Asian" minority and Peru even has a quite important Japanese minority, of which Alberto Fujimori and his daughter Keiko are only the most well known examples. Basically, if there is any ethnic group you can find in the US, you are likely to find it in some place in Latin America as well.

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** Look at the picture of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arlen_Siu Arlen Siu]] - would your first though thought be "Nicaraguan"? Furthermore, would you have guessed she was a martyr for the Sandinista cause? Many Latin American countries actually have a sizable "Asian" minority and Peru even has a quite important Japanese minority, of which Alberto Fujimori and his daughter Keiko are only the most well known examples. Basically, if there is any ethnic group you can find in the US, you are likely to find it in some place in Latin America as well.
10th Aug '17 3:16:47 PM Shorty_Lickens
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* Unless something very strange happened with their metabolism, caucasians almost always turn yellow when they die, not white. This is rarely portrayed correctly in action and sci-fi, and and infrequently in horror. Possibly because television and film started in black & white, but also because it looks sickeningly gross whereas most deaths are portrayed dramatically instead of frighteningly. In fact if a white persons blood flow slows considerably their skin will probably turn yellow before they even die. It is usually portrayed accurately in medical dramas, but not always.
9th Aug '17 1:34:49 AM AntonF
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** An especially common error is assuming that that Iran is inhabited by Arabs, or the Persians are a subset of Arabs. These two communities share the religion of Islam, but other than that, they are as far away as night and day. Iran prouds itself for its over 2,500-year history with one of the oldest Indo-European language to branch out of the common tongue. Naturally, they didn't let go of this heritage easily when foreign influences came in, just as Europeans didn't shade their pagan festivals when Christianity knocked in. There are Iranians who have names of Arabic origin, of course, but names of indigenous origin, especially those taken from poetry, are more common still. Some names, like Manouchehr, Payam, and Jahangir (boys), or Ghoncheh, Mahvash, and Parisa (girls) can't occur in Arabic because the sounds used are nonexistent there.
** The Turks of Turkey have it worse, as they have even less in common with the Arabs, and calling them Mideast peoples, insofar as how the latter are viewed in popular culture, is plain wrong. The Turks owe their heritage more to the native folks of Anatolia who spoke mainly Greek (in the west) and Armenian (in the east) before the 1071 Battle of Manzikert, which opened the doors for Turkish-speaking populations to settle in the peninsula. Turkey is also the usual destination for Muslim immigrants fleeing persecution in Europe during the 19th-20th century, most of whom are European converts who still keep some of their traditions to this very day.
** Even calling Arabs an ethnic group is already problematic by itself. No such thing as a unified Arab culture exists; each so-called Arab country has a different set of traditions, and each part of the country in turn has its own quirks. Different nations that sprang up and readily identified as separate during antiquity, such the Babylonians in southern Iraq, the Phoenicians in Lebanon and coastal Syria, and the Berbers in Northwestern Africa, never actually stop existing; what brought them together is the Arabic language and the Islamic religion. Moreover, you'll be hard pressed to understand the speech of the Moroccans without resorting to code-switching if you only understand Egyptian Arabic, just as a Frenchman can't understand Russian any better. These places are thousands of miles away from each other, and not everyone are interested in travelling, especially not during the medieval era.

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** An especially common error is assuming that that Iran is inhabited by Arabs, or the Persians are a subset of Arabs. These two communities share the religion of Islam, Islam and the Arabic script, but other than that, they are as far away different as night and day. Iran prouds boasts itself for its over 2,500-year history with one of the oldest Indo-European language to branch out of the common tongue. Naturally, they didn't let go of this heritage easily when foreign influences came in, just as Europeans didn't shade shed their pagan festivals when Christianity knocked in. There are Iranians who have names of Arabic origin, of course, but names of indigenous origin, especially those taken from poetry, are more common still. Some names, like Manouchehr, Payam, and Jahangir (boys), or Ghoncheh, Mahvash, and Parisa (girls) can't occur in Arabic because the sounds used are nonexistent there.
** The Turks of Turkey have it worse, as they have even less in common with the Arabs, and calling them Mideast peoples, insofar as how the latter are viewed in popular culture, is plain wrong. The Turks owe their heritage more to the native folks of Anatolia who spoke mainly Greek (in the west) and Armenian (in the east) before the 1071 Battle of Manzikert, which opened the doors for Turkish-speaking populations to settle in the peninsula. Turkey is also the usual destination for Muslim immigrants fleeing persecution in Europe during the 19th-20th century, most of whom are European converts who still keep some of their traditions to this very day.
day. Another mistake is depicting Turkish as written using Arabic instead of Latin script. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_language#Writing_system The former hasn't been used for nearly a century]].
** Even calling Arabs an ethnic group is already problematic by itself. No such thing as a unified Arab culture exists; each so-called Arab country has a different set of traditions, and each part of the country in turn has its own quirks. Different nations that sprang up and readily identified as separate during antiquity, such as the Babylonians in southern Iraq, the Phoenicians in Lebanon and coastal Syria, and the Berbers in Northwestern Africa, never actually stop existing; what brought them together is the Arabic language and the Islamic religion. Moreover, you'll be hard pressed to understand the speech of the Moroccans without resorting to code-switching if you only understand Egyptian Arabic, just as a Frenchman can't understand Russian any better. These places are thousands of miles away from each other, and not everyone are interested in travelling, especially not during the medieval era.
6th Aug '17 10:05:20 PM AntonF
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* Not everybody in [[{{Qurac}} the Middle East]] is named Mahmud, or Ahmad, or Muhammad. The region is a very diverse place, just as Europe is a very diverse continent, and Arabs are hardly the only ethnic group to live there by a wide margin.
** An especially common error is assuming that that Iran is inhabited by Arabs, or the Persians are a subset of Arabs. These two communities share the religion of Islam, but other than that, they are as far away as night and day. Iran prouds itself for its over 2,500-year history with one of the oldest Indo-European language to branch out of the common tongue. Naturally, they didn't let go of this heritage easily when foreign influences came in, just as Europeans didn't shade their pagan festivals when Christianity knocked in. There are Iranians who have names of Arabic origin, of course, but names of indigenous origin, especially those taken from poetry, are more common still. Some names, like Manouchehr, Payam, and Jahangir (boys), or Ghoncheh, Mahvash, and Parisa (girls) can't occur in Arabic because the sounds used are nonexistent there.
** The Turks of Turkey have it worse, as they have even less in common with the Arabs, and calling them Mideast peoples, insofar as how the latter are viewed in popular culture, is plain wrong. The Turks owe their heritage more to the native folks of Anatolia who spoke mainly Greek (in the west) and Armenian (in the east) before the 1071 Battle of Manzikert, which opened the doors for Turkish-speaking populations to settle in the peninsula. Turkey is also the usual destination for Muslim immigrants fleeing persecution in Europe during the 19th-20th century, most of whom are European converts who still keep some of their traditions to this very day.
** Even calling Arabs an ethnic group is already problematic by itself. No such thing as a unified Arab culture exists; each so-called Arab country has a different set of traditions, and each part of the country in turn has its own quirks. Different nations that sprang up and readily identified as separate during antiquity, such the Babylonians in southern Iraq, the Phoenicians in Lebanon and coastal Syria, and the Berbers in Northwestern Africa, never actually stop existing; what brought them together is the Arabic language and the Islamic religion. Moreover, you'll be hard pressed to understand the speech of the Moroccans without resorting to code-switching if you only understand Egyptian Arabic, just as a Frenchman can't understand Russian any better. These places are thousands of miles away from each other, and not everyone are interested in travelling, especially not during the medieval era.
2nd Aug '17 5:00:00 PM thecarolinabull01
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* Any time the UglyGuyHotWife trope is played straight it is often given flack by fans because everyone knows that no woman that good-looking would ever choose a partner who is beneath them on the attractiveness scale unless that he is rich or well-hung. According to several research articles [[http://elitedaily.com/women/women-dating-ugly-guys/1092623/ like]] [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/verena-von-pfetten/why-women-gladly-date-ugl_b_100704.html these]] [[http://www.livescience.com/7483-beautiful-women-marry-attractive-men.html three]], this may actually be more common in RealLife than fiction would lead you to believe. The same goes for the inverse HotGuyUglyWife, even though it's less common in fiction than its SpearCounterpart.
22nd Jul '17 4:52:22 AM Morgenthaler
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* Many people of Spanish, Latin American and Italian descent have light skin tone and hair, but you'll be hard-pressed to find them in American media.
** A good example is Sofía Vergara. She's naturally blonde but dyes her hair to look more "Latin."

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* Many people of Spanish, Latin American and Italian descent have light skin tone and hair, but [[LatinoIsBrown you'll be hard-pressed to find them in American media.
media]].
** A good example is Sofía Vergara.Creator/SofiaVergara. She's naturally blonde but dyes her hair to look more "Latin."
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