History RealLife / CoolPlane

20th Jan '18 4:41:07 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_P-61_Black_Widow Northrop P-61 Black Widow]]''', apart from it's [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast dangerous-sounding]] AwesomeMcCoolname, was the first night fighter of US design. It was faster than the legendary Mosquito at all altitudes, capable of climbing faster, and to add insult to injury can make tighter turns than the Mosquito. It was also heavily armed with four nose-mounted 20mm cannons, as well as a quartet of 12.7mm M2 Browning machine guns mounted in a remote-controlled turret at the top-back of the aircraft. A [=P-61=] was credited with the last unofficial kill of the Pacific Theater, when a Nakajima [=Ki-44=] dived on the [=P-61=] flying at wave level and began a series of maneuvers that ended with [[EpicFail the pilot striking the water]].



** Neither did the fact that majority of the Japanese Navy fighter pilots were enlisted men, while officers beyond Lieutenant Commander usually held desk jobs. And held the enlisted men and junior officers in contempt. Saburo Sakai (an enlisted Warrant Officer who was eventually commissioned and made Lt.JG in 1945) wrote bitterly of those [[ArmchairMilitary officers who could command but not fly]].

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** Neither did the fact that majority of the Japanese Navy fighter pilots were enlisted men, while officers beyond Lieutenant Commander usually held desk jobs. And held the enlisted men and junior officers in contempt. Saburo Sakai (an enlisted Warrant Officer who was eventually commissioned and made Lt.JG in 1945) 1945, and one of the few lucky enough to survive the entire wa) wrote bitterly of those [[ArmchairMilitary officers who could command but not fly]].


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* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Me_410 Messerschmitt Me 410 ]]''' ''Hornisse'' ("Hornet") , developed from the [[TheAllegedCar infamously dangerous to fly]] Me 210, proved an elusive target for RAF night fighters. The plane can carry a variety of armaments and bombs (there was even one variant armed with a 50mm cannon adapted from a Panzer III tank) allowing it to act in all sorts of roles ranging from night fighter, fighter-bomber, and interceptor. It was, at first, moderately successful in it's intended role as interceptor, until a guy named Jimmy Doolittle developed a tactic of letting Allied fighter escorts fly ahead of the bomber streams to clear the skies of Luftwaffe aircraft, resulting in mounting losses for the Me 410 as it was ill-suited to fighting against single-engined fighters which were more agile than it was. Nevertheless, the Me 410 continued service well afterwards, if only in the rather unremarkable role of recon aircraft.
* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junkers_Ju_88 Junkers Ju 88]]''', a German attempt at their ''Schnellbomber'' concept, was one of World War II's most versatile twin-engined aircraft, capable of doing anything from level bombing, ''dive bombing'', torpedo-bombing, reconnaisance, as well as heavy/night fighter roles. It was also the aircraft used by the Germans in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_raid_on_Bari Air raid over Bari Harbor]] (the raid was nicknamed "Little Pearl Harbor"); 105 Ju [=88s=] surprised the Allied defenders (who did not assign fighters to guard Bari as they believed [[TemptingFate the Luftwaffe incapable of striking at such strength at that stage of the war]]) and attacked with bombs and ''Motobomba'' Italian circling torpedoes, sinking twenty-eight merchant ships, rendering the harbor unusable for three weeks as well as making it incapable of operating at full capacity until February 1944, and leading to an unintentional [[DeadlyGas chemical gas release]] when USS ''John Harvey'' sank and spilled liquid sulfur mustard into the harbor's waters. Said battle was a CurbStompBattle for the Germans, who only lost ''one'' Ju 88.
18th Jan '18 8:09:08 PM YoshimitsuMaster
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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]''', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite its ugly/outdated looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''. The Kate's huge wing area and plan-form was designed for maximum lift and maneuverability, allowing it to carry up to 800 kilograms of ordnance (the heaviest of which were a battleship cannon-projectile with fins attached or an 800 kg torpedo with wooden fins stuck on to keep drop depth to a minimum) and out-turn most Allied fighters of the day (its pitiful defensive armament consisted of a single Type 92 Lewis gun mounted at the rear of the cockpit).

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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]''', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite its ugly/outdated looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''. The Kate's huge wing area and plan-form was designed for maximum lift and maneuverability, allowing it to carry up to 800 kilograms of ordnance (the heaviest of which were a battleship cannon-projectile with fins attached [[note]] One such projectile is the reason the USS Arizona has rested beneath the waters of Pearl Harbor after it was sunk on December 7 1941 [[/note]] or an 800 kg torpedo with wooden fins stuck on to keep drop depth to a minimum) and out-turn most Allied fighters of the day (its pitiful defensive armament consisted of a single Type 92 Lewis gun mounted at the rear of the cockpit).cockpit).



* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_CR.42 FIAT CR.42]]'''. The last biplane fighter, and the fastest (top speed of 434 kph, or 270 mph) and more advanced of them all, and that, coupled with its awesome manouverability, allowed it to hold its own against early monoplanes, and [[WorthyOpponent praised for it by the RAF]]. Sadly, it came too late, when tougher, better armed and increasingly faster monoplanes were becoming the norm, and, after a few attempts at keeping it competitive by installing heavier weapons and the Daimler-Benz DB 601A engine (resulting in a top speed of 525 kph (326 mph), making it the fastest biplane to have ever flown, it was admitted to be outmatched and phased out. It still managed to get kills as late as 1945, with their last victory being claimed on February 8 against a P-38.

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* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_CR.42 FIAT Fiat CR.42]]'''. The last biplane fighter, and the fastest (top speed of 434 kph, or 270 mph) and more advanced of them all, and that, coupled with its awesome manouverability, allowed it to hold its own against early monoplanes, and [[WorthyOpponent praised for it by the RAF]]. Sadly, it came too late, when tougher, better armed and increasingly faster monoplanes were becoming the norm, and, after a few attempts at keeping it competitive by installing heavier weapons and the Daimler-Benz DB 601A engine (resulting in a top speed of 525 kph (326 mph), making it the fastest biplane to have ever flown, it was admitted to be outmatched and phased out. It still managed to get kills as late as 1945, with their last victory being claimed on February 8 against a P-38.
18th Jan '18 2:39:24 PM TheWildWestPyro
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* The '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtiss_P-40_Warhawk Curtiss P-40 Warhawk]]''' (as well as her derivative models) has been denigrated by many as an obsolete airframe with poor handling characteristics, suitable only as a stopgap in the ground-attack role. However, The P-40's wartime record and the recommendations of her pilots tell a different story. Far from being a poor dogfighter, the P-40 had one of the tightest turning radii of her contemporaries at high speed. Further, the Warhawk's modular construction and 5-spar wing design meant that it was a rugged aircraft which could sustain horrific damage and be repaired easily. There is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kittyhawkdamaged.jpg a photo]] on Wiki/TheOtherWiki of a P-40 which lost a quarter of a wing from artillery shell hit and managed to return home. The Warhawk and the Kittyhawk were made famous by the American Volunteer Group, the AVG, more commonly known as the Flying Tigers, especially for their special painting of the noses like the the heads of ferocious sharks ready to chew up the enemy.

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* The '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtiss_P-40_Warhawk Curtiss P-40 Warhawk]]''' (as well as her derivative models) has been denigrated by many as an obsolete airframe with poor handling characteristics, suitable only as a stopgap in the ground-attack role. However, The P-40's wartime record and the recommendations of her pilots tell a different story. Far from being a poor dogfighter, the P-40 had one of the tightest turning radii of her contemporaries at high speed. Further, the Warhawk's modular construction and 5-spar wing design meant that it was a rugged aircraft which could sustain horrific damage and be repaired easily. There is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kittyhawkdamaged.jpg a photo]] on Wiki/TheOtherWiki of a P-40 which lost a quarter of a wing from artillery shell hit and managed to return home. The Warhawk and the Kittyhawk were made famous by the American Volunteer Group, Group assisting Nationalist China, the AVG, more commonly known as the Flying Tigers, especially for their special painting of the noses like the the heads of ferocious sharks ready to chew up the enemy.Japanese.
18th Jan '18 8:13:09 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]'', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite its ugly/outdated looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''. The Kate's huge wing area and plan-form was designed for maximum lift and maneuverability, allowing it to carry up to 800 kilograms of ordnance (the heaviest of which were a battleship cannon-projectile with fins attached or an 800 kg torpedo with wooden fins stuck on to keep drop depth to a minimum) and outturn most Allied fighters of the day (its pitiful defensive armament consisted of a single Type 92 Lewis gun mounted at the rear of the cockpit).

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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the ''[[https://en.'''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]'', B5N]]''', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite its ugly/outdated looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''. The Kate's huge wing area and plan-form was designed for maximum lift and maneuverability, allowing it to carry up to 800 kilograms of ordnance (the heaviest of which were a battleship cannon-projectile with fins attached or an 800 kg torpedo with wooden fins stuck on to keep drop depth to a minimum) and outturn out-turn most Allied fighters of the day (its pitiful defensive armament consisted of a single Type 92 Lewis gun mounted at the rear of the cockpit).
18th Jan '18 7:39:26 AM axc387
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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]'', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite it's ugly looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''.

to:

* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]]'', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite it's ugly its ugly/outdated looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''. The Kate's huge wing area and plan-form was designed for maximum lift and maneuverability, allowing it to carry up to 800 kilograms of ordnance (the heaviest of which were a battleship cannon-projectile with fins attached or an 800 kg torpedo with wooden fins stuck on to keep drop depth to a minimum) and outturn most Allied fighters of the day (its pitiful defensive armament consisted of a single Type 92 Lewis gun mounted at the rear of the cockpit).
18th Jan '18 6:00:45 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]], known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite it's ugly looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''.

to:

* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the [[https://en.''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]], B5N]]'', known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite it's ugly looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''.
18th Jan '18 6:00:08 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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* While the '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewster_F2A_Buffalo Brewster 239]]''' fighter has received a lot bad press in the US and elsewhere, due to the glacial pace the factory turned them out and some correctable bugs that nobody invested the time to fix, but the Finns loved it when they got hold of it. On 17 October 1939, the Finnish Embassy in Washington, DC, received a telegram clearing the purchase of fighter aircraft. Prompt availability and compatibility with 87-octane fuel (which they could get from Sweden and Germany) were the only stipulated requirements. The Buffalo was the only American fighter that met both. It was maneuverable, durable, and had a long air endurance time of 4 hours. It was popular enough that the State Aircraft Factory (today's Patria Industries) designed their own wooden copy of it, the VL Humu, the prototype of which is on display in the Central Finland Aviation Museum. Almost all top Finnish aces scored at least some victories with a Buffalo, with top pilots Hans Wind (39 kills of his 78) and Ilmari Juutilainen (36 of 94) leading the way. The plane had 32:1 kill to loss ratio against the Soviets, and some pilots went on to score victories even in the Lapland War against the Germans. The last Brewsters were phased out in 1948, having been used as liaison aircraft after the war.

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* While the '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewster_F2A_Buffalo Brewster 239]]''' F2A Buffalo]]''' fighter has received a lot bad press in the US and elsewhere, due to the glacial pace the factory turned them out and some correctable bugs that nobody invested the time to fix, but the Finns loved it when they got hold of it. On 17 October 1939, the Finnish Embassy in Washington, DC, received a telegram clearing the purchase of fighter aircraft. Prompt availability and compatibility with 87-octane fuel (which they could get from Sweden and Germany) were the only stipulated requirements. The Buffalo was the only American fighter that met both. It was maneuverable, durable, and had a long air endurance time of 4 hours. It was popular enough that the State Aircraft Factory (today's Patria Industries) designed their own wooden copy of it, the VL Humu, the prototype of which is on display in the Central Finland Aviation Museum. Almost all top Finnish aces scored at least some victories with a Buffalo, with top pilots Hans Wind (39 kills of his 78) and Ilmari Juutilainen (36 of 94) leading the way. The plane had 32:1 kill to loss ratio against the Soviets, and some pilots went on to score victories even in the Lapland War against the Germans. The last Brewsters were phased out in 1948, having been used as liaison aircraft after the war.



* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macchi_C.205 Macchi C.205 Veltro]]''', hailing from Italy, is one of the finest World War II fighters, and gave the Allied Spitfire and Mustang fighters [[WorthyOpponent major troubles]] in the hands of a good pilot. While unfortunately introduced too late and in too little amounts (only 262 were ever built, not helped by the plane's tricky construction which made it slow to build), the Veltro was well-armed [[note]] or at least, the later variants which are equipped with two 20mm [=MG151=] cannons and two 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT machineguns; the earlier variants do not have the cannons [[/note]], fast (reaching 640kph), and turned really well. It was liked and respected by both Axis and Allied pilots, and famed test pilot Eric Brown called it one of the finest aircraft he ever flew, and a perfect blend of Italian design and German engineering.

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* The '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macchi_C.205 Macchi C.205 Veltro]]''', hailing from Italy, is one of the finest World War II fighters, and gave the Allied Spitfire and Mustang fighters [[WorthyOpponent major troubles]] in the hands of a good pilot. While unfortunately introduced too late and in too little amounts (only 262 were ever built, not helped by the plane's tricky construction which made it slow to build), the Veltro was well-armed [[note]] or at least, the later variants which are equipped with two 20mm [=MG151=] cannons and two 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT machineguns; the earlier variants do not have the cannons [[/note]], fast (reaching 640kph), and turned really well. It was liked and respected by both Axis and Allied pilots, and famed test pilot Eric Brown called it one of the finest aircraft he ever flew, flew and a perfect blend of Italian design and German engineering.



* The ''' [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_Ki-61 Ki-61 Hien]]''' "Flying Swallow" was an indigenous Japanese design, but was so out-of-sync, looks-wise, with the rest of the Japanese aircraft that Allied pilots initially refused to believe it was Japanese, believing it to be a licence-built Bf 109 (hence it's earlier Allied nickname of "Mike"), and later a licence-built [=MC=] C.202 ''Folgore'' (hence the later "Tony" Allied nickname); the Allies were quite shocked to learn that the Ki-61 ''was'' indeed Japanese when one was captured and tested. The ''Hien'' had good armor and self-sealing fuel tanks, lacking the Zero's or the Hayabusa's fragility, and was also quite speedy thanks to it's Ha-40 engine (a licence-built DB 601). This proved a nasty shock to Allied pilots who [[OhCrap found out the hard way that the Ki-61 can keep up with them in a dive]]. Only teething problems due to being rushed to service (and poor attention to engine behavior in tropical climates) and deteriorating Japanese manufacturing conditions kept it from showing its true potential. Later, when the Ha-40 was put out of production due to Allied bombing raids, the engineers at Kawasaki decided to replace the engine with the Mitsubishi Ha-112 Kinsei radial engine. The result was the Ki-100, which had much better performance in medium altitude dogfighting than its predecessor against the P-51 Mustang and the P-47 Thunderbolt in that the Ki-100 had a tighter turning radius than the other two and could keep pace with them in a high speed dive.

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* The ''' [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_Ki-61 Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien]]''' "Flying Swallow" ("Flying Swallow") was an indigenous Japanese design, but was looked so out-of-sync, looks-wise, with out-of-the-ordinary from the rest of the Japanese aircraft that Allied pilots initially refused to believe it was Japanese, believing it to be a licence-built Bf 109 (hence it's earlier Allied nickname of "Mike"), and later a licence-built [=MC=] C.202 ''Folgore'' (hence the later "Tony" Allied nickname); the Allies were quite shocked to learn that the Ki-61 ''was'' indeed Japanese when one was captured and tested. The ''Hien'' had good armor and self-sealing fuel tanks, lacking the Zero's or the Hayabusa's fragility, and was also quite speedy thanks to it's Ha-40 engine (a licence-built DB 601). This proved a nasty shock to Allied pilots who [[OhCrap found out the hard way that the Ki-61 can keep up with them in a dive]]. Only teething problems due to being rushed to service (and poor attention to engine behavior in tropical climates) and deteriorating Japanese manufacturing conditions kept it from showing its true potential.
**
Later, when the Ha-40 was put out of production due to Allied bombing raids, the engineers at Kawasaki decided to replace the engine with the Mitsubishi Ha-112 Kinsei radial engine. The result was the Ki-100, which had much better performance in medium altitude dogfighting than its predecessor against the P-51 Mustang and the P-47 Thunderbolt in that the Ki-100 had a tighter turning radius than the other two and could keep pace with them in a high speed dive.


Added DiffLines:

* Another Japanese example of a plane that isn't cool by appearance but certainly is by achievements is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_B5N Nakajima B5N]], known as "Kate" to the Allies. Despite it's ugly looks (being a design dating back to 1935), it was actually faster than the contemporary American-made TBD Devastator and the British-made Fairey Swordfish. Like the Swordfish, it was obsolete before Japan went to war with the US, but stayed in service right till the end. The Kate's achievements include sinking the USS ''Lexington'' and ''Hornet'' carriers during the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Santa Cruz respectively, as well as disabling the ''Yorktown'', in turn making her an easy target for the Japanese [=I-168=] submarine which later sank the ''Yorktown''.
16th Jan '18 7:31:59 AM axc387
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* The ''' [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_Ki-61 Ki-61 Hien]]''' "Flying Swallow" was an indigenous Japanese design, but was so out-of-sync, looks-wise, with the rest of the Japanese aircraft that Allied pilots initially refused to believe it was Japanese, believing it to be a licence-built Bf 109 (hence it's earlier Allied nickname of "Mike"), and later a licence-built [=MC=] C.202 ''Folgore'' (hence the later "Tony" Allied nickname); the Allies were quite shocked to learn that the Ki-61 ''was'' indeed Japanese when one was captured and tested. The ''Hien'' had good armor and self-sealing fuel tanks, lacking the Zero's or the Hayabusa's fragility, and was also quite speedy thanks to it's Ha-40 engine (a licence-built DB 601). This proved a nasty shock to Allied pilots who [[OhCrap found out the hard way that the Ki-61 can keep up with them in a dive]]. Only teething problems due to being rushed to service and deteriorating Japanese conditions kept it from showing its true potential.

to:

* The ''' [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_Ki-61 Ki-61 Hien]]''' "Flying Swallow" was an indigenous Japanese design, but was so out-of-sync, looks-wise, with the rest of the Japanese aircraft that Allied pilots initially refused to believe it was Japanese, believing it to be a licence-built Bf 109 (hence it's earlier Allied nickname of "Mike"), and later a licence-built [=MC=] C.202 ''Folgore'' (hence the later "Tony" Allied nickname); the Allies were quite shocked to learn that the Ki-61 ''was'' indeed Japanese when one was captured and tested. The ''Hien'' had good armor and self-sealing fuel tanks, lacking the Zero's or the Hayabusa's fragility, and was also quite speedy thanks to it's Ha-40 engine (a licence-built DB 601). This proved a nasty shock to Allied pilots who [[OhCrap found out the hard way that the Ki-61 can keep up with them in a dive]]. Only teething problems due to being rushed to service (and poor attention to engine behavior in tropical climates) and deteriorating Japanese manufacturing conditions kept it from showing its true potential.potential. Later, when the Ha-40 was put out of production due to Allied bombing raids, the engineers at Kawasaki decided to replace the engine with the Mitsubishi Ha-112 Kinsei radial engine. The result was the Ki-100, which had much better performance in medium altitude dogfighting than its predecessor against the P-51 Mustang and the P-47 Thunderbolt in that the Ki-100 had a tighter turning radius than the other two and could keep pace with them in a high speed dive.



* Perhaps not cool in appearance but cool by achievements, the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aichi_D3A Aichi D3A]]''' was the most successful carrier-launched dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy, having been the first to bomb American targets and having sunk more Allied warships than all other Axis aircraft combined! Quite an accomplishment for a design completed in 1937 and accepted into service in 1939. The [=D3A=], whose Allied reporting name was "Val," was chosen over its more advanced rival, the Nakajima [=D3N=], because it had better flight performance despite having a fixed undercarriage. Notable features include a well-designed elliptical wing (with wash-out function to combat stalling and sudden unwanted snap-rolling), effective dive brakes which prevented the plane from passing the aircraft's never-exceed speed [[note]] at which point aerodynamic drag tears the plane to pieces [[/note]] in a dive and allowed the pilot plenty of time to line up and drop an armor-piercing bomb into a very vulnerable spot on a warship, and an extended vertical tail fin similar to that on the Boeing B-17 for better stability. After dropping its bomb-load, the [=D3A=] could act like a two-seat fighter as it possessed superb maneuverability (and indeed, several times the plane was called to serve in that role). The only problem with that application was that the [=D3A=] only possessed two rifle-caliber machine guns in the engine cowling and a Type 92 Lewis gun for the tail gunner [[note]](rifle bullets tend not to do much critical damage to aircraft developed after 1940 unless the pilot/gunner tries SnipingTheCockpit) [[/note]]. Being easy to fly meant that the [=D3A=] was good for training new pilots after getting declared obsolete for front-line service, but it also became a prime candidate for carrying out Kamikaze strikes [[note]](on one such mission, a pilot and gunner pair abandoned the mission after losing squadron mates to American fighters. The surviving bomber jettisoned its bombs and then was chased home by three [=F4U=] Corsairs in hot pursuit, with the Corsairs eventually calling it quits after wasting all their ammunition trying to down the more agile [=D3A=], which then crash-landed with both crewmen surviving the incident and the rest of the war)[[/note]].

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* Perhaps not cool in appearance but cool by achievements, the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aichi_D3A Aichi D3A]]''' was the most successful carrier-launched dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy, having been the first to bomb American targets and having sunk more Allied warships than all other Axis aircraft combined! Quite an accomplishment for a design completed in 1937 and accepted into service in 1939. The [=D3A=], whose Allied reporting name was "Val," was chosen over its more advanced rival, the Nakajima [=D3N=], because it had better flight performance despite having a fixed undercarriage. Notable features include a well-designed elliptical wing (with wash-out function to combat stalling and sudden unwanted snap-rolling), effective dive brakes which prevented the plane from passing the aircraft's never-exceed speed [[note]] at which point aerodynamic drag tears the plane to pieces [[/note]] in a dive and allowed the pilot plenty of time to line up and drop an armor-piercing bomb into a very vulnerable spot on a warship, and an extended vertical tail fin similar to that on the Boeing B-17 for better stability. After dropping its bomb-load, the [=D3A=] could act like a two-seat fighter as it possessed superb maneuverability (and indeed, several times the plane was called to serve in that role). The only problem with that application was that the [=D3A=] [=D3A's=] defensive equipment consisted of only possessed two Type 97 Vickers rifle-caliber machine guns in the engine cowling and a Type 92 Lewis gun for the tail gunner [[note]](rifle gunner[[note]]rifle bullets tend not to do much critical damage to aircraft developed after 1940 unless the pilot/gunner tries SnipingTheCockpit) [[/note]]. SnipingTheCockpit[[/note]]. Being easy to fly meant that the [=D3A=] was good for training new pilots after getting declared obsolete for front-line service, but it also became a prime candidate for carrying out Kamikaze strikes [[note]](on strikes[[note]]on one such mission, sortie, a pilot and gunner pair abandoned of a [=D3A=] agreed to abort the mission after losing squadron mates to American fighters. The surviving dive bomber jettisoned its bombs and then was chased home by three [=F4U=] Corsairs in hot pursuit, with the Corsairs. The Corsairs eventually calling called it quits after wasting all their ammunition trying to down the more agile [=D3A=], which then crash-landed with both crewmen surviving the incident and the rest of the war)[[/note]].war[[/note]].
15th Jan '18 3:27:30 AM YoshimitsuMaster
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* Perhaps not cool in appearance but cool by achievements, the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aichi_D3A Aichi D3A]]''' was the most successful carrier-launched dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy, having been the first to bomb American targets and having sunk more Allied warships than all other Axis aircraft combined! Quite an accomplishment for a design completed in 1937 and accepted into service in 1939. The [=D3A=], whose Allied reporting name was "Val," was chosen over its more advanced rival, the Nakajima [=D3N=], because it had better flight performance despite having a fixed undercarriage. Notable features include a well-designed elliptical wing (with wash-out function to combat stalling and sudden unwanted snap-rolling), effective dive brakes which prevented the plane from passing the aircraft's never-exceed speed [[note]] at which point aerodynamic drag tears the plane to pieces [[/note]] in a dive and allowed the pilot plenty of time to line up and drop an armor-piercing bomb into a very vulnerable spot on a warship, and an extended vertical tail fin similar to that on the Boeing B-17 for better stability. After dropping its bomb-load, the [=D3A=] could act like a two-seat fighter as it possessed superb maneuverability (and indeed, several times the plane was called to serve in that role). The only problem with that application was that the [=D3A=] possessed two rifle-caliber machine guns in the engine cowling and a Type 92 Lewis gun for the tail gunner (rifle bullets tend not to do much critical damage to aircraft developed after 1940 unless the pilot/gunner tries SnipingTheCockpit). Being easy to fly meant that the [=D3A=] was good for training new pilots after getting declared obsolete for front-line service, but it also became a prime candidate for carrying out Kamikaze strikes (on one such mission, a pilot and gunner pair abandoned the mission after losing squadron mates to American fighters. The surviving bomber jettisoned its bombs and then was chased home by three [=F4U=] Corsairs in hot pursuit, with the Corsairs eventually calling it quits after wasting all their ammunition trying to down the more agile [=D3A=], which then crash-landed with both crewmen surviving the incident and the rest of the war).

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* Perhaps not cool in appearance but cool by achievements, the '''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aichi_D3A Aichi D3A]]''' was the most successful carrier-launched dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy, having been the first to bomb American targets and having sunk more Allied warships than all other Axis aircraft combined! Quite an accomplishment for a design completed in 1937 and accepted into service in 1939. The [=D3A=], whose Allied reporting name was "Val," was chosen over its more advanced rival, the Nakajima [=D3N=], because it had better flight performance despite having a fixed undercarriage. Notable features include a well-designed elliptical wing (with wash-out function to combat stalling and sudden unwanted snap-rolling), effective dive brakes which prevented the plane from passing the aircraft's never-exceed speed [[note]] at which point aerodynamic drag tears the plane to pieces [[/note]] in a dive and allowed the pilot plenty of time to line up and drop an armor-piercing bomb into a very vulnerable spot on a warship, and an extended vertical tail fin similar to that on the Boeing B-17 for better stability. After dropping its bomb-load, the [=D3A=] could act like a two-seat fighter as it possessed superb maneuverability (and indeed, several times the plane was called to serve in that role). The only problem with that application was that the [=D3A=] only possessed two rifle-caliber machine guns in the engine cowling and a Type 92 Lewis gun for the tail gunner (rifle [[note]](rifle bullets tend not to do much critical damage to aircraft developed after 1940 unless the pilot/gunner tries SnipingTheCockpit). SnipingTheCockpit) [[/note]]. Being easy to fly meant that the [=D3A=] was good for training new pilots after getting declared obsolete for front-line service, but it also became a prime candidate for carrying out Kamikaze strikes (on [[note]](on one such mission, a pilot and gunner pair abandoned the mission after losing squadron mates to American fighters. The surviving bomber jettisoned its bombs and then was chased home by three [=F4U=] Corsairs in hot pursuit, with the Corsairs eventually calling it quits after wasting all their ammunition trying to down the more agile [=D3A=], which then crash-landed with both crewmen surviving the incident and the rest of the war).war)[[/note]].



* The German '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dornier_Do_335 Do 335 Pfeil]]''' is a unique aircraft whose "Push/Pull" tandem-twin engine arrangement necessitated it having the first functional ejection seat. It matched speed with early jet fighters and easily out-manoeuvered them. Unfortunately, it was ''more'' complex than even a contemporary jet fighter, and like the ''Schwalbe'' was limited by Germany's declining fortunes late in the war. The history of the Do-335 is debated in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, because while there are no definitive reports of US pilots meeting them, it's probably because the German pilots simply opened the throttles and left P-51s and the like in the dust.
** While certainly a capable aircraft, a Do-335 with no fuel or weapons was over 1,000lbs heavier than a fully loaded Me-262 at maximum take-off weight.

to:

* The German '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dornier_Do_335 Do 335 Pfeil]]''' is a unique aircraft whose "Push/Pull" tandem-twin engine arrangement necessitated it having the first functional ejection seat. It matched speed with early jet fighters and easily out-manoeuvered them. Unfortunately, it was ''more'' complex than even a contemporary jet fighter, plus while it was without a doubt a capable aircraft, a Do-335 with no fuel or weapons was over 1,000lbs heavier than a fully loaded Me-262 at maximum take-off weight, and like the ''Schwalbe'' the ''Pfeil'' was limited by Germany's declining fortunes late in the war. The history of the Do-335 is debated in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, because while there are no definitive reports of US pilots meeting them, it's probably because the German pilots simply opened the throttles and left P-51s and the like in the dust.
** While certainly a capable aircraft, a Do-335 with no fuel or weapons was over 1,000lbs heavier than a fully loaded Me-262 at maximum take-off weight.
dust.
13th Jan '18 4:56:05 PM YT45
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* The '''[[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_B-26_Marauder Martin B-26 Marauder]]''' had a rather rocky start. Designed and built by Glen L. Martin Aviation of Baltimore, Maryland, the high-speed twin-engine bomber with impossibly short, stubby wings and insanely-high (200+ mph) landing speed quickly developed a reputation as an expensive means for six men to commit suicide. It acquired a list of unpleasant nicknames: “Flying Prostitute” (because it flew with “no visible means of support”), “B-Dash-Crash,” “Baltimore Whore,” and “Martin Murderer.” The Army Air Forces were on the verge of junking the Type when no less an aviator than [[MemeticBadass Colonel Jimmy Doolittle]] evaluated it and determined that the wings needed to be extended by ten feet. With this alteration, the Marauder, [[DifficulyButAwesome while still a challenging plane to fly]], became the workhorse that would see the lowest combat loss rate of any American bomber type. One Marauder, 43-31173 ''Flak Bait'', holds the record for the most combat missions flown by an American warplane, and is currently under restoration at the Smithsonian.

to:

* The '''[[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_B-26_Marauder Martin B-26 Marauder]]''' had a rather rocky start. Designed and built by Glen L. Martin Aviation of Baltimore, Maryland, the high-speed twin-engine bomber with impossibly short, stubby wings and insanely-high (200+ mph) landing speed quickly developed a reputation as an expensive means for six men to commit suicide. It acquired a list of unpleasant nicknames: “Flying Prostitute” (because it flew with “no visible means of support”), “B-Dash-Crash,” “Baltimore Whore,” and “Martin Murderer.” The Army Air Forces were on the verge of junking the Type when no less an aviator than [[MemeticBadass Colonel Jimmy Doolittle]] evaluated it and determined that the wings needed to be extended by ten feet. With this alteration, the Marauder, [[DifficulyButAwesome [[DifficultButAwesome while still a challenging plane to fly]], became the workhorse that would see the lowest combat loss rate of any American bomber type. One Marauder, 43-31173 ''Flak Bait'', holds the record for the most combat missions flown by an American warplane, and is currently under restoration at the Smithsonian.
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