History Radio / TheWaroftheWorlds

1st Nov '17 11:20:28 PM Mdumas43073
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Welles thought it was the end of his career. But the one-hour program became a media sensation. Welles and his show were instantly internationally famous. The Campbell Soup Company jumped at the chance of becoming the sponsorless show's underwriter, and ''The Mercury Theater on the Air'' was renamed ''The Campbell Playhouse''. Whether or not Welles used the format to [[ForTheEvulz intentionally troll radio listeners]] is still up for debate [[note]]massive evidence has been found that he did not, and was horrified at what had happened[[/note]], but the show made him a star, and led before too long to a movie contract, and ''Film/CitizenKane''.

to:

Welles thought it was the end of his career. But the one-hour program became a media sensation. Welles and his show were instantly internationally famous. The Campbell Soup Company jumped at the chance of becoming the sponsorless show's underwriter, and ''The Mercury Theater Theatre on the Air'' was renamed ''The Campbell Playhouse''. Whether or not Welles used the format to [[ForTheEvulz intentionally troll radio listeners]] is still up for debate [[note]]massive evidence has been found that he did not, and was horrified at what had happened[[/note]], but the show made him a star, and led before too long to a movie contract, and ''Film/CitizenKane''.
1st Nov '17 11:19:11 PM Mdumas43073
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By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. If you believe the research done by Jeff Pooley and Mike Socolow, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. However, the story's more complex than that. What people believed and continue to believe ''about'' the broadcast is as important as the fact that people believed the broadcast itself. The legend of this program has become part of American folklore.

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events a bona fide AlienInvasion was taking place were really happening, place, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. If you believe the research done by Jeff Pooley and Mike Socolow, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. However, the story's more complex than that. What people believed and continue to believe ''about'' the broadcast is as important as the fact that people believed the broadcast itself. The legend of this program has become part of American folklore.
1st Nov '17 11:18:16 PM Mdumas43073
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When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...

to:

When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells Creator/HGWells' 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater ''Mercury Theatre'' broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...
1st Nov '17 11:17:40 PM Mdumas43073
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When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} nationwide radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...

to:

When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} nationwide radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...
12th Aug '17 12:10:33 AM CaptEquinox
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Added DiffLines:

* MoralGuardians: Lots of them in the wake of the sensationalized post-broadcast reports, calling for censorship, speaking up against "terrorizing" broadcasts, the fake-news format (which wasn't new, as any listener to ''March of Time'''s news re-enactments could have told you), radio as a corrupter of children, &c., &c. The kids, of course, knew the story or caught on quickly; thousands wrote fan letters to Welles.
10th Aug '17 4:48:44 PM CaptEquinox
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By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. If you believe the research done by Jeff Pooley and Mike Socolow, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. However, the story's more complex than that. [[note]]And see the comments to the mssv.net article also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller".[[/note]]

Police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Following the broadcast, CBS, the FCC and Orson Himself were flooded with mail.[[note]]Writing to a show or network back then was as common as comments sections and blog posts today.[[/note]] People of all ages and walks of life wrote that they'd believed the broadcast, although not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had. Many letter writers were thoughtful, wondering about radio's influence on behavior, on democracy.

The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters; the hallways outside the New York studio swarmed with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

The one-hour program became a media sensation. Welles and his show were instantly internationally famous. The Campbell Soup Company jumped at the chance of becoming the sponsorless show's underwriter, and ''The Mercury Theater on the Air'' was renamed ''The Campbell Playhouse''. Whether or not Welles used the format to [[ForTheEvulz intentionally troll radio listeners]] is still up for debate, but the show made him a star, and led before too long to a movie contract, and ''Film/CitizenKane''.

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. If you believe the research done by Jeff Pooley and Mike Socolow, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. However, the story's more complex than that. [[note]]And see What people believed and continue to believe ''about'' the comments to broadcast is as important as the mssv.net article also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller".[[/note]]

fact that people believed the broadcast itself. The legend of this program has become part of American folklore.

Police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Following the broadcast, CBS, the FCC and Orson Himself were flooded with mail.[[note]]Writing to a show or network back then was as common as comments sections and blog posts today.[[/note]] People of all ages and walks of life wrote that they'd believed the broadcast, although not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally.

Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Many believed only until they heard something that told them it was a play. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to heard the radio, show but heard about ''about'' it from friends or neighbors who had. Many letter writers were thoughtful, wondering about radio's influence on behavior, on democracy.

The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters; the hallways outside the New York studio swarmed with reporters and cops, cops who besieged the cast and crew after the show until they had to leave via a rear exit, and exit; Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

The Welles thought it was the end of his career. But the one-hour program became a media sensation. Welles and his show were instantly internationally famous. The Campbell Soup Company jumped at the chance of becoming the sponsorless show's underwriter, and ''The Mercury Theater on the Air'' was renamed ''The Campbell Playhouse''. Whether or not Welles used the format to [[ForTheEvulz intentionally troll radio listeners]] is still up for debate, debate [[note]]massive evidence has been found that he did not, and was horrified at what had happened[[/note]], but the show made him a star, and led before too long to a movie contract, and ''Film/CitizenKane''.



* FaceDeathWithDignity: The radio reporter in New York, who narrates the advance of the Martian tripods into the city, knowing perfectly well he's going to die. ("This is the end, now.")

to:

* FaceDeathWithDignity: The radio reporter in New York, York[[note]]played by ''PerryMason'''s Ray Collins[[/note]], who narrates the advance of the Martian tripods into the city, knowing perfectly well he's going to die. ("This is the end, now.")



* {{Kayfabe}}: Welles was concerned that ''War of the Worlds'' was such a well-known antique that bored audiences would tune out, so he repeatedly emphasized realistic portrayals and the "radio news" format. He was mostly occupied with the theatrical play he was putting on at the same time, so left it to the cast and crew to do the WorldBuilding necessary to make it fully believable.



* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]).[[note]]Embellishing the facts just to sell papers was typical, especially for Hearst papers. They used huge scare headlines and lurid, often grossly exaggerated, tabloid-like narratives.[[/note]] Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified. Letters have been found from people who had indeed believed it, many ''congratulating'' Welles on his ingenuity. To sum up, about six million people listened, and about a million of them, however briefly, believed it was real.

to:

* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]).[[note]]Embellishing the facts just to sell papers was typical, especially for Hearst papers. They used huge scare headlines and lurid, often grossly exaggerated, tabloid-like narratives.[[/note]] This caused rumors which then spread to other papers and radio news.[[/note]] Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" world"[[note]]This happened in several other cities as well.[[/note]] -- were verified. Letters and telegrams have been found from people who had indeed believed it, many ''congratulating'' Welles on his ingenuity. To sum up, about six million people listened, and about a million of them, however briefly, believed it was real.
7th Aug '17 10:42:31 PM CaptEquinox
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* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]).[[note]]Embellishing the facts just to sell papers was typical for many newspapers, especially Hearst papers. They routinely used huge scare headlines and lurid, often grossly exaggerated, tabloid-like narratives.[[/note]] Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified.

to:

* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]).[[note]]Embellishing the facts just to sell papers was typical for many newspapers, typical, especially for Hearst papers. They routinely used huge scare headlines and lurid, often grossly exaggerated, tabloid-like narratives.[[/note]] Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified. Letters have been found from people who had indeed believed it, many ''congratulating'' Welles on his ingenuity. To sum up, about six million people listened, and about a million of them, however briefly, believed it was real.
7th Aug '17 1:35:34 PM CaptEquinox
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By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller"[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.

Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.

The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country were lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the New York studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, If you believe the research done by Jeff Pooley and Mike Socolow, there was little to no actual panic and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but newspapers]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. However, the story's more complex than that. [[note]]And see the comments to that page the mssv.net article also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller"[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. What ''did'' happen was that police Miller".[[/note]]

Police
and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.

Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally.
verify. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Following the broadcast, CBS, the FCC and Orson Himself were flooded with mail.[[note]]Writing to a show or network back then was as common as comments sections and blog posts today.[[/note]] People of all ages and walks of life wrote that they'd believed the broadcast, although not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.

had. Many letter writers were thoughtful, wondering about radio's influence on behavior, on democracy.

The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country were lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters, reporters; the hallways outside the New York studio were swarming swarmed with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."
18th Jun '17 1:04:42 PM CaptEquinox
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* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]). Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified.

to:

* NewMediaAreEvil: It seems that newspapers ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false embellished the facts to make radio look bad]]). [[note]]Embellishing the facts just to sell papers was typical for many newspapers, especially Hearst papers. They routinely used huge scare headlines and lurid, often grossly exaggerated, tabloid-like narratives.[[/note]] Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified.
13th Jun '17 9:52:54 PM nombretomado
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Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a WorldWarOne gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.

to:

Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.



** This is one reason so many people ''did'' believe it. WorldWarOne and its gas warfare was fresh in their memories, WorldWarTwo was brewing in Europe; America was primed for possible attacks or invasion. Regular programming experienced constant interruptions by news bulletins about Hitler's conquests. Sometimes one bulletin would be interrupted by another! So they heard "Martians", but thought it was really Nazis making it ''look'' like a Martian attack.

to:

** This is one reason so many people ''did'' believe it. WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI and its gas warfare was fresh in their memories, WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was brewing in Europe; America was primed for possible attacks or invasion. Regular programming experienced constant interruptions by news bulletins about Hitler's conquests. Sometimes one bulletin would be interrupted by another! So they heard "Martians", but thought it was really Nazis making it ''look'' like a Martian attack.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Radio.TheWaroftheWorlds