History Radio / TheWaroftheWorlds

22nd May '17 3:08:57 PM Mdumas43073
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* HorrorDoesntSettleForSimpleTuesday: The supposed Martian invasion begins on the night before Halloween.
9th May '17 8:26:58 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/war_of_the_worlds_1938_radio_panic.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:300:http://static.[[quoteright:280:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/war_of_the_worlds_1938_radio_panic.jpg]]
9th May '17 8:26:08 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/war_of_the_worlds_1938_radio_panic.jpg]]
23rd Mar '17 3:06:09 PM CaptEquinox
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Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a wartime gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and set off firecrackers or shut off the lights. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.

to:

Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed the broadcast, but not all succumbed to panic, fled their homes or behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a wartime WorldWarOne gas attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and [[JumpScare set off firecrackers or shut off the lights.lights]]. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.



* EmergencyPresidentialAddress: Averted by ExecutiveMeddling. It was originally intended for the unnamed Secretary of the Interior to be President UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt, but CBS objected to this detail. That didn't stop Welles from having the actor imitate Roosevelt's voice.

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* EmergencyPresidentialAddress: Averted by ExecutiveMeddling. It was originally intended for the unnamed Secretary of the Interior Interior[[note]](It would have been Harold Ickes, who really [[https://youtu.be/G2Tk87amlxQ?t=1m29s didn't sound much like Roosevelt]].[[/note]] to be President UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt, but CBS objected to this detail. That didn't stop Welles from having the actor imitate Roosevelt's voice.



* NewMediaAreEvil: Latter-day research has found that most people weren't taken in by the faux-news format (or at least did little more than call police to ask what was happening) and that newspapers embellished the facts to make radio look bad ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false seems to be the most likely]]).

to:

* NewMediaAreEvil: Latter-day research has found that most people weren't taken in by the faux-news format (or at least did little more than call police to ask what was happening) and It seems that newspapers embellished the facts to make radio look bad ([[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false seems to be embellished the most likely]]).facts to make radio look bad]]). Latter-day research has found that the number of people who were taken in by the faux-news format [[http://www.csicop.org/sb/show/shootout_with_martians_in_the_wake_of_the_1938_broadcast_panic wasn't as high as previously thought]]. And [[https://www.amazon.com/Broadcast-Hysteria-Orson-Welless-Worlds-ebook/dp/B00OFID7TE/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= those who did believe it mostly reacted rationally]]. The "mass panic" reported in the press, with thousands fleeing the city, simply didn't occur, although some individual incidents -- like the woman who ran into the Indianapolis church to announce the "end of the world" -- were verified.



* WeInterruptThisProgram: The first ten minutes of the show involves "Ramon Raquello and His Orchestra" playing Thirties dance music, with the plot occasionally interrupting to provide breaking news. Later on it changes to piano music by Debussy, in a textbook example of classical music on radio being shorthand for world-threatening disaster.

to:

* WeInterruptThisProgram: The first ten minutes of the show involves "Ramon Raquello and His Orchestra" playing Thirties dance music, with the plot occasionally interrupting to provide breaking news. Later on it changes to piano music by Debussy, in a textbook example of classical music on radio being shorthand for world-threatening disaster.disaster.
** This is one reason so many people ''did'' believe it. WorldWarOne and its gas warfare was fresh in their memories, WorldWarTwo was brewing in Europe; America was primed for possible attacks or invasion. Regular programming experienced constant interruptions by news bulletins about Hitler's conquests. Sometimes one bulletin would be interrupted by another! So they heard "Martians", but thought it was really Nazis making it ''look'' like a Martian attack.
5th Mar '17 11:05:43 AM CaptEquinox
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By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller"[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below.

Many people reported that they ''did'' believe the broadcast, but did not panic, flee their homes or behave irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly; others simply prepared as for a wartime gas attack.

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller"[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. \n\nMany people reported that they What ''did'' believe happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.

Many people wrote to CBS reporting that they'd believed
the broadcast, but did not all succumbed to panic, flee fled their homes or behave behaved irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly; calmly;[[note]]Two sisters left their apartment to warn people, then decided to have cocktails before the Martians arrived. They later billed Welles for the cost of the drinks.[[/note]] others simply prepared as for a wartime gas attack.
attack. College students fell for it by the dozen, much to the delight of those who knew it was a play and set off firecrackers or shut off the lights. Some of the more extreme reactions may have been people who hadn't listened to the radio, but heard about it from friends or neighbors who had.



The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' by Creator/WoodyAllen. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes of Music/{{Negativland}}'s weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] information in modern life.

to:

The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' (1987) by Creator/WoodyAllen.Creator/WoodyAllen. Two episodes of Music/{{Negativland}}'s weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" (2006) and a 1999 examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] information in modern life. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes The historical events and situations that set up this incident are described in PBS' 2013 ''American Experience'' episode "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1iLFp6XyPY The War of Music/{{Negativland}}'s weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on Worlds]]". There's more in A. Brad Schwartz's 2015 book ''Broadcast Hysteria: Orson Welles' War of the program as an example Worlds & the Art of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] information in modern life.
Fake News''.
4th Mar '17 5:22:31 PM CaptEquinox
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The broadcast was actually [[http://www.war-ofthe-worlds.co.uk/war_worlds_quito.htm recreated in 1949 in Quito, Ecuador]] by director Leonardo Páez, ''definitely'' as an intentional prank, although not on the diabolical level that's been attributed to him. A huge riot erupted when listeners were finally told it was a gag. An angry mob with TorchesAndPitchforks set fire to the station, with 100 workers trapped inside. Seven people died. It was tried again in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-oTTyGOkIg an updated version by WKBW]] in Buffalo, New York in 1968. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1A0R1vldv4 Conceived]] by engineer-director Dan Kriegler and program director Jeff Kaye, it used the station's news staff and contemporary music and commercials and put the action in nearby Grand Island. Instead of a script, Kaye wrote out a series of events and had the news people read them as they would normally. In spite of fairly frequent "this is a dramatization" announcements, the show's format meant that people who tuned in late were going to think, at least for a few minutes, that it was real. A local newspaper, several police officers and the Canadian National Guard (which sent troops to the border) were among those deceived. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXTEUM4OF7Q WKBW updated the format again and rebroadcast the show in 1971]]. For the 50th anniversary of the broadcast in 1988, Creator/{{NPR}} aired [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIeYnoutthU yet another remake]] directed by Creator/TheFiresignTheater's David Ossman and featuring several of the network's on-air personalities. And in 2008, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjF0KVDdMuo another revival]] was presented on NPR by the LA Theatre Works with a nearly all-''Franchise/StarTrek'' cast including Creator/LeonardNimoy as Prof. Pierson and Gates [=McFadden=] as [[GenderFlip reporter ''Carla'' Phillips]].

to:

The broadcast was actually [[http://www.war-ofthe-worlds.co.uk/war_worlds_quito.htm recreated in 1949 in Quito, Ecuador]] by director Leonardo Páez, ''definitely'' as an intentional prank, although not on the diabolical level that's been attributed to him. A huge riot erupted when listeners were finally told it was a gag. An angry mob with TorchesAndPitchforks set fire to the station, with 100 workers trapped inside. Seven people died. It was tried again in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-oTTyGOkIg an updated version by WKBW]] in Buffalo, New York in 1968. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1A0R1vldv4 Conceived]] by engineer-director Dan Kriegler and program director Jeff Kaye, it used the station's news staff and contemporary music and commercials and put the action in nearby Grand Island. Instead of a script, Kaye wrote out a series of events and had the news people read them as they would normally. In spite of fairly frequent "this is a dramatization" announcements, the show's format meant that people who tuned in late were going to think, at least for a few minutes, that it was real. A local newspaper, several police officers and the Canadian National Guard (which sent troops to the border) were among those deceived. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXTEUM4OF7Q WKBW updated the format again and rebroadcast the show in 1971]]. For the 50th anniversary of the broadcast in 1988, Creator/{{NPR}} aired [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIeYnoutthU yet another remake]] directed by Creator/TheFiresignTheater's David Ossman and featuring several of the network's on-air personalities. And in 2008, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjF0KVDdMuo another revival]] was presented on NPR by the LA Theatre Works with a nearly all-''Franchise/StarTrek'' cast including Creator/LeonardNimoy as Prof. Pierson and Gates [=McFadden=] as [[GenderFlip reporter ''Carla'' Carla Phillips]].
4th Mar '17 5:21:41 PM CaptEquinox
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By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country were lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the New York studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also[[/note]] also, especially "Book Excerpts, by Prof. David L. Miller"[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. below.

Many people reported that they ''did'' believe the broadcast, but did not panic, flee their homes or behave irrationally. People with loved ones in the area tried to call them (the jammed switchboards gave the impression that ''something'' was happening); some drove or flew there. Some thought the "invasion" was really Nazis; some faced "the end of the world" calmly; others simply prepared as for a wartime gas attack.

The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country were lit up like pinball machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the New York studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."



The broadcast was actually [[http://www.war-ofthe-worlds.co.uk/war_worlds_quito.htm recreated in 1949 in Quito, Ecuador]] by director Leonardo Páez, ''definitely'' as an intentional prank, although not on the diabolical level that's been attributed to him. A huge riot erupted when listeners were finally told it was a gag. An angry mob with TorchesAndPitchforks set fire to the station, with 100 workers trapped inside. Seven people died. It was tried again in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-oTTyGOkIg an updated version by WKBW]] in Buffalo, New York in 1968. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1A0R1vldv4 Conceived]] by engineer-director Dan Kriegler and program director Jeff Kaye, it used the station's news staff and contemporary music and commercials and put the action in nearby Grand Island. Instead of a script, Kaye wrote out a series of events and had the news people read them as they would normally. In spite of fairly frequent "this is a dramatization" announcements, the show's format meant that people who tuned in late were going to think, at least for a few minutes, that it was real. A local newspaper, several police officers and the Canadian National Guard (which sent troops to the border) were among those deceived. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXTEUM4OF7Q WKBW updated the format again and rebroadcast the show in 1971]]. For the 50th anniversary of the broadcast in 1988, Creator/{{NPR}} aired yet another remake directed by Creator/TheFiresignTheater's David Ossman and featuring several of the network's on-air personalities.

to:

The broadcast was actually [[http://www.war-ofthe-worlds.co.uk/war_worlds_quito.htm recreated in 1949 in Quito, Ecuador]] by director Leonardo Páez, ''definitely'' as an intentional prank, although not on the diabolical level that's been attributed to him. A huge riot erupted when listeners were finally told it was a gag. An angry mob with TorchesAndPitchforks set fire to the station, with 100 workers trapped inside. Seven people died. It was tried again in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-oTTyGOkIg an updated version by WKBW]] in Buffalo, New York in 1968. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1A0R1vldv4 Conceived]] by engineer-director Dan Kriegler and program director Jeff Kaye, it used the station's news staff and contemporary music and commercials and put the action in nearby Grand Island. Instead of a script, Kaye wrote out a series of events and had the news people read them as they would normally. In spite of fairly frequent "this is a dramatization" announcements, the show's format meant that people who tuned in late were going to think, at least for a few minutes, that it was real. A local newspaper, several police officers and the Canadian National Guard (which sent troops to the border) were among those deceived. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXTEUM4OF7Q WKBW updated the format again and rebroadcast the show in 1971]]. For the 50th anniversary of the broadcast in 1988, Creator/{{NPR}} aired [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIeYnoutthU yet another remake remake]] directed by Creator/TheFiresignTheater's David Ossman and featuring several of the network's on-air personalities.
personalities. And in 2008, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjF0KVDdMuo another revival]] was presented on NPR by the LA Theatre Works with a nearly all-''Franchise/StarTrek'' cast including Creator/LeonardNimoy as Prof. Pierson and Gates [=McFadden=] as [[GenderFlip reporter ''Carla'' Phillips]].
18th Nov '16 3:53:15 PM CaptEquinox
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When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices nationwide, and the CBS studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards were lit up like pinball machines with calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

to:

When Creator/OrsonWelles needed to come up with a HalloweenEpisode for the October 30, 1938 broadcast of his Creator/{{CBS}} nationwide radio program ''Radio/TheMercuryTheatreOnTheAir'', he decided to adapt the Creator/HGWells 1898 novel ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' to a contemporary American setting. Rather than staging a regular radio play like all of the previous Mercury Theater broadcasts, for this episode the program aired what seemed like a regular night of music, until reports came over the air of strange phenomena on the surface of Mars and what seem to be meteorites landing in locations across America...

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices and CBS affiliate stations nationwide, and the CBS New York studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the [[http://mssv.net/realityart/wotwemails.html breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers newspapers]][[note]]but see the comments to that page also[[/note]] were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards across the country were lit up like pinball machines with machines, the calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the New York studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."



* WeInterruptThisProgram: The first ten minutes of the show involves "Ramon Raquello and His Orchestra" playing Thirties dance music, with the plot occasionally interrupting to provide breaking news.

to:

* WeInterruptThisProgram: The first ten minutes of the show involves "Ramon Raquello and His Orchestra" playing Thirties dance music, with the plot occasionally interrupting to provide breaking news. Later on it changes to piano music by Debussy, in a textbook example of classical music on radio being shorthand for world-threatening disaster.
18th Nov '16 2:32:13 PM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices nationwide, and the CBS studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers were an attempt by newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards were lit up like pinball machines with calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."

to:

By the time large alien tripods emerged from the cylindrical meteorite and began destroying the American countryside, many listeners believed that the events taking place were really happening, and a nationwide panic ensued. Or so the UrbanLegends say, at least. In fact, there was little to no actual panic[[note]]What ''did'' happen was that police and fire stations, newspaper offices nationwide, and the CBS studios, were swamped with thousands of telephone calls -- less a mass panic than a mass attempt to verify.[[/note]] and the breathless reports that ran in the next day's newspapers were an attempt by said newspapers both to sell more papers and discredit radio--see NewMediaAreEvil below. The fact remains that CBS telephone switchboards were lit up like pinball machines with calls not just from listeners but from reporters, the hallways outside the studio were swarming with reporters and cops, the cast and crew had to leave via a rear exit, and Welles himself ended the program by saying that the program was little more than "dressing up in a sheet, jumping out of a bush, and saying 'Boo!'" and suggesting that the audience shouldn't be taken in by make-believe stories on the radio. Later that night, the ''New York Times'' building's famous neon headline crawler in Times Square was announcing "ORSON WELLES CAUSES PANIC."



The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' by Creator/WoodyAllen. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes of Music/Negativland's weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] information in modern life.

to:

The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' by Creator/WoodyAllen. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes of Music/Negativland's Music/{{Negativland}}'s weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] information in modern life.
18th Nov '16 2:29:59 PM CaptEquinox
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The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' by Creator/WoodyAllen. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes of Music/Negativland's weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] reports in media.

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The incident was dramatized in "The Night America Trembled", a 1957 episode of ''Westinghouse Studio One'', and ''The Night That Panicked America'', a 1975 MadeForTVMovie co-starring Creator/JohnRitter; and touched upon in feature films like ''Film/RadioDays'' by Creator/WoodyAllen. It was analyzed in a [[http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/ hysterically funny episode]] of NPR's ''Radiolab'' in 2008, talking about the power of mass media and humanity's need for storytelling. Two episodes of Music/Negativland's weekly KPFA radio happening ''Over the Edge'', helmed by master culture jammer Don Joyce, focused on the program as an example of "[[https://archive.org/details/OTE_20060518_How_Radio_Was_Done_3_-_WOTWW How Radio Was Done]]" and an examination of how we discern [[https://archive.org/details/OTE_19990200_True_and_False true from false]] reports information in media.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Radio.TheWaroftheWorlds