History Radar / LooneyTunes

4th Dec '15 9:15:42 AM jamespolk
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* A prop used in several cartoons was the tall cylindrical trash can on wheels, with the initials "D.S.C." on the side. In real life, these were used (before automobiles were common) by the Department of Street Cleaners, whose job was to patrol the streets and clean up horse manure. Used as a LiteralMetaphor in "Drip-Along Daffy", where Daffy claims, "I told you I'd clean up this one-horse town!"

to:

* A prop used in several cartoons was the tall cylindrical trash can on wheels, with the initials "D.S.C." on the side. In real life, these were used (before automobiles were common) by the Department of Street Cleaners, whose job was to patrol the streets and clean up horse manure. Used as a LiteralMetaphor in "Drip-Along Daffy", "WesternAnimation/DripAlongDaffy", where Daffy claims, "I told you I'd clean up this one-horse town!"
24th Dec '14 3:42:18 PM Geoduck
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* "An Itch In Time" has one surprisingly blatant example that somehow waltzed right past the censors has a dog dragging his itchy butt across a carpet, and pausing to cheerfully comment to the audience "Hey, I'd better cut this out, [[ADateWithRosiePalms I may get to like it]]!"

to:

* "An Itch In Time" has one surprisingly blatant example that somehow waltzed right past the censors has censors: a dog is dragging his itchy butt across a carpet, and pausing pauses to cheerfully comment to the audience "Hey, I'd better cut this out, [[ADateWithRosiePalms I may get to like it]]!"
6th Dec '14 6:08:06 PM N.Harmonik
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* In "A Tale of Two Kitties", cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.

to:

* In "A Tale of Two Kitties", cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's Babbit's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.



-->'''Catstello:''' ([[BreakingTheFourthWall to audience]]) If da Hays Office would only let me, I'd [[FlippingTheBird give 'im the boid], all right!

to:

-->'''Catstello:''' ([[BreakingTheFourthWall to audience]]) If da Hays Office would only let me, I'd [[FlippingTheBird give 'im the boid], boid]], all right!
21st Nov '14 6:34:13 AM SAMAS
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Added DiffLines:

** This joke was actually used ''twice''. The second time, the line was "a friend of my sister Carmella."
18th Nov '14 6:24:11 PM Mdumas43073
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* In "BookRevue", one of the books is ''Cherokee Strip'' (a Marquis James memoir about his boyhood in turn-of-the-century Oklahoma), but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.

to:

* In "BookRevue", one of the books is ''Cherokee Strip'' (a then-popular Marquis James memoir about his boyhood in turn-of-the-century Oklahoma), but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.
18th Nov '14 6:23:42 PM Mdumas43073
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* In "BookRevue", one of the books is ''Cherokee Strip" (a Marquis James memoir about his boyhood in turn-of-the-century Oklahoma), but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.

to:

* In "BookRevue", one of the books is ''Cherokee Strip" Strip'' (a Marquis James memoir about his boyhood in turn-of-the-century Oklahoma), but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.
18th Nov '14 6:22:30 PM Mdumas43073
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* In "BookRevue", one of the books is called ''Cherokee Strip,'' presumably about the region in Kansas, but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.

to:

* In "BookRevue", one of the books is called ''Cherokee Strip,'' presumably Strip" (a Marquis James memoir about the region his boyhood in Kansas, turn-of-the-century Oklahoma), but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.
18th Nov '14 6:17:17 PM Mdumas43073
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* "Hollywood Daffy" has Daffy impersonating a studio director fooling the o-fay Joe Besser-like gate cop into thinking he'll make him a star. Daffy examines him and asks "What's Errol Flynn got that you haven't got?" before interjecting, [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder "Don't answer that!"]] So what '''''does''''' Errol Flynn have that the studio cop doesn't? Apparently, '''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errol_Flynn#Personal_life a statutory rape charge]]'''''. Errol Flynn was notorious as a ladies' man and was accused of seducing two teenaged girls a couple of years prior to the cartoon's premiere. Flynn was acquitted of all charges.

to:

* "Hollywood Daffy" has Daffy impersonating a studio director fooling the o-fay Joe Besser-like gate cop into thinking he'll make him a star. Daffy examines him and asks "What's Errol Flynn Creator/ErrolFlynn got that you haven't got?" before interjecting, [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder "Don't answer that!"]] So what '''''does''''' ''does'' Errol Flynn have that the studio cop doesn't? Apparently, '''''[[http://en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errol_Flynn#Personal_life a statutory rape charge]]'''''. Errol charge]]. Flynn was notorious as a ladies' man and was accused of seducing two teenaged girls a couple of years prior to the cartoon's premiere. Flynn was acquitted of all charges.
18th Nov '14 6:15:25 PM Mdumas43073
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* At the beginning in "A Corny Concerto" (Clampett, 1943), Porky [[TalkingWithSigns holds up a sign]] to the [[BreakingTheFourthWall audience]] saying: "I'M HUNTING THAT [[SymbolSwearing @%#&]] RABBIT!!"
* "Hare Conditioned" (Jones, 1945), has Bugs in drag as a female customer in the shoe department trying to fool the store manager (who wants Bugs mounted and stuffed, having served his purpose as a store window prop). What the manager does following this dialogue would be tantamount to sexual harassment today:

to:

* At the beginning in "A Corny Concerto" (Clampett, 1943), Concerto", Porky [[TalkingWithSigns holds up a sign]] to the [[BreakingTheFourthWall audience]] saying: "I'M HUNTING THAT [[SymbolSwearing @%#&]] RABBIT!!"
* "Hare Conditioned" (Jones, 1945), has Bugs in drag as a female customer in the shoe department trying to fool the store manager (who wants Bugs mounted and stuffed, having served his purpose as a store window prop). What the manager does following this dialogue would be tantamount to sexual harassment today:



* "Hollywood Daffy" (Freleng, 1946) has Daffy impersonating a studio director fooling the o-fay Joe Besser-like gate cop into thinking he'll make him a star. Daffy examines him and asks "What's Errol Flynn got that you haven't got?" before interjecting, [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder "Don't answer that!"]] So what '''''does''''' Errol Flynn have that the studio cop doesn't? Apparently, '''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errol_Flynn#Personal_life a statutory rape charge]]'''''. Errol Flynn was notorious as a ladies' man and was accused of seducing two teenaged girls a couple of years prior to the cartoon's premiere. Flynn was acquitted of all charges.
* "A Gruesome Twosome" (Clampett, 1945) features a pair of alley cats, one a Jimmy Durante-like guy, the other a mostly silent deadpan, both after Tweety. At one point they're disguised in a two-man horse costume. The Durante cat pulls off his headpiece and tells us "I'm the horse's head!", which of course makes the other guy the horse's ass.
* In "Bewitched Bunny" (Jones, 1954), after Bugs turns Witch Hazel into a female rabbit, he turns to the camera and remarks, "Ah, sure, I know, but aren't they ''all'' witches inside?" That line was actually the subject of controversy in Canada, of all places, for being misogynistic (and yet, America -- which has MoralGuardians by the boatload going after every little thing and chipping away at what's supposed to be fun and entertaining, regardless of age -- did nothing about it). The case in Canada was dropped after a few days.

to:

* "Hollywood Daffy" (Freleng, 1946) has Daffy impersonating a studio director fooling the o-fay Joe Besser-like gate cop into thinking he'll make him a star. Daffy examines him and asks "What's Errol Flynn got that you haven't got?" before interjecting, [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder "Don't answer that!"]] So what '''''does''''' Errol Flynn have that the studio cop doesn't? Apparently, '''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errol_Flynn#Personal_life a statutory rape charge]]'''''. Errol Flynn was notorious as a ladies' man and was accused of seducing two teenaged girls a couple of years prior to the cartoon's premiere. Flynn was acquitted of all charges.
* "A Gruesome Twosome" (Clampett, 1945) features a pair of alley cats, one a Jimmy Durante-like guy, the other a mostly silent deadpan, both after Tweety. At one point they're disguised in a two-man horse costume. The Durante cat pulls off his headpiece and tells us "I'm the horse's head!", which of course makes the other guy the horse's ass.
* In "Bewitched Bunny" (Jones, 1954), Bunny", after Bugs turns Witch Hazel into a female rabbit, he turns to the camera and remarks, "Ah, sure, I know, but aren't they ''all'' witches inside?" That line was actually the subject of controversy in Canada, of all places, for being misogynistic (and yet, America -- which has MoralGuardians by the boatload going after every little thing and chipping away at what's supposed to be fun and entertaining, regardless of age -- did nothing about it). The case in Canada was dropped after a few days.



* In "BookRevue" (Clampett, 1946), one of the books is called ''Cherokee Strip,'' presumably about the region in Kansas, but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.
* In "The Draft Horse" (Jones, 1942), they sneaked in the old marching song "You're in the army now" on an eyesight test, which featured the verse "you'll never get rich/you ''son of a bitch''" (written so small it's almost illegible without pausing).

to:

* In "BookRevue" (Clampett, 1946), "BookRevue", one of the books is called ''Cherokee Strip,'' presumably about the region in Kansas, but the cover has a picture of an Indian girl in revealing clothing accompanied by cheers and wolf whistles.
* In "The Draft Horse" (Jones, 1942), Horse", they sneaked in the old marching song "You're in the army now" on an eyesight test, which featured the verse "you'll never get rich/you ''son of a bitch''" (written so small it's almost illegible without pausing).



* A surprising example in a much later Looney Tunes cartoon is in "Bunny and Claude" ([=McKimson=], 1968), where at one point as the Film/BonnieAndClyde-esque [[OutlawCouple gangster rabbit duo]] that only steals carrots is trying to evade the sheriff, Bunny says to Claude "I just want to tell you that there's a..." and whispers inaudibly. Claude then turns to her and says "Is that all you ever think about? ...Carrots?"
* A prop used in several cartoons was the tall cylindrical trash can on wheels, with the initials "D.S.C." on the side. In real life, these were used (before automobiles were common) by the Department of Street Cleaners, whose job was to patrol the streets and clean up horse manure. Used as a LiteralMetaphor in "Drip-Along Daffy" (Jones, 1951), where Daffy claims, "I told you I'd clean up this one-horse town!"

to:

* A surprising example in a much later Looney Tunes cartoon is in "Bunny and Claude" ([=McKimson=], 1968), Claude", where at one point as the Film/BonnieAndClyde-esque [[OutlawCouple gangster rabbit duo]] that only steals carrots is trying to evade the sheriff, Bunny says to Claude "I just want to tell you that there's a..." and whispers inaudibly. Claude then turns to her and says "Is that all you ever think about? ...Carrots?"
* A prop used in several cartoons was the tall cylindrical trash can on wheels, with the initials "D.S.C." on the side. In real life, these were used (before automobiles were common) by the Department of Street Cleaners, whose job was to patrol the streets and clean up horse manure. Used as a LiteralMetaphor in "Drip-Along Daffy" (Jones, 1951), Daffy", where Daffy claims, "I told you I'd clean up this one-horse town!"



* Here's one that's ''still'' rarely edited out. In "People Are Bunny" ([=McKimson=], 1959), Bugs gets a call from a call-in quiz show where he has to answer a question to win a prize. The question is a ''very'' complicated multiplication problem, which he successfully answers in about a second. (In his head.) When the host asks him how he answered so quickly, his response?

to:

* Here's one that's ''still'' rarely edited out. In "People Are Bunny" ([=McKimson=], 1959), Bunny", Bugs gets a call from a call-in quiz show where he has to answer a question to win a prize. The question is a ''very'' complicated multiplication problem, which he successfully answers in about a second. (In his head.) When the host asks him how he answered so quickly, his response?



* In "A Tale of Two Kitties" (Clampett, 1942), cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.

to:

* In "A Tale of Two Kitties" (Clampett, 1942), Kitties", cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.



* In "Birds of a Father" ([=McKimson=], 1961), Sylvester tries to shoot a bird, but ends up shooting a prop bird off an old woman's hat, which promts the woman to smack him with her purse. When Junior laments that his father would go to such a low as "shooting a defenseless old lady," Sylvester quips in response "Yeah, as defenseless as a porcupine in a nudist colony."

to:

* In "Birds of a Father" ([=McKimson=], 1961), Father", Sylvester tries to shoot a bird, but ends up shooting a prop bird off an old woman's hat, which promts the woman to smack him with her purse. When Junior laments that his father would go to such a low as "shooting a defenseless old lady," Sylvester quips in response "Yeah, as defenseless as a porcupine in a nudist colony."



* One surprisingly blatant example in "An Itch In Time" (Clampett, 1942) that somehow waltzed right past the censors has a dog dragging his itchy butt across a carpet, and pausing to cheerfully comment to the audience "Hey, I'd better cut this out, [[ADateWithRosiePalms I may get to like it]]!"

to:

* One "An Itch In Time" has one surprisingly blatant example in "An Itch In Time" (Clampett, 1942) that somehow waltzed right past the censors has a dog dragging his itchy butt across a carpet, and pausing to cheerfully comment to the audience "Hey, I'd better cut this out, [[ADateWithRosiePalms I may get to like it]]!"
18th Nov '14 6:12:20 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In "A Tale of Two Kitties", cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.

to:

* In "A Tale of Two Kitties", Kitties" (Clampett, 1942), cats Babbit and Catstello (cartoon versions of Creator/AbbottAndCostello) are trying to catch Tweety Bird in his nest. Babbot's plan: send Catstello up a giant ladder to raid the nest. Catstello, unfortunately, is afraid of heights, but Babbit forces him up anyway. Once Catstello is at the top, Babbit hollers up at him from the bottom of the ladder.



* In "Birds of a Father", Sylvester tries to shoot a bird, but ends up shooting a prop bird off an old woman's hat, which promts the woman to smack him with her purse. When Junior laments that his father would go to such a low as "shooting a defenseless old lady," Sylvester quips in response "Yeah, as defenseless as a porcupine in a nudist colony."

to:

* In "Birds of a Father", Father" ([=McKimson=], 1961), Sylvester tries to shoot a bird, but ends up shooting a prop bird off an old woman's hat, which promts the woman to smack him with her purse. When Junior laments that his father would go to such a low as "shooting a defenseless old lady," Sylvester quips in response "Yeah, as defenseless as a porcupine in a nudist colony."
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