History ProductPlacement / LiveActionTV

19th May '17 5:33:44 PM Nakuyabi
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* Of course, in just about any kind of sporting event televised live, the walls around the field and stadium will typically be plastered with eye-catching brand logos for whenever the camera happens to follow a play in their direction. With the advent of digital manipulation, some cameras can even be programmed to insert such advertisements into the frame whenever the camera turns toward the walls, changing which logos are shown from week to week depending on who's paying to be endorsed.
11th May '17 8:25:42 PM fdsa1234567890
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* In Series/TheExpanse, the OPA uses cargo pods with the FedEx label on them as boarding craft.
23rd Apr '17 2:40:18 PM nombretomado
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** ''Smallville'' doesn't just pimp gum; it advertises everything else to the point that (before he was PutOnABus) Pete was nicknamed '[[http://forums.televisionwithoutpity.com/index.php?s=d2be62141d8bd81ac710e41079b593f8&showtopic=3116027&view=findpost&p=1248946 Product Placement Pete]]' by TelevisionWithoutPity for mentioning everything from Lemon Pledge to a shameless push of the ''Smallville'' soundtrack, in character, to boot! After he leaves, though, the Product Placement remains glaringly obvious, with Chloe saying things like "We'll take my Yaris." rather than "Let's use my car." and the directors seemingly going out of their way to show unnecessary close-ups of the characters' cell phones as they dial, to show off the nifty Verizon logos.

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** ''Smallville'' doesn't just pimp gum; it advertises everything else to the point that (before he was PutOnABus) Pete was nicknamed '[[http://forums.televisionwithoutpity.com/index.php?s=d2be62141d8bd81ac710e41079b593f8&showtopic=3116027&view=findpost&p=1248946 Product Placement Pete]]' by TelevisionWithoutPity Website/TelevisionWithoutPity for mentioning everything from Lemon Pledge to a shameless push of the ''Smallville'' soundtrack, in character, to boot! After he leaves, though, the Product Placement remains glaringly obvious, with Chloe saying things like "We'll take my Yaris." rather than "Let's use my car." and the directors seemingly going out of their way to show unnecessary close-ups of the characters' cell phones as they dial, to show off the nifty Verizon logos.
8th Apr '17 9:55:36 AM nombretomado
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** In the season 2 episode "Innocence", Buffy and Angelus fight amongst prominently displayed posters for the then-new (and presumably not hated yet) ''Film/QuestForCamelot''.

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** In the season 2 episode "Innocence", Buffy and Angelus fight amongst prominently displayed posters for the then-new (and presumably not hated yet) ''Film/QuestForCamelot''.''WesternAnimation/QuestForCamelot''.
5th Apr '17 3:12:39 PM FromtheWordsofBR
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* During the mid-'90s, the ABC network was bought by the [[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Company]]. In doing so, Disney had most, if not all, of their current shows make episodes that involved their characters [[ImGoingToDisneyWorld going on a vacation to]] [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Walt Disney World]]. Even if Disneyland is closer to a show's setting (like ''Series/FullHouse'', based in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco), or if such a trip would normally be outside the characters' budget (like ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' and maybe ''Series/FamilyMatters''). Most did them without complaint and simply moved on. However, there was one revolt. The cast and crew of ''Roseanne'' didn't like being forced to make an hour-long Disney World commercial (it's a two-parter, but they don't reach Disney World until part 2), so the ''very next episode'' was a thinly-veiled and scathing TakeThat against them. In it, David gets a job at an amusement park called Edelweiss Gardens, where the brainwashing and conformity jokes come fast and hard. They also give the entire park a German theme with a Hans the Hare mascot, superficially a parody of Busch Gardens, but still adding in some unsettling Nazi overtones.

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* During In 1995, the mid-'90s, the ABC Creator/{{ABC}} network was bought by the [[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Company]]. In doing so, Disney had most, if not all, of their current shows make episodes that involved their characters [[ImGoingToDisneyWorld going on a vacation to]] [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Walt Disney World]]. Even if Disneyland is closer to a show's setting (like ''Series/FullHouse'', based in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco), or if such a trip would normally be outside the characters' budget (like ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' and maybe ''Series/FamilyMatters''). Most did them without complaint and simply moved on. However, there was one revolt. WriterRevolt. The cast and crew of ''Roseanne'' didn't like being forced to make an hour-long Disney World commercial (it's a two-parter, but they don't reach Disney World until part 2), so the ''very next episode'' was a [[BitingTheHandHumor thinly-veiled and scathing scathing]] TakeThat against them. In it, David gets a job at an amusement park called Edelweiss Gardens, where the brainwashing and conformity jokes come fast and hard. They also give the entire park a German theme with a Hans the Hare mascot, superficially a parody of Busch Gardens, but still adding in some unsettling Nazi overtones.
5th Apr '17 3:06:20 PM FromtheWordsofBR
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* ''Series/HomeImprovement'' avoids this trope by having Tim's ShowWithinAShow ''Tool Time'' sponsored by the fictional tool company Binford. Whenever Tim uses a tool, he announces that it's a Binford. However, this causes ''Tool Time'' to comes across within the world of the show as a trumped-up infomercial for Binford rather than an honest, educational home improvement program.



* ''Series/ImpracticalJokers'' has it in the background when they get to set a challenge in Ikea, White Castle, and so forth, but one extremely obvious example centers around a Kellogg cereal taste test and questions.



* ''Shark Tank'': Later episodes have prominently featured one or more [[InsistentTerminology T-Mobile devices]].

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* ''Shark Tank'': ''[[Series/DragonsDen Shark Tank]]'': Later episodes have prominently featured [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWWHVrK5BhE featured]] one or more [[InsistentTerminology T-Mobile devices]].



* ''Total normal'' was supposedly sponsored by Mitropa, and Creator/HapeKerkeling would repeatedly present and give away coffee machines manufactured by them. It's actually a catering company, primarily working on trains.



* Back when it existed, the ITC (the UK's Independent Television Commission) once ran a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_5qiwnUMdQ Home and Away commercial]] lambasting ProductPlacement, showing a mock Aussie soap scene that focuses more on the beer than the plot. Flash forward to 2010, and the UK is just now drawing up rules for product placement.
* ''Series/ImpracticalJokers'' has it in the background when they get to set a challenge in Ikea, White Castle, and so forth, but one extremely obvious example centers around a Kellogg cereal taste test and questions.

to:

* Back when it existed, the ITC (the UK's Independent Television Commission) once ran a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_5qiwnUMdQ Home and Away commercial]] lambasting ProductPlacement, showing a mock Aussie soap scene that focuses more on the beer than the plot. Flash forward to 2010, and the The UK is only just now drawing then drew up rules for product placement.
* ''Series/ImpracticalJokers'' has it
placement years later in 2010.
* ''Series/HomeImprovement'' avoids this trope by having Tim's ShowWithinAShow ''Tool Time'' sponsored by
the background when they get fictional tool company Binford. Whenever Tim uses a tool, he announces that it's a Binford. However, this causes ''Tool Time'' to set comes across within the world of the show as a challenge in Ikea, White Castle, and so forth, but one extremely obvious example centers around a Kellogg cereal taste test and questions.trumped-up infomercial for Binford rather than an honest, educational home improvement program.



* ''Total normal'' was supposedly sponsored by Mitropa, and Creator/HapeKerkeling would repeatedly present and give away coffee machines manufactured by them. It's actually a catering company, primarily working on trains.

to:

* ''Total normal'' was supposedly sponsored by Mitropa, and Creator/HapeKerkeling would repeatedly present and give away coffee machines manufactured by them. It's actually a catering company, primarily working on trains.
23rd Mar '17 5:17:08 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' actually inverts this. Given the predominance of ProductPlacement in the current media landscape, most assume that the show just did it to get money. Actually, the ProductPlacement in ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' broke a lot of sitcom etiquette by actually mentioning specific products, and the writers had to lobby for ''permission'' to use the names of real products. Why? The [[ContemplateOurNavels Contemplating Our Navels]] conversations that ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' is famous for are based on RealLife diction, and such diction is extremely clunky to recreate with an abstract BrandX. As an example, one episode involves George Costanza attempting to prove that someone took his candy bar impugning a suspect's description of [[ConvictionByContradiction candy bars]]. By using actual candy bars, the viewer can base her own experiences with that candy bar in interpreting how the characters on screen react to it. The incidental ProductPlacement in ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' is actually a large reason why ProductPlacement in general has become so popular in the modern age. Prior to ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', ad executives were far more worried about negative association than, in retrospect, they should have been. One of the clip shows features a two minute montage of the cast mentioning brand names such as Drake's Cakes, Chunky bars, Snapple, Yoohoo, and, of coursem Junior Mints.

to:

* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' actually inverts this. Given the predominance of ProductPlacement in the current media landscape, most assume that the show just did it to get money. Actually, the ProductPlacement in ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' broke a lot of sitcom etiquette by actually mentioning specific products, and the writers had to lobby for ''permission'' to use the names of real products. Why? The [[ContemplateOurNavels Contemplating Our Navels]] conversations that ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' is famous for are based on RealLife diction, and such diction is extremely clunky to recreate with an abstract BrandX. As an example, one episode involves George Costanza attempting to prove that someone took his candy bar impugning a suspect's description of [[ConvictionByContradiction candy bars]]. By using actual candy bars, the viewer can base her own experiences with that candy bar in interpreting how the characters on screen react to it. The incidental ProductPlacement in ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' is actually a large reason why ProductPlacement in general has become so popular in the modern age. Prior to ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', ad executives were far more worried about negative association than, in retrospect, they should have been. One of the clip shows features a two minute montage of the cast mentioning brand names such as Drake's Cakes, Chunky bars, Snapple, Yoohoo, and, of coursem course, Junior Mints.
23rd Mar '17 5:15:41 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* ''Series/LastComicStanding' tried to play it straight by having a minion from the then-upcoming ''Despicable Me'' show up as an auditionee. It might not have been a good idea to do that with a judging panel of {{Deadpan Snarker}}s.

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* ''Series/LastComicStanding' ''Series/LastComicStanding'' tried to play it straight by having a minion from the then-upcoming ''Despicable Me'' show up as an auditionee. It might not have been a good idea to do that with a judging panel of {{Deadpan Snarker}}s.
14th Mar '17 1:33:14 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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** ''KamenRiderExAid'' shows a flashback that features ''[[{{Tekken}} Tekken 7: Fated Retribution]]''. What's really painful about the flashback is that it takes place in the year ''2010'', a full 7 years before Tekken 7 would be released.

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** ''KamenRiderExAid'' ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'' shows a flashback that features ''[[{{Tekken}} ''[[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Tekken 7: Fated Retribution]]''. What's really painful about the flashback is that it takes place in the year ''2010'', a full 7 years before Tekken 7 would be released.
4th Mar '17 4:10:42 PM nombretomado
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* An episode of ''American Crime'' has one of the main character browsing posters in a comic book shop. All of the comic characters characters featured (Comicbook/{{Elektra}}, [[Comicbook/HeroesForHire The Daughters of Dragon]], and [[Series/AgentsOfSHIELD Melinda May]]) are Marvel heroines, while a prominent advertisement for ''Comicbook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'' can be seen in the background. The show aired on ABC, which, like MarvelComics, is owned by Disney.

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* An episode of ''American Crime'' has one of the main character browsing posters in a comic book shop. All of the comic characters characters featured (Comicbook/{{Elektra}}, [[Comicbook/HeroesForHire The Daughters of Dragon]], and [[Series/AgentsOfSHIELD Melinda May]]) are Marvel heroines, while a prominent advertisement for ''Comicbook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'' can be seen in the background. The show aired on ABC, which, like MarvelComics, Creator/MarvelComics, is owned by Disney.
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