History OlderThanTheyThink / Other

22nd Sep '16 6:44:34 AM morane
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* The holiday of Easter is known in all other European languages with a name deriving from Latin ''Paschalis''. This word itself is a loan from Hebrew - from פסח (''pesach''), which translates in English neatly as Passover. The commandment for Passover can be found in Exodus, making it OlderThanDirt.
22nd Sep '16 6:34:43 AM morane
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* "Stacy" is a post-[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII WWII]] creation, right? And it certainly is a girl's name - isn't it? Try telling that to Stacy Potts, a ''man'' who lived in New Jersey during the American Revolution (1775-1783), and who is known to us because he was a personal friend of the Hessian colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall, UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington's opposite number at the famous Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776.

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* "Stacy" is a post-[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII WWII]] creation, right? And it certainly is a girl's name - isn't it? Try telling that to Stacy Potts, a ''man'' who lived in New Jersey during the American Revolution (1775-1783), and who is known to us because he was a personal friend of the Hessian colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall, UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington's opposite number at the famous Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776. Stacy is short from Greek '' Ανάσταση'', "Anastasi" (resurrection), which has been a popular Christian name for centuries, either as ''Anastasis'' (male) or ''Anastasia'' (female), making it OlderThanFeudalism.
22nd Sep '16 6:24:59 AM morane
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* While the Medieval Europeans are usually credited with inventing the fully plate-armored knight, forms of rigid metal armor for the entire body had actually been invented far back in the bronze age. The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendra_panoply Dendra panoply]] is a Mycenaean era plate armor dated to about 1500 BC. This type of armour is known amongst the re'enactors as "oil-barrel armour", and it was used mainly by the ''maryannu'', charioteers. Medieval Europeans didn't invent maille armor either, since it appeared in the Celtic regions of Europe around the beginning of the 4th century BC, and the Romans adopted it as ''lorica hamata''. In fact, the invention of the famous segmented plate ''lorica segmentata'' in the late 1st century BC [[https://myarmoury.com/feature_mail.html did not make mail obsolete and was actually outlasted by it]], challenging the preconception that plate armor is self-evidently superior to mail as protection or technologically more advanced. The unique achievement of the Europeans during the 14th and 15th centuries was to create a sophisticated system of plate-on-plate articulation that made it possible for armor to be both closer-fitting and more flexible. This was never the only solution to the problem, however, since Ottoman Siaphis and Japanese Samurai fought with a similar level of protection, the first with plate-and-mail and the second with lamellar or laminar armor.

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* While the Medieval Europeans are usually credited with inventing the fully plate-armored knight, forms of rigid metal armor for the entire body had actually been invented far back in the bronze age. The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendra_panoply Dendra panoply]] is a Mycenaean era plate armor dated to about 1500 BC. This type of armour is known amongst the re'enactors re-enactors as "oil-barrel armour", and it was used mainly by the ''maryannu'', charioteers. Medieval Europeans didn't invent maille armor either, since it appeared in the Celtic regions of Europe around the beginning of the 4th century BC, and the Romans adopted it as ''lorica hamata''. In fact, the invention of the famous segmented plate ''lorica segmentata'' in the late 1st century BC [[https://myarmoury.com/feature_mail.html did not make mail obsolete and was actually outlasted by it]], challenging the preconception that plate armor is self-evidently superior to mail as protection or technologically more advanced. The unique achievement of the Europeans during the 14th and 15th centuries was to create a sophisticated system of plate-on-plate articulation that made it possible for armor to be both closer-fitting and more flexible. This was never the only solution to the problem, however, since Ottoman Siaphis and Japanese Samurai fought with a similar level of protection, the first with plate-and-mail and the second with lamellar or laminar armor.



** ...as the Roman cataphracts had ''draco'', a windsock-like emblem shaped like a dragon as their emblem. Cataphracts usually were enclosed in mail and/or lamellar, not plate, though.

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** ...as the Roman cataphracts had ''draco'', ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_%28military_standard%29 draco]]'', a windsock-like emblem shaped like a dragon as their emblem.emblem ''which even made dragon-like hissing sound in the wake of the charging unit''. Cataphracts usually were enclosed in mail and/or lamellar, not plate, though.
22nd Sep '16 6:19:36 AM morane
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* While the Medieval Europeans are usually credited with inventing the fully plate-armored knight, forms of rigid metal armor for the entire body had actually been invented far back in the bronze age. The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendra_panoply Dendra panoply]] is a Mycenaean era plate armor dated to about 1500 BC. They didn't invent maille armor either, since it appeared in the Celtic regions of Europe around the beginning of the 4th century BC, and the Romans adopted it as ''lorica hamata''. In fact, the invention of the famous segmented plate ''lorica segmentata'' in the late 1st century BC [[https://myarmoury.com/feature_mail.html did not make mail obsolete and was actually outlasted by it]], challenging the preconception that plate armor is self-evidently superior to mail as protection or technologically more advanced. The unique achievement of the Europeans during the 14th and 15th centuries was to create a sophisticated system of plate-on-plate articulation that made it possible for armor to be both closer-fitting and more flexible. This was never the only solution to the problem, however, since Ottoman Siaphis and Japanese Samurai fought with a similar level of protection, the first with plate-and-mail and the second with lamellar or laminar armor.

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* While the Medieval Europeans are usually credited with inventing the fully plate-armored knight, forms of rigid metal armor for the entire body had actually been invented far back in the bronze age. The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendra_panoply Dendra panoply]] is a Mycenaean era plate armor dated to about 1500 BC. They This type of armour is known amongst the re'enactors as "oil-barrel armour", and it was used mainly by the ''maryannu'', charioteers. Medieval Europeans didn't invent maille armor either, since it appeared in the Celtic regions of Europe around the beginning of the 4th century BC, and the Romans adopted it as ''lorica hamata''. In fact, the invention of the famous segmented plate ''lorica segmentata'' in the late 1st century BC [[https://myarmoury.com/feature_mail.html did not make mail obsolete and was actually outlasted by it]], challenging the preconception that plate armor is self-evidently superior to mail as protection or technologically more advanced. The unique achievement of the Europeans during the 14th and 15th centuries was to create a sophisticated system of plate-on-plate articulation that made it possible for armor to be both closer-fitting and more flexible. This was never the only solution to the problem, however, since Ottoman Siaphis and Japanese Samurai fought with a similar level of protection, the first with plate-and-mail and the second with lamellar or laminar armor.


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** And speaking of knights, heavy shock cavalry with both horse and rider armoured was already knewn in the 4th century BC. They were known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cataphract cataphracts]]. It is likely the Knights of Round Table are based on Roman cataphract unit...
**...as the Roman cataphracts had ''draco'', a windsock-like emblem shaped like a dragon as their emblem. Cataphracts usually were enclosed in mail and/or lamellar, not plate, though.


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** It may be an independent innovation in Europe, as 13th century writers such as Roger Bacon deal with it and even give several formulae for different uses. It was rifling, not gunpowder itself, which made armour obsolete as rifling enabled much more accurate fire and less windage between the round and barrel, enabling greater kinetic energies than smoothbores. Barrel rifling was invented in Augsburg, Germany at the end of the fifteenth century. Though true rifling dates from the mid-16th century, it did not become commonplace until the nineteenth century.
22nd Sep '16 6:08:00 AM morane
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* Skydiving. It was heavily subsided in Soviet Union (the Red Army desired to found large parachute corps), and the oldest parachuting clubs in the USSR were founded already in early 1930s. Many of the early cosmonauts, such as Valentina Tereshkova, have been skydivers - not pilots.
22nd Sep '16 1:29:21 AM KeithM
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** The Hudson's Bay Company (established 1670) never gained the notoriety of the two East India companies, but it functioned as the ''de facto'' European government of large parts of North America before various European nations (and later the United States and Canada) got around to claiming them, often using the trading posts and infrastructure established by the company as the basis for their own administration, and was the largest non-national landowner on the planet.
22nd Sep '16 1:00:16 AM KeithM
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* "Tiffany" sounds like a 20th Century name if there ever was one, but it's found in documents dating from the 1100s in England and France as a variation of the name Theophania.
22nd Sep '16 12:48:40 AM KeithM
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* ScienceFiction literature must be something from the 20th century right? Nope, Creator/JulesVerne already wrote stories about moon travel, journeys to the center of the earth and travels to the bottom of the sea in the late 19th century. And even before him, in the 17th century, there is Francis Godwin's "The Man in the Moone" (1638) as the first work of science fiction in English, and Cyrano de Bergerac's "Comical History of the States and Empires of the Moon" (1656). Space travel also figures prominently in Creator/{{Voltaire}}'s "Micromégas" (1752), which is also notable for the suggestion that people of other worlds may be in some ways more advanced than those of earth.

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* ScienceFiction literature must be something from the 20th century right? Nope, Creator/JulesVerne already wrote stories about moon travel, journeys to the center of the earth and travels to the bottom of the sea in the late 19th century. And even before him, there was Mary Shelley's ''{{Frankenstein}}'' in 1818[[note]]Although generally considered horror, the story is based on using scientific methods as understood at the time to create artificial life, and the responsibilities of those who created it. There's a reason a great many stories these days involving ArtificialIntelligence seem very similar.[[/note]], and in the 17th century, there is Francis Godwin's "The Man in the Moone" (1638) as the first work of science fiction in English, and Cyrano de Bergerac's "Comical History of the States and Empires of the Moon" (1656). Space travel also figures prominently in Creator/{{Voltaire}}'s "Micromégas" (1752), which is also notable for the suggestion that people of other worlds may be in some ways more advanced than those of earth.
20th Sep '16 8:26:10 AM Morgenthaler
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** The first assault rifle. The [=AK47=]? Not even close. The [=STG44=]? Nope. That would be the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedorov_Avtomat Fedorov Avtomat]], which dates back to WorldWarI.

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** The first assault rifle. The [=AK47=]? Not even close. The [=STG44=]? Nope. That would be the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedorov_Avtomat Fedorov Avtomat]], which dates back to WorldWarI.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.



* The phenomenon of girls playing basketball didn't start in 1996 with the founding of the WNBA. There was a girls' high-school basketball team in Seattle, Washington, around the time of WorldWarI - barely two decades after basketball itself was invented!

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* The phenomenon of girls playing basketball didn't start in 1996 with the founding of the WNBA. There was a girls' high-school basketball team in Seattle, Washington, around the time of WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI - barely two decades after basketball itself was invented!
17th Aug '16 6:59:36 PM Doug86
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* Most people think that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Bucket_Challenge ALS Ice Bucket Challenge]] is a new phenomena that originated in the United States in June 2014. However, it actually originated in Wigan, Greater Manchester, UnitedKingdom, as far back as early August 2004, incidentally enough as a fundraising event, but for events relating to ''other disabilities'' (DownsSyndrome, other disabilities etc.). It's basically HilariousInHindsight when you consider that it was actually invented by the British. So much for the likes of IggyAzalea and SelenaGomez thinking it's a craze.

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* Most people think that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Bucket_Challenge ALS Ice Bucket Challenge]] is a new phenomena that originated in the United States in June 2014. However, it actually originated in Wigan, Greater Manchester, UnitedKingdom, as far back as early August 2004, incidentally enough as a fundraising event, but for events relating to ''other disabilities'' (DownsSyndrome, other disabilities etc.). It's basically HilariousInHindsight when you consider that it was actually invented by the British. So much for the likes of IggyAzalea Music/IggyAzalea and SelenaGomez Music/SelenaGomez thinking it's a craze.
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