History OldShame / ComicBooks

2nd Jan '16 1:40:47 PM nombretomado
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* For a long time, this was the attitude Creator/MarkMillar took towards a collection of early strips he wrote for ''SonicTheComic'' in the nineties, insisting that [[MoneyDearBoy he only wrote them for the money]] to pay for his wedding. He seems to have softened his stance on them lately, though.
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* For a long time, this was the attitude Creator/MarkMillar took towards a collection of early strips he wrote for ''SonicTheComic'' ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic'' in the nineties, insisting that [[MoneyDearBoy he only wrote them for the money]] to pay for his wedding. He seems to have softened his stance on them lately, though.
12th Nov '15 6:35:55 PM TheTrailblazerCritic
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* Most at Marvel Comics, in particular writer Chris Claremont deeply regret ''The Avengers #200'', which almost immediately caused an uproar among fans for its controversial storyline regarding Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers) giving birth to Marcus, the son of Immortus who had impregnated Ms. Marvel in Limbo with the intent to have himself reborn in the mortal world to claim her heart; said impregnation was the result of Marcus seeking out the affection of Ms. Marvel with whom he desired intercourse to create a new hybrid race, a feat only accomplished after manipulating her feelings with Immortus' machinations. This revelation drew accusations that the story in question had glorified rape, infamously dubbed by one reviewer as "The Rape of Ms. Marvel". Condemnation towards the comic's implications prompted Chris Claremont and his team to publish "Avengers Annual #10", featuring the return of Ms. Marvel to Earth from Limbo that directly addresses the events of the aforementioned issue and the Avengers' lax reaction to the acts committed against her.
8th Nov '15 9:41:33 AM comicwriter
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* Creator/KevinSmith has said he regrets agreeing to do the OrphanedSeries ''Comicbook/{{Daredevil}}/Bullseye: The Target'', and that he only did it to hold Creator/JoeQuesada to his word after he'd promised that Smith would get to write the next encounter between Daredevil and Bullseye.
5th Nov '15 7:50:53 PM Pinokio
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* ''ComicBook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': Before leaving the title, Jim Valentino disowned two issues brainstormed with Rob Liefeld, ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' #28-29, having a "lackluster script" and "barebones plot", and criticizes Annual #2 for being unable to look at the art.
7th Oct '15 4:27:33 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.
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* Creator/JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.
6th Aug '15 3:17:32 PM LondonKdS
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* Eric Powell is extremely negative in his attitude to his earliest issues of ''ComicBook/TheGoon''. He keeps them available because he understands that people want to see them, and they include some content that is important for later plot developments. However, the TPB is called ''Rough Stuff'', and contains no less than four prefaces apologising for the content, three prose and one in comic format, [[BreakingTheFourthWall in which the characters themselves]] complain about how they were drawn. Powell considers the art to have been very bad and the comedy too broad and silly.
28th May '15 6:17:10 PM ShinyTsukkomi
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* Creator/JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.
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* Creator/JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''InvaderZim'' ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.
27th Apr '15 2:21:18 PM Patachou
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** The first, ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheLandOfTheSoviets'' (1929), is ripped off wholesale from a single book condemning the Communist regime and has extremely primitive art, which was never updated to his later style. Hergé only republished it during the 1970s and solely because many bootleg copies were sold during that time. Still, it was kept in its original black-and-white form, without any alterations, and in an act of CanonDiscontinuity kept out of the regular Tintin canon. ** The second, ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo'' contains many old stereotypes of Africans, causing a furor in the UK when it was reprinted. There was also an unsuccessful private prosecution in Belgium to try to get the book banned as incitement to racism. Tintin's psychotic maiming of wildlife (blowing up a rhinoceros with a drilled hole and a stick of dynamite) is pretty hard to take as well. Hergé recognized this in retrospect and ''begged'' for them to be left out of print. Unlike the Soviet adventure, ''Tintin in The Congo'' was later redrawn and republished in color and with Hergé's later more polished art style. The rhinoceros was spared in the Scandinavian edition (except for the newest Swedish translation) and the English color edition. ** A third example is ''Recap/TintinTheShootingStar'', created during the Nazi occupation of Belgium; it originally featured a stereotyped Jewish-American villain, who in later versions was altered to be of an unindicated ethnicity. A very antisemitic comedy scene with two rabbis was entirely cut.
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** The first, ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheLandOfTheSoviets'' ''[[Recap/TintinTintinInTheLandOfTheSoviets Tintin In The Land Of The Soviets]]'' (1929), is ripped off wholesale from a single book condemning the Communist regime and has extremely primitive art, which was never updated to his later style. Hergé only republished it during the 1970s and solely because many bootleg copies were sold during that time. Still, it was kept in its original black-and-white form, without any alterations, and in an act of CanonDiscontinuity kept out of the regular Tintin canon. ** The second, ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo'' ''[[Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo Tintin In The Congo]]'' (1930) contains many old stereotypes of Africans, causing a furor in the UK when it was reprinted.released to the English reading public in 2005. There was also an unsuccessful private prosecution in Belgium to try to get the book banned as incitement to racism. Tintin's psychotic maiming of wildlife (blowing up a rhinoceros with a drilled hole and a stick of dynamite) is pretty hard to take as well. Hergé recognized this in retrospect and ''begged'' for them to be left out of print. Unlike the Soviet adventure, ''Tintin in The Congo'' was later redrawn and republished in color and with Hergé's later more polished art style. The rhinoceros was spared in the Scandinavian edition (except for the newest Swedish translation) and the English color edition. ** A third example is ''Recap/TintinTheShootingStar'', ''Recap/TintinTheShootingStar'' (1941), created during the Nazi occupation of Belgium; it originally featured a stereotyped Jewish-American villain, who in later versions was altered to be of an unindicated ethnicity. A very antisemitic comedy scene with two rabbis was entirely cut.

* The 1930s MickeyMouse comics count as this, since many of them contain racist stereotypes, Mickey attempting suicide, and other themes contrary to the image of Mickey Mouse today. Because the comics themselves were believed to be in the public domain, Eternity Comics, an independent company not affiliated with Disney, attempted to anthologize "The Uncensored Mouse" in comic-book format in 1989 without permission from Disney, doing everything they could to prevent a lawsuit (using all-black covers, shrink-wrapping them so nobody would flip through the books, acknowledging Disney's rights in the copyright page, etc.). They were shut down anyway, because even if the ''comics'' were in the public domain (which is questionable), the characters weren't. * JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.
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* The 1930s MickeyMouse WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse comics count as this, since many of them contain racist stereotypes, Mickey attempting suicide, and other themes contrary to the image of Mickey Mouse today. Because the comics themselves were believed to be in the public domain, Eternity Comics, an independent company not affiliated with Disney, attempted to anthologize "The Uncensored Mouse" in comic-book format in 1989 without permission from Disney, doing everything they could to prevent a lawsuit (using all-black covers, shrink-wrapping them so nobody would flip through the books, acknowledging Disney's rights in the copyright page, etc.). They were shut down anyway, because even if the ''comics'' were in the public domain (which is questionable), the characters weren't. * JhonenVasquez, Creator/JhonenVasquez, author of ''JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', ''ComicBook/{{Squee}}'', and creator/showrunner of ''InvaderZim'' put out a single-issue "throwaway" comic called the ''Bad Art Collection'' early in his career, which was exactly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what it says on the cover]]. When someone brought a copy to a signing event at a convention he responded with his usual good grace and humour; and commented, laughingly, "Oh my God, someone actually bought this thing," while signing it. According to Vasquez, the origin of the collection was him writing the cartoons back in school in order to get people to stop bugging him to draw for them. Unsurprisingly, the ''Bad Art Collection'' has been out of print for at least a decade.

* PeterDavid has said he regrets [[StuffedIntoTheFridge killing off Betty Ross]] in ''Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk'', and that [[RealitySubtext the rash decision was the result of the traumatic divorce he was going through at the time]].
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* PeterDavid Creator/PeterDavid has said he regrets [[StuffedIntoTheFridge killing off Betty Ross]] in ''Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk'', and that [[RealitySubtext the rash decision was the result of the traumatic divorce he was going through at the time]].

* ''ComicBook/SuskeEnWiske'': Creator Willy Vandersteen already made comics during the Second World War before he struck gold with Suske & Wiske after the liberation of Belgium. One of the stories he drew were antisemitic cartoons for a Nazi SS magazine. Vandersteen was smart enough to do this under a pseudonym and this SecretShame was only revealed in 2010, literally 20 years after his death. Even his relatives claimed he never told them anything about this. * ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': Creator Albert Uderzo has apologized about the very anti-German "Asterix and the Goths" album. In this story the Goths (Germans) [[AllGermansAreNazis are depicted as being evil and militaristic.]] He said the story was made just two decades after World War II and anti-German sentiments were still vivid then. In later "Asterix" stories Germans are depicted more sympathetically.
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* ''ComicBook/SuskeEnWiske'': Creator Willy Vandersteen already made comics during the Second World War before he struck gold with Suske & Wiske after the liberation of Belgium. One of the stories he drew were antisemitic cartoons for a Nazi SS magazine. Vandersteen was smart enough to do this under a pseudonym and this SecretShame secret shame was only revealed in 2010, literally 20 years after his death. Even his relatives claimed he never told them anything about this. * ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': Creator Albert Uderzo has apologized about the very anti-German "Asterix and the Goths" ''Recap/AsterixAndTheGoths'' album. In this story the Goths (Germans) [[AllGermansAreNazis are depicted as being evil and militaristic.]] He said the story was made just two decades after World War II and anti-German sentiments were still vivid then. In later "Asterix" stories Germans are depicted more sympathetically.
12th Feb '15 1:20:03 PM Byzantine
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** The first, ''Tintin in the Land of the Soviets'' (1929), is ripped off wholesale from a single book condemning the Communist regime and has extremely primitive art, which was never updated to his later style. Hergé only republished it during the 1970s and solely because many bootleg copies were sold during that time. Still, it was kept in its original black-and-white form, without any alterations, and in an act of CanonDiscontinuity kept out of the regular Tintin canon. ** The second, ''Tintin in the Congo'' contains many old stereotypes of Africans, causing a furor in the UK when it was reprinted. There was also an unsuccessful private prosecution in Belgium to try to get the book banned as incitement to racism. Tintin's psychotic maiming of wildlife (blowing up a rhinoceros with a drilled hole and a stick of dynamite) is pretty hard to take as well. Hergé recognized this in retrospect and ''begged'' for them to be left out of print. Unlike the Soviet adventure, ''Tintin in The Congo'' was later redrawn and republished in color and with Hergé's later more polished art style. The rhinoceros was spared in the Scandinavian edition (except for the newest Swedish translation) and the English color edition. ** A third example is ''Shooting Star'', created during the Nazi occupation of Belgium; it originally featured a stereotyped Jewish-American villain, who in later versions was altered to be of an unindicated ethnicity. A very antisemitic comedy scene with two rabbis was entirely cut.
to:
** The first, ''Tintin in the Land of the Soviets'' ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheLandOfTheSoviets'' (1929), is ripped off wholesale from a single book condemning the Communist regime and has extremely primitive art, which was never updated to his later style. Hergé only republished it during the 1970s and solely because many bootleg copies were sold during that time. Still, it was kept in its original black-and-white form, without any alterations, and in an act of CanonDiscontinuity kept out of the regular Tintin canon. ** The second, ''Tintin in the Congo'' ''Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo'' contains many old stereotypes of Africans, causing a furor in the UK when it was reprinted. There was also an unsuccessful private prosecution in Belgium to try to get the book banned as incitement to racism. Tintin's psychotic maiming of wildlife (blowing up a rhinoceros with a drilled hole and a stick of dynamite) is pretty hard to take as well. Hergé recognized this in retrospect and ''begged'' for them to be left out of print. Unlike the Soviet adventure, ''Tintin in The Congo'' was later redrawn and republished in color and with Hergé's later more polished art style. The rhinoceros was spared in the Scandinavian edition (except for the newest Swedish translation) and the English color edition. ** A third example is ''Shooting Star'', ''Recap/TintinTheShootingStar'', created during the Nazi occupation of Belgium; it originally featured a stereotyped Jewish-American villain, who in later versions was altered to be of an unindicated ethnicity. A very antisemitic comedy scene with two rabbis was entirely cut.
9th Feb '15 5:39:13 PM WillyFourEyes
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* Undoubtedly the case for Nick Simmons with ''ComicBook/{{Incarnate}}''. He gave up his comic book career and shut down his Website/DeviantArt account when the backlash over his alleged plaguarism in it came to light.
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* Undoubtedly the case for Nick Simmons with ''ComicBook/{{Incarnate}}''. He gave up his comic book career and shut down his Website/DeviantArt account when the backlash over his alleged plaguarism plagiarism in it the book came to light.
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