History NoodleIncident / RealLife

12th Jan '18 7:24:21 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
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* Among the things that the women in ''Theatre/{{Lysistrata}}'' agree to [[LysistrataGambit abstain from doing]] is "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch[ing] like the lioness on the cheese grater]]." The ''only'' historical fact we have about this activity is that it was the single most expensive "item" on the "menu" at an Ancient Greek brothel.
** The translation we used in college said "I will not stretch my slippers toward the ceiling/ Nor like a lion on all fours go kneeling."

to:

* Among the things that the women in ''Theatre/{{Lysistrata}}'' agree to [[LysistrataGambit abstain from doing]] is "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch[ing] "crouch[ing] like the lioness on the cheese grater]].grater." The ''only'' historical fact we have about this activity is that it was the single most expensive "item" on the "menu" at an Ancient Greek brothel.
** The translation we used in college said "I will not stretch my slippers toward the ceiling/ Nor like a lion on all fours go kneeling."
brothel.
12th Dec '17 6:51:16 AM RedScharlach
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* Five decades later, Creator/WernerHerzog has yet to release (and, in all likelihood, [[WordOfGod will never release]]) "Game in the Sand", a 1964 short film. Not much is known about it, other than the plot concerns four children and a rooster in a cardboard box, and that there is a scene where the chicken is buried in sand up to its neck. According to Herzog, the filming "got out of hand", and he had to abandon the project. Given that his 1970 movie ''Film/EvenDwarfsStartedSmall'' includes footage of piglets attempting to suckle on the body of their dead mother pig, chickens eating each other, and somebody being hit by a truck (all taken accidently in the course of filming), one can only imagine how bad "Game in the Sand" must get.

to:

* Five decades later, Creator/WernerHerzog has yet to release (and, in all likelihood, [[WordOfGod will never release]]) "Game in the Sand", a 1964 short film. Not much is known about it, other than the plot concerns four children and a rooster in a cardboard box, and that there is a scene where the chicken is buried in sand up to its neck. According to Herzog, the filming "got out of hand", and he had to abandon the project. Given that his 1970 movie ''Film/EvenDwarfsStartedSmall'' includes footage of piglets attempting to suckle on the body of their dead mother pig, chickens eating each other, and somebody being hit by a truck (all taken accidently in shot accidentally over the course of filming), one can only imagine how bad "Game in the Sand" must get.
22nd Oct '17 12:58:40 PM BackgroundGuy
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* The Anti-Chinese Campaign by the Mexican government. From 1911 to 1934, taking advantage of the legal vacuum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asian people in Mexico, and arrested and executed around 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon.[[note]]The Mexican North, at the time, was very culturally similar to the American South, racism included.[[/note]] Chinese workers lost a ''lot'' of their civil rights and were gathered into ghettos, deported and publicly shamed; many of those laws remained until the last legs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* The Anti-Chinese Campaign by the Mexican government. From 1911 to 1934, taking advantage of the legal vacuum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asian people in from Mexico, and arrested and executed around 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon.[[note]]The Mexican North, at the time, was very culturally similar to the American South, racism included.[[/note]] Chinese workers lost a ''lot'' of their civil rights and were gathered into ghettos, deported deported, and publicly shamed; many of those laws remained until the last legs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This What's weird is especially relevant because that neither China nor Japan has ''never'' have ''ever'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are especially considering the grudge they still bitter each other hold against one another for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while Nanking]]. Sure, it inflicted hurt many more victims, people, but it just only lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who whereas what Mexico did lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, so it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those that all countries to this date. involved have not spoken on the matter since. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other than the fact that that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a an unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained [[note]]One possibility as to why no one seems to care anymore is that many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s 1800s, and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. thus were borderline slaves. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they those who were deported back to their countries, many times they countries were often jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't don't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, As for Mexico, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few little information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade Japan; as of now, [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.Wikipedia.[[/note]]
12th Oct '17 7:42:04 AM TheDeadSkin
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives out there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the The Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from government. From 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives out there[[/note]] Taking taking advantage of the legal vaccum vacuum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians Asian people in Mexico, and participated in the arrest arrested and execution of nearly executed around 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Torreon.[[note]]The Mexican women; North, at the time, was very culturally similar to the American South, racism included.[[/note]] Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They lost a ''lot'' of their civil rights and were gathered into ghettos, deported, deported and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and publicly shamed; many of those laws remained until the final last legs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
15th Jul '17 10:02:43 AM nombretomado
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives out there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives out there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
24th May '17 8:02:18 PM luisedgarf
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one out there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
24th May '17 7:59:16 PM luisedgarf
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and unknown number or Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and a unknown number or of Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
24th May '17 7:58:32 PM luisedgarf
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date. Outside the Torreon Massacre, there's no further information of any other massacres against Asians within that time period, other that 16,000 Chinese immigrants, and unknown number or Japanese and other Asians, were deported or killed.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
24th May '17 7:48:07 PM luisedgarf
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* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]

to:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, and taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
24th May '17 7:44:20 PM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

* There's ''one hell of a NoodleIncident'' that involve not only three different countries of three different cultures and each other having their reasons to keep this incident as silently as possible in their own turfs: We are talking about the Anti-Chinese Campaign pulled out by the Mexican government against Chinese and Japanese immigrants from 1911 to 1934, that involve deportation and mass ''[[FinalSolution genocide]]'' against any Asian person in Mexico, especially in the [[DeepSouth Northern states of that country]][[note]]The Mexican North is for all intents very similar, culture-wise, to the American South, up to even racism, especially in that era. Luckily, it already changed for the better, albeit some stereotypes still lives one there[[/note]] Taking advantage of the legal vaccum caused by the Mexican Revolution, the government deported many Asians and participated in the arrest and execution of nearly 400 Chinese merchants in the northern city of Torreon. Laws were created that forbade the marrying of Chinese men with Mexican women; Chinese workers were not allowed to own land, sell food, hold public office, enter museums or restaurants. They were gathered into ghettos, deported, and accused of being the cause of all sorts of disease and pestilence and many of those laws remained until the final legs of WorldWarII. This is especially relevant because neither China nor Japan has ''never'' accused Mexico of any wrongdoing against their citizens to this date, taking into account how China and Japan are still bitter each other for the whole [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanking_Massacre Rape of Nanking]] who, while it inflicted more victims, it just lasted ''one year'', compared with the Mexican one, who lasted ''three decades'', albeit with less victims, it's still incredible why this whole incident remains ignored in those countries to this date.[[note]]This could be explained as many of those immigrants were people who defected from their countries illegally, or worked in the construction of rail lines in the USA and in Mexico since the 1800s and as such, they worked in almost slavery conditions. Most of the times their homelands didn't give a damn about the fate of their citizens abroad, since common citizens weren't allowed to leave their countries without permission, and in the case they were deported back to their countries, many times they were jailed or executed, so it's very likely both Japanese and Chinese governments doesn't want to admit their part on the whole deal. In the Mexican case, the government doesn't teach this incident in either public or private schools and there's very few information about it in either Mexico, China and Japan, to the grade [[https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campa%C3%B1a_Antichina the only article about the topic]] is located in the ''Spanish'' Wikipedia, and there isn't any translations to either English, Chinese or Japanese.[[/note]]
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