History NonIndicativeName / Theatre

7th Nov '15 5:31:55 PM Prfnoff
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* The main character from ''MissSaigon'', Kim, doesn't actually win the Miss Saigon title at the beauty pageant that opens the musical.

to:

* The main character from ''MissSaigon'', ''Theatre/MissSaigon'', Kim, doesn't actually win the Miss Saigon title at the beauty pageant that opens the musical.



* Trekkie Monster from Theatre/AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of Franchise/StarTrek.
* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudeville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Hite (Real name Henry Mullens) was indeed the giant, but Tommy Lowe (real name Roland Picaro) was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.

to:

* Trekkie Monster from Theatre/AvenueQ ''Theatre/AvenueQ'' is a monster, but not a fan of Franchise/StarTrek.
* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudeville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Hite (Real name Henry Mullens) was indeed the giant, but Tommy Lowe (real name Roland Picaro) was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.Ross.
* The solo instrument in "Cornet Man" from ''Theatre/FunnyGirl'' is a trumpet, not a cornet.
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21st Jun '14 1:59:39 AM MrInitialMan
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* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudeville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Mullens "Hite" was indeed the giant, but Roland Picaro "Lowe" was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.

to:

* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudeville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Mullens "Hite" Hite (Real name Henry Mullens) was indeed the giant, but Tommy Lowe (real name Roland Picaro "Lowe" Picaro) was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.
21st Jun '14 1:55:11 AM MrInitialMan
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* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Mullens "Hite" was indeed the giant, but Roland Picaro "Lowe" was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.

to:

* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudville}} post-{{Vaudeville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Mullens "Hite" was indeed the giant, but Roland Picaro "Lowe" was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.
21st Jun '14 1:54:49 AM MrInitialMan
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* Trekkie Monster from Theatre/AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of Franchise/StarTrek.

to:

* Trekkie Monster from Theatre/AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of Franchise/StarTrek.Franchise/StarTrek.
* LoweHiteAndStanley, a post-{{Vaudville}} act, consisting of a giant, an averaged-sized guy, and a midget. Henry Mullens "Hite" was indeed the giant, but Roland Picaro "Lowe" was ''not'' the midget--he was the averaged-sized man. The midget was Stanley Ross.
4th Aug '13 11:17:32 AM nombretomado
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* Trekkie Monster from AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of StarTrek.

to:

* Trekkie Monster from AvenueQ Theatre/AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of StarTrek.Franchise/StarTrek.
26th May '13 1:34:59 PM Explosivo25
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* The finale song "Letting Go" from some productions of TheMusical of Jack Heifner's ''Vanities'' is not necessarily a farewell song, but about ''not'' letting go of one's best friends.

to:

* The finale song "Letting Go" from some productions of TheMusical of Jack Heifner's ''Vanities'' is not necessarily a farewell song, but about ''not'' letting go of one's best friends.friends.
* Trekkie Monster from AvenueQ is a monster, but not a fan of StarTrek.
5th Dec '12 6:57:46 AM Prfnoff
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* The dance number "Bolero d'Amour" from ''{{Follies}}'' is a tango.

to:

* The dance number "Bolero d'Amour" from ''{{Follies}}'' ''Theatre/{{Follies}}'' is a tango.



* The eponymous ''FiddlerOnTheRoof'' is not a main character of the musical at all, and only shows up at the very beginning as a metaphor for the main character Tevye to point out.
11th Nov '12 2:51:07 PM Oreochan
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* There's a prestige class in one of the DungeonsAndDragons settings called Lord of Tides. It has nothing to do with the sea; its main purpose is to locate water in the dry desert setting used, and later summon elementals.
** There's also TurnUndead, which uses an obscure meaning of the word "turn".
* Chinese Checkers game was created in Germany. This NonindicativeName was induced deliberately when it was brought into the United States, as the marketers thought it sounded more exotic that way. Probably for the same or a similar reason, when the traditional English dice game Yacht was mass-marketed, it was given a pseudo-Oriental makeover and renamed {{Yahtzee}} (no connection with [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation this]] Yahtzee).
* Necrons for ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' have melee soldiers known as "Flayed Ones". Actually, they are the ones doing the flaying. And wearing their victims' skins.
** Also in the novels, Graham [=McNeil=] Literature/{{Ultramarines}} novel ''Dead Sky, Black Sun'' has the Unfleshed, hulking monstrosities with a lot of flesh in the form of muscle. It's the ''skin'' they lack (no, it wasn't taken by the guys above).
* Joe Dever was obviously far more concerned about creating an elaborate world and riveting adventures when writing the LoneWolf series than accurate titles. As a result, quite a few of them are at best very loose fits:
** Fire on the Water - This refers to the big naval battle where you wield the legendary Sommerswerd, which occurs at the very end of the adventure and is easily the least dangerous part of it. The great majority of the adventure is your quest to obtain the weapon.
** The Caverns of Kalte - Your mission begins in open wilderness and ends in a fortress; unless you take one very specific branch of one very specific path, you won't see the eponymous caverns at all.
** The Kingdoms of Terror - The wars between the Stornland kingdoms play next to no real part in your quest, and in any case there's nothing particularly terrifying about any of them.
** The Cauldron of Fear - Not only is the Cauldron is a completely nondescript landmark which serves solely to get you to Zaaryx, there's a 50% chance you won't even use that route.
** The Dungeons of Torgar - As with FOTW, the point of nearly the entire adventure is getting to Torgar's dungeons, and you hardly do anything in them.
** The Prisoners of Time - You don't see the prisoners in question until the ''very end'' of the adventure, they don't have anything to do with your quest, and until you meet them you don't even know who they are.
** The Captives of Kaag - Just the one captive! (There are other unfortunates in Kaag, but they're well beyond saving.)
** Dawn of the Dragons - An epic, sprawling journey where you face a grand total of ONE dragon, near (yep) the very end. And of course, if you're successful, there is no "dawn of the dragons" ; they're toast.
** The Curse of Naar - Despite the fact that you're in Naar's domain, not only doesn't he speak to you or attempt to hinder your quest (especailly curious since he does both several times over the course of Grand Master), he doesn't even appear at all!
** The Buccaneers of Shadaki - You face them once in a ''very'' brief encounter near the start of the adventure, after which they have no relevance to anything whatsoever.

to:

* There's a prestige class The opera ''Four Saints in one of the DungeonsAndDragons settings called Lord of Tides. It has nothing to do with the sea; its main purpose Three Acts'' is to locate water in the dry desert setting used, four acts and later summon elementals.
** There's also TurnUndead, which uses an obscure meaning of the word "turn".
* Chinese Checkers game was created in Germany. This NonindicativeName was induced deliberately when it was brought into the United States, as the marketers thought it sounded more exotic that way. Probably for the same or a similar reason, when the traditional English dice game Yacht was mass-marketed, it was given a pseudo-Oriental makeover and renamed {{Yahtzee}} (no connection with [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation this]] Yahtzee).
* Necrons for ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' have melee soldiers known as "Flayed Ones". Actually, they are the ones doing the flaying. And wearing their victims' skins.
** Also in the novels, Graham [=McNeil=] Literature/{{Ultramarines}} novel ''Dead Sky, Black Sun'' has the Unfleshed, hulking monstrosities with a lot of flesh in the form of muscle. It's the ''skin'' they lack (no, it wasn't taken by the guys above).
* Joe Dever was obviously far more concerned
about creating as many as seven saints. (It's difficult to give an elaborate world and riveting adventures when writing the LoneWolf series than accurate titles. As a result, quite a few exact number of them are at best very loose fits:
** Fire on the Water - This refers
protagonists due to the big naval battle where you wield the legendary Sommerswerd, which occurs at the very end of the adventure and is easily the least dangerous part of it. The great majority of the adventure is your quest to obtain the weapon.
** The Caverns of Kalte - Your mission begins in open wilderness and ends in a fortress; unless you take one very specific branch of one very specific path, you won't see the eponymous caverns at all.
** The Kingdoms of Terror - The wars between the Stornland kingdoms play next to no real part in your quest, and in any case there's nothing particularly terrifying about any of them.
** The Cauldron of Fear - Not only is the Cauldron is a completely nondescript landmark which serves solely to get you to Zaaryx, there's a 50% chance you won't even use that route.
** The Dungeons of Torgar - As with FOTW, the point of nearly the entire adventure is getting to Torgar's dungeons, and you hardly do anything in them.
** The Prisoners of Time - You don't see the prisoners in question until the ''very end'' of the adventure, they don't have anything to do with your quest, and until you meet them you don't even know who they are.
** The Captives of Kaag - Just the one captive! (There are other unfortunates in Kaag, but they're well beyond saving.
show's [[TrueArtIsInComprehensible incomprehensible]] style.)
** Dawn of * The dance number "Bolero d'Amour" from ''{{Follies}}'' is a tango.
* Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TwelfthNight'' does not take place on Twelfth Night, nor is it even mentioned in
the Dragons - An epic, sprawling journey where you face a grand total of ONE dragon, near (yep) the very end. And of course, if you're successful, there is no "dawn of the dragons" ; they're toast.
**
play. (It was written ''for'' Twelfth Night).
*
The Curse of Naar - Despite the fact that you're in Naar's domain, not only main character from ''MissSaigon'', Kim, doesn't he speak to you or attempt to hinder your quest (especailly curious since he does both several times over actually win the course of Grand Master), he doesn't even appear Miss Saigon title at all!
**
the beauty pageant that opens the musical.
*
The Buccaneers of Shadaki - You face them once in eponymous ''FiddlerOnTheRoof'' is not a ''very'' brief encounter near the start main character of the adventure, after which they have no relevance musical at all, and only shows up at the very beginning as a metaphor for the main character Tevye to anything whatsoever.point out.
* The finale song "Letting Go" from some productions of TheMusical of Jack Heifner's ''Vanities'' is not necessarily a farewell song, but about ''not'' letting go of one's best friends.
11th Nov '12 2:50:37 PM Oreochan
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* There's a prestige class in one of the DungeonsAndDragons settings called Lord of Tides. It has nothing to do with the sea; its main purpose is to locate water in the dry desert setting used, and later summon elementals.
** There's also TurnUndead, which uses an obscure meaning of the word "turn".
* Chinese Checkers game was created in Germany. This NonindicativeName was induced deliberately when it was brought into the United States, as the marketers thought it sounded more exotic that way. Probably for the same or a similar reason, when the traditional English dice game Yacht was mass-marketed, it was given a pseudo-Oriental makeover and renamed {{Yahtzee}} (no connection with [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation this]] Yahtzee).
* Necrons for ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' have melee soldiers known as "Flayed Ones". Actually, they are the ones doing the flaying. And wearing their victims' skins.
** Also in the novels, Graham [=McNeil=] Literature/{{Ultramarines}} novel ''Dead Sky, Black Sun'' has the Unfleshed, hulking monstrosities with a lot of flesh in the form of muscle. It's the ''skin'' they lack (no, it wasn't taken by the guys above).
* Joe Dever was obviously far more concerned about creating an elaborate world and riveting adventures when writing the LoneWolf series than accurate titles. As a result, quite a few of them are at best very loose fits:
** Fire on the Water - This refers to the big naval battle where you wield the legendary Sommerswerd, which occurs at the very end of the adventure and is easily the least dangerous part of it. The great majority of the adventure is your quest to obtain the weapon.
** The Caverns of Kalte - Your mission begins in open wilderness and ends in a fortress; unless you take one very specific branch of one very specific path, you won't see the eponymous caverns at all.
** The Kingdoms of Terror - The wars between the Stornland kingdoms play next to no real part in your quest, and in any case there's nothing particularly terrifying about any of them.
** The Cauldron of Fear - Not only is the Cauldron is a completely nondescript landmark which serves solely to get you to Zaaryx, there's a 50% chance you won't even use that route.
** The Dungeons of Torgar - As with FOTW, the point of nearly the entire adventure is getting to Torgar's dungeons, and you hardly do anything in them.
** The Prisoners of Time - You don't see the prisoners in question until the ''very end'' of the adventure, they don't have anything to do with your quest, and until you meet them you don't even know who they are.
** The Captives of Kaag - Just the one captive! (There are other unfortunates in Kaag, but they're well beyond saving.)
** Dawn of the Dragons - An epic, sprawling journey where you face a grand total of ONE dragon, near (yep) the very end. And of course, if you're successful, there is no "dawn of the dragons" ; they're toast.
** The Curse of Naar - Despite the fact that you're in Naar's domain, not only doesn't he speak to you or attempt to hinder your quest (especailly curious since he does both several times over the course of Grand Master), he doesn't even appear at all!
** The Buccaneers of Shadaki - You face them once in a ''very'' brief encounter near the start of the adventure, after which they have no relevance to anything whatsoever.
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