History NoExportForYou / AnimeAndManga

28th Dec '16 9:38:07 AM nombretomado
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*** ADV had a similar situation with ''Manga/SgtFrog''. They dubbed the first few episodes three different ways (which were a mass market pilot, an otaku/fan pilot, and a kids' pilot) and shopped the show around to several different kids networks with CartoonNetwork liking the mass market pilot, while Nickelodeon liked the kids' pilot. Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} was very close to airing it and asked ADV to acquire the merchandising rights first before the network aired the show. However, due to ADV's bankruptcy, the show never aired there. It sat in effective DevelopmentHell for nearly 3 years, until Creator/{{Funimation}} got the series and was able to give it a proper DVD release.

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*** ADV had a similar situation with ''Manga/SgtFrog''. They dubbed the first few episodes three different ways (which were a mass market pilot, an otaku/fan pilot, and a kids' pilot) and shopped the show around to several different kids networks with CartoonNetwork Creator/CartoonNetwork liking the mass market pilot, while Nickelodeon liked the kids' pilot. Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} was very close to airing it and asked ADV to acquire the merchandising rights first before the network aired the show. However, due to ADV's bankruptcy, the show never aired there. It sat in effective DevelopmentHell for nearly 3 years, until Creator/{{Funimation}} got the series and was able to give it a proper DVD release.
26th Dec '16 5:53:35 PM mimitchi33
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* Outside of Asia and the Middle East, the preschool anime ''[[Anime/ShimaShimaToraNoShimajiro Shimajiro]]'' has never been licensed for a release, except for an alleged brief run of the first season in Australia where it was released DirectToVideo. However, Shimajiro's Wow! [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/world/ has been streaming with English subtitles on the Benesse website]], and the company [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/tv/en/ is trying to get companies to license the show]] outside of Asia.

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* Outside of Asia and the Middle East, the preschool anime ''[[Anime/ShimaShimaToraNoShimajiro Shimajiro]]'' has never been licensed for a release, except for an alleged brief run of the first season in Australia where it was released DirectToVideo. However, Shimajiro's Wow! [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/world/ has been streaming with English subtitles on the Benesse website]], website, and the company [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/tv/en/ is trying to get companies to license the show]] outside of Asia.
26th Dec '16 5:53:12 PM mimitchi33
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* Outside of Asia and the Middle East, the preschool anime ''[[Anime/ShimaShimaToraNoShimajiro Shimajiro]]'' has never been licensed for a release, except for an alleged brief run of the first season in Australia where it was released DirectToVideo. However, Shimajiro's Wow! [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/world/ has been streaming with English subtitles on the Benesse website]], and the company [[http://kodomo.benesse.ne.jp/open/tv/en/ is trying to get companies to license the show]] outside of Asia.
20th Dec '16 8:46:21 AM mimitchi33
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* ''WesternAnimation/YumeNoCrayonOukoku'' was the anime that kickstarted the trend of MagicalGirl anime airing at 8:30AM on Sundays. However, the show only made it to France and Italy, though [[http://kidscreen.com/1999/12/01/27464-19991201/ a dub was rumored to air in Australia]].
9th Dec '16 10:14:01 PM nombretomado
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* Let's list a few reasons why releasing ''Anime/CorrectorYui'' to the United States would have been a good idea: '''One''', during its run in Japan ([[TheNineties aired April 9, 1999-October 20, 2000]]), two other MagicalGirl shows were hugely popular in the States: ''Manga/CardCaptorSakura'' and ''Manga/SailorMoon''; '''Two''', a then-recent movie called ''Film/TheMatrix'' introduced many people to the concepts of InsideAComputerSystem, YourMindMakesItReal, and EverythingIsOnline--something ''Anime/CorrectorYui'' has much in common with and people can easily relate to; '''Three''', [[TheHeroine Yui]] JumpedAtTheCall whereas most protagonists at the time would [[IJustWantToBeNormal wish to be normal]] or [[RefusalOfTheCall refuse the call]], further setting itself apart from its competition; and '''Four''', Yui is an OtakuSurrogate for MagicalGirl stories herself, which the growing {{Anime}} {{Fandom}} would likely enjoy. What instead happened with this show is that only 18 of the 52 episodes have ever been officially subbed into English, and it is so [[SlidingScaleOfAnimeObscurity obscure in the United States]], that there are no [[{{Fansub}} fan-subs]] of it yet; which is sad considering how different, interesting, and engaging the show really is.

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* Let's list a few reasons why releasing ''Anime/CorrectorYui'' to the United States would have been a good idea: '''One''', during its run in Japan ([[TheNineties aired April 9, 1999-October 20, 2000]]), two other MagicalGirl shows were hugely popular in the States: ''Manga/CardCaptorSakura'' and ''Manga/SailorMoon''; '''Two''', a then-recent movie called ''Film/TheMatrix'' introduced many people to the concepts of InsideAComputerSystem, YourMindMakesItReal, and EverythingIsOnline--something ''Anime/CorrectorYui'' has much in common with and people can easily relate to; '''Three''', [[TheHeroine Yui]] JumpedAtTheCall whereas most protagonists at the time would [[IJustWantToBeNormal wish to be normal]] or [[RefusalOfTheCall refuse the call]], further setting itself apart from its competition; and '''Four''', Yui is an OtakuSurrogate for MagicalGirl stories herself, which the growing {{Anime}} {{Fandom}} would likely enjoy. What instead happened with this show is that only 18 of the 52 episodes have ever been officially subbed into English, and it is so [[SlidingScaleOfAnimeObscurity obscure in the United States]], States, that there are no [[{{Fansub}} fan-subs]] of it yet; which is sad considering how different, interesting, and engaging the show really is.
9th Dec '16 8:35:25 PM mightystar
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*** Except for the above paragraph's very last sentence, ADV had a similar situation with ''Manga/SgtFrog''. They dubbed the first few episodes three different ways (which were a mass market pilot, an otaku/fan pilot, and a kids' pilot) and shopped the show around to several different kids networks with CartoonNetwork liking the mass market pilot, while Nickelodeon liked the kids' pilot. Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} was very close to airing it and asked ADV to acquire the merchandising rights first before the network aired the show. However, due to ADV's bankruptcy, the show never aired on Nick. It sat in effective DevelopmentHell for nearly 3 years, until Creator/{{Funimation}} got the series and was able to give it a proper DVD release.

to:

*** Except for the above paragraph's very last sentence, ADV had a similar situation with ''Manga/SgtFrog''. They dubbed the first few episodes three different ways (which were a mass market pilot, an otaku/fan pilot, and a kids' pilot) and shopped the show around to several different kids networks with CartoonNetwork liking the mass market pilot, while Nickelodeon liked the kids' pilot. Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} was very close to airing it and asked ADV to acquire the merchandising rights first before the network aired the show. However, due to ADV's bankruptcy, the show never aired on Nick.there. It sat in effective DevelopmentHell for nearly 3 years, until Creator/{{Funimation}} got the series and was able to give it a proper DVD release.



* ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' never had an official release in North America until 2014 even though the series has been around since the 70s, ''[[LongRunners and still going]]''. This is likely due to a combination of the insane length of the series (over 2000 TV episodes and more than 25 movies), and what is probably an insanely high license price for even a single season (the series is the second most popular anime in Japan, second only to Manga/SazaeSan, which did get an English manga release to teach Japanese kids the langugae). There actually was an official English release of the ''Doraemon'' manga, but it was in Singapore.

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* ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' never had an official release in North America until 2014 even though the series has been around since the 70s, ''[[LongRunners and still going]]''. This is was likely due to a combination of the insane length of the series (over 2000 TV episodes and more than 25 movies), and what is probably an insanely high license price for even a single season (the series is the second most popular anime in Japan, second only to Manga/SazaeSan, which did get an English manga release to teach Japanese kids the langugae). There actually was an official English release of the ''Doraemon'' manga, but it was in Singapore.



** This is almost certainly because that series is very VERY weird and probably "too Japanese" for most foreign (or at least American) markets. ''Anime/YokaiWatch'', another series based on youkai mythology was still localized though, but it has a less creepy vibe.

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** This is almost certainly because that series is very very, VERY weird and probably "too Japanese" for most foreign (or at least American) markets. ''Anime/YokaiWatch'', another series based on youkai mythology was still localized though, but it has a less creepy vibe.



** There was an english dub of Anime/OnegaiMyMelody called [[http://lostmedia.wikia.com/wiki/My_Melody%27s_Magical_Adventure_%28Mid-2000%27s_Cartoon_Network_Dub%29 "My Melody's Magical Adventure"]] which aired on an unknown Asian Cartoon Network Channel. [[MissingEpisode Only one clip of the english version was uploaded on Youtube. Unfortunately the clip is currently removed from the site.]]

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** There was an english English dub of Anime/OnegaiMyMelody called [[http://lostmedia.wikia.com/wiki/My_Melody%27s_Magical_Adventure_%28Mid-2000%27s_Cartoon_Network_Dub%29 "My Melody's Magical Adventure"]] which aired on an unknown Asian Cartoon Network Channel. [[MissingEpisode Only one clip of the english version was uploaded on Youtube. Unfortunately the clip is currently removed from the site.]]



** ''Ojarumaru'' did get licensed by Enoki Films' US division several years ago, however, they never managed to do anything with the license other than providing info for it on their official website. Prior to the US division shutting down in 2010, it's possible that they tried shopping it around to American anime publishers, but couldn't find one that was willing to license it. Interestingly enough, Enoki Films' [[DubNameChange suggested name changes]] for the characters were used in the Italian, Spanish, and Tagalog dubs.

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** ''Ojarumaru'' did get licensed by Enoki Films' US division several years ago, however, under a different title ''Prince Mackaroo''. However, they never managed to do anything with the license other than providing info for it on their official website. Prior to the US division shutting down in 2010, it's possible that they tried shopping it around to American anime publishers, but couldn't find one that was willing to license it. Interestingly enough, Enoki Films' [[DubNameChange suggested name changes]] for the characters were used in the Italian, Spanish, and Tagalog dubs.



** The manga, under a different title, ''Failure Ninja Rantarou'', has never been exported anywhere outside of Japan [[note]] Except for the US and Vietnam. In the US, a small amount of the manga was available digitally on JManga until the website was shut down, leaving American fans screwed. [[/note]]
7th Dec '16 9:24:50 AM mightystar
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* ''Anime/{{Ojarumaru}}'' was never exported to any English-speaking speaking countries, along with many other countries despite its huge popularity in Japan. What's most likely holding the series back is that the Japanese cultural elements and slow-paced nature are very challenging to deal with. The series ''did'' get licensed by Enoki Films' US division years ago, however, they didn't to do anything with the license. It's possible that they tried shopping it around to American anime publishers, but couldn't find one that would've been willing to license it.
** The Cantonese DuelingDubs skipped straight to Series 5 and stopped during Series 6. The Tagalog dub also skipped straight to Series 5 and didn't make it to Series 9.
** The very rare manga version that was serialized in the ''Ciao'' magazine in 1993 was never exported anywhere outside of Japan.
** None of the specials were exported to the countries that dubbed the series.

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* ''Anime/{{Ojarumaru}}'' was never Many of the anime series produced by NHK Enterprises, such as ''Manga/NintamaRantarou'', ''Anime/{{Ojarumaru}}'', and most recently ''Wasimo'', have barely been exported to any English-speaking speaking countries, along with many other countries despite its huge popularity in Japan. What's most likely holding the series back is that the Japanese cultural elements and slow-paced nature are very challenging to deal with. The series ''did'' anywhere outside of Asia.
** ''Ojarumaru'' did
get licensed by Enoki Films' US division several years ago, however, they didn't never managed to do anything with the license. It's license other than providing info for it on their official website. Prior to the US division shutting down in 2010, it's possible that they tried shopping it around to American anime publishers, but couldn't find one that would've been was willing to license it.
** The Cantonese DuelingDubs skipped straight to Series 5
it. Interestingly enough, Enoki Films' [[DubNameChange suggested name changes]] for the characters were used in the Italian, Spanish, and stopped during Series 6. The Tagalog dub also skipped straight to Series 5 and didn't make it to Series 9.
** The very rare manga version that was serialized in the ''Ciao'' magazine in 1993 was never exported anywhere outside of Japan.
** None of the specials were exported to the countries that dubbed the series.
dubs.



* ''Manga/NintamaRantarou'' has never been exported to any Western countries [[note]] Except for Latin America and Spain. [[/note]] outside of Asia, despite its popularity there.
26th Nov '16 1:56:21 AM starjewel
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* 4Kids was forced to drop plans to release the uncut subtitled version of ''Anime/YuGiOh: Duel Monsters'' online (both on Hulu and their own Toonzaki channel) when Yugi's seiyuu refused to clear the use of his voice… or something, it's rather unclear. ''[[Anime/YuGiOh5Ds 5Ds]]'' was released uncut on [=YouTube=] (along with uncut ''Anime/SonicX'' on Hulu) but the first series of ''Duel Monsters'' will never get an unedited translation unless Shunsuke Kazama pulls his head out of his ass, which is highly unlikely. And while 4Kids announced plans to subtitle GX, nothing has come of it yet.

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* 4Kids was forced to drop plans to release the uncut subtitled version of ''Anime/YuGiOh: Duel Monsters'' online (both on Hulu and their own Toonzaki channel) when Yugi's seiyuu because Shunsuke Kazama's (Yugi's voice actor) management. Kazama is employed by Johnny's Entertainment, an exclusive management company for male idols who not only have a monopoly on Japan's entertainment industry, but also regulates information very strictly (i.e. they will send takedown letters to people who post images of their idols without permission, they refused to clear release Tokio's "9 o'clock News", the use of his voice… or something, it's rather unclear. first OpeningTheme to ''Manga/KodomoNoOmocha'' overseas, they refused to release [=SMAP=]'s "Kimi-iro Omoi", the first OpeningTheme to ''Manga/AkazukinChacha'' on home release, etc.) ''[[Anime/YuGiOh5Ds 5Ds]]'' was released uncut on [=YouTube=] (along with uncut ''Anime/SonicX'' on Hulu) but the first series of ''Duel Monsters'' will never get an unedited translation unless Shunsuke Kazama pulls his head out of his ass, which is highly unlikely.translation. And while 4Kids announced plans to subtitle GX, nothing has come of it yet.
21st Nov '16 10:08:02 AM MarcoPolo250
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However, Viz's all-encompassing home video license only applies to the United States and Canada, thus unintentionally shafting UK fans ([[Creator/MadmanEntertainment Madman]] has the license in AUS/NZ). Viz does stream the series... on the Hulu-affiliated Neon Alley... which is blocked in Canada. Understandably, Canadian and British fans were ''enraged''. Luckily, on July 15, 2016, Viz suddenly started streaming the show to Canada through a streaming site called Tubi TV. But at the moment, it currently lacks the new dub that's on home video. Now the UK is the last one still not getting the show again.

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However, Viz's all-encompassing home video license only applies to the United States and Canada, thus unintentionally shafting UK fans ([[Creator/MadmanEntertainment Madman]] has the license in AUS/NZ). Moreover, while Viz does stream the series... series on the Hulu-affiliated Neon Alley... which is blocked its website, neither it's video portal, nor NeonAlley (after it become a Creator/{{Hulu}}-affiliated channel), are available in Canada. Understandably, Canadian and British fans were ''enraged''. Luckily, on July 15, 2016, Viz suddenly started began streaming the show and several other titles to Canada through a streaming site called Tubi TV. But at the moment, it currently lacks the new dub that's on home video. Now TV, but only with Japanese audio and English subtitles. Fans in the UK is the last one are still not getting left out in the show again.cold, however.
19th Nov '16 4:52:15 PM mightystar
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* ''Anime/{{Ojarumaru}}'' was never exported to any English-speaking speaking countries, along with many other countries despite its huge popularity in Japan. This is because the series is very, ''very'' Japanese and would be hard to translate it to audiences unfamiliar with Japanese culture. Not to mention that the series' slow-paced nature and lack of action makes it a hard sell to networks, at least in the US. The series ''did'' get licensed by Enoki Films' US division years ago, however, '''they didn't to do anything with the license'''.

to:

* ''Anime/{{Ojarumaru}}'' was never exported to any English-speaking speaking countries, along with many other countries despite its huge popularity in Japan. This is because What's most likely holding the series back is very, ''very'' that the Japanese cultural elements and would be hard to translate it to audiences unfamiliar with Japanese culture. Not to mention that the series' slow-paced nature and lack of action makes it a hard sell are very challenging to networks, at least in the US. deal with. The series ''did'' get licensed by Enoki Films' US division years ago, however, '''they they didn't to do anything with the license'''.license. It's possible that they tried shopping it around to American anime publishers, but couldn't find one that would've been willing to license it.



* ''Manga/NintamaRantarou'' has never been exported to any Western countries [[note]] Except for Latin America and Spain. [[/note]] outside of Asia, despite its popularity there. This is because the series is too old, too long [[note]] It has a total of 1,943 episodes as of June 2016. [[/note]], and too Japanese [[note]] Half of the jokes consists of Japanese word puns, which would most likely be incredibly difficult to translate or localize without ruining the joke. [[/note]]. Not to mention that the series has some questionable content that would cause MoralGuardians and parents in the West to go bonkers, since it is a kids anime. A couple of examples of the questionable content are that some episodes have the First Year Ha Class (the students are all 10-year-olds) using rifles and episode 2B has a scene of the same class running around in a mine field.
** The manga, under a different title, ''Failure Ninja Rantarou'', has never been exported anywhere outside of Japan [[note]] Except for the US and Vietnam. In the US, a small amount of the manga was available digitally on JManga until the website shut down, leaving American fans screwed. [[/note]], most likely for the same reasons as the anime.

to:

* ''Manga/NintamaRantarou'' has never been exported to any Western countries [[note]] Except for Latin America and Spain. [[/note]] outside of Asia, despite its popularity there. This is because the series is too old, too long [[note]] It has a total of 1,943 episodes as of June 2016. [[/note]], and too Japanese [[note]] Half of the jokes consists of Japanese word puns, which would most likely be incredibly difficult to translate or localize without ruining the joke. [[/note]]. Not to mention that the series has some questionable content that would cause MoralGuardians and parents in the West to go bonkers, since it is a kids anime. A couple of examples of the questionable content are that some episodes have the First Year Ha Class (the students are all 10-year-olds) using rifles and episode 2B has a scene of the same class running around in a mine field.
there.
** The manga, under a different title, ''Failure Ninja Rantarou'', has never been exported anywhere outside of Japan [[note]] Except for the US and Vietnam. In the US, a small amount of the manga was available digitally on JManga until the website was shut down, leaving American fans screwed. [[/note]], most likely for the same reasons as the anime.[[/note]]
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