History NintendoHard / GameShows

29th Aug '15 12:31:21 AM jameygamer
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** Pay the Rent is an extremely difficult game to win. The player has to put a pair of grocery items at each tier (except for the the top tier) and following pair has to be more expensive than the pair before it, and then the single item at the very top has to be more expensive than the last pair of items. The player can either quit and take what they won ($1000, $5000, or $10,000) or keep going and risk losing everything should they screw up. If you use most of the expensive items too early, you're pretty much boned. To date, only ''one'' person had won the $100,000 in the history of the game.

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** Pay the Rent is an extremely difficult game to win. The player has to put a pair of grocery items at each tier (except for the the top tier) and following pair has to be more expensive than the pair before it, and then the single item at the very top has to be more expensive than the last pair of items. The player can either quit and take what they won ($1000, $5000, or $10,000) or keep going and risk losing everything should they screw up. If you use most of the expensive items too early, you're pretty much boned. To date, only ''one'' person ''two'' people had won the $100,000 in the history of the game.
11th Mar '15 11:36:34 PM MagnetMissile
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* ''MillionDollarMoneyDrop''. The premise is that you start with a million, and you put how much you want to bet on the 4 answers given for a question, but you have to leave one answer with no money on it. If there is any money on an incorrect answer, you lose that money. Round 3 reduces the answers to three, but you must still leave one with no money. But in the final round, you have two answers, and you must still leave one answer with no money (turning it into an AllOrNothing question).

to:

* ''MillionDollarMoneyDrop''.''Series/MillionDollarMoneyDrop''. The premise is that you start with a million, and you put how much you want to bet on the 4 answers given for a question, but you have to leave one answer with no money on it. If there is any money on an incorrect answer, you lose that money. Round 3 reduces the answers to three, but you must still leave one with no money. But in the final round, you have two answers, and you must still leave one answer with no money (turning it into an AllOrNothing question).



* UK show ''TheCrystalMaze'' was won by only a few teams in its entire run. The individual challenges to earn crystals ranged from dead simple to unfair, but what ultimately decided the difference between winning an adventure holiday or going home with only a souvenir paperweight was the Crystal Dome, a giant hollow wind chamber in the shape of a crystal in which the team would have a period of five seconds per crystal to grab at slips of foil, hoping to collect 100 more gold ones than silver ones.

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* UK show ''TheCrystalMaze'' ''Series/TheCrystalMaze'' was won by only a few teams in its entire run. The individual challenges to earn crystals ranged from dead simple to unfair, but what ultimately decided the difference between winning an adventure holiday or going home with only a souvenir paperweight was the Crystal Dome, a giant hollow wind chamber in the shape of a crystal in which the team would have a period of five seconds per crystal to grab at slips of foil, hoping to collect 100 more gold ones than silver ones.



* ''ThePriceIsRight'' post-Roger Dobkowitz (season 37-present) has been accused by longtime fans of being Nintendo Hard - from brutal pricing game setups to impossible to bid showcases, especially killing Double Showcase Winners. On the week of January 11-15, 2010, only three games were won.

to:

* ''ThePriceIsRight'' ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' post-Roger Dobkowitz (season 37-present) has been accused by longtime fans of being Nintendo Hard - from brutal pricing game setups to impossible to bid showcases, especially effectively killing Double Showcase Winners. On the week of January 11-15, 2010, only three games were won. These brutal setups likely contributed in longtime producer Kathy Greco being fired a year later.



** Temptation and Hi Lo are both very difficult to win for one reason: If even one mistake is made on both pricing games, the contestant loses. Early on in Temptation's lifespan, the contestant wasn't allowed to change a number. They either walked or went on with the car. There was also a huge gap between wins that lasted nearly ''five'' years from 2007-2012. Hi Lo wasn't exactly forgiving early on either - the price difference could be a dime apart!



* UK kids GameShow ''{{Raven}}'' contains The Way Of The Warrior, an assault course played 3 times a week over each season's four week run. It's played by the contestant currently in last place, and it keeps being played until it's defeated. Over the first 8 seasons, it's been attempted 101 times, and won just four, and each time it's come back harder the next year... Not that no-one defeating it stops them upping the difficulty between seasons, it simply isn't guaranteed to be increased in difficulty unless someone beats it.

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** Early on in the show's career - producer Jay Wolpert's pricing game setups fell under this trope. For example, early on in 10 Chances' lifespan, it didn't have the zero rule at all. Lucky $even and Dice Game didn't even have the "no zeroes," and for the latter, zeroes and numbers higher than six could appear in the price.
* UK kids GameShow ''{{Raven}}'' ''Series/{{Raven}}'' contains The Way Of The Warrior, an assault course played 3 times a week over each season's four week run. It's played by the contestant currently in last place, and it keeps being played until it's defeated. Over the first 8 seasons, it's been attempted 101 times, and won just four, and each time it's come back harder the next year... Not that no-one defeating it stops them upping the difficulty between seasons, it simply isn't guaranteed to be increased in difficulty unless someone beats it.
17th Sep '14 8:53:12 PM Gaz85
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** Several of the games were so hard that nobody ever won them. One Futuristic Zone game in the first series was played in almost every episode and involved trying to guide 4 ball-bearings into tiny pin-holes, it was never as much as half-won. Despite this, the opening title sequence showed the Crystal being won in this game - presumably as stock footage.
28th Jul '14 12:27:47 AM Tero
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* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'', at least in the US version, brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse, contestants have picked the suitcase with the top prize, and even some cases where the top dollar amount was ''doubled'' or ''tripled'' because of a special event (Thanksgiving, season 2 premiere promotional event). But the worst failing of all was the total disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize that needed an ''armored car with a police escort'' to get the money in safely. The top dollar amount was promptly revealed really early, and viewers fled the channel in the wake of another another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the US version's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount, with nobody taking away more than six figures even when there were even multiple seven-figure increments on the board. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.

to:

* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'', at least in the US version, brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse, contestants have picked the suitcase with the top prize, and even some cases where the top dollar amount was ''doubled'' or ''tripled'' because of a special event (Thanksgiving, season 2 premiere promotional event). But the worst failing of all was the total disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize that needed an ''armored car with a police escort'' to get the money in safely. The top dollar amount was promptly revealed really early, and viewers fled the channel in the wake of another another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the US version's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount, with nobody taking away more than six figures even when there were even multiple seven-figure increments on the board. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results. Which also stalled out and led to complete cancellation.
28th Jul '14 12:27:04 AM Tero
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* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse, contestants have picked the suitcase with the top prize, and even some cases where the top dollar amount was ''doubled'' or ''tripled'' because of a special event (Thanksgiving, season 2 premiere promotional event). But the worst failing of all was the total disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize that needed an ''armored car with a police escort'' to get the money in safely. The top dollar amount was promptly revealed really early, and viewers fled the channel in the wake of another another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.

to:

* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'', at least in the US version, brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse, contestants have picked the suitcase with the top prize, and even some cases where the top dollar amount was ''doubled'' or ''tripled'' because of a special event (Thanksgiving, season 2 premiere promotional event). But the worst failing of all was the total disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize that needed an ''armored car with a police escort'' to get the money in safely. The top dollar amount was promptly revealed really early, and viewers fled the channel in the wake of another another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's US version's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount.amount, with nobody taking away more than six figures even when there were even multiple seven-figure increments on the board. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.
28th Jul '14 12:24:06 AM Tero
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* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse was the even bigger disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize which ended in another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.

to:

* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse Worse, contestants have picked the suitcase with the top prize, and even some cases where the top dollar amount was ''doubled'' or ''tripled'' because of a special event (Thanksgiving, season 2 premiere promotional event). But the worst failing of all was the even bigger total disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize which ended that needed an ''armored car with a police escort'' to get the money in safely. The top dollar amount was promptly revealed really early, and viewers fled the channel in the wake of another another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.
28th Jul '14 12:19:59 AM Tero
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* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse was the even bigger disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize which ended in another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF'''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.

to:

* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse was the even bigger disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize which ended in another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF'''' '''''HALF''''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.
28th Jul '14 12:19:46 AM Tero
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to:

* ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' brought down scores of contestants who failed to win the top prize of $1,000,000. Many of them had children who needed college funding, and as soon as the banker slapped a tempting offer on the board, they were done. Other playthroughs saw contestants knock out all of top dollar amounts and leave with as little as ''five dollars''. Worse was the even bigger disappointment of a great big publicity stunt with a '''$6,000,000''' top prize which ended in another mediocre playing of the show. It wasn't until '''''HALF'''' of the 26 cases were loaded with the million that ''one'' contestant in the show's entire history won. Yes, the show offered sextuple its top prize and struggled to give away the normal amount. In the end, the series was demoted from a primetime show to a syndicated show and the top prize got slashed to $500,000 because it wasn't delivering results.
14th Apr '14 8:46:26 AM mlsmithca
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* MillionDollarMoneyDrop. The premise is that you start with a million, and you put how much you want to bet on the 4 answers given for a question, but you have to leave one answer with no money on it. If there is any money on an incorrect answer, you lose that money. Round 3 reduces the answers to three, but you must still leave one with no money. But in the final round, you have two answers, and you must still leave one answer with no money (turning it into an AllOrNothing question).
* The Nickelodeon kids show ''Series/LegendsOfTheHiddenTemple'' had a really low success rate (less than 25%). The locked doors guaranteed that you would have to go all the way to the far end of the temple and double back to retrieve the artifact (making Olmec's slogan "The Choices are Yours and Yours Alone" BlatantLies,) and you had to perform tasks and solve puzzles in up to 12 rooms before you found it (some were simple, like the Throne of the Pretender, but others, like the Shrine of the Silver Monkey, messed EVERYONE up.) Adding to that were Temple Guards, who would "kidnap" you and would cause your teammate to have to start over from the beginning. Throw in [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking darkness, shadows, music, fog, Kirk Fogg]], and you'll see why more than one kid ended up walking in circles with confused looks on their faces.
** There were also some technical problems with the temple; namely, it appeared to have been designed, built, and tested with adults, meaning that some of the child contestants simply '''were not tall enough to complete the tasks.'' The two worst rooms for this were the Shrine of the Silver Monkey (the three pieces of the monkey puzzle were overhead and shorter contestants had to jump to reach them) and the Jester's Court (contestants had to line up with a wall painting and hit three buttons on the hands, feet, etc., and again, some kids just were not tall enough to reach.)

to:

* MillionDollarMoneyDrop.''MillionDollarMoneyDrop''. The premise is that you start with a million, and you put how much you want to bet on the 4 answers given for a question, but you have to leave one answer with no money on it. If there is any money on an incorrect answer, you lose that money. Round 3 reduces the answers to three, but you must still leave one with no money. But in the final round, you have two answers, and you must still leave one answer with no money (turning it into an AllOrNothing question).
* The Nickelodeon kids show ''Series/LegendsOfTheHiddenTemple'' had a really low success rate (less than 25%). The locked doors guaranteed that you would have to go all the way to the far end of the temple and double back to retrieve the artifact (making Olmec's slogan "The Choices are Yours and Yours Alone" BlatantLies,) BlatantLies), and you had to perform tasks and solve puzzles in up to 12 rooms before you found it (some were simple, like the Throne of the Pretender, but others, like the Shrine of the Silver Monkey, messed EVERYONE up.) Adding to that were Temple Guards, who would "kidnap" you and would cause your teammate to have to start over from the beginning. Throw in [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking darkness, shadows, music, fog, Kirk Fogg]], and you'll see why more than one kid ended up walking in circles with confused looks on their faces.
** There were also some technical problems with the temple; namely, it appeared to have been designed, built, and tested with adults, meaning that some of the child contestants simply '''were ''were not tall enough to complete the tasks.'' The two worst rooms for this were the Shrine of the Silver Monkey (the three pieces of the monkey puzzle were overhead and shorter contestants had to jump to reach them) and the Jester's Court (contestants had to line up with a wall painting and hit three buttons on the hands, feet, etc., and again, some kids just were not tall enough to reach.)



* ''Series/MinuteToWinIt'' is a prime example of this trope. The first few levels are usually simple, but once you hit around Level 6, they truly start getting Nintendo Hard (try bouncing six marbles into tiny thimbles, or keeping three marbles on a slanted table with the back of a spoon for a full minute, or using a chopstick in one hand to make a stable tower of ten metal nuts on a wooden board in the ''other'' hand). But the real head of the beast is ''Supercoin'', the Million Dollar game. You have to bounce a quarter off of a table into a water jug 15 feet away, with the hole being a mere 1.75 inches wide (barely larger than the quarter itself). Needless to say, it's basically a LuckBasedMission, and of the eight people who have tried it (only one of whom got there the "legitimate" way, mind you), all have failed. You know something's wrong when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPdcroF-Fwc#t=34 only the host of the Turkish version can actually beat it in less than 60 seconds]]. And ''he was only demonstrating it to a contestant''
** It's getting so bad that now the audience even groans upon hearing the game's name. That's how stupidly hard it is.
* ''ThePriceIsRight'' post-Roger Dobkowitz (season 37-present) has been accused by longtime fans of being ''Nintendo Hard'' - from brutal pricing game setups to impossible to bid showcases, especially killing Double Showcase Winners. On the week of January 11-15, 2010, only three games were won.

to:

* ''Series/MinuteToWinIt'' is a prime example of this trope. The first few levels are usually simple, but once you hit around Level 6, they truly start getting Nintendo Hard (try bouncing six marbles into tiny thimbles, or keeping three marbles on a slanted table with the back of a spoon for a full minute, or using a chopstick in one hand to make a stable tower of ten metal nuts on a wooden board in the ''other'' hand). But the real head of the beast is ''Supercoin'', the Million Dollar game. You have to bounce a quarter off of a table into a water jug 15 feet away, with the hole being a mere 1.75 inches wide (barely larger than the quarter itself). Needless to say, it's basically a LuckBasedMission, and of the eight people who have tried it (only one of whom got there the "legitimate" way, mind you), all have failed. You know something's wrong when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPdcroF-Fwc#t=34 only the host of the Turkish version can actually beat it in less than 60 seconds]]. And ''he was only demonstrating it to a contestant''
** It's getting
contestant.'' It got so bad that now the audience even groans started groaning upon hearing the game's name. That's how stupidly hard it is.
* ''ThePriceIsRight'' post-Roger Dobkowitz (season 37-present) has been accused by longtime fans of being ''Nintendo Hard'' Nintendo Hard - from brutal pricing game setups to impossible to bid showcases, especially killing Double Showcase Winners. On the week of January 11-15, 2010, only three games were won.



** Pay the Rent is an extremely difficult game to win at. The player has to put a pair of grocery items at each tier (except for the the top tier) and following pair has to be more expensive than the pair before it, and then the single item at the very top has to be more expensive than the last pair of items. The player can either quit and take what they won ($1000, $5000, or $10,000) or keep going and risk losing everything should they screw up. If you use most of the expensive items too early, you're pretty much boned. To date, only ''one'' person had won the $100,000 in the history of the game.

to:

** Pay the Rent is an extremely difficult game to win at.win. The player has to put a pair of grocery items at each tier (except for the the top tier) and following pair has to be more expensive than the pair before it, and then the single item at the very top has to be more expensive than the last pair of items. The player can either quit and take what they won ($1000, $5000, or $10,000) or keep going and risk losing everything should they screw up. If you use most of the expensive items too early, you're pretty much boned. To date, only ''one'' person had won the $100,000 in the history of the game.



* The earlier UK kids GameShow ''Series/{{Knightmare}}'' had a similar record- 80 teams challenged the Dungeon of Deceit over the course of 8 series. 72 of them failed. The first and third series didn't have a single winner.

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* The earlier UK kids GameShow ''Series/{{Knightmare}}'' had a similar record- 80 teams challenged challenge the Dungeon of Deceit over the course of 8 series. Only eight of them won; 72 of them failed. The first and third series didn't have a single winner.



* The Winner's Big Money Game from ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury''. Here, [[TimedMission you have to solve a series of six-clue puzzles within the time limit]]. It was originally five in 25 seconds, later changed to 4 in 20 seconds--either way, you have to get each subject within five seconds on average. There is virtually no margin for error in this bonus round. If you miss twice, it's game over, and even though you're still allowed to pass, you have to be pretty lucky in order to get the rest of them. What makes it worse is that each clue takes slightly more than one second to appear on the screen, and there's also the dreaded "You must stop the clock before it hits double zero." Because the clock counts in single seconds as opposed to tenths-of-a-second as seen on its sister show ''Series/{{Scrabble}}'', contestants can be, and often are, screwed at the very last second, because even if they buzz in just microseconds before the bell rings, it still counts as a loss because the clock reads 00. Worse, if a champion was playing for the car, and they lost, they had to retire as an "[[BlatantLies undefeated champion]]". BTW, of the 64 Winner's Big Money Games that were a part of the initial package from [[Creator/{{GSN}} GSN]], only 22 were won, with numerous losing streaks along the way.

to:

* The Winner's Big Money Game from ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury''. Here, [[TimedMission you have to solve a series of six-clue puzzles within the time limit]]. It was originally five in 25 seconds, later changed to 4 in 20 seconds--either way, you have to get each subject within five seconds on average. There is virtually no margin for error in this bonus round. If you miss twice, it's game over, and even though you're still allowed to pass, you have to be pretty lucky in order to get the rest of them. What makes it worse is that each clue takes slightly more than one second to appear on the screen, and there's also the dreaded "You must stop the clock before it hits double zero." Because the clock counts in single seconds as opposed to tenths-of-a-second as seen on its sister show ''Series/{{Scrabble}}'', contestants can be, and often are, screwed at the very last second, because even if they buzz in just microseconds before the bell rings, it still counts as a loss because the clock reads 00. Worse, if a champion was playing for the car, and they lost, they had to retire as an "[[BlatantLies undefeated champion]]". BTW, of Of the 64 Winner's Big Money Games that were a part of the initial package from [[Creator/{{GSN}} GSN]], Creator/{{GSN}}, only 22 were won, with numerous losing streaks along the way.
14th Apr '14 8:33:38 AM case
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** In fact, Website/{{Cracked}} wrote an article on strategies to beat various game shows, and their strategy to win Wipeout was to deliberately fail every obstacle course so that you wouldn't waste time trying to (and mostly likely failing to) clear them.

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** In fact, Website/{{Cracked}} wrote an article on strategies to beat various game shows, and their strategy to win Wipeout was to deliberately fail every obstacle course so that you wouldn't waste time trying to (and mostly likely failing to) clear them. [[SchmuckBait If you actually try this]], have fun racking up time in the water which is edited out in broadcast but still adds to your clock.
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