History NightmareFuel / TheBeachBoys

25th Aug '17 5:21:50 AM Nick7689
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** The "Fire" curse seemingly reared its ugly head yet again when Brian Wilson revisited it for his 2004 revival of ''Smile''. He was apparently still scared of the song, so much so that he left the arrangements to collaborator Darian Sahanaja and had no involvement other than recording some vocal harmonies. Brian never attended rehearsals. Which is good since, while his band rehearsed the song, there was a power cut. Sahanaja theorised that had Brian been there during this, he most likely would have scrapped the album again. The fact that something like this actually happened makes you think Brian's fear of this song may not be an overreaction after all...
17th Jul '17 12:01:28 AM bt8257
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* The cover art of ''Surf's Up'', our page image. If you just glanced over it without seeing the title plaque, chances are your immediate assumption would be that this is some freakin' heavy metal right here. And without having heard the songs themselves, titles like "Don't Go Near the Water" and "'Til I Die" just sound creepy and ominous.
* "'Til I Die" immediately begins with a droning synthesizer chord progression that plays throughout the whole song. The song's themes of despair, anguish, and (of course) death further brings chills down the listener's spine.

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* The cover art of ''Surf's Up'', our page image. If you just glanced over it without seeing the title plaque, chances are your immediate assumption would be that this is some freakin' heavy metal right here. And without having heard the songs themselves, titles like "Don't Go Near the Water" and "'Til I Die" just sound creepy and ominous.
* "'Til I Die" immediately begins with a droning synthesizer organ chord progression that plays throughout the whole song. The song's themes of despair, anguish, and (of course) death further brings chills down the listener's spine.



* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnyGklpCc84 My Solution,]]" a ''Landlocked'' outtake. Nonsensical, drug-addled spoken word soliloquy about some kind of mad doctor(?) featuring dark, eerie synths equals some creepy shivers, for sure.[[note]]However, if you are now in need of some NightmareRetardant, Brian later reworked it as a joyful anthem of recovery for his 1998 album, ''Imagination''![[/note]]

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* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnyGklpCc84 My Solution,]]" Solution]]", a ''Landlocked'' outtake. Nonsensical, drug-addled spoken word soliloquy about some kind of mad doctor(?) featuring dark, eerie synths equals some creepy shivers, for sure.[[note]]However, if you are now in need of some NightmareRetardant, Brian later reworked it as a joyful anthem of recovery for his 1998 album, ''Imagination''![[/note]]
13th Jun '17 3:07:59 PM notahandle
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* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tF1NeZlOWP4 My Solution,]]" a ''Landlocked'' outtake. Nonsensical, drug-addled spoken word soliloquy about some kind of mad doctor(?) featuring dark, eerie synths equals some creepy shivers, for sure.[[note]]However, if you are now in need of some NightmareRetardant, Brian later reworked it as a joyful anthem of recovery for his 1998 album, ''Imagination''![[/note]]

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* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tF1NeZlOWP4 com/watch?v=tnyGklpCc84 My Solution,]]" a ''Landlocked'' outtake. Nonsensical, drug-addled spoken word soliloquy about some kind of mad doctor(?) featuring dark, eerie synths equals some creepy shivers, for sure.[[note]]However, if you are now in need of some NightmareRetardant, Brian later reworked it as a joyful anthem of recovery for his 1998 album, ''Imagination''![[/note]]
25th May '17 10:11:44 AM hohocrush
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* The ending with the cacophony of dogs and trains make for an effective LastNoteNightmare.
22nd May '17 5:27:17 AM Nick7689
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'''''Music/SummerDaysAndSummerNights'''''
* "Amusement Parks U.S.A" has a pretty creepy vibe throughout the song. Aside from the slightly out of tune organ playing throughout, there's also an insane laugh that sounds like it's coming either from a clown or a witch, the promoter speaking with CreepyMonotone into a distorted microphone and the band saying you'll "crash and burn in the bumper cars"...


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* Not related to the band's music but what is surely a terrifying thought is that Dennis Wilson had the freaking '''''Manson family''''' living in his home for a while!
24th Mar '17 4:00:03 PM Nick7689
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* [[https://spectator.imgix.net/content/uploads/2016/11/Beachboys.jpg?auto=compress,enhance,format,redeye&crop=faces,entropy,edges&fit=crop&w=620&h=413 This picture.]] Behold, Mike Love's NightmareFace.
27th Nov '16 4:19:33 PM bt8257
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[[caption-width-right:300:[[LessDisturbingInContext DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER.]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:300:[[LessDisturbingInContext DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER.Don't Go Near the Water.]]]]
26th Nov '16 12:55:42 PM bt8257
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* The repetitive "Heroes and Villains" harpsichord motif. An massive EarWorm teetering uncomfortably on the edge between beauty and horror, it's been known to induce wildly different reactions to whomever is exposed to it. What's more, if you're listening to [=Smile=] for the first time, after hearing the first side you might [[ParanoiaFuel expect it to appear out of nowhere at any time]].
** Around the time of its release in 2011, ''The [=Smile=] Sessions'' had an official sub-site as part of The Beach Boys' official website. The first thing you were greeted with when opening it? [[JumpScare The "Heroes and Villains" riff]] (in its even darker outtake form, even), juxtaposed with the otherwise happy and cheerful album art, modified with some UncannyValley animation.

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* The repetitive "Heroes and Villains" harpsichord motif. An A massive EarWorm teetering uncomfortably on the edge between beauty and horror, it's been known to induce wildly different reactions to whomever is exposed to it. What's more, if you're listening to [=Smile=] for the first time, after hearing the first side you might [[ParanoiaFuel expect it to appear out of nowhere at any time]].
** Around the time of its release in 2011, ''The [=Smile=] Smile Sessions'' had an official sub-site as part of The Beach Boys' official website. The first thing you were greeted with when opening it? [[JumpScare The "Heroes and Villains" riff]] (in its even darker outtake form, even), juxtaposed with the otherwise happy and cheerful album art, modified with some UncannyValley animation.



* ''Smiley Smile'', the album we got instead of ''[=Smile=]'', was no picnic either. In fact, most consider it to be even more creepy and nightmarish. A minimalist, quirky, and intimate production, it's been likened to being stuck in a small room with some imaginative, if harmless, manics for thirty minutes. It even manages to make some of the ''[=Smile=]'' songs that were relatively innocuous dark and creepy...

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* ''Smiley Smile'', the album we got instead of ''[=Smile=]'', ''Smile'', was no picnic either. In fact, most consider it to be even more creepy and nightmarish. A minimalist, quirky, and intimate production, it's been likened to being stuck in a small room with some imaginative, if harmless, manics for thirty minutes. It even manages to make some of the ''[=Smile=]'' songs that were relatively innocuous dark and creepy...
5th Oct '16 10:46:22 AM WheelFarrow
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** The revamped "Heroes and Villains" that was finally issued as a single on July 1967, as well as being the track that starts this record. The song commences rather lightheartedly, with first two verses being a bouncy ode to the Old West; its tone reminiscent of the good clean fun typical of early Beach Boys songs, and its surging rhythm evoking the dynamics of "Good Vibrations". It seems like a song full of groundbreaking promise, an attempt to surpass "Good Vibrations", enticing us to eagerly anticipate what surprises Brian Wilson has in store for us. Only to fade out. And then... without warning, the CHORUS JUMPS AT US. But unlike earlier, we are subjected to a chorus so sad, so melancholic, it comes off as jarring. "Heroes and villains... just see what you done....," the Boys lament. They chant not once, but twice, and we are left with a sense of despair and helplessness. What did these heroes and villains do? And then it hits you, Are *we* the heroes and villains of the title? "Na na na naaa na...," they sing with unnervingly childish inflection as though they are taunting us for our actions. And as we begin to contemplate over our enforced guilt, the song JUMPS AGAIN to the bouncy verse. There's a slow rendition of the verse that follows it, and the music box-like instrumentation gives it a gentle feel at first. However, it then descends into disturbing territory, as the barbershop-style vocalizations become more ominous. Just before it could become creepy, it abruptly halts. Fading in is a soothing a capella reprise of the first verse. The sound quality is significantly different this time around, being of low fidelity. The hisses from the background are so dissonant on a sonic level, the idea that it could be a cult recording from a dark basement is not far off. And before the last couplet "I'm fit with the stuff to ride in the rough / and sunny down snuff, I'm all right by the heroes and villains" could be completed, it CUTS RIGHT OFF TO CHORUS for a second time and fading out to uncertainty. It's as though Brian gave up on the whole thing.

to:

** The revamped "Heroes and Villains" that was finally issued as a single on July 1967, as well as being 1967 is the track that starts opens this record. The song commences starts on a rather lightheartedly, lighthearted manner, with first two verses being a bouncy ode to the Old West; its tone reminiscent of the good clean fun typical of early Beach Boys songs, and its surging rhythm evoking the dynamics of "Good Vibrations". It seems like a song full of groundbreaking promise, promise: an attempt to surpass "Good Vibrations", Vibrations" as pop music's greatest achievement as planned; enticing us to eagerly anticipate what surprises Brian Wilson has in store for us. Only to fade out. And then... without warning, the CHORUS JUMPS AT US. But unlike earlier, we are subjected to a chorus so sad, so melancholic, it comes off as jarring. "Heroes and villains... just see what you done....," the Boys lament. They chant not once, but twice, and we are left with a sense of despair and helplessness. What did these heroes and villains do? And then it hits you, Are *we* the heroes and villains of the title? "Na na na naaa na...," they sing with unnervingly childish inflection as though they are taunting us for our actions. And as we begin to contemplate over our enforced guilt, the song JUMPS AGAIN to the bouncy verse. There's a slow rendition of the verse that follows it, and the music box-like instrumentation gives it a gentle feel at first. However, it then descends into disturbing territory, as the barbershop-style vocalizations become more ominous. Just before it could become creepy, it abruptly halts. Fading in is a soothing a capella reprise of the first verse. The sound quality is significantly different this time around, being of low fidelity. The hisses from the background are so dissonant on a sonic level, the idea that it could be a cult recording from a dark basement is not far off. And before the last couplet "I'm fit with the stuff to ride in the rough / and sunny down snuff, I'm all right by the heroes and villains" could be completed, it CUTS RIGHT OFF TO CHORUS for a second time and fading out to uncertainty. It's as though Brian gave up on the whole thing.
5th Oct '16 10:40:57 AM WheelFarrow
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Added DiffLines:

** The revamped "Heroes and Villains" that was finally issued as a single on July 1967, as well as being the track that starts this record. The song commences rather lightheartedly, with first two verses being a bouncy ode to the Old West; its tone reminiscent of the good clean fun typical of early Beach Boys songs, and its surging rhythm evoking the dynamics of "Good Vibrations". It seems like a song full of groundbreaking promise, an attempt to surpass "Good Vibrations", enticing us to eagerly anticipate what surprises Brian Wilson has in store for us. Only to fade out. And then... without warning, the CHORUS JUMPS AT US. But unlike earlier, we are subjected to a chorus so sad, so melancholic, it comes off as jarring. "Heroes and villains... just see what you done....," the Boys lament. They chant not once, but twice, and we are left with a sense of despair and helplessness. What did these heroes and villains do? And then it hits you, Are *we* the heroes and villains of the title? "Na na na naaa na...," they sing with unnervingly childish inflection as though they are taunting us for our actions. And as we begin to contemplate over our enforced guilt, the song JUMPS AGAIN to the bouncy verse. There's a slow rendition of the verse that follows it, and the music box-like instrumentation gives it a gentle feel at first. However, it then descends into disturbing territory, as the barbershop-style vocalizations become more ominous. Just before it could become creepy, it abruptly halts. Fading in is a soothing a capella reprise of the first verse. The sound quality is significantly different this time around, being of low fidelity. The hisses from the background are so dissonant on a sonic level, the idea that it could be a cult recording from a dark basement is not far off. And before the last couplet "I'm fit with the stuff to ride in the rough / and sunny down snuff, I'm all right by the heroes and villains" could be completed, it CUTS RIGHT OFF TO CHORUS for a second time and fading out to uncertainty. It's as though Brian gave up on the whole thing.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=NightmareFuel.TheBeachBoys