History NetworkToTheRescue / LiveActionTV

29th Apr '16 6:42:58 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'' was originally produced by [[Creator/CannonFilms Cannon Television]], but after the first four episodes they ran into financial difficulties - CBS, the show's home, then agreed to pick up the tab themselves.

to:

* ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'' was originally produced by [[Creator/CannonFilms [[Creator/TheCannonGroup Cannon Television]], but after the first four episodes they ran into financial difficulties - CBS, the show's home, then agreed to pick up the tab themselves.
29th Apr '16 6:41:23 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Warner Brothers were quietly supportive of ''Series/BabylonFive'' throughout the first four years of its run, repeatedly not canceling it and in fact giving it modest budget increases between seasons simply because a lot of the executives apparently just really liked it, to the extent of not even giving production notes after the start of the second season and just letting the production team get on with it. They were rewarded by moderate ratings increases and a high profile among SF fans, arguably higher than that of rival series ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' which cost more than twice as much to make. When they were faced with the task of canceling the show due to the Creator/PrimeTimeEntertainmentNetwork (what was left of it, anyway) collapsing, they encouraged their cousins at TNT to come on board and save the day, ensuring that the show got to it's planned ending. Warner Brothers eventually reaped a strong reward: international, VHS and DVD sales have seen the show make more than five times its budget back in profit since the show ended.

to:

* Warner Brothers were quietly supportive of ''Series/BabylonFive'' throughout the first four years of its run, repeatedly not canceling it and in fact giving it modest budget increases between seasons simply because a lot of the executives apparently just really liked it, to the extent of not even giving production notes after the start of the second season and just letting the production team get on with it. They were rewarded by moderate ratings increases and a high profile among SF fans, arguably higher than that of rival series ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' which cost more than twice as much to make. When they were faced with the task of canceling the show due to the Creator/PrimeTimeEntertainmentNetwork (what Creator/{{PTEN}} service(what was left of it, anyway) collapsing, they encouraged their cousins at TNT to come on board and save the day, ensuring that the show got to it's planned ending. Warner Brothers eventually reaped a strong reward: international, VHS and DVD sales have seen the show make more than five times its budget back in profit since the show ended.
29th Apr '16 6:40:36 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Another big one for NBC is ''Series/FridayNightLights''. It was a constant ratings disappointment in its first two seasons, but gained enough fans among the network executives that it was saved by an experimental schedule of having the next season be only thirteen episodes, which would first air on DirecTV in the fall and then on NBC itself in the spring. It was such a success that ''two'' more similarly constructed seasons were ordered towards the end of it. Notably, those three seasons are essentially being constructed as one long epilogue, with a large part of the focus going toward giving each character a three or four episode arc to send them off the show.

to:

** Another big one for NBC is ''Series/FridayNightLights''. It was a constant ratings disappointment in its first two seasons, but gained enough fans among the network executives that it was saved by an experimental schedule of having the next season be only thirteen episodes, which would first air on DirecTV [=DirecTV=] in the fall and then on NBC itself in the spring. It was such a success that ''two'' more similarly constructed seasons were ordered towards the end of it. Notably, those three seasons are essentially being constructed as one long epilogue, with a large part of the focus going toward giving each character a three or four episode arc to send them off the show.



** Late Night With Creator/ConanOBrien: The show didn't start off well for the first few years. Early commercials even mocked the fact that no one knew who O'Brien was and that he was obviously uncomfortable in front of the camera. In spite of it all, NBC stuck with it and were rewarded with the highest rated late night lineup along with Jay Leno. Unfortunately, when they gave Conan ''TheTonightShow'', they didn't give him [[ScrewedByTheNetwork much of a chance]].

to:

** Late ''Late Night With Creator/ConanOBrien: Creator/ConanOBrien'': The show didn't start off well for the first few years. Early commercials even mocked the fact that no one knew who O'Brien was and that he was obviously uncomfortable in front of the camera. In spite of it all, NBC stuck with it and were rewarded with the highest rated late night lineup along with Jay Leno. Unfortunately, when they gave Conan ''TheTonightShow'', they didn't give him [[ScrewedByTheNetwork much of a chance]].



** Apparently, 'Idol'' was originally pitched to Creator/{{UPN}}, who [[ItWillNeverCatchOn rejected it]]. The people who ran the network weren't the best at programming (they killed the AnimatedAdaptation of ''WesternAnimation/{{Dilbert}}'' by scheduling it after a show called ''Shasta [=McNasty=]''), and the fact that UPN died unceremoniously in 2006 shows how badly they screwed up.

to:

** Apparently, 'Idol'' ''Idol'' was originally pitched to Creator/{{UPN}}, who [[ItWillNeverCatchOn rejected it]]. The people who ran the network weren't the best at programming (they killed the AnimatedAdaptation of ''WesternAnimation/{{Dilbert}}'' by scheduling it after a show called ''Shasta [=McNasty=]''), and the fact that UPN died unceremoniously in 2006 shows how badly they screwed up.
29th Apr '16 6:39:43 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'' was originally produced by Cannon Television, but after the first four episodes they ran into financial difficulties - CBS, the show's home, then agreed to pick up the tab themselves.

to:

* ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'' was originally produced by [[Creator/CannonFilms Cannon Television, Television]], but after the first four episodes they ran into financial difficulties - CBS, the show's home, then agreed to pick up the tab themselves.
29th Apr '16 6:39:26 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Going all the way back to 1966, they picked up ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' after CBS turned it down. It ran from 1966 to 1980, an unheard-of lifespan for a game show in that era, and spawned a nighttime syndicated version that lasted from 1971 to 1981. Since then, the show has had four revivals (''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'', also for NBC, in 1983-84; syndie versions from 1986-88 and 1998-2004; and ''HipHopSquares'' in 2012).

to:

* Going all the way back to 1966, they picked up ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' after CBS turned it down. It ran from 1966 to 1980, an unheard-of lifespan for a game show in that era, and spawned a nighttime syndicated version that lasted from 1971 to 1981. Since then, the show has had four revivals (''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'', also for NBC, in 1983-84; syndie versions from 1986-88 1986-89 and 1998-2004; and ''HipHopSquares'' in 2012).



** {{Fox}} did something like this for "Series/{{Fringe}}", as well. In the second season, they moved it to the FridayNightDeathSlot, yet they renewed it two more times. During the fourth season, fans had started a Twitter campaign to save the show, and Fox cooperated by replacing the #Fringe hashtag in the corner of the screen with the fans' episode-specific hashtags. Eventually, they decided to renew the series for a final 13-episode fifth season, which ingratiated them with the fans and brought the show up to the 100-episode mark unofficially required for syndication.

to:

** {{Fox}} did something like this for "Series/{{Fringe}}", ''Series/{{Fringe}}'', as well. In the second season, they moved it to the FridayNightDeathSlot, yet they renewed it two more times. During the fourth season, fans had started a Twitter campaign to save the show, and Fox cooperated by replacing the #Fringe hashtag in the corner of the screen with the fans' episode-specific hashtags. Eventually, they decided to renew the series for a final 13-episode fifth season, which ingratiated them with the fans and brought the show up to the 100-episode mark unofficially required for syndication.



* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' was ditched by NBC after the seventh season and given a proper final season on ABC. Which was successful enough to warrant a ''ninth'' (and what would turn out to be final) season.

to:

** And now it's set to come back on the Internet thanks to a massively successful Kickstarter campaign.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' was ditched by NBC after the seventh season and given a proper final season on ABC.ABC (which owned the show already; it was produced by Disney's Touchstone TV). Which was successful enough to warrant a ''ninth'' (and what would turn out to be final) season.



** Apparently, 'Idol'' was originally pitched to Creator/{{UPN}}, who [[ItWillNeverCatchOn rejected it]]. The people who ran the network weren't the best at programming (they killed the AnimatedAdaptation of ''WesternAnimation/{{Dilbert}}'' by scheduling it after a show called ''Shasta [=McNasty=]''), and the fact that UPN died unceremoniously in 2006 shows how badly they screwed up.



* Warner Brothers were quietly supportive of ''Series/BabylonFive'' throughout the first four years of its run, repeatedly not canceling it and in fact giving it modest budget increases between seasons simply because a lot of the network executives apparently just really liked it, to the extent of not even giving production notes after the start of the second season and just letting the production team get on with it. They were rewarded by moderate ratings increases and a high profile among SF fans, arguably higher than that of rival series ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' which cost more than twice as much to make. When they were faced with the task of canceling the show due to a complex international co-funding agreement with the PTEN network collapsing, they encouraged the TNT cable network to come on board and save the day, ensuring that the show got to its planned ending. Warner Brothers eventually reaped a strong reward: international, VHS and DVD sales have seen the show make more than five times its budget back in profit since the show ended.

to:

* Warner Brothers were quietly supportive of ''Series/BabylonFive'' throughout the first four years of its run, repeatedly not canceling it and in fact giving it modest budget increases between seasons simply because a lot of the network executives apparently just really liked it, to the extent of not even giving production notes after the start of the second season and just letting the production team get on with it. They were rewarded by moderate ratings increases and a high profile among SF fans, arguably higher than that of rival series ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' which cost more than twice as much to make. When they were faced with the task of canceling the show due to a complex international co-funding agreement with the PTEN network Creator/PrimeTimeEntertainmentNetwork (what was left of it, anyway) collapsing, they encouraged the their cousins at TNT cable network to come on board and save the day, ensuring that the show got to its it's planned ending. Warner Brothers eventually reaped a strong reward: international, VHS and DVD sales have seen the show make more than five times its budget back in profit since the show ended.



** Which it was. This is actually a case of this going incredibly well. Since the move to Nickelodeon, ratings for the show have more than tripled. In fact, ''Samurai,'' which airs at noon on Saturday, has actually outperformed the prime-time schedules for both Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel.

to:

** Which it was. This is actually a case of this going incredibly well. Since the move to Nickelodeon, ratings for the show have more than tripled. In fact, ''Samurai,'' which airs aired at noon on Saturday, has actually outperformed the prime-time schedules for both Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel.Channel during its' run.



* Fred Silverman, who was CBS's then vice president for programming, canceled ''The $10,000 Pyramid'' in 1974 after only a year as NBC's ''Jeopardy!'' (which NBC programmer Lin Bolen tried to mercy-kill by slotting it against ''Pyramid'' and failed) was beating it. Five weeks later, ABC Entertainment president Martin Starger nabbed ''Pyramid'' and it not only had a six-year run on ABC but a nighttime version and an Emmy win. The real kicker, however, was that Silverman later replaced Starger in 1975, causing him to now see the cancellation as an awful ink blot on an otherwise distinguished career at CBS. In addition, even before ABC picked up the daytime version, Bud Grant, CBS's then vice president for daytime programming, actually disagreed with the cancellation decision and before he carried it out, he gave series creator and executive producer Bob Stewart the phone number for Viacom, a syndication firm founded by CBS, and suggested to him that he have them help stage the weekly nighttime version in the first place. ''Pyramid'' later did a TakeThat against Silverman during the show's GrandFinale with a mock category named "Hit Shows on NBC-TV", a not so subtle jab at the fact that Silverman, now working as president and CEO of NBC, was green lighting flop after flop on the network.

to:

* Fred Silverman, who was CBS's then vice president for programming, canceled ''The ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000 Pyramid'' Pyramid]]'' in 1974 after only a year as NBC's ''Jeopardy!'' (which NBC programmer Lin Bolen tried to mercy-kill by slotting it against ''Pyramid'' and failed) was beating it. Five weeks later, ABC Entertainment president Martin Starger nabbed ''Pyramid'' and it not only had a six-year run on ABC but a nighttime version and an Emmy win. The real kicker, however, was that Silverman later replaced Starger in 1975, causing him to now see the cancellation as an awful ink blot on an otherwise distinguished career at CBS. In addition, even before ABC picked up the daytime version, Bud Grant, CBS's then vice president for daytime programming, actually disagreed with the cancellation decision and before he carried it out, he gave series creator and executive producer Bob Stewart the phone number for Viacom, a syndication firm founded by CBS, and suggested to him that he have them help stage the weekly nighttime version in the first place. ''Pyramid'' later did a TakeThat against Silverman during the show's GrandFinale with a mock category named "Hit Shows on NBC-TV", a not so subtle jab at the fact that Silverman, now working as president and CEO of NBC, was green lighting flop after flop on the network.



* Family Net put the musical anthology The Venue in the FridayNightDeathSlot in January 2011 with the intention to drop its Saturday Night slot the very next month. They apparently listened to the fans and kept the Saturday Night airing due to the popularity. However, they took it off the air altogether in favor of [[{{Glurge}} Live at Oak Tree]]

to:

* Family Net [=FamilyNet=] put the musical anthology The Venue in the FridayNightDeathSlot in January 2011 with the intention to drop its Saturday Night slot the very next month. They apparently listened to the fans and kept the Saturday Night airing due to the popularity. However, they took it off the air altogether in favor of [[{{Glurge}} Live at Oak Tree]]



* ''ForYourLove'' was originally aired on NBC and cancelled after six episodes, it was then picked up by the WB and ran for another four seasons, it's rather surprising that they stuck with a show that so few people seemed to watch, you rarely ever hear FYL mentioned when people are talking about WB shows(not to mention the WB was almost as infamous as FOX for cancelling shows left and right), they even renewed the show after it suffered a 70% ratings decline during the third season. Though it did kinda get screwed during it's last couple of years on the network as it was regularly shifted around the schedule and six episodes of the fifth season(including the series finale) were not aired, though TVOne later picked up the series for reruns and aired the missing episodes.

to:

* ''ForYourLove'' ''For Your Love'' was originally aired on NBC and cancelled after six episodes, it was then picked up by the WB and ran for another four seasons, it's seasons. It's rather surprising that they stuck with a show that so few people seemed to watch, you rarely ever hear FYL mentioned when people are talking about WB shows(not shows (not to mention the WB was almost as infamous as FOX Fox for cancelling shows left and right), they even renewed the show after it suffered a 70% ratings decline during the third season. Though it did kinda get screwed during it's last couple of years on the network as it was regularly shifted around the schedule and six episodes of the fifth season(including season (including the series finale) were not aired, though TVOne later picked up the series for reruns and aired the missing episodes.
24th Mar '16 2:15:59 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Ironically, the far darker and more memorable Season 4 finale wasn't supposed to be the final episode of the show, merely the cliffhanger into a fifth and final season. The BBC decided to call it a day at that point, despite the extremely strong ratings (besting ''CoronationStreet'', Britain's biggest soap opera, in the ratings with over 10 million viewers). Gareth Thomas had emphatically declined to reprise his role as Blake except for a one-off appearance in the finale (in which he was thoroughly McLeaned at his own insistence) and there weren't many more places to go with the story arc without turning it into a FranchiseZombie.

to:

** Ironically, the far darker and more memorable Season 4 finale wasn't supposed to be the final episode of the show, merely the cliffhanger into a fifth and final season. The BBC decided to call it a day at that point, despite the extremely strong ratings (besting ''CoronationStreet'', ''Series/CoronationStreet'', Britain's biggest soap opera, in the ratings with over 10 million viewers). Gareth Thomas had emphatically declined to reprise his role as Blake except for a one-off appearance in the finale (in which he was thoroughly McLeaned at his own insistence) and there weren't many more places to go with the story arc without turning it into a FranchiseZombie.
23rd Mar '16 11:40:42 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* First ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' got [[ScrewedByTheNetwork screwed by]] ComedyCentral after a change in leadership. Then the SciFiChannel came to the rescue. Then Sci Fi screwed them as well, again, after a change in leadership.

to:

* First ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' got [[ScrewedByTheNetwork screwed by]] ComedyCentral Creator/ComedyCentral after a change in leadership. Then the SciFiChannel came to the rescue. Then Sci Fi screwed them as well, again, after a change in leadership.



** Another, even earlier case came when MST was on the Comedy Channel before it merged with Ha! to form ComedyCentral. Ha! wanted to remove MST from the line-up, but Comedy Channel considered it the "flagship of its fleet" and refused to merge unless it remained. Not only did they keep it on, they gave it a contract for three 26-episode seasons.

to:

** Another, even earlier case came when MST was on the Comedy Channel before it merged with Ha! to form ComedyCentral.Comedy Central. Ha! wanted to remove MST from the line-up, but Comedy Channel considered it the "flagship of its fleet" and refused to merge unless it remained. Not only did they keep it on, they gave it a contract for three 26-episode seasons.
19th Mar '16 2:32:33 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Fox}} initially did this with ''TheSarahConnorChronicles''. Then, after a drop in ratings, they moved it to the FridayNightDeathSlot midway through the second season, and, according to a deluge of on-site news reports, axed it.

to:

* {{Fox}} initially did this with ''TheSarahConnorChronicles''.''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles''. Then, after a drop in ratings, they moved it to the FridayNightDeathSlot midway through the second season, and, according to a deluge of on-site news reports, axed it.
18th Mar '16 10:18:41 PM Hossmeister
Is there an issue? Send a Message
8th Feb '16 9:24:52 AM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** And later it was more like Network's Biggest Figurehead to the Rescue when Lucille Ball made vague threats to execs that convinced them to bring it back for season 3.

to:

*** And later it was more like Network's Biggest Figurehead to the Rescue when Lucille Ball Creator/LucilleBall made vague threats to execs that convinced them to bring it back for season 3.
This list shows the last 10 events of 40. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=NetworkToTheRescue.LiveActionTV