History Music / Yes

14th Aug '16 9:34:19 PM gewunomox
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[[caption-width-right:350:Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).]]

Yes is a British group that has been vital in the formation of ProgressiveRock, embodying the best (incredible instrumental proficiency) and worst of the genre (EndingFatigue-inducing endless jamming). Formed in 1968, their music is marked by [[EpicRocking long song lengths]], instrumental prowess, {{uncommon time}}, sudden dynamic shifts, [[WordSaladLyrics incomprehensible lyrics]], lush vocal harmonies and lead singer Jon Anderson's distinctive high-pitched voice.

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.)[[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist/experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year.[[note]]It may be worth noting that ''Drama'' and ''Tormato'' have undergone similar reappraisals to that of ''Tales'' in recent years, with ''Drama'' in particular cropping up on a rather large number of "Favourite Yes albums" lists.[[/note]]

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart".[[note]]The band members themselves didn't actually want to release the album as Yes, particularly since Trevor Rabin didn't want to be perceived as replacing Steve Howe, but ExecutiveMeddling insisted.[[/note]]

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin-Squire-Kaye-White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with eight of the nine members that had recorded more than two albums with the band (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White; original guitarist Peter Banks was the odd man out). A live recording from this tour is available as ''Union Live''.

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:Yes' [[caption-width-right:350: Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).]]

Yes is a British group that has been vital in the formation of ProgressiveRock, embodying the best (incredible instrumental proficiency) and worst of the genre (EndingFatigue-inducing (EndingFatigue inducing endless jamming). Formed in 1968, their music is marked by [[EpicRocking long song lengths]], instrumental prowess, {{uncommon time}}, sudden dynamic shifts, [[WordSaladLyrics incomprehensible lyrics]], lush vocal harmonies and lead singer Jon Anderson's distinctive high-pitched voice.

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) (Anderson / Howe / Squire / Wakeman / Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman [[note]] (Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.)[[/note]] ) [[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist/experienced vocalist / experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year.[[note]]It [[note]] It may be worth noting that ''Drama'' and ''Tormato'' have undergone similar reappraisals to that of ''Tales'' in recent years, with ''Drama'' in particular cropping up on a rather large number of "Favourite Yes albums" lists.lists. [[/note]]

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart".[[note]]The [[note]] The band members themselves didn't actually want to release the album as Yes, particularly since Trevor Rabin didn't want to be perceived as replacing Steve Howe, but ExecutiveMeddling insisted.insisted. [[/note]]

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin-Squire-Kaye-White Rabin / Squire / Kaye / White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with eight of the nine members that had recorded more than two albums with the band (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White; original guitarist Peter Banks was the odd man out). A live recording from this tour is available as ''Union Live''.






!!!Discography and notable songs:
* ''Yes'' (1969) – "Beyond and Before", "Every Little Thing" (Music/TheBeatles cover), "Harold Land", "Survival"
* ''Time and a Word'' (1970) – "No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed" (Richie Havens cover), "Everydays" (Buffalo Springfield cover), "Sweet Dreams", "Time and a Word"
* ''The Yes Album'' (1971) – "Yours Is No Disgrace", "I've Seen All Good People", "Starship Trooper"
* ''Fragile'' (1971) – "Roundabout", "South Side of the Sky", "Long Distance Runaround", "Heart of the Sunrise"
* ''Close to the Edge'' (1972) – "Close to the Edge", "And You and I", "Siberian Khatru" (the only songs on the album)
* ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' (1973) – "Ritual"
* ''Relayer'' (1974) – "The Gates of Delirium", "Sound Chaser", "To Be Over" ([[RunningGag again]], the only songs on the album)
* ''Going for the One'' (1977) – "Going for the One", "Wonderous Stories", "Awaken"
* ''Tormato'' (1978) – "Onward", "Don't Kill the Whale", "Release, Release", "On the Silent Wings of Freedom"
* ''Drama'' (1980) – "Machine Messiah", "Into the Lens", "Tempus Fugit"
* ''90125'' (1983) – "Owner of a Lonely Heart", "Leave It", "It Can Happen", "Changes", "Cinema" [[note]]An instrumental that was awarded Yes' only Grammy to date[[/note]]
* ''Big Generator'' (1987) – "Rhythm of Love", "Love Will Find a Way", "Shoot High Aim Low", "Final Eyes"
* ''Union'' (1991) – "Lift Me Up", "Saving My Heart", "Masquerade"[[note]]A Steve Howe guitar instrumental that was nominated for a Grammy[[/note]]
* ''Talk'' (1994) – "Endless Dream", "The Calling", "Walls"
* ''Keys To Ascension'' (1996) – "Be the One", "That, That Is"
* ''Keys To Ascension 2'' (1997) – "Mind Drive", "Foot Prints", "Children of Light"
* ''Open Your Eyes'' (1997) – "Open Your Eyes", "No Way We Can Lose"

to:

!!!Discography
!!! Discography
and notable songs:
songs:

* ''Yes'' (1969) – "Beyond and Before", "Every Little Thing" (Music/TheBeatles cover), "Harold Land", "Survival"
"Survival".
* ''Time and a Word'' (1970) – "No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed" (Richie Havens cover), "Everydays" (Buffalo Springfield cover), "Sweet Dreams", "Time and a Word"
Word".
* ''The Yes Album'' (1971) – "Yours Is is No Disgrace", "I've Seen All Good People", "Starship Trooper"
Trooper".
* ''Fragile'' (1971) – "Roundabout", "South Side of the Sky", "Long Distance Runaround", "Heart of the Sunrise"
Sunrise".
* ''Close to the Edge'' (1972) – "Close to the Edge", "And You and I", "Siberian Khatru" (the only songs on the album)
album).
* ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' (1973) – "Ritual"
"Ritual".
* ''Relayer'' (1974) – "The Gates of Delirium", "Sound Chaser", "To Be Over" ([[RunningGag again]], the only songs on the album)
album).
* ''Going for the One'' (1977) – "Going for the One", "Wonderous Stories", "Awaken"
"Awaken".
* ''Tormato'' (1978) – "Onward", "Don't Kill the Whale", "Release, Release", "On the Silent Wings of Freedom"
Freedom".
* ''Drama'' (1980) – "Machine Messiah", "Into the Lens", "Tempus Fugit"
Fugit".
* ''90125'' (1983) – "Owner of a Lonely Heart", "Leave It", "It Can Happen", "Changes", "Cinema" [[note]]An "Cinema". [[note]] An instrumental that was awarded Yes' only Grammy to date[[/note]]
date [[/note]]
* ''Big Generator'' (1987) – "Rhythm of Love", "Love Will Find a Way", "Shoot High Aim Low", "Final Eyes"
Eyes".
* ''Union'' (1991) – "Lift Me Up", "Saving My Heart", "Masquerade"[[note]]A "Masquerade". [[note]] A Steve Howe guitar instrumental that was nominated for a Grammy[[/note]]
Grammy [[/note]]
* ''Talk'' (1994) – "Endless Dream", "The Calling", "Walls"
"Walls".
* ''Keys To to Ascension'' (1996) – "Be the One", "That, That Is"
Is".
* ''Keys To Ascension 2'' (1997) – "Mind Drive", "Foot Prints", "Children of Light"
Light".
* ''Open Your Eyes'' (1997) – "Open Your Eyes", "No Way We Can Lose"Lose".



* ''Fly from Here'' (2011) – "Fly from Here" [[note]]a song left over from ''Drama'', played live by the 1980–81 lineup but never recorded properly until 2011[[/note]], "Madman at the Screens", "Solitaire"
* ''Heaven & Earth'' (2014) – "To Ascend", "In a World of Our Own", "Believe Again", "It Was All We Knew"

to:

* ''Fly from Here'' (2011) – "Fly from Here" [[note]]a [[note]] a song left over from ''Drama'', played live by the 1980–81 lineup but never recorded properly until 2011[[/note]], 2011 [[/note]], "Madman at the Screens", "Solitaire"
"Solitaire".
* ''Heaven & Earth'' (2014) – "To Ascend", "In a World of Our Own", "Believe Again", "It Was All We Knew"
Knew".



!!!Members:

to:

!!!Members:
!!! Members:



!!!Former Members:

to:

!!!Former Members:
!!! Former Members:






!!!'''''Owner of a Lonely Trope''''':

to:

!!!'''''Owner
!!! '''''Owner
of a Lonely Trope''''':Trope''''':



* TheBandMinusTheFace: ''Drama'', made without Rick Wakeman and Jon Anderson, and any lineup since excluding Anderson; the Davison/Sherwood lineup may count double due to Squire's departure and passing.

to:

* TheBandMinusTheFace: ''Drama'', made without Rick Wakeman and Jon Anderson, and any lineup since excluding Anderson; the Davison/Sherwood Davison / Sherwood lineup may count double due to Squire's departure and passing.



** Guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Billy Sherwood was in the running to replace Jon Anderson for what would have been the follow-up to ''Big Generator'' (his collaboration with Chris Squire, "The More We Live–Let Go" is featured on ''Union'', while the outtake "Love Conquers All" appears on the ''[=YesYears=]'' box set), came back as a SixthRanger to help on the ''Talk'' tour, came back again as an official member alongside Jon Anderson for ''Open Your Eyes'' and ''The Ladder'', and most recently did some engineering work on ''Fly from Here'' and ''Heaven & Earth''. He would also fill in for an ailing Squire on bass for a 2015 tour.

to:

** Guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Guitarist / keyboardist / vocalist Billy Sherwood was in the running to replace Jon Anderson for what would have been the follow-up to ''Big Generator'' (his collaboration with Chris Squire, "The More We Live–Let Go" is featured on ''Union'', while the outtake "Love Conquers All" appears on the ''[=YesYears=]'' box set), came back as a SixthRanger to help on the ''Talk'' tour, came back again as an official member alongside Jon Anderson for ''Open Your Eyes'' and ''The Ladder'', and most recently did some engineering work on ''Fly from Here'' and ''Heaven & Earth''. He would also fill in for an ailing Squire on bass for a 2015 tour.



* CommonTime: Averted. ''You'' try playing in 13/8 time.



* ChekhovsGun: Remember that demo song Horn and Downes played to the remaining members of the band before being asked to join? Well, it didn't make it onto ''Drama''... it was eventually reworked into the title track of ''Fly from Here'' 31 years later.

to:

* ChekhovsGun: Remember that demo song Horn and Downes played to the remaining members of the band before being asked to join? Well, it didn't make it onto ''Drama''... it It was eventually reworked into the title track of ''Fly from Here'' 31 years later.



* ChromaKey: The video for [[http://youtu.be/Gz0s7-uGWJ8 "Leave It"]], while groundbreaking for its time has some notable Chroma Key issues with the white shirts on the white background.
** Kevin Godley and Lol Creme were the masterminds behind the "Leave It" video, which they reportedly made ''fifteen different versions'' of. They were all variations of the five band members standing in a lineup against a white background: Most were upside-down, some were right-side-up, one version had their backs to the camera, and one version had some choreography involved. The most familiar version – and the only one to be found so far on Website/YouTube – has them upside-down while their images are altered by various visual effects.

to:

* ChromaKey: The video for [[http://youtu.be/Gz0s7-uGWJ8 "Leave It"]], It", while groundbreaking for its time has some notable Chroma Key issues with the white shirts on the white background.
background.
** Kevin Godley and Lol Creme were the masterminds behind the "Leave It" video, which they reportedly made ''fifteen different versions'' of. They were all variations of the five band members standing in a lineup against a white background: Most were upside-down, some were right-side-up, one version had their backs to the camera, and one version had some choreography involved. The most familiar version –- and the only one to be found so far on Website/YouTube -– has them upside-down while their images are altered by various visual effects.effects.
* CommonTime: Averted. ''You'' try playing in 13/8 time.



* CoversAlwaysLie: The band picture on the front of the US version of ''Time and a Word'' has Steve Howe in it...despite the fact that ''he just joined'' and didn't play on the album at all.

to:

* CoversAlwaysLie: The band picture on the front of the US version of ''Time and a Word'' has Steve Howe in it...despite Despite the fact that ''he just joined'' and didn't play on the album at all.



** And then after they left ''again'' in the 2000s.

to:

** And then after they left ''again'' in the 2000s.2000's.



* EightiesHair: Even Yes was affected in the ''90125''-''Big Generator'' era, but Chris Squire had the '80s-est hair of all. Jon Anderson apparently borrowed Music/RodStewart's hair in the late '80s.

to:

* EightiesHair: Even Yes was affected in the ''90125''-''Big ''90125'' / ''Big Generator'' era, but Chris Squire had the '80s-est hair of all. Jon Anderson apparently borrowed Music/RodStewart's hair in the late '80s.



** ''Close to the Edge'' is 39 straight minutes of this, as is ''Relayer''. Both have identical formats: one song about 20 minutes long, followed by two that are about 10.

to:

** ''Close to the Edge'' is 39 straight minutes of this, as is ''Relayer''. Both have identical formats: one One song about 20 minutes long, followed by two that are about 10.



* GratuitousPanning: The orchestra throughout ''Time and a Word''; the organ/guitar bridge and guitar solo in "Yours Is No Disgrace"; and guitar solo in "Owner of a Lonely Heart". The first album had a bit of it as well, seeing as it was made at the end of TheSixties.

to:

* GratuitousPanning: The orchestra throughout ''Time and a Word''; the organ/guitar organ / guitar bridge and guitar solo in "Yours Is is No Disgrace"; and guitar solo in "Owner of a Lonely Heart". The first album had a bit of it as well, seeing as it was made at the end of TheSixties.



* InNameOnly: Inverted - Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe was essentially a reunion of the 1971–72 lineup, minus Chris Squire. They recorded one SelfTitledAlbum in 1989 and toured behind it, before being assimilated back into Yes in 1991.

to:

* InNameOnly: Inverted - -- Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe was essentially a reunion of the 1971–72 lineup, minus Chris Squire. They recorded one SelfTitledAlbum in 1989 and toured behind it, before being assimilated back into Yes in 1991.



*** When the "''90125''/"Yes West" lineup which recorded ''Talk'' broke up in 1995, Rick Wakeman replaced Tony Kaye as Yes' keyboardist again. Igor Khoroshev's hiring in 1997 after Wakeman's departure marked the second time he would be replaced by a largely-unknown, non-English-born keyboardist (after Patrick Moraz).

to:

*** When the "''90125''/"Yes "''90125'' / "Yes West" lineup which recorded ''Talk'' broke up in 1995, Rick Wakeman replaced Tony Kaye as Yes' keyboardist again. Igor Khoroshev's hiring in 1997 after Wakeman's departure marked the second time he would be replaced by a largely-unknown, non-English-born largely unknown, non-English born keyboardist (after Patrick Moraz).



** "We Have Heaven"--two lines repeated over and over in a sort of round:

to:

** "We Have Heaven"--two Heaven" -- Two lines repeated over and over in a sort of round:



* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly from Here'' (both [=DR7=]) are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is less affected at [=DR8=] and isn't clipped nearly as noticeably (it's only particularly terrible in one section of "Can You Imagine" that lasts for about fifty seconds). Some of the band's other recent releases have averted this trope; ''Progeny'' in particular was noted for its complete aversion of this trope (having a [[http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/111124 high dynamic range]] by ''1970s standards'', let alone modern ones) and being the best-sounding recording of the band’s ’70s live performances to date. The band's latest studio album ''Heaven & Earth'' also averts it at [=DR11=], so it's possible they've acquired a distaste for this trope in recent years.

to:

* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly from Here'' (both [=DR7=]) are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is less affected at [=DR8=] and isn't clipped nearly as noticeably (it's only particularly terrible in one section of "Can You Imagine" that lasts for about fifty seconds). Some of the band's other recent releases have averted this trope; ''Progeny'' in particular was noted for its complete aversion of this trope (having a [[http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/111124 high dynamic range]] by ''1970s ''1970's standards'', let alone modern ones) and being the best-sounding recording of the band’s ’70s band's '70s live performances to date. The band's latest studio album ''Heaven & Earth'' also averts it at [=DR11=], so it's possible they've acquired a distaste for this trope in recent years.



* MinisculeRocking: The ridiculously small – as in 37 seconds – "Five Per Cent for Nothing" comes right after an [[EpicRocking 8-minute epic]].

to:

* MinisculeRocking: The ridiculously small -– as in 37 seconds -– "Five Per Cent for Nothing" comes right after an [[EpicRocking 8-minute epic]].



** ''Drama'' has very prominent {{New Wave|Music}} influences due to Music/TheBuggles joining, and is the only album where Steve Howe's playing goes into [[HeavyMetal heavy metal]].

to:

** ''Drama'' has very prominent {{New Wave|Music}} influences due to Music/TheBuggles joining, and is the only album where Steve Howe's playing goes into [[HeavyMetal heavy metal]].{{heavy metal}}.



* [[NotUsingTheZWord Not Using The "Y" Word]]: Some press releases for Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe are comically bent out of shape implying that this band was Yes without ever actually using the name. Yet others explicitly refer to ABWH as a band that in the 70's was called Yes, so Creator/AristaRecords' lawyers seemed uncertain if they could actually use the word "Yes" or not. An agreement between Arista and Atco Records specified later that they could refer to their origins in Yes, but could not call themselves that.

to:

* [[NotUsingTheZWord Not Using The "Y" Word]]: Some press releases for Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe are comically bent out of shape implying that this band was Yes without ever actually using the name. Yet others explicitly refer to ABWH as a band that in the 70's '70s was called Yes, so Creator/AristaRecords' lawyers seemed uncertain if they could actually use the word "Yes" or not. An agreement between Arista and Atco Records specified later that they could refer to their origins in Yes, but could not call themselves that.



* OutOfGenreExperience: "I Am Waiting" is mostly a mellow, dreamy song based around a rather soothing guitar line and angelic vocals from Jon Anderson, albeit with loud drums in parts. About halfway through, Trevor Rabin suddenly launches into a hair metal riff and takes over lead vocals, singing a few lines in a much more aggressive tone. Less than 30 seconds later, it's back to the original mellow guitar line as if nothing happened.



* OutOfGenreExperience: "I Am Waiting" is mostly a mellow, dreamy song based around a rather soothing guitar line and angelic vocals from Jon Anderson, albeit with loud drums in parts. About halfway through, Trevor Rabin suddenly launches into a hair metal riff and takes over lead vocals, singing a few lines in a much more aggressive tone. Less than 30 seconds later, it's back to the original mellow guitar line as if nothing happened.



* PunBasedTitle: ''Tormato'' was originally going to be named ''Yes Tor'' after [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_Tor a peak in Devon]].

to:

* PunBasedTitle: ''Tormato'' was originally going to be named ''Yes Tor'' after [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_Tor a peak in Devon]].



** In ''Going for the One'', the last riff of "Awaken" is basically a major-key transposition of the opening riff of "Siberian Khatru", also from ''Close to the Edge''. The band's live/studio album ''Keys to Ascension'' gives a [[LampshadeHanging sly nod]] towards this by making these two songs the BookEnds of the first disc.

to:

** In ''Going for the One'', the last riff of "Awaken" is basically a major-key transposition of the opening riff of "Siberian Khatru", also from ''Close to the Edge''. The band's live/studio live / studio album ''Keys to Ascension'' gives a [[LampshadeHanging sly nod]] towards this by making these two songs the BookEnds of the first disc.



** The first part of "I've Seen All Good People" has two references to Music/JohnLennon: one of the lines is "Send an instant karma to me, initial it with loving care", and towards the 3-minute mark during the {{scatting}} chorus, Anderson can be heard in the left channel singing "All we are saying, is give peace a chance!".[[note]] The first shout-out is {{hilarious in hindsight}} when you know that Alan White played the drums on "Instant Karma!" [[/note]]

to:

** The first part of "I've Seen All Good People" has two references to Music/JohnLennon: one of the lines is "Send an instant karma to me, initial it with loving care", and towards the 3-minute mark during the {{scatting}} chorus, Anderson can be heard in the left channel singing "All we are saying, is give peace a chance!". [[note]] The first shout-out is {{hilarious in hindsight}} when you know that Alan White played the drums on "Instant Karma!" [[/note]]



** Rather than hire a new keyboardist to replace the newly-departed Igor Khoroshev in 2000, Yes opted to continue with the remaining four-piece lineup of Anderson/Howe/Squire/White with a symphony orchestra handling what would have been keyboard/synthesizer parts for a whole album[[note]]They previously incorporated orchestral parts on ''Time and a Word'', but this was the first time an orchestra ''replaced'' the keyboardist[[/note]]; the result was ''Magnification''. The band toured with the orchestra for their ''[=YesSymphonic=]'' tour (and DVD concert film), hiring keyboardist Tom Breslin as a temporary non-member sideman.

to:

** Rather than hire a new keyboardist to replace the newly-departed Igor Khoroshev in 2000, Yes opted to continue with the remaining four-piece lineup of Anderson/Howe/Squire/White Anderson / Howe / Squire / White with a symphony orchestra handling what would have been keyboard/synthesizer keyboard / synthesizer parts for a whole album[[note]]They album [[note]] They previously incorporated orchestral parts on ''Time and a Word'', but this was the first time an orchestra ''replaced'' the keyboardist[[/note]]; keyboardist [[/note]]; the result was ''Magnification''. The band toured with the orchestra for their ''[=YesSymphonic=]'' tour (and DVD concert film), hiring keyboardist Tom Breslin as a temporary non-member sideman.



** The track "Themes" from the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album is a jab at ''Big Generator'', especially in regards to the hit single-focused writing of the album.

to:

** The track "Themes" from the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album is a jab at ''Big Generator'', especially in regards to the hit single-focused single focused writing of the album.



* TriumphantReprise: A notable example is "We Have Heaven", from 1971's ''Fragile'' (near the beginning). This is a reprise at the end of the last song of the album, and, more notably, in the short song "Can I?" on ''The Ladder'' - which was released in 1999.

to:

* TriumphantReprise: A notable example is "We Have Heaven", from 1971's ''Fragile'' (near the beginning). This is a reprise at the end of the last song of the album, and, more notably, in the short song "Can I?" on ''The Ladder'' - -- which was released in 1999.
2nd Aug '16 6:26:37 PM bt8257
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''"I'll be the roundabout, the tropes will make you out 'n' out... ''"

to:

''"I'll !!!'''''"I'll be the roundabout, the tropes will make you out 'n' out... ''"out"'''''
25th Jul '16 9:41:35 AM TheWhistleTropes
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Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Peter Banks on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.)[[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

to:

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Peter Banks on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.)[[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).
2nd Jul '16 10:39:18 AM BlackMageAnolis
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** In ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', the chorus to "The Revealing Science of God" makes a reappearance at the climax of "High the Memory". The placid guitar solo at the start of "Ritual" reprises not only a number of motifs from earlier in the album, but also the main riff of the title track from their previous album, ''Close to the Edge''.

to:

** In ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', the chorus to "The Revealing Science of God" makes a reappearance at the climax of "High the Memory". "The Remembering". The placid guitar solo at the start of "Ritual" reprises not only a number of motifs from earlier in the album, but also the main riff of the title track from their previous album, ''Close to the Edge''.Edge''.
** Also in ''Tales'', the melody of the chorus to "The Remembering" is featured in every single song, lyrically in the first two songs (''Soft summer mover distance mind'' in "The Revealing Science of God", and obviously the chorus of "The Remembering") and musically in the last two during Howe's guitar solos.
25th Jun '16 5:08:51 PM bt8257
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* ''Drama'' (1980) – "Machine Messiah", "Into the Lens", "Tempus fugit"

to:

* ''Drama'' (1980) – "Machine Messiah", "Into the Lens", "Tempus fugit"Fugit"
25th Jun '16 5:08:31 PM bt8257
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* BigYes: "Tempus fugit" has one.

to:

* BigYes: "Tempus fugit" Fugit" has one.



* BookEnds: ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' and ''Fly from Here'' respectively: A riff from "The Revealing Science of God" appears at the end of "Ritual", and David can be heard singing "And we can fly from here..." numerous times in the cooldown to "Into the Storm".

to:

* BookEnds: {{Bookends}}: ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' and ''Fly from Here'' respectively: A riff from "The Revealing Science of God" appears at the end of "Ritual", and David can be heard singing "And we can fly from here..." numerous times in the cooldown to "Into the Storm".
22nd Jun '16 7:12:51 PM CassandraLeo
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Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Peter Banks on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards. However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist/experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year.

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart".

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin-Squire-Kaye-White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with all the eight members that were in the band at various points (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White).

After the mixed reception of ''Talk'' (the last album with Rabin and Kaye), the band's since returned to their old prog sound, reunited their classic lineup and released ''Keys to Ascension'', ''Keys to Ascension 2'', ''Open Your Eyes'', ''The Ladder'', and ''Magnification''. They were going strong until 2008, when Jon Anderson fell ill. The band soldiered on with Rick Wakeman's son Oliver on keyboards (since booted out so Downes could rejoin) and, most surprisingly, [[PromotedFanboy Benoît David]] of tribute band Close to the Edge on vocals for ''Fly from Here''. However, David was released by the band and replaced by Jon Davison, also from a Yes tribute band for their latest album, ''Heaven & Earth''.

to:

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Peter Banks on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson-Howe-Squire-Wakeman-Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards. [[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.)[[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist/experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year.

year.[[note]]It may be worth noting that ''Drama'' and ''Tormato'' have undergone similar reappraisals to that of ''Tales'' in recent years, with ''Drama'' in particular cropping up on a rather large number of "Favourite Yes albums" lists.[[/note]]

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart".

Heart".[[note]]The band members themselves didn't actually want to release the album as Yes, particularly since Trevor Rabin didn't want to be perceived as replacing Steve Howe, but ExecutiveMeddling insisted.[[/note]]

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin-Squire-Kaye-White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with all the eight of the nine members that were in had recorded more than two albums with the band at various points (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White).

White; original guitarist Peter Banks was the odd man out). A live recording from this tour is available as ''Union Live''.

After the mixed reception of ''Talk'' (the last album with Rabin and Kaye), the band's since returned to their old prog sound, reunited their classic lineup and released the acclaimed ''Keys to Ascension'', Ascension'' and ''Keys to Ascension 2'', 2''. Various further lineup changes resulted in ''Open Your Eyes'', ''The Ladder'', and ''Magnification''.''Magnification'', the former of which earned a mixed reception but the latter two of which have generally been well-received. They were going strong until 2008, when Jon Anderson fell ill. The band soldiered on with Rick Wakeman's son Oliver on keyboards (since booted out so Downes could rejoin) and, most surprisingly, [[PromotedFanboy Benoît David]] of tribute band Close to the Edge on vocals for ''Fly from Here''. However, David was released by the band and replaced by Jon Davison, also from a Yes tribute band for their latest album, ''Heaven & Earth''.
Earth''.



* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any particularly noticeable clipping problems. Some of the band's other recent releases have averted this trope; ''Progeny'' in particular was noted for its complete aversion of this trope (having a high dynamic range by ''1970s standards'', let alone modern ones) and being the best-sounding recording of the band’s ’70s live performances to date.

to:

* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From from Here'' (both [=DR7=]) are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards less affected at [=DR8=] and doesn’t have any isn't clipped nearly as noticeably (it's only particularly noticeable clipping problems. terrible in one section of "Can You Imagine" that lasts for about fifty seconds). Some of the band's other recent releases have averted this trope; ''Progeny'' in particular was noted for its complete aversion of this trope (having a [[http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/111124 high dynamic range range]] by ''1970s standards'', let alone modern ones) and being the best-sounding recording of the band’s ’70s live performances to date.date. The band's latest studio album ''Heaven & Earth'' also averts it at [=DR11=], so it's possible they've acquired a distaste for this trope in recent years.
22nd Jun '16 12:51:22 PM CassandraLeo
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* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any particularly noticeable clipping problems.

to:

* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any particularly noticeable clipping problems. Some of the band's other recent releases have averted this trope; ''Progeny'' in particular was noted for its complete aversion of this trope (having a high dynamic range by ''1970s standards'', let alone modern ones) and being the best-sounding recording of the band’s ’70s live performances to date.
22nd Jun '16 12:45:59 PM CassandraLeo
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* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any clipping problems.

to:

* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any particularly noticeable clipping problems.
22nd Jun '16 12:45:00 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

* LoudnessWar: ''The Ladder'' and ''Fly From Here'' are affected, having fairly low dynamic range and clipping throughout. Strangely, ''Magnification'', released between the two albums, is pretty quiet by contemporary standards and doesn’t have any clipping problems.
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