History Music / Yes

18th Jun '17 4:45:57 PM nombretomado
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* ReligionRantSong: Perhaps surprisingly, they have one. According to ThatOtherWiki, "Long Distance Runaround" was written about Anderson's experiences with religious hypocrisy during his youth and his desire to find a genuine, compassionate example of godliness. With the WordSaladLyrics, it is of course difficult to tell.

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* ReligionRantSong: Perhaps surprisingly, they have one. According to ThatOtherWiki, Wiki/ThatOtherWiki, "Long Distance Runaround" was written about Anderson's experiences with religious hypocrisy during his youth and his desire to find a genuine, compassionate example of godliness. With the WordSaladLyrics, it is of course difficult to tell.
17th Jun '17 12:51:52 AM bt8257
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[[caption-width-right:350: Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).[[note]]This is the collection of Yes members that will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[[/note]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350: Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).[[note]]This is the collection of Yes members that will be were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[[/note]]]]



Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson/Howe/Squire/Wakeman/Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.) [[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

to:

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson/Howe/Squire/Wakeman/Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's Roger Dean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.) [[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).
13th May '17 10:50:16 AM Schroeder1174
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** Guitarist / keyboardist / vocalist Billy Sherwood was in the running to replace Jon Anderson for what would have been the follow-up to ''Big Generator'' (his collaboration with Chris Squire, "The More We Live–Let Go" is featured on ''Union'', while the outtake "Love Conquers All" appears on the ''[=YesYears=]'' box set), came back as a SixthRanger to help on the ''Talk'' tour, came back again as an official member alongside Jon Anderson for ''Open Your Eyes'' and ''The Ladder'', and most recently did some engineering work on ''Fly from Here'' and ''Heaven & Earth''. He would also fill in for an ailing Squire on bass for a 2015 tour.

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** Guitarist / keyboardist / vocalist Billy Sherwood was in the running to replace Jon Anderson for what would have been the follow-up to ''Big Generator'' (his collaboration with Chris Squire, "The More We Live–Let Go" is featured on ''Union'', while the outtake "Love Conquers All" appears on the ''[=YesYears=]'' box set), came back as a SixthRanger to help on the ''Talk'' tour, came back again as an official member alongside Jon Anderson for ''Open Your Eyes'' and ''The Ladder'', and most recently did some engineering work on ''Fly from Here'' and ''Heaven & Earth''. He would also fill in for an ailing Squire on bass for a 2015 tour.tour, before becoming the band's permanent bassist upon Squire's death in June 2015.


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** ARW is a supergroup comprised of Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman, with bassist Lee Pomeroy and drummer Louis Molino III filling in, which formed in 2010. Following the band's Rock And Roll Hall of Fame induction in 2017, they have billed themselves as "Yes featuring Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin, Rick Wakeman" with a different logo, as Anderson (who co-owned the rights to the band name with Squire and had allowed Yes to continue without him, so long as Chris was still in the group) wishes to assert himself as the only remaining active founding member of the band and believes his group to more closely work in the spirit of the group than the official lineup.
9th May '17 8:24:45 PM LeeM
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As of 2017, Anderson, Rabin & Wakeman are performing vintage Yes material with their self-titled band.
23rd Dec '16 1:17:10 PM DavidDelony
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* TheNapoleon: Jon Anderson was nicknamed as such in the band's early days for his short stature and habit of chewing out band members who turned up late to rehearsals.
23rd Dec '16 5:34:26 AM MarkLungo
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Yes is a British group that has been vital in the formation of ProgressiveRock, embodying the best (incredible instrumental proficiency) and worst of the genre (EndingFatigue inducing endless jamming). Formed in 1968, their music is marked by [[EpicRocking long song lengths]], instrumental prowess, {{uncommon time}}, sudden dynamic shifts, [[WordSaladLyrics incomprehensible lyrics]], lush vocal harmonies and lead singer Jon Anderson's distinctive high-pitched voice.

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson / Howe / Squire / Wakeman / Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]] (Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.) [[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist / experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year. [[note]] It may be worth noting that ''Drama'' and ''Tormato'' have undergone similar reappraisals to that of ''Tales'' in recent years, with ''Drama'' in particular cropping up on a rather large number of "Favourite Yes albums" lists. [[/note]]

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart". [[note]] The band members themselves didn't actually want to release the album as Yes, particularly since Trevor Rabin didn't want to be perceived as replacing Steve Howe, but ExecutiveMeddling insisted. [[/note]]

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin / Squire / Kaye / White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with eight of the nine members that had recorded more than two albums with the band (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White; original guitarist Peter Banks was the odd man out). A live recording from this tour is available as ''Union Live''.

to:

Yes is a British group that has been vital in the formation of ProgressiveRock, embodying both the best (incredible instrumental proficiency) and worst of the genre (EndingFatigue inducing endless jamming). Formed in 1968, their music is marked by [[EpicRocking long song lengths]], instrumental prowess, {{uncommon time}}, sudden dynamic shifts, [[WordSaladLyrics incomprehensible lyrics]], lush vocal harmonies and lead singer Jon Anderson's distinctive high-pitched voice.

Despite ''Yes'' and ''Time and a Word'' suffering from mixed reception and EarlyInstallmentWeirdness ({{cover version}}s, overproduction, orchestras overpowering everything, [[ThePeteBest Peter Banks]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking on guitar]]), the band's "classic lineup" (Anderson / Howe / Squire / Wakeman / Bruford) (Anderson/Howe/Squire/Wakeman/Bruford) and distinctive ProgressiveRock sound and look (the latter supplied by Creator/RogerDean's DesignStudentsOrgasm artwork) coalesced at the start of TheSeventies, resulting in the critically acclaimed trilogy of ''The Yes Album'', ''Fragile'', and ''Close to the Edge'', the latter considered their masterpiece. But it didn't last, as they came back to earth with the widely-reviled double album ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', which was roundly panned for its self-indulgence (although it got to the top of the charts at the time). Notably, Rick Wakeman was so [[CreatorBacklash displeased]] with the album that he left soon afterwards.[[note]] (Wakeman [[note]](Wakeman has since softened on it, noting that there was a lot of really good material on it, but that it got padded out because there was too much material for a single LP but not enough for a double LP. Fan and critical consensus has since softened as well.) [[/note]] However, the band soldiered on, managing to make two more reasonably well-received albums influenced by jazz fusion, ''Relayer'' and ''Going for the One'' (the latter getting to number one at the height of punk's popularity) and bringing back Wakeman before once again sabotaging their career with the horribly-received ''Tormato'' (although it reached the Top 10 in the Album charts just like ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' did).

After an internal conflict and falling out, Anderson and Wakeman left in 1980, being replaced by vocalist / experienced vocalist/experienced RecordProducer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes of Music/TheBuggles. The resulting lineup recorded one album, ''Drama'', which showcased a heavier, harder rock sound than before and earned mixed reception, before disintegrating the next year. [[note]] It [[note]]It may be worth noting that ''Drama'' and ''Tormato'' have undergone similar reappraisals to that of ''Tales'' in recent years, with ''Drama'' in particular cropping up on a rather large number of "Favourite Yes albums" lists. lists.[[/note]]

The band's former rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White soon joined up with South African UsefulNotes/{{South Africa}}n guitarist Music/TrevorRabin, whose sensibilities were far more mainstream, and formed a new band called Cinema. Squire also brought back Yes' original keyboard player Tony Kaye and got Trevor Horn to produce the album. During a chance encounter between Anderson and Squire, the former heard Cinema's demos and was so impressed he joined right away, re-singing most of the previously recorded vocals and re-writing some of the lyrics. The resulting album, ''90125'' (named after its catalog number), was released under the "Yes" moniker and showcased a departure from the band's previous formula, being made up of catchy, accessible poppy hard-rock tunes that still preserved enough of the band's former weirdness like incomprehensible lyrics, complex production, abrupt time changes and multitracked vocal harmonies. The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks predictable whining from older fans]] couldn't drown out the critical acclaim, and ''90125'' became the band's highest-selling album and spawned their biggest-selling single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart". [[note]] The [[note]]The band members themselves didn't actually want to release the album as Yes, particularly since Trevor Rabin didn't want to be perceived as replacing Steve Howe, but ExecutiveMeddling insisted. insisted.[[/note]]

The follow-up, ''Big Generator'', had reasonable sales and positive reception, but was widely considered inferior to ''90125''. Anderson, in particular, was so disappointed with it he left Yes to join up with his ''Close to the Edge''-era bandmates to form "Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe", which released one self-titled album in 1989. As both groups were preparing new material, ABWH's label, label Creator/AristaRecords, through some wheeling and dealing, bought out Yes' record contract and name with the intention of improving ABWH's sales by releasing their next album under the Yes name, with contributions from the Rabin / Squire / Kaye / White Rabin/Squire/Kaye/White Yes. The resulting album ''Union'', suffered from severe ExecutiveMeddling and was widely panned. The tour, however, was considered one of their best, with a "Mega-Yes" lineup with eight of the nine members that had recorded more than two albums with the band (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Rabin, Kaye, Wakeman, Bruford, and White; original guitarist Peter Banks was the odd man out). A live recording from this tour is available as ''Union Live''.



* [[NotUsingTheZWord Not Using The "Y" Word]]: Some press releases for Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe are comically bent out of shape implying that this band was Yes without ever actually using the name. Yet others explicitly refer to ABWH as a band that in the '70s was called Yes, so Creator/AristaRecords' lawyers seemed uncertain if they could actually use the word "Yes" or not. An agreement between Arista and Atco Records specified later that they could refer to their origins in Yes, but could not call themselves that.

to:

* [[NotUsingTheZWord Not Using The "Y" Word]]: Some press releases for Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe are comically bent out of shape implying that this band was Yes without ever actually using the name. Yet others explicitly refer to ABWH as a band that in the '70s was called Yes, so Creator/AristaRecords' lawyers seemed uncertain if they could actually use the word "Yes" or not. An agreement between Arista and Atco Records Creator/AtcoRecords specified later that they could refer to their origins in Yes, but could not call themselves that.



* RealSongThemeTune: "Roundabout" was used as the ending credits theme to the first two parts of the anime adaptation of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.

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* RealSongThemeTune: "Roundabout" was used as the ending credits theme to the first two parts of the anime adaptation of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.



** Another example from ''Drama'' is "Into the Lens", which references Christopher Isherwood novel ''Goodbye to Berlin'' (part of ''The Berlin Stories''; Isherwood is probably now better known for ''Film/ASingleMan''), which contains the phrase "I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking". It's another example of a GeniusBonus, once again due to the story's relative obscurity.

to:

** Another example from ''Drama'' is "Into the Lens", which references Christopher Isherwood novel ''Goodbye to Berlin'' (part of ''The Berlin Stories''; Stories'', the precursor to ''Theatre/{{Cabaret}''; Isherwood is probably now better known for ''Film/ASingleMan''), which contains the phrase "I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking". It's another example of a GeniusBonus, once again due to the story's relative obscurity.



** Rather than hire a new keyboardist to replace the newly-departed Igor Khoroshev in 2000, Yes opted to continue with the remaining four-piece lineup of Anderson / Howe / Squire / White with a symphony orchestra handling what would have been keyboard / synthesizer parts for a whole album [[note]] They previously incorporated orchestral parts on ''Time and a Word'', but this was the first time an orchestra ''replaced'' the keyboardist [[/note]]; the result was ''Magnification''. The band toured with the orchestra for their ''[=YesSymphonic=]'' tour (and DVD concert film), hiring keyboardist Tom Breslin as a temporary non-member sideman.

to:

** Rather than hire a new keyboardist to replace the newly-departed Igor Khoroshev in 2000, Yes opted to continue with the remaining four-piece lineup of Anderson / Howe / Squire / White Anderson/Howe/Squire/White with a symphony orchestra handling what would have been keyboard / synthesizer keyboard/synthesizer parts for a whole album [[note]] They previously incorporated orchestral parts on ''Time and a Word'', but this was the first time an orchestra ''replaced'' the keyboardist [[/note]]; the result was ''Magnification''. The band toured with the orchestra for their ''[=YesSymphonic=]'' tour (and DVD concert film), hiring keyboardist Tom Breslin as a temporary non-member sideman.



* TakeThat: "White Car" is a dig at Music/GaryNuman, who had been given a car by his label.

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* TakeThat: TakeThat:
**
"White Car" is a dig at Music/GaryNuman, who had been given a car by his label.
21st Dec '16 9:10:38 PM bt8257
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[[caption-width-right:350: Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350: Yes' ''Union'' 8-man lineup, circa 1991 (l-r: Music/TrevorRabin, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Music/BillBruford, Steve Howe).]]
[[note]]This is the collection of Yes members that will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[[/note]]]]
22nd Nov '16 6:03:01 PM Sunburst
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* LeadBassist: Squire's basslines are very prominent.

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* LeadBassist: Squire's basslines are very prominent.Chris Squire was certainly a Type A. While he had some serious competition from his bandmates, his bass lines would frequently be prominent and he outright comes to the fore in some songs from ''Fragile'' and ''Drama''.
18th Oct '16 9:51:22 AM WaxingName
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* RealSongThemeTune: "Roundabout" was used as the ending credits theme to the 2012 anime adaptation of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.

to:

* RealSongThemeTune: "Roundabout" was used as the ending credits theme to the 2012 first two parts of the anime adaptation of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure''.
14th Oct '16 7:38:28 AM TonyG
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Added DiffLines:

** According to Wakeman, ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'' has about a hour's worth of good material, but since that was too long to fit into a single vinyl album, they had to pad the tracks out to fit a double album.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.Yes