History Music / SimpleMinds

19th Jul '17 1:58:31 AM MarkLungo
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* BoleroEffect: "East At Easter" from ''Sparkle in the Rain''.

to:

* BoleroEffect: BoleroEffect:
**
"East At Easter" from ''Sparkle in the Rain''.



* CanonDiscontinuity: The lead track from the Amsterdam EP, a cover of Prince's Sign Of The Times, has never appeared on one of their singles compilations or albums, despite being a hit. The band were embarrassed by it and prefer to use its B Side Let It All Come Down instead. However, the full single appears as part of the Themes box sets, still in print.

to:

* CanonDiscontinuity: The lead track from the Amsterdam ''Amsterdam'' EP, a cover of Prince's Sign Of The Times, Music/{{Prince}}'s "Sign of the Times", has never appeared on one of their singles compilations or albums, despite being a hit. The band were embarrassed by it and prefer to use its B Side Let BSide "Let It All Come Down Down" instead. However, the full single appears as part of the Themes ''Themes'' box sets, still in print.



** Sun City - Dance To The Music on ''Live In The City Of Lights''

to:

** Sun "Sun City - Dance To The Music Music" on ''Live In The City Of Lights''



* HiddenTrack: The band included an unreleased excerpt of the long track A Brass Band In Africa on the 12" single of Speed Your Love To Me, after the Extended Mix fades out. CD issues append this to the end of the Extended Mix. Other parts of A Brass Band In Africa can be found on the 7" and 12" singles of Up On The Catwalk and on the Sparkle In The Rain album as Shake Off The Ghosts.

to:

* HiddenTrack: The band included an unreleased excerpt of the long track A 'A Brass Band In Africa Africa" on the 12" single of Speed "Speed Your Love To Me, Me", after the Extended Mix fades out. CD issues append this to the end of the Extended Mix. Other parts of A "A Brass Band In Africa Africa" can be found on the 7" and 12" singles of Up "Up On The Catwalk Catwalk" and on the Sparkle ''Sparkle In The Rain Rain'' album as Shake "Shake Off The Ghosts.Ghosts".



** The original artwork for Real Life was also dark blue, and had a small design in the middle as well as the title. Later pressing reversed the front and back cover so it was a picture of the band on white.

to:

** The original artwork for Real Life ''Real Life'' was also dark blue, and had a small design in the middle as well as the title. Later pressing reversed the front and back cover so it was a picture of the band on white.



** ''Life in a Day''(Art Punk),

to:

** ''Life in a Day''(Art Day'' (Art Punk),



** ''New Gold Dream'' (Similar to Sons And Fascination but shorter and with more viable singles)
** ''Sparkle in the Rain'' (A bridge between the new wave of New Gold Dream and the stadium Rock of Once Upon A Time).

to:

** ''New Gold Dream'' (Similar to Sons ''Sons And Fascination Fascination'' but shorter and with more viable singles)
** ''Sparkle in the Rain'' (A bridge between the new wave of New ''New Gold Dream Dream'' and the stadium Rock rock of Once ''Once Upon A Time).Time'').



** ''Real Life'' (A combination of Street Fighting Years and then current pop music)

to:

** ''Real Life'' (A combination of Street ''Street Fighting Years Years' and then current pop music)



** ''Our Secrets Are The Same'' (More rock based than Neapolis)
** ''Neon Lights'' (A CoverAlbum in the modern electronic style of Cry)

to:

** ''Our Secrets Are The Same'' (More rock based than Neapolis)
''Neapolis'')
** ''Neon Lights'' (A CoverAlbum in the modern electronic style of Cry)''Cry'')



** ''Graffiti Soul'' (A fusion of the sound of Sons And Fascination with that of Once Upon A Time and the pop sensibilities of Black And White 050505. Fans usually consider this a return to form.)

to:

** ''Graffiti Soul'' (A fusion of the sound of Sons ''Sons And Fascination Fascination'' with that of Once ''Once Upon A Time Time'' and the pop sensibilities of Black ''Black And White 050505.050505''. Fans usually consider this a return to form.)



* PrecisionFStrike: Their cover of "Rockin' In A Free World" actually adds one.

to:

* PrecisionFStrike: Their cover of Music/NeilYoung's "Rockin' In A the Free World" actually adds one.



** "Let The Children Speak" from ''Real Life'' is a vocal rearrangement of the instrumental "Theme For Great Cities" from ''Sister Feelings Call''. Theme For Great Cities '91 is a completely new recording of the track that is somewhat like an instrumental "Let The Children Speak" would be but with more rave influences.

to:

** "Let The Children Speak" from ''Real Life'' is a vocal rearrangement of the instrumental "Theme For Great Cities" from ''Sister Feelings Call''. Theme "Theme For Great Cities Cities" '91 is a completely new recording of the track that is somewhat like an instrumental "Let The Children Speak" would be but with more rave influences.



** "Moscow Underground" is based around a riff in the band's 2004 cover of "White Light, White Heat". As this cover was only released in Italy as part of a rare Vodafone compilation, not many fans noticed.

to:

** "Moscow Underground" is based around a riff in the band's 2004 cover of "White Light, White Heat".Music/VelvetUnderground's "Music/WhiteLightWhiteHeat". As this cover was only released in Italy as part of a rare Vodafone compilation, not many fans noticed.
19th Jul '17 1:45:23 AM MarkLungo
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-->"Waterfront"

to:

-->"Waterfront"
-->--"Waterfront"



In early '79, they recorded their first album, ''Life in a Day''. Sales were disappointing, and the band quickly [[CanonDiscontinuity dismissed]] it as sounding too much like their influences (Music/DavidBowie, Music/{{Genesis}}, Music/RoxyMusic, and the Punk and New Wave around them). Their next album, ''Real to Real Cacophony'', was dark, moody, and experimental. It sold even less than ''Life in a Day''. Their third album, 1980's ''Empires and Dance'', was proto-{{Industrial}}, sold poorly again, and this time Arista had had enough and they were transferred to Virgin Records.

to:

In early '79, they recorded their first album, ''Life in a Day''. Sales were disappointing, and the band quickly [[CanonDiscontinuity dismissed]] it as sounding too much like their influences (Music/DavidBowie, Music/{{Genesis}}, Music/RoxyMusic, and the Punk and New Wave around them). Their next album, ''Real to Real Cacophony'', was dark, moody, and experimental. It sold even less than ''Life in a Day''. Their third album, 1980's ''Empires and Dance'', was proto-{{Industrial}}, sold poorly again, and this time Arista had had enough and they were the band transferred to Virgin Records.
17th Jun '17 1:51:39 PM nombretomado
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During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to UsefulNotes/TheTroubles to the BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.

to:

During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to UsefulNotes/TheTroubles to the BerlinWall.UsefulNotes/BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.
15th May '17 7:22:49 PM nombretomado
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During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to TheTroubles to the BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.

to:

During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to TheTroubles UsefulNotes/TheTroubles to the BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.
3rd Jan '17 3:15:24 PM Exxolon
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Mel Gaynor returned for ''Real Life'', a sequel to ''Street Fighting Years''. It went to #2 in the UK, but the U.S. shut the door on Simple Minds, this time for good. Gaynor left again in '92, and since then Simple Minds has officially been a duo of Kerr and Burchill. Their last album of the stadium rock era was 1995's ''Good News from the Next World''.

to:

Mel Gaynor returned for ''Real Life'', a sequel to ''Street Fighting Years''. It went to #2 in the UK, but the U.S. shut the door on Simple Minds, this time for good. Gaynor left again in '92, '92 (he would return in '97 and has remained with band since then), and since then Simple Minds has officially been a duo of Kerr and Burchill. Their last album of the stadium rock era was 1995's ''Good News from the Next World''.
3rd Jan '17 3:09:02 PM Exxolon
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* Andy Gillespe (keyboards)

to:

* Andy Gillespe Gillespie (keyboards)


Added DiffLines:

* [[CoolOldGuy Cool Old Guys]] - The core members of the band are all nearing sixty, but can still put on a great show.
29th Dec '16 9:34:10 AM nombretomado
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During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to TheTroubles to the BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.

to:

During the three years of fame and touring that followed ''Once Upon A Time'', the band took an interest in politics. This led to their only UK #1 single, "Mandela Day", and their next album, ''Street Fighting Years''. ''Street Fighting Years'' addressed political topics from [[TheApartheidEra [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra Apartheid]] to TheTroubles to the BerlinWall. Musically, it brought back the subtlety of ''New Gold Dream'', though with acoustic rather than electronic instruments, creating a Celtic folk-rock sound. Once again, work took its toll, and Giblin and Gaynor both left during the recording sessions. ''Street Fighting Years'' rose to the top of the UK album charts, but America didn't want to hear about the worries of the world.
30th Apr '16 10:34:08 PM aye_amber
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Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Zoom, a division of Creator/AristaRecords.

to:

Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie Music/DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Zoom, a division of Creator/AristaRecords.
11th Mar '16 1:54:05 PM MarkLungo
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Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Zoom, a division of Music/AristaRecords.

to:

Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Zoom, a division of Music/AristaRecords.
Creator/AristaRecords.
11th Mar '16 12:53:33 PM MarkLungo
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Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Arista Records.

In early '79, they recorded their first album, ''Life in a Day''. Sales were disappointing, and the band quickly [[CanonDiscontinuity dismissed]] it as sounding too much like their influences (DavidBowie, Music/{{Genesis}}, RoxyMusic, and the Punk and New Wave around them). Their next album, ''Real to Real Cacophony'', was dark, moody, and experimental. It sold even less than ''Life in a Day''. Their third album, 1980's ''Empires and Dance'', was proto-{{Industrial}}, sold poorly again, and this time Arista had had enough and they were transferred to Virgin Records.

to:

Kerr and Burchill were friends since childhood. In 1977, they joined a punk band called Johnny & The Self-Abusers, which released one single and broke up. Kerr and Burchill, along with Self-Abusers bandmates Tony Donald (bass) and Brian [=McGee=] (drums) renamed themselves Simple Minds, after a line in the DavidBowie song "Jean Genie". The next year and a half saw much touring and a demo tape. Mick [=MacNeil=] joined on keyboards, and Donald was replaced by Derek Forbes on bass. They became known for their live act, and were signed to Arista Records.

Zoom, a division of Music/AristaRecords.

In early '79, they recorded their first album, ''Life in a Day''. Sales were disappointing, and the band quickly [[CanonDiscontinuity dismissed]] it as sounding too much like their influences (DavidBowie, (Music/DavidBowie, Music/{{Genesis}}, RoxyMusic, Music/RoxyMusic, and the Punk and New Wave around them). Their next album, ''Real to Real Cacophony'', was dark, moody, and experimental. It sold even less than ''Life in a Day''. Their third album, 1980's ''Empires and Dance'', was proto-{{Industrial}}, sold poorly again, and this time Arista had had enough and they were transferred to Virgin Records.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.SimpleMinds