History Music / Revolver

17th Jun '16 8:36:14 PM whunt
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* AntiLoveSong/BreakupSong: "For No One" is about the end of "A love that should have lasted years".

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* AntiLoveSong/BreakupSong: {{AntiLoveSong}}/{{BreakupSong}}: "For No One" is about the end of "A love that should have lasted years".
17th Jun '16 8:35:08 PM whunt
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* BreakupSong: "For No One" is about the end of "A love that should have lasted years".

to:

* BreakupSong: AntiLoveSong/BreakupSong: "For No One" is about the end of "A love that should have lasted years".
4th May '16 8:11:25 AM Mdumas43073
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# "Here, There And Everywhere" (2:26)

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# "Here, There And and Everywhere" (2:26)



# "I Want To Tell You" (2:30)
# "Got To Get You Into My Life" (2:31)

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# "I Want To to Tell You" (2:30)
# "Got To to Get You Into My Life" (2:31)
4th May '16 8:10:56 AM Mdumas43073
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The album is the subject of two books: ''[[http://revolverbook.co.uk/ Abacadabra!: The Complete Story of the Beatles' ''Revolver'']]'' (2006), an e-book by Ray Newman, and ''[[http://revolverbook.com/revolver Revolver: How the Beatles Reimagined Rock 'n' Roll]]'' (2012) by Robert Rodriguez (the music writer, not [[Creator/RobertRodriguez the filmmaker]]).

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The album is the subject of two books: ''[[http://revolverbook.co.uk/ Abacadabra!: The Complete Story of the Beatles' ''Revolver'']]'' (2006), an e-book by Ray Newman, and ''[[http://revolverbook.com/revolver Revolver: How the Beatles Reimagined Rock 'n' Roll]]'' (2012) by Robert Rodriguez (the music writer, not [[Creator/RobertRodriguez the filmmaker]]). \n ''[[Magazine/TimeMagazine Time]]'' magazine included the album in their [[TimeAllTime100Albums 2006 list of 100 timeless and essential albums]], and it was listed at #3 on ''Magazine/RollingStone''[='s=] [[Music/RollingStone500GreatestAlbumsOfAllTime 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.]]
7th Mar '16 6:43:34 PM gallium
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* AluminumChristmasTrees: In the post UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan-UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher era, it can be hard to believe that "One for you nineteen for me" is not an exaggeration; the British government in 1966 really did have a 95% top marginal tax rate.

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* AluminumChristmasTrees: In the post UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan-UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher era, it can be hard to believe that "One for you nineteen for me" is not an exaggeration; the British government in 1966 really did have a 95% top marginal tax rate.[[note]]That's ''marginal'' tax rate; that is, only your income over a certain very high amount was taxed at 95%[[/note]]
11th Feb '16 5:20:30 PM MarkLungo
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* WorldMusic: Music/GeorgeHarrison plays sitar during "Love You To", an instrument he learned to master thanks to Music/RaviShankar. He played it earlier during "Norwegian Wood" on ''Music/RubberSoul'' (1965) and would play it again on "Within, Without You" from ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'' (1967).

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* WorldMusic: Music/GeorgeHarrison plays sitar during "Love You To", an instrument he learned to master thanks to Music/RaviShankar. He played it earlier during "Norwegian Wood" on ''Music/RubberSoul'' (1965) and would play it again on "Within, "Within You, Without You" from ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'' (1967).
11th Feb '16 5:18:16 PM MarkLungo
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* WordSaladLyrics: The enigmatic lyrics of "And Your Bird Can Sing" are very open to interpretation. Jonathan Gould (author of ''Can't Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain and America'') theorizes that John intended them as a TakeThat to Music/FrankSinatra for Ol' Blue Eyes' criticism of The Beatles and rock music in general.[[note]]Sinatra underwent some evolution on this, covering the Beatles' "Something" and striking up a friendship with Music/DavidBowie in the mid '70s.[[/note]] Musicologist Alan Pollack instead suggested they reflect a kind of mid-life crisis John was undergoing at the time, also hinted at in his infamous Maureen Cleave interview. Another theory is that the song is a TakeThat to [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger]] and the "bird"[[note]]"Bird" being English slang for a young woman at the time[[/note]] in the song referred to his then girlfriend, Music/MarianneFaithfull. As noted in NonSequitur above, however, the main source of the Word Salad is in the lines that start with "and your bird...", without which the song would be a pretty straightforward condemnation of pride and materialism.

to:

* WordSaladLyrics: The enigmatic lyrics of "And Your Bird Can Sing" are very open to interpretation. Jonathan Gould (author of ''Can't Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain and America'') theorizes that John intended them as a TakeThat to Music/FrankSinatra for Ol' Blue Eyes' criticism of The Beatles and rock music in general.[[note]]Sinatra underwent some evolution on this, covering the Beatles' "Something" and striking up a friendship with Music/DavidBowie in the mid '70s.[[/note]] Musicologist Alan Pollack instead suggested they reflect a kind of mid-life crisis John was undergoing at the time, also hinted at in his infamous Maureen Cleave interview. Another theory is that the song is a TakeThat to [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger]] and the "bird"[[note]]"Bird" being English slang for a young woman at the time[[/note]] in the song referred to his then girlfriend, Music/MarianneFaithfull. As noted in NonSequitur above, however, the main source of the Word Salad is in the lines that start with "and your bird...", without which the song would be a pretty straightforward condemnation of pride {{Pride}} and materialism.
11th Feb '16 5:16:18 PM MarkLungo
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** ''Of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning.....''
* CallAndResponseSong: Played with. The backing vocals in the bridge provide the call and George provides the response in "Taxman".

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** ''Of -->''Of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning, of the beginning.....''
* CallAndResponseSong: Played with.PlayedWith. The backing vocals in the bridge provide the call and George provides the response in "Taxman".



--> "And yet you don't believe her when she says her love is dead, you think she needs you."

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--> "And -->''"And yet you don't believe her when she says her love is dead, you think she needs you.""''
11th Feb '16 5:10:48 PM eroock
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'''''Revolver''''' is the seventh studio album by Music/TheBeatles, recorded in the spring of 1966 and released that August.

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'''''Revolver''''' ''Revolver'' is the seventh studio album by Music/TheBeatles, recorded in the spring of 1966 and released that August.
30th Dec '15 11:50:18 PM Anorgil
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* WordSaladLyrics: The enigmatic lyrics of "And Your Bird Can Sing" are very open to interpretation. Jonathan Gould (author of ''Can't Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain and America'') theorizes that John intended them as a TakeThat to Music/FrankSinatra for Ol' Blue Eyes' criticism of The Beatles and rock music in general.[[note]]Sinatra underwent some evolution on this, covering the Beatles' "Something" and striking up a friendship with Music/DavidBowie in the mid '70s.[[/note]] Musicologist Alan Pollack instead suggested they reflect a kind of mid-life crisis John was undergoing at the time, also hinted at in his infamous Maureen Cleave interview. Another theory is that the song is a TakeThat to [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger]] and the "bird"[[note]]"Bird" being English slang for a young woman at the time[[/note]] in the song referred to his then girlfriend, Music/MarianneFaithfull. As noted in NonSequitur above, however, the main source of the Word Salad is in the lines that start with "and your bird...", without which the song is a pretty straightforward condemnation of pride and materialism.

to:

* WordSaladLyrics: The enigmatic lyrics of "And Your Bird Can Sing" are very open to interpretation. Jonathan Gould (author of ''Can't Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain and America'') theorizes that John intended them as a TakeThat to Music/FrankSinatra for Ol' Blue Eyes' criticism of The Beatles and rock music in general.[[note]]Sinatra underwent some evolution on this, covering the Beatles' "Something" and striking up a friendship with Music/DavidBowie in the mid '70s.[[/note]] Musicologist Alan Pollack instead suggested they reflect a kind of mid-life crisis John was undergoing at the time, also hinted at in his infamous Maureen Cleave interview. Another theory is that the song is a TakeThat to [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger]] and the "bird"[[note]]"Bird" being English slang for a young woman at the time[[/note]] in the song referred to his then girlfriend, Music/MarianneFaithfull. As noted in NonSequitur above, however, the main source of the Word Salad is in the lines that start with "and your bird...", without which the song is would be a pretty straightforward condemnation of pride and materialism.
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