History Music / MiklosRozsa

23rd Apr '18 6:26:13 AM LongTallShorty64
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheSpyInBlack'' (1939)
8th Apr '18 7:42:19 AM LongTallShorty64
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In his lifetime, Rózsa scored about a hundred films. At the height of his career, while he was scoring 4, 5 or 6 films a year, he was also producing works for the concert stage. In 1953 alone, Rózsa did five film scores, including ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Film/KnightsOfTheRoundTable'', and ''Young Bess'', while also working on his Violin Concerto (which made its debut three years later). He was among the very first film score composers to present an orchestral overture as a prelude to the actual film. His output stretched from monumental epics, where he emphasized historical accuracy, to the most intimate love themes. He matched the moods set by directors as varied as Creator/AlfredHitchcock, William Wyler, Creator/BillyWilder, Vincente Minnelli and Douglas Sirk.

Rózsa's scoring was marked by five distinct "periods": The first, Rózsa called the "oriental" period, with films featuring exotic locations (e.g. ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad'', ''The Four Feathers'', and ''The Jungle Book''); the second featured his "psychological" portraits (e.g., ''Film/TheLostWeekend'', ''The Red House'', and the Oscar-winning score for ''Film/{{Spellbound}}''); the third was his "film noir" period (e.g., ''Film/DoubleIndemnity'' and his Oscar-winning score for ''A Double Life''); the fourth was his Historico-Biblical Period (e.g., ''Madame Bovary'', ''Film/QuoVadis'', ''Film/ElCid'', ''Lust for Life'' (a BioPic of Vincent van Gogh), and his Oscar-winning score for ''Film/BenHur''); and the fifth was his sci-fi phase (e.g., ''The Power'' (notable for its use of the Hungarian cembalo) and ''Time After Time'').

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In his lifetime, Rózsa scored about a hundred films. At the height of his career, while he was scoring 4, 5 or 6 films a year, he was also producing works for the concert stage. In 1953 alone, Rózsa did five film scores, including ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Film/KnightsOfTheRoundTable'', and ''Young Bess'', while also working on his Violin Concerto (which made its debut three years later). He was among the very first film score composers to present an orchestral overture as a prelude to the actual film. His output stretched from monumental epics, where he emphasized historical accuracy, to the most intimate love themes. He matched the moods set by directors as varied as Creator/AlfredHitchcock, William Wyler, Creator/WilliamWyler, Creator/BillyWilder, Vincente Minnelli Creator/VincenteMinnelli and Douglas Sirk.

Creator/DouglasSirk.

Rózsa's scoring was marked by five distinct "periods": The first, Rózsa called the "oriental" period, with films featuring exotic locations (e.g. ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad'', ''The Four Feathers'', and ''The Jungle Book''); the second featured his "psychological" portraits (e.g., ''Film/TheLostWeekend'', ''The Red House'', and the Oscar-winning score for ''Film/{{Spellbound}}''); the third was his "film noir" period (e.g., ''Film/DoubleIndemnity'' and his Oscar-winning score for ''A Double Life''); ''Film/ADoubleLife''); the fourth was his Historico-Biblical Period (e.g., ''Madame Bovary'', ''Film/QuoVadis'', ''Film/ElCid'', ''Lust for Life'' (a BioPic of Vincent van Gogh), and his Oscar-winning score for ''Film/BenHur''); and the fifth was his sci-fi phase (e.g., ''The Power'' (notable for its use of the Hungarian cembalo) and ''Time After Time'').
8th Apr '18 4:39:21 AM jormis29
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* ''Knight Without Armour'' (1937)

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* ''Knight Without Armour'' ''Film/KnightWithoutArmour'' (1937)
9th Jan '18 5:21:39 AM Cryoclaste
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Rózsa was delighted to be on American soil; his autobiographical recollections of life in America, a country he eventually made his own, are filled with humor and grace. By 1943, he had conducted his first Hollywood Bowl concert; five years later, he'd conduct the same orchestra behind the celebrated tenor Mario Lanza, who would also record a vocal version of Rózsa's ''QuoVadis?'' composition, "Lygia." Rózsa was none too thrilled with the superficial Hollywood lifestyle, however; anytime he visited New York City, by contrast, he felt like he was "coming back to civilization again."

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Rózsa was delighted to be on American soil; his autobiographical recollections of life in America, a country he eventually made his own, are filled with humor and grace. By 1943, he had conducted his first Hollywood Bowl concert; five years later, he'd conduct the same orchestra behind the celebrated tenor Mario Lanza, who would also record a vocal version of Rózsa's ''QuoVadis?'' ''Film/QuoVadis?'' composition, "Lygia." Rózsa was none too thrilled with the superficial Hollywood lifestyle, however; anytime he visited New York City, by contrast, he felt like he was "coming back to civilization again."



Rózsa's scoring was marked by five distinct "periods": The first, Rózsa called the "oriental" period, with films featuring exotic locations (e.g. ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad'', ''The Four Feathers'', and ''The Jungle Book''); the second featured his "psychological" portraits (e.g., ''Film/TheLostWeekend'', ''The Red House'', and the Oscar-winning score for ''Film/{{Spellbound}}''); the third was his "film noir" period (e.g., ''Film/DoubleIndemnity'' and his Oscar-winning score for ''A Double Life''); the fourth was his Historico-Biblical Period (e.g., ''Madame Bovary'', ''QuoVadis'', ''Film/ElCid'', ''Lust for Life'' (a BioPic of Vincent van Gogh), and his Oscar-winning score for ''Film/BenHur''); and the fifth was his sci-fi phase (e.g., ''The Power'' (notable for its use of the Hungarian cembalo) and ''Time After Time'').

to:

Rózsa's scoring was marked by five distinct "periods": The first, Rózsa called the "oriental" period, with films featuring exotic locations (e.g. ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad'', ''The Four Feathers'', and ''The Jungle Book''); the second featured his "psychological" portraits (e.g., ''Film/TheLostWeekend'', ''The Red House'', and the Oscar-winning score for ''Film/{{Spellbound}}''); the third was his "film noir" period (e.g., ''Film/DoubleIndemnity'' and his Oscar-winning score for ''A Double Life''); the fourth was his Historico-Biblical Period (e.g., ''Madame Bovary'', ''QuoVadis'', ''Film/QuoVadis'', ''Film/ElCid'', ''Lust for Life'' (a BioPic of Vincent van Gogh), and his Oscar-winning score for ''Film/BenHur''); and the fifth was his sci-fi phase (e.g., ''The Power'' (notable for its use of the Hungarian cembalo) and ''Time After Time'').
25th May '17 3:45:56 AM jormis29
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In his lifetime, Rózsa scored about a hundred films. At the height of his career, while he was scoring 4, 5 or 6 films a year, he was also producing works for the concert stage. In 1953 alone, Rózsa did five film scores, including ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Knights of the Round Table'', and ''Young Bess'', while also working on his Violin Concerto (which made its debut three years later). He was among the very first film score composers to present an orchestral overture as a prelude to the actual film. His output stretched from monumental epics, where he emphasized historical accuracy, to the most intimate love themes. He matched the moods set by directors as varied as Creator/AlfredHitchcock, William Wyler, Creator/BillyWilder, Vincente Minnelli and Douglas Sirk.

to:

In his lifetime, Rózsa scored about a hundred films. At the height of his career, while he was scoring 4, 5 or 6 films a year, he was also producing works for the concert stage. In 1953 alone, Rózsa did five film scores, including ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Knights of the Round Table'', ''Film/KnightsOfTheRoundTable'', and ''Young Bess'', while also working on his Violin Concerto (which made its debut three years later). He was among the very first film score composers to present an orchestral overture as a prelude to the actual film. His output stretched from monumental epics, where he emphasized historical accuracy, to the most intimate love themes. He matched the moods set by directors as varied as Creator/AlfredHitchcock, William Wyler, Creator/BillyWilder, Vincente Minnelli and Douglas Sirk.



* ''Knights of the Round Table'' (1953)

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* ''Knights of the Round Table'' ''Film/KnightsOfTheRoundTable'' (1953)
4th Mar '17 11:47:04 AM nombretomado
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* Joseph L. Mankiewicz's ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'' (1953) -- James Mason as Brutus, John Gielgud as Cassius, and MarlonBrando as Antony

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* Joseph L. Mankiewicz's ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'' (1953) -- James Mason as Brutus, John Gielgud as Cassius, and MarlonBrando Creator/MarlonBrando as Antony
7th Jan '17 10:11:08 AM nombretomado
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* ''Lady Hamilton'' [-AKA-] ''That Hamilton Woman'' (1940) -- LaurenceOlivier and Vivien Leigh as Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton

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* ''Lady Hamilton'' [-AKA-] ''That Hamilton Woman'' (1940) -- LaurenceOlivier Creator/LaurenceOlivier and Vivien Leigh as Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton
20th Oct '16 11:23:06 PM jormis29
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* ''The Strange Love of Martha Ivers'' (1946) -- Another Barbara Stanwyck FilmNoir

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* ''The Strange Love of Martha Ivers'' ''Film/TheStrangeLoveOfMarthaIvers'' (1946) -- Another Barbara Stanwyck FilmNoir
3rd Apr '16 11:34:42 AM eroock
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[[quoteright:248:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Miklos_Rozsa_6326.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:248:http://static.[[quoteright:268:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Miklos_Rozsa_6326.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/miklos_rozsa.jpg]]
3rd Apr '16 11:30:38 AM eroock
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'''Miklós Rózsa''' was born in Budapest on April 18, 1907. Though his father wanted him to study chemistry, Rózsa's musical talents led him to the Conservatory in Leipzig, where he studied with such people as Hermann Grabner. Eventually he made his way to Paris, where he tried to make a living composing music, but found that he had to author a few popular tunes under the pseudonym Nic Tomay just to keep food on the table.

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'''Miklós Rózsa''' Miklós Rózsa was born in Budapest on April 18, 1907. Though his father wanted him to study chemistry, Rózsa's musical talents led him to the Conservatory in Leipzig, where he studied with such people as Hermann Grabner. Eventually he made his way to Paris, where he tried to make a living composing music, but found that he had to author a few popular tunes under the pseudonym Nic Tomay just to keep food on the table.



* ''Film/TheLostWeekend'' (1945)



* ''Film/TheLostWeekend'' (1945)
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