History Music / JesusChristSuperstar

3rd Apr '16 10:23:47 AM Theatre_Maven_3695
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* SomethingWeForgot

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* %% SomethingWeForgot
24th Mar '16 12:23:34 PM JeaniWeiner
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* MetalScream: Jesus and Judas across productions, dating back to [[Music/DeepPurple Ian Gillan]] and Murray Head respectively on the original Concept Album. Ted Neely (as Jesus) and Carl Anderson, an understudy for Ben Vereen (as Judas) became famous for the roles on stage and film, since Gillan and Head had become too successful as musicians to perform, and duplicating their vocal range can be quite difficult for other actors. Interestingly, Murray Head is not black; Ben Vereen and subsequently Carl Anderson pioneered that idea, in no small part because Anderson simply had the voice for the notes.

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* MetalScream: Jesus and Judas across productions, dating back to [[Music/DeepPurple Ian Gillan]] and Murray Head respectively on the original Concept Album. Ted Neely Neeley (as Jesus) and Carl Anderson, an understudy for Ben Vereen (as Judas) became famous for the roles on stage and film, since Gillan and Head had become too successful as musicians to perform, and duplicating their vocal range can be quite difficult for other actors. Interestingly, Murray Head is not black; Ben Vereen and subsequently Carl Anderson pioneered that idea, in no small part because Anderson simply had the voice for the notes.



* RewatchBonus: Pay close attention to the beginning and end of the Norman Jewison film; Ted Neely (Jesus) is never seen getting off the bus with the rest of the cast - he's rather "conjured up" by them in the middle of a circle - and he is never seen boarding the bus at the end.
** This is not strictly true. While we don't see Ted Neely (Jesus) get off the bus itself, you can see him walk past in street clothes right after they remove the cross from the top of the bus.

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* RewatchBonus: Pay close attention to the beginning and end of the Norman Jewison film; Ted Neely Neeley (Jesus) is never seen getting off the bus with the rest of the cast - he's rather "conjured up" by them in the middle of a circle - and he is never seen boarding the bus at the end.
** This is not strictly true. While we don't see Ted Neely Neeley (Jesus) get off the bus itself, you can see him walk past in street clothes right after they remove the cross from the top of the bus.



** For Ted Neely's 2015 Q&A tour with the film, they played a 1997 performance of "Superstar" over the credits (the last time he & Carl were together before his death).

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** For Ted Neely's Neeley's 2015 Q&A tour with the film, they played a 1997 performance of "Superstar" over the credits (the last time he & Carl were together before his death).
24th Mar '16 12:18:08 PM JeaniWeiner
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Added DiffLines:

** This is not strictly true. While we don't see Ted Neely (Jesus) get off the bus itself, you can see him walk past in street clothes right after they remove the cross from the top of the bus.
15th Mar '16 3:01:49 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* OneSteveLimit: Simon Peter is just called Peter to distinguish him from Simon. The other Apostle named Judas (aka Jude) is never named. Mary Magdalene is the only Mary included out of at least three.



** In the 2000 version, Jesus is portrayed in a quite different light, putting him squarely in the Psychopathic Manchild category - same lyrics, different body language and facial expressions and so on. Consider "Simon Zealotes/Poor Jerusalem," where Simon sings about power and glory and Jesus retorts about how Simon and the others have no understanding of power or glory. In the 1973 version, Jesus looks dignified and genuinely sad over the apostle's shallow understanding. In the 2000 version, Jesus looks jealous, with an attitude of "How dare you steal my show! I'm the prophet here, not you! Me, me, me!" Which comes across as especially petty as Simon just led a counterstrike that pushed back a Roman attack, arguably saving Jesus and the others.

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** In the 2000 version, Jesus is portrayed in a quite different light, putting him squarely in the Psychopathic Manchild category - same lyrics, different body language and facial expressions and so on. Consider "Simon Zealotes/Poor Jerusalem," where Simon sings about power and glory and Jesus retorts about how Simon and the others have no understanding of power or glory. In the 1973 version, Jesus looks dignified and genuinely sad over the apostle's apostles' shallow understanding. In the 2000 version, Jesus looks jealous, with an attitude of "How dare you steal my show! I'm the prophet here, not you! Me, me, me!" Which comes across as especially petty as Simon just led a counterstrike that pushed back a Roman attack, arguably saving Jesus and the others.
15th Mar '16 2:42:05 PM fusilcontrafusil
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A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971 and was filmed as a major movie in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for PBS, and the show lives on in stage production and tours to this day. InspiredBy the four evangelical books of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material.

to:

A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971 and was filmed as a major movie in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for PBS, and the show lives on in stage production and tours to this day. InspiredBy the [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material.
15th Mar '16 2:40:15 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* AmbiguousEnding: The film ends shortly after the death of Jesus with the rest of the cast simply boarding the bus; Pilate, Mary Magdalene and Judas (last of all) look back wistfully. The matter of the resurrection is left unclear.

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* AmbiguousEnding: The film ends shortly after the death of Jesus with the rest of the cast simply boarding the bus; Pilate, Mary Magdalene and Judas (last of all) look back wistfully. The matter of the resurrection is left unclear. The final shot shows the empty cross -- with a shepherd and his sheep walking past it. This was unplanned by director Norman Jewison, who [[ThrowItIn left it in]] since audiences could take it as a subtle hint to the resurrection if they wished.



* CompositeCharacter: Mary Magdalene in the musical's story combines elements of herself with that of Mary, the sister of Martha, whose "waste" of costly perfume on Jesus was derided by Judas.

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* CompositeCharacter: CompositeCharacter:
**
Mary Magdalene in the musical's story combines elements of herself with that of Mary, the sister of Martha, whose "waste" of costly perfume on Jesus was derided by Judas.Judas.
** Pilate himself has "Pilate's Dream" and sings about it, instead of his wife, though some productions like the 1973 film include her as a non-speaking role.



* YouCantFightFate: One of the main themes (along with all the HoYay). Jesus, Judas, Pilate and even Peter struggle to escape the roles that have been written for them, or at least to pass/pin the blame for their part on someone else, but to no avail. God ''will'' have His martyr, His betrayer(s), and His bloody, horrible ending.

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* YouCantFightFate: One of the main themes (along with all the HoYay). Jesus, Judas, Pilate and even Peter struggle to escape the roles that have been written for them, or at least to pass/pin the blame for their part on someone else, but to no avail. God ''will'' have His martyr, His betrayer(s), and His bloody, horrible ending.
1st Mar '16 10:00:50 AM VicGeorge2011
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* RewatchBonus: Pay close attention to the beginning and end of the Norman Jewison film; Ted Neely (Jesus) is never seen getting off the bus with the rest of the cast - he's rather "conjured up" by them in the middle of a circle - and he is never seen boarding the bus at the end.



* RewatchBonus: Pay close attention to the beginning and end of the Norman Jewison film; Ted Neely (Jesus) is never seen getting off the bus with the rest of the cast - he's rather "conjured up" by them in the middle of a circle - and he is never seen boarding the bus at the end.
1st Mar '16 9:59:19 AM VicGeorge2011
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!!!Tracklist

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!!!Tracklist!!Tracklist
1st Mar '16 6:25:17 AM VicGeorge2011
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!!Tropes:

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!!Tropes:!!What's the tropes? Tell me what's a-happening.
29th Feb '16 3:20:16 PM VicGeorge2011
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* 1. "Overture"
* 2. "Heaven On Their Minds"
* 3. "What's The Buzz/Strange Thing Mystifying"
* 4. "Everything's Alright"
* 5. "This Jesus Must Die"

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* 1. # "Overture"
* 2. # "Heaven On Their Minds"
* 3. # "What's The Buzz/Strange Thing Mystifying"
* 4. # "Everything's Alright"
* 5. # "This Jesus Must Die"



* 1. "Hosanna"
* 2. "Simon Zealotes/Poor Jerusalem"
* 3. "Pilate's Dream"
* 4. "The Temple"
* 5. "Everything's Alright (reprise)"
* 6. "I Don't Know How To Love Him"
* 7. "Damned For All Time/Blood Money"

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* 1. # "Hosanna"
* 2. # "Simon Zealotes/Poor Jerusalem"
* 3. # "Pilate's Dream"
* 4. # "The Temple"
* 5. # "Everything's Alright (reprise)"
* 6. # "I Don't Know How To Love Him"
* 7. # "Damned For All Time/Blood Money"



* 1. "The Last Supper"
* 2. "Gethsemane (I Only Want To Say)"
* 3. "The Arrest"
* 4. "Peter's Denial"
* 5. "Pilate And Christ"
* 6. "Herod's Song (Try It And See)"

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* 1. # "The Last Supper"
* 2. # "Gethsemane (I Only Want To Say)"
* 3. # "The Arrest"
* 4. # "Peter's Denial"
* 5. # "Pilate And Christ"
* 6. # "Herod's Song (Try It And See)"



* 1. "Judas' Death"
* 2. "Trial Before Pilate (including the 39 Lashes)"
* 3. "Superstar"
* 4. "The Crucifixion"
* 5. "John Nineteen: Forty-One"

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* 1. # "Judas' Death"
* 2. # "Trial Before Pilate (including the 39 Lashes)"
* 3. # "Superstar"
* 4. # "The Crucifixion"
* 5. # "John Nineteen: Forty-One"
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.JesusChristSuperstar