History Music / JesusChristSuperstar

20th May '18 2:19:05 AM annieholmes
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* BSODSong: Lines from "Judas' Death" and "Gethsemane" are the page quotes for the trope in question.

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* BSODSong: Lines from "Judas' Death" and "Gethsemane" are used to be the page quotes for the trope in question.
9th May '18 5:11:32 PM WaxingName
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9th May '18 5:11:20 PM WaxingName
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InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material and is considerably [[DarkerAndEdgier less playful]].

to:

InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] [[InspiredBy Inspired by]] Literature/TheFourGospels of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material and is considerably [[DarkerAndEdgier less playful]].
4th May '18 7:05:43 AM brian8871
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* BrokenRecord: "What's the buzz? Tell me what's a-happenin'."

to:

* BrokenRecord: BrokenRecord:
**
"What's the buzz? Tell me what's a-happenin'."
** "Everything's alright, yes, everything's alright, yes...
"
4th May '18 6:46:28 AM brian8871
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Added DiffLines:

* BrokenRecord: "What's the buzz? Tell me what's a-happenin'."
24th Apr '18 8:29:13 PM creaseintime
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** Pilate too, much as in the canonical gospels. (But not in RealLife.)

to:

** Pilate too, much as in the canonical gospels. (But not in RealLife.)
23rd Apr '18 8:21:11 PM meganrenee
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A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971, and was adapted into a film directed by Norman Jewison in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for Creator/{{PBS}}, a filmed version of the UK arena tour starring Creator/TimMinchin as Judas was released in 2012, and a live adaptation starting Creator/JohnLegend as Jesus, Creator/SaraBareilles as Mary Magdalene and Creator/AliceCooper as Herod that aired on Creator/{{NBC}} in 2018, and the show lives on in stage production and tours to this day. InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material and is considerably [[DarkerAndEdgier less playful]].

Depending on the production (and productions can be ''wildly'' different), the actors and settings in the show are portrayed with [[AnachronismStew blends of modern and biblical-era clothing and motifs]], running with the idea of Jesus being a rockstar-like figure (something not always appreciated by the MoralGuardians), the Apostles being [[NewAgeRetroHippie counter-cultural radicals]], and the Romans dressing in black leather and taking a {{Big Brother|IsWatching}} approach to running TheEmpire. The 2000 filmed version updates the visual metaphors. Specifically, setting it in a modern-day dystopic version of the Roman Empire with Nazi-esque guards, and Jesus' followers appear to be a street gang, seen toting submachine guns and assault rifles at times. The 2012 arena tour version and 2018 live broadcast both evoke the Occupy movement, the former more [[Anviliciously on the nose]] than the latter. The plot is the same, but with different things emphasized in different productions.

to:

A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, 1970 (when Lloyd Webber and Rice were still in their very early twenties, no less!), it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971, and was adapted into a film directed by Norman Jewison in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for Creator/{{PBS}}, a Creator/{{PBS}}. A filmed version of the UK arena tour starring Creator/TimMinchin as Judas was released on DVD and digital in 2012, and a live adaptation starting Creator/JohnLegend as Jesus, Creator/SaraBareilles as Mary Magdalene and Creator/AliceCooper as Herod that aired on Creator/{{NBC}} in 2018, and the 2018. The show lives on in stage production productions and tours (and even non-theatrical tribute albums from fans who were more attracted to it as an album than a show) to this day. day.
InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material and is considerably [[DarkerAndEdgier less playful]].

Depending on the production (and productions can be ''wildly'' different), the actors and settings in the show are portrayed with [[AnachronismStew blends of modern and biblical-era clothing and motifs]], running with the idea of Jesus being a rockstar-like figure (something not always appreciated by the MoralGuardians), the Apostles being [[NewAgeRetroHippie counter-cultural radicals]], and the Romans dressing in black leather and taking a {{Big Brother|IsWatching}} approach to running TheEmpire. The 2000 filmed version updates the visual metaphors. Specifically, metaphors- specifically, setting it in a modern-day dystopic version of the Roman Empire with Nazi-esque guards, and where Jesus' followers appear to be a street gang, seen toting submachine guns and assault rifles at times. The 2012 arena tour version and 2018 live broadcast both evoke the Occupy movement, the former more [[Anviliciously more[[{{Anvilicious}} on the nose]] than the latter. The plot is the same, but with different things emphasized in different productions.
23rd Apr '18 4:57:38 PM meganrenee
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** The original album musically references Krzstof Penderecki’s avant-garde Passion work “Utrenja: Ewangelia” during “Trial By Pilate/The 39 Lashes”- note the clattering percussion and the robotic, atonal way the crowd shouts “kill him! he says he’s God! he’s a blasphemer!”. Later productions lost some of this effect by giving the chorus more of a melody to shout to.

to:

** The original album musically references Krzstof Penderecki’s avant-garde Passion work “Utrenja: Ewangelia” during “Trial By Pilate/The 39 Lashes”- note the clattering percussion and the robotic, atonal way the crowd shouts “kill him! he says he’s God! he’s “we have no king but Caesar” and “remember Caesar/you have a blasphemer!”.duty”, etc. Later productions lost some of this effect by giving the chorus more of a melody to shout to.
23rd Apr '18 2:55:57 PM meganrenee
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Added DiffLines:

***The 2012 arena tour has some fun with this section by portraying Pilate as a rich judge interrupted during his morning workout at home. Every break between those words is filled by him doing a push-up.


Added DiffLines:

** The original album musically references Krzstof Penderecki’s avant-garde Passion work “Utrenja: Ewangelia” during “Trial By Pilate/The 39 Lashes”- note the clattering percussion and the robotic, atonal way the crowd shouts “kill him! he says he’s God! he’s a blasphemer!”. Later productions lost some of this effect by giving the chorus more of a melody to shout to.


Added DiffLines:

* SoundtrackDissonance: The last two minutes or so of “Superstar” can be summarized as groovy music playing while very un-groovy things (Jesus being given the crown of thorns, forced to drag the cross, and abused by jeering crowds, all while still raw and bleeding from being flogged) happen.


Added DiffLines:

* SurrealHorror: The crucifixion sounds this way on the original studio album, with dissonant piano jangling, electronic warp noises, and the sounds of the laughing crowd twisted into something demonic that sounds like it belongs on the soundtrack to Film/TheShining. Downplayed in many later versions, where the actors playing the crowd merely laugh- cruelly, but not in a terrifying manner.
23rd Apr '18 1:52:02 PM meganrenee
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A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971, and was adapted into a film directed by Norman Jewison in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for Creator/{{PBS}}, and a live adaptation that aired on Creator/{{NBC}} in 2018, and the show lives on in stage production and tours to this day. InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material.

Depending on the production (and productions can be ''wildly'' different), the actors and settings in the show are portrayed with [[AnachronismStew blends of modern and biblical-era clothing and motifs]], running with the idea of Jesus being a rockstar-like figure (something not always appreciated by the MoralGuardians), the Apostles being [[NewAgeRetroHippie counter-cultural radicals]], and the Romans dressing in black leather and taking a {{Big Brother|IsWatching}} approach to running TheEmpire. The 2000 filmed version updates the visual metaphors. Specifically, setting it in a modern-day dystopic version of the Roman Empire with Nazi-esque guards, and Jesus' followers appear to be a street gang, seen toting submachine guns and assault rifles at times. The plot is the same, but with different things emphasized; Annas, for instance, appears in many more scenes than in the '73 version and in a [[EvilChancellor very different light]], the HoYay between Judas and Jesus is played up to the point of a LoveTriangle with Mary Magdalene, and other things.

to:

A RockOpera and (subverted?) PassionPlay by Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/TimRice. Originally released as a ConceptAlbum in 1970, it made its way to the Broadway and London stage in 1971, and was adapted into a film directed by Norman Jewison in 1973. An updated version was recorded sometime around 2000 by Webber's Really Useful Group for Creator/{{PBS}}, a filmed version of the UK arena tour starring Creator/TimMinchin as Judas was released in 2012, and a live adaptation starting Creator/JohnLegend as Jesus, Creator/SaraBareilles as Mary Magdalene and Creator/AliceCooper as Herod that aired on Creator/{{NBC}} in 2018, and the show lives on in stage production and tours to this day. InspiredBy [[Literature/TheFourGospels four evangelical books]] of Literature/TheBible (specifically the arrival in Jerusalem and subsequent crucifixion of Jesus), it chronicles the last seven days of Jesus' life, focusing mainly on the characters of Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. It's regarded among Andrew Lloyd Webber's best works. It's a pseudo-sequel to ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', though this took a bit more liberty with the source material.

material and is considerably [[DarkerAndEdgier less playful]].

Depending on the production (and productions can be ''wildly'' different), the actors and settings in the show are portrayed with [[AnachronismStew blends of modern and biblical-era clothing and motifs]], running with the idea of Jesus being a rockstar-like figure (something not always appreciated by the MoralGuardians), the Apostles being [[NewAgeRetroHippie counter-cultural radicals]], and the Romans dressing in black leather and taking a {{Big Brother|IsWatching}} approach to running TheEmpire. The 2000 filmed version updates the visual metaphors. Specifically, setting it in a modern-day dystopic version of the Roman Empire with Nazi-esque guards, and Jesus' followers appear to be a street gang, seen toting submachine guns and assault rifles at times. The 2012 arena tour version and 2018 live broadcast both evoke the Occupy movement, the former more [[Anviliciously on the nose]] than the latter. The plot is the same, but with different things emphasized; Annas, for instance, appears emphasized in many more scenes than in the '73 version and in a [[EvilChancellor very different light]], the HoYay between Judas and Jesus is played up to the point of a LoveTriangle with Mary Magdalene, and other things.
productions.



** Most productions leave some amount of ambiguity, but several have thrown in various hints that Jesus resurrected (such as ending with him on the cross, audibly drawing breath after dying).

to:

** Most Many productions leave some amount of ambiguity, but several have thrown in various hints that Jesus resurrected (such as ending with him on the cross, audibly drawing breath after dying).dying). According to movie/long-running stage Jesus Ted Neeley, this was a way of meeting Christian protestors in the middle.



* AmbiguouslyGay: Pontius Pilate is mildly campy and "theatrical" in many productions following the original, to the point of {{flanderization}} when Film/{{Monty Python|sLifeOfBrian}} [[FollowTheLeader did it too]].
** This is probably due to the very flamboyant Barry Dennen, who created the role in the ConceptAlbum, original stage production, and 1973 film.
** [[http://i42.tinypic.com/16llco5.jpg King Herod]], anyone?

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Pontius Pilate is mildly campy and "theatrical" in many productions following the original, to the point of {{flanderization}} when Film/{{Monty Python|sLifeOfBrian}} [[FollowTheLeader did it too]].
**
too]]. This is probably due to the very flamboyant (and unashamed real life gay man) Barry Dennen, who created the role in the ConceptAlbum, original stage production, and 1973 film.
film, though ironically he is far campier as Barry-Dennen-about-to-play-Pilate in the FramingDevice than he is as Pilate proper. Ben Daniels skirts the same line in the 2018 version, while Fred Johansen’s 2000 version leans more toward Pilate as played by [[Creator/BrianBlessed BRIAN BLESSED!]] and Alexander Hanson’s in 2012 is simply a detached, wealthy bureaucrat.
** [[http://i42.tinypic.com/16llco5.jpg This is also a frequent tack to take with King Herod]], anyone?Herod (who was played as an outright DragQueen in the first official stage production). This has grown less common over time in favor of making him TheBarnum or even CampStraight, with the camp merely a way of covering his straight horndog tendencies.



** The actor in the '73 film, Josh Mostel, is Zero Mostel's son, so it might not be quite as ambiguous...

to:

** The actor in the '73 film, Josh Mostel, is Zero Mostel's son, so it’s less ambiguous there, to put it might not be quite as ambiguous...lightly.



* AngryBlackMan: Simon and Judas in the 1973 version. They have NoIndoorVoice.
** Caiaphas in the 2000 revival. Also a {{Badass Ba|ritone}}ss.

to:

* AngryBlackMan: Simon and Judas in the 1973 version. They have NoIndoorVoice.
version, though Simon is a less traditional version of the trope (an ecstatic fanboy whose anger is tempered by his enthusiasm for Jesus).
** Caiaphas in the 2000 revival. revival and 2018 broadcast. Also a {{Badass Ba|ritone}}ss.Ba|ritone}}.
** Averted with Brandon Victor Dixon’s Judas in the 2018 version, who’s more a Stressed-Out Black Man.



* BreakingTheFourthWall: The 2018 NBC version has Jesus and his followers enter through the audience for Hosanna, and audience members can be seen singing along and straining to be touched. Are they reaching for Jesus, or Creator/JohnLegend?
**Might double as an unusual form of EnforcedMethodActing.



** The rest of the cast is traditionally played by a variety of races, following precedent set by the 1973 cast (with a black Judas and an Asian Mary Magdalene).

to:

** The rest of the cast is traditionally played by a variety of races, following precedent set by the 1973 cast (with a black Judas and an Asian a Hapa Mary Magdalene).



** This is emphasized by pairing him with Annas, who's usually a countertenor (the highest voice type for a male).

to:

** This is emphasized by pairing him with Annas, who's usually a countertenor (the highest voice type for a male).male) or even a crosscast contralto.



**In the 2018 NBC version, Ben Daniels’ Pilate visibly realizes that Jesus is the Galilean man he dreamed of, recoils, and begins pleading with the crowd to stop scapegoating Jesus. Too bad he’s still a JerkAss about it and [[HeelFaceDoorSlam sneers at them in disgust for their bloodlust rather than rationally arguing in Jesus’ favor]].



* KangarooCourt: All three of Jesus's trials; at the hands of Caiaphas, Herod and Pontius.

to:

* KangarooCourt: All three of Jesus's trials; at the hands of Caiaphas, Herod and Pontius.Pilate.


Added DiffLines:

** The 2018 NBC production subtly homages Theatre/NatashaPierreAndTheGreatCometOf1812 during “Hosanna”, with Jesus and his followers entering through the audience and interacting with them, as well as the string flourishes being played by female ensemblists (and Great Comet alumni) running with the group.
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