History Music / Genesis

23rd May '17 7:58:01 AM Rik-B
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* HumansThroughAlienEyes: ''Watcher of the Skies'' describes the remains of the extinct mankind through the eyes of an alien that has landed on Earth after their destruction.
20th May '17 4:10:39 PM Rik-B
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** The cover drop of one album in the background of the artwork of ''another one''? Well, that's ununsual ...[[http://www.soundstation.dk/images/products/large/52/132252-b.jpg Let's see if you can find it.]]

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** The cover A drop of one album album's cover in the background of the artwork of ''another one''? Well, that's ununsual ...[[http://www.soundstation.dk/images/products/large/52/132252-b.jpg Let's see if you can find it.]]
20th May '17 4:07:16 PM Rik-B
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** An unusual one for ''Nursery Cryme''. The cover drop doesn't happen in the lyrics of the album themselves but in the booklet's liner notes to ''The Musical Box'', describing a beheading by a croquet mallet.

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** An unusual one for ''Nursery Cryme''. The cover drop doesn't happen in the lyrics of the album themselves but in the booklet's liner notes to ''The Musical Box'', describing [[CruelAndUnusualDeath a beheading by a croquet mallet.mallet]].
20th May '17 4:04:39 PM Rik-B
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* CoverDrop:
** An unusual one for ''Nursery Cryme''. The cover drop doesn't happen in the lyrics of the album themselves but in the booklet's liner notes to ''The Musical Box'', describing a beheading by a croquet mallet.
** In Music/SuppersReady, there's a punny one for ''Foxtrot'', the "focks on the rocks".
** The cover drop of one album in the background of the artwork of ''another one''? Well, that's ununsual ...[[http://www.soundstation.dk/images/products/large/52/132252-b.jpg Let's see if you can find it.]]
** The verse "When the sun beats down and I lie on the bench, I can always hear them talk" from ''I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)'' most likely refers to [[http://images.genius.com/74dc26f541899f1bec17a3b23218bcf6.1000x1000x1.jpg the cover of ''Selling England by the Pound'']].
30th Apr '17 5:30:55 PM CassandraLeo
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** The historical drama of "Driving the Last Spike" doesn't really echo any Gabriel-era sounds or themes, except for maybe its longer length compared to other songs on ''We Can't Dance'' and a couple of time changes, but the song certainly wouldn't look out of place if it had appeared on 1978's ''...And Then There Were Three...''.

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** The historical drama of "Driving the Last Spike" doesn't really echo any Gabriel-era sounds or themes, except for maybe its longer length compared to other songs on ''We Can't Dance'' and a couple of time changes, but the song certainly wouldn't look out of place if it had appeared on 1978's ''...And Then There Were Three...''. On the other hand, the lengthy instrumental midsection of "Fading Lights" could be considered Genesis' re-imagining of their '70s symphonic prog sound for the '90s, though it still sounds somewhat less complex than much of the band's '70s material, owing mostly to its slower tempo. It even incorporates their '70s-era habit of reprising melodic material from an album's first song in its ultimate or penultimate track.
30th Apr '17 5:24:35 PM CassandraLeo
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** While the band is often perceived as having gone from pure progressive rock to pure pop after Hackett's departure, their transition from prog to pop was actually fairly gradual, and they arguably never abandoned prog entirely. The clearest turning point is probably ''Duke'', which consists of about half prog songs and about half pop songs, and was also when Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. The concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above) still has pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. A few tracks on the remaining "pop" albums also have elements of progressive rock and could be considered examples of what Prog Archives classifies as "Crossover Prog" (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Mama"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino", "The Brazilian", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep", "Living Forever", "Fading Lights", and to a lesser extent the album version of "No Son of Mine"). Meanwhile, the band also had several earlier works that were clearly early attempts at crafting pop singles but were simply too quirky to receive mass airplay ("Happy the Man" from the ''Nursery Cryme'' sessions, "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)" from ''Selling England by the Pound'', "Counting Out Time" from ''Music/TheLambLiesDownOnBroadway'', "A Trick of the Tail" from its eponymous album, etc.); the band's first pop songs to catch on were "Your Own Special Way" (''Wind & Wuthering'') and "Follow You Follow Me" (''...And Then There Were Three...'').

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** While the band is often perceived as having gone from pure progressive rock to pure pop after Hackett's departure, their transition from prog to pop was actually fairly gradual, and they arguably never abandoned prog entirely. entirely.
***
The clearest turning point is probably ''Duke'', which consists of about half prog songs and about half pop songs, and was also when Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. The concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above) still has pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). tracks).
***
The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. A few tracks on the remaining "pop" albums also have elements of progressive rock and could be considered examples of what Prog Archives classifies as "Crossover Prog" (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Mama"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino", "The Brazilian", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep", "Living Forever", "Fading Lights", and to a lesser extent the album version of "No Son of Mine"). Mine").
***
Meanwhile, the band also had several earlier works that were clearly early attempts at crafting pop singles but were simply too quirky to receive mass airplay ("Happy the Man" from the ''Nursery Cryme'' sessions, "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)" from ''Selling England by the Pound'', "Counting Out Time" from ''Music/TheLambLiesDownOnBroadway'', "A Trick of the Tail" from its eponymous album, etc.); the band's first pop songs to catch on were "Your Own Special Way" (''Wind & Wuthering'') and "Follow You Follow Me" (''...And Then There Were Three...'').
30th Apr '17 5:23:39 PM CassandraLeo
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** While the band is often perceived as having gone from pure progressive rock to pure pop after Hackett's departure, their transition from prog to pop was actually fairly gradual, and they arguably never abandoned prog entirely. The turning point is generally regarded as ''Duke'', which consists of about half prog songs and about half pop songs, and was also when Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. The concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above) still has pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. A few tracks on the remaining "pop" albums also have elements of progressive rock and could be considered examples of what Prog Archives classifies as "Crossover Prog" (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Mama"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino", "The Brazilian", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep", "Living Forever", "Fading Lights", and to a lesser extent the album version of "No Son of Mine").

to:

** While the band is often perceived as having gone from pure progressive rock to pure pop after Hackett's departure, their transition from prog to pop was actually fairly gradual, and they arguably never abandoned prog entirely. The clearest turning point is generally regarded as probably ''Duke'', which consists of about half prog songs and about half pop songs, and was also when Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. The concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above) still has pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. A few tracks on the remaining "pop" albums also have elements of progressive rock and could be considered examples of what Prog Archives classifies as "Crossover Prog" (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Mama"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino", "The Brazilian", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep", "Living Forever", "Fading Lights", and to a lesser extent the album version of "No Son of Mine"). Meanwhile, the band also had several earlier works that were clearly early attempts at crafting pop singles but were simply too quirky to receive mass airplay ("Happy the Man" from the ''Nursery Cryme'' sessions, "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)" from ''Selling England by the Pound'', "Counting Out Time" from ''Music/TheLambLiesDownOnBroadway'', "A Trick of the Tail" from its eponymous album, etc.); the band's first pop songs to catch on were "Your Own Special Way" (''Wind & Wuthering'') and "Follow You Follow Me" (''...And Then There Were Three...'').
30th Apr '17 5:16:42 PM CassandraLeo
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** ''Duke'', where they almost entirely abandoned their prog roots and went pop. This is also the point where Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. Except for the concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above), which still had pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. Indeed, a few tracks on each "pop" album still display elements of progressive rock (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino"/"The Brazilian"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike"/"Dreaming While You Sleep"/"Living Forever"/"Fading Lights").
** ''Trespass'' may be the most straightforward example, since it was much closer to the progressive sound they were eventually famous for than the folksy light psychedelic pop of ''From Genesis to Revelation''.

to:

** While the band is often perceived as having gone from pure progressive rock to pure pop after Hackett's departure, their transition from prog to pop was actually fairly gradual, and they arguably never abandoned prog entirely. The turning point is generally regarded as ''Duke'', where they almost entirely abandoned their which consists of about half prog roots songs and went pop. This is about half pop songs, and was also the point where when Tony Banks abandoned the Hammond organ and Mellotron for an entirely synthesizer-based sound, and Rutherford switched from mostly 12-string guitar work to a more conventional [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmourish]] tone. Except for the The concept suite spread throughout the album (see "Concept Album" above), which above) still had has pretty strong prog elements (especially the final two, mostly instrumental tracks). The prog sound was more fully abandoned on the next album, ''Abacab'', although the title track and "Dodo/Lurker" still had trace elements of the band's prog roots. Indeed, a A few tracks on each the remaining "pop" album still display albums also have elements of progressive rock and could be considered examples of what Prog Archives classifies as "Crossover Prog" (''Genesis'': "Home by the Sea"/"Second Home by the Sea"; Sea", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Mama"; ''Invisible Touch'': "Domino"/"The Brazilian"; "Domino", "The Brazilian", and to a lesser extent the album version of "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight"; ''We Can't Dance'': "Driving the Last Spike"/"Dreaming Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep"/"Living Forever"/"Fading Lights").
Sleep", "Living Forever", "Fading Lights", and to a lesser extent the album version of "No Son of Mine").
** ''Trespass'' may be is probably the most straightforward example, since it was much closer to the progressive sound they were eventually famous for than the folksy light psychedelic pop of ''From Genesis to Revelation''.
30th Apr '17 4:48:32 PM CassandraLeo
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* GenderBender: Father Tiresias from "The Cinema Show" and Hermaphroditus from "The Fountain of Salmacis" both qualify. Like many other elements of the band's lyrics, they're also both taken directly from [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greek mythology]].
30th Apr '17 4:41:10 PM CassandraLeo
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** Even during the Gabriel era, Collins sang lead on "For Absent Friends" (from ''Nursery Cryme'') and "More Fool Me" (from ''Selling England by the Pound'').

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** Even during the Gabriel era, Collins sang lead on "For Absent Friends" (from ''Nursery Cryme'') and "More Fool Me" (from ''Selling England by the Pound''). His voice also dominates the mix of "Harlequin" (also from ''Nursery Cryme''; may actually be a case of SelfBackingVocalist), and he sings a few lines in "The Colony of Slippermen" (from ''Music/TheLambLiesDownOnBroadway'') to represent Rael's brother John. He also provides backing vocals on several other songs from the Gabriel albums and can be clearly heard once listeners have learned to distinguish his voice, particularly on headphones.
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