History Music / DeepPurple

20th Feb '17 1:13:00 AM bt8257
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So far there have been eight distinct lineups, or Marks, of Deep Purple, not including a "bogus" Deep Purple that toured in 1980 with only one original member (vocalist Rod Evans).

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So far there have been eight distinct lineups, or Marks, of Deep Purple, not including a "bogus" Deep Purple that toured in 1980 with only one original member (vocalist Rod Evans).
11th Feb '17 6:25:29 PM MarkLungo
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American guitarist Tommy Bolin, known for his time in The James Gang, joined Deep Purple. By this time, Hughes was a cocaine addict, and Bolin turned out to be a heroin junkie. Deep Purple, never known as a junkie band, was beset with troubles as the members grappled with addictions and personal problems. A disastrous concert in `UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} resulted in one of the band's road crew being murdered when thrown down an elevator shaft, and Deep Purple being forced to play an additional concert practically at gunpoint. Bolin tragically died from a heroin overdose in December 1976, ending the Mark IV lineup for good. Coverdale would go on to form his own band, Music/{{Whitesnake}}, and Paice and Lord would join that band for several albums. Hughes had a brief stint as Music/BlackSabbath's singer and also collaborated with Joe Lynn Turner (of the Mk. V lineup) in the Hughes-Turner Project.

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American guitarist Tommy Bolin, known for his time in The James Gang, joined Deep Purple. By this time, Hughes was a cocaine addict, and Bolin turned out to be a heroin junkie. Deep Purple, never known as a junkie band, was beset with troubles as the members grappled with addictions and personal problems. A disastrous concert in `UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} resulted in one of the band's road crew being murdered when thrown down an elevator shaft, and Deep Purple being forced to play an additional concert practically at gunpoint. Bolin tragically died from a heroin overdose in December 1976, ending the Mark IV lineup for good. Coverdale would go on to form his own band, Music/{{Whitesnake}}, and Paice and Lord would join that band for several albums. Hughes had a brief stint as Music/BlackSabbath's singer and also collaborated with Joe Lynn Turner (of the Mk. V lineup) in the Hughes-Turner Project.
11th Feb '17 6:24:17 PM MarkLungo
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The band recruited bassist and vocalist Glenn Hughes from another well-known British band, Trapeze, but Blackmore sought a vocalist with a more bluesy voice to be the frontman. Frustrated by attempts to recruit Paul Rodgers (of Free and Bad Company), Deep Purple ended up selecting an unknown singer named David Coverdale from a pile of submitted tapes. This is the lineup that played at the infamous California Jam concert where Blackmore attacked the cameraman with his guitar and set off an explosion on part of the stage. Blackmore walked out on the band in 1975, at which point Deep Purple made the fateful choice to go on without him.

to:

The band recruited bassist and vocalist Glenn Hughes from another well-known British band, Trapeze, but Blackmore sought a vocalist with a more bluesy voice to be the frontman. Frustrated by attempts to recruit Paul Rodgers (of Free Music/{{Free}} and Bad Company), Music/BadCompany), Deep Purple ended up selecting an unknown singer named David Coverdale from a pile of submitted tapes. This is the lineup that played at the infamous California Jam concert where Blackmore attacked the cameraman with his guitar and set off an explosion on part of the stage. Blackmore walked out on the band in 1975, at which point Deep Purple made the fateful choice to go on without him.



American guitarist Tommy Bolin, known for his time in The James Gang, joined Deep Purple. By this time, Hughes was a cocaine addict, and Bolin turned out to be a heroin junkie. Deep Purple, never known as a junkie band, was beset with troubles as the members grappled with addictions and personal problems. A disastrous concert in Indonesia resulted in one of the band's road crew being murdered when thrown down an elevator shaft, and Deep Purple being forced to play an additional concert practically at gunpoint. Bolin tragically died from a heroin overdose in December 1976, ending the Mark IV lineup for good. Coverdale would go on to form his own band, Whitesnake, and Paice and Lord would join that band for several albums. Hughes had a brief stint as Black Sabbath's singer and also collaborated with Joe Lynn Turner (of the Mk. V lineup) in the Hughes-Turner Project.

to:

American guitarist Tommy Bolin, known for his time in The James Gang, joined Deep Purple. By this time, Hughes was a cocaine addict, and Bolin turned out to be a heroin junkie. Deep Purple, never known as a junkie band, was beset with troubles as the members grappled with addictions and personal problems. A disastrous concert in Indonesia `UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} resulted in one of the band's road crew being murdered when thrown down an elevator shaft, and Deep Purple being forced to play an additional concert practically at gunpoint. Bolin tragically died from a heroin overdose in December 1976, ending the Mark IV lineup for good. Coverdale would go on to form his own band, Whitesnake, Music/{{Whitesnake}}, and Paice and Lord would join that band for several albums. Hughes had a brief stint as Black Sabbath's Music/BlackSabbath's singer and also collaborated with Joe Lynn Turner (of the Mk. V lineup) in the Hughes-Turner Project.
11th Feb '17 6:22:21 PM MarkLungo
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Often considered the 'classic' Deep Purple lineup, Mk. II was formed when Ritchie Blackmore decided to fire Evans and Simper from the Mk. I lineup, and asked a musician acquaintance named Mick Underwood for ideas for replacements. Underwood, curiously, suggested the singer and bassist of his own band, Episode Six, by the names of Ian Gillan and Roger Glover. Gillan had recently recorded the part of Jesus on the original concept album for Music/JesusChristSuperstar when he got the Deep Purple gig. Although the band produced such classics as "Child in Time", "Highway Star", and their best known song, "Smoke on the Water", Mk. II suffered from the fraught relationship between Gillan and Blackmore. Gillan and Glover opted to leave the band (or were driven out) in 1973. Mark II would reunite in 1984, but Gillan and Blackmore proved no more able to work together than they had eleven years before (in one notable incident, Blackmore smashed a plate of spaghetti into Gillan's face). Blackmore quit Deep Purple for good in 1993.

to:

Often considered the 'classic' Deep Purple lineup, Mk. II was formed when Ritchie Blackmore decided to fire Evans and Simper from the Mk. I lineup, and asked a musician acquaintance named Mick Underwood for ideas for replacements. Underwood, curiously, suggested the singer and bassist of his own band, Episode Six, by the names of Ian Gillan and Roger Glover. Gillan had recently recorded the part of Jesus on the original concept album for Music/JesusChristSuperstar ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'' when he got the Deep Purple gig. Although the band produced such classics as "Child in Time", "Highway Star", and their best known song, "Smoke on the Water", Mk. II suffered from the fraught relationship between Gillan and Blackmore. Gillan and Glover opted to leave the band (or were driven out) in 1973. Mark II would reunite in 1984, but Gillan and Blackmore proved no more able to work together than they had eleven years before (in one notable incident, Blackmore smashed a plate of spaghetti into Gillan's face). Blackmore quit Deep Purple for good in 1993.
11th Feb '17 6:21:04 PM MarkLungo
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* ''Albums'': ''Deep Purple in Rock'' (1970), ''Fireball'' (1971), ''Machine Head'' (1972), ''Who Do We Think We Are'' (1973), ''Perfect Strangers'' (1984), ''The House of Blue Light'' (1987), ''The Battle Rages On...'' (1993).

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* ''Albums'': ''Deep Purple in Rock'' ''Music/DeepPurpleInRock'' (1970), ''Fireball'' (1971), ''Machine Head'' ''Music/MachineHead'' (1972), ''Who Do We Think We Are'' (1973), ''Perfect Strangers'' (1984), ''The House of Blue Light'' (1987), ''The Battle Rages On...'' (1993).
2nd Dec '16 8:34:56 PM Xtifr
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'''Deep Purple''' is a long-running {{hard rock}} band founded in 1968. Their style is primarily BluesRock and HardRock, with occasional ventures into other rock sub-genres, including some [[ProgressiveRock prog]] efforts. Their sound was also an influence on HeavyMetal.

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'''Deep Purple''' Deep Purple is a long-running {{hard rock}} band founded in 1968. Their style is primarily BluesRock and HardRock, with occasional ventures into other rock sub-genres, including some [[ProgressiveRock prog]] efforts. Their sound was also an influence on HeavyMetal.
23rd Oct '16 4:43:18 AM Nick7689
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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Original vocalist Rod Evans disappeared after his involvement with the infamous "Deep Purple Reunion" of 1980. He hasn't been seen or heard from since, but is apparently receiving royalties again as of 2015.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Original vocalist Rod Evans disappeared after his involvement with the infamous "Deep Purple Reunion" of 1980. He hasn't been seen or heard from since, but is apparently receiving royalties again as of 2015. Former Captain Beyond drummer Bobby Caldwell mentioned in 2015 that Rod currently works in Los Angeles as a respiratory therapist.
13th Sep '16 3:55:38 PM WhatArtThee
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'''Deep Purple''' is a long-running {{hard rock}} band founded in 1968. They are one of the widely considered "Big Three (or Four)" of early HeavyMetal (along with Music/BlackSabbath, Music/LedZeppelin, and -- if you count them -- Music/BlueCheer). Their style is primarily BluesRock and HardRock, with occasional ventures into other rock sub-genres, including some [[ProgressiveRock prog]] efforts.

to:

'''Deep Purple''' is a long-running {{hard rock}} band founded in 1968. They are one of the widely considered "Big Three (or Four)" of early HeavyMetal (along with Music/BlackSabbath, Music/LedZeppelin, and -- if you count them -- Music/BlueCheer). Their style is primarily BluesRock and HardRock, with occasional ventures into other rock sub-genres, including some [[ProgressiveRock prog]] efforts.
efforts. Their sound was also an influence on HeavyMetal.



* GenreRoulette: While they are generally considered a HardRock band, their music incorporates multiple influences. In addition, each Mark has its signature take on rock (with Mark I being more of a ProgressiveRock bent, Mark II on the harder rock / metal part, Mark III / IV known for funk influences, Mark V with an AOR sound that sounded more like '80s Music/{{Rainbow}} or Music/{{Foreigner}}, and the modern lineup being a mix of all of this).

to:

* GenreRoulette: While they are generally considered a HardRock band, their music incorporates multiple influences. In addition, each Mark has its signature take on rock (with Mark I being more of a ProgressiveRock bent, Mark II on the harder rock / metal part, Mark III / IV known for funk influences, Mark V with an AOR sound that sounded more like '80s Music/{{Rainbow}} or Music/{{Foreigner}}, and the modern lineup being a mix of all of this).



* HeavyMetal: A UrExample of the genre.

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* HeavyMetal: A UrExample of the genre.significant influence.



* MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness: Ranges from 2 ("Anyone's Daughter") to 7 ("Fireball"), but rarely goes lower than 5.

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* MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness: Ranges from 2 ("Anyone's Daughter") to 7 ("Fireball"), but rarely goes lower than 5.Generally a 5-6, sometimes as low as 2, with a few 7s.
23rd Aug '16 1:13:15 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

* UncommonTime: Generally rare in their music, but the instrumental sections of "Perfect Strangers" are in alternating bars of 4/4 and 5/4 time, up until the point where Gillan sings "I know I must remain inside this silent well of sorrow", which reverts to 4/4 time.
18th Aug '16 1:13:16 AM 06tele
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** The live version of "You Fool No One" on ''Live in London'' has an outrageous two-and-a-half-minute opening organ solo by Jon Lord, in which he goes totally nuts with a ring modulator before seguing into the well-known chorale melody from Creator/JohannSebastianBach's cantata ''BWV 147 Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben'' and finally resolving into E major for the actual song -- and then, instead of plunging straight into the song the way the album version does, it kicks off with Ian Paice playing the drum part and hammering the hell out his [[MoreCowbell cowbell]], then Blackmore plays a simpler, meaner version of the riff on guitar, then the bass joins in, and only after another couple of minutes of awesome riffage does the song get properly under way. After that, the rest of the performance is a bit of an anticlimax.

to:

** The live version of "You Fool No One" on ''Live in London'' has an outrageous two-and-a-half-minute opening organ solo by Jon Lord, in which he goes totally nuts with a ring modulator before seguing into the well-known chorale melody from Creator/JohannSebastianBach's cantata ''BWV 147 Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben'' and finally resolving into E major for the actual song -- and then, instead of plunging straight into the song the way the album version does, it kicks off with Ian Paice playing the drum part and hammering the hell out his [[MoreCowbell cowbell]], cowbell, then Blackmore plays a simpler, meaner nastier version of the riff on guitar, then the bass joins in, and only after another couple of minutes of awesome riffage does the song get properly under way. After that, the rest of the performance is a bit of an anticlimax.
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