History MissingEpisode / VideoGames

29th Oct '16 6:37:33 PM KoopaKid17
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* Back in the mid 90s, Sega had the digital distribution service known as Sega Channel. Players would receive games straight to their Genesis via a TV signal. Unfortunately, no means of storing them was provided, so the games would be lost after the system was shut down. As as result, any Sega Channel-exclusive game versions were never dumped and are now lost forever. Among them is the Sega Channel-exclusive game ''Garfield: The Lost Levels'' and the American version of ''Mega Man: The Wily Wars''.

to:

* Back in the mid 90s, Sega had the digital distribution service known as Sega Channel. Players would receive games straight to their Genesis via a TV signal. Unfortunately, no means of storing them was provided, so the games would be lost after the system was shut down. As as result, any Sega Channel-exclusive game versions were never dumped and are now lost forever. Among them is the Sega Channel-exclusive game ''Garfield: The Lost Levels'' and the American version of ''Mega Man: The Wily Wars''. The Genesis version of ''Chessmaster'' met this fate as well as it was also a Sega Channel exclusive.
29th Oct '16 11:44:55 AM nombretomado
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* The fourth game in Creator/{{Atari}}'s ''Swordquest'' series, ''Airworld'', was never developed, probably due to TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983. One of Parker Brothers' ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' games also never made it past the concept art stage (the other unreleased game, ''Ewok Adventure'', was discovered as a prototype).

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* The fourth game in Creator/{{Atari}}'s ''Swordquest'' series, ''Airworld'', was never developed, probably due to TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983.UsefulNotes/TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983. One of Parker Brothers' ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' games also never made it past the concept art stage (the other unreleased game, ''Ewok Adventure'', was discovered as a prototype).
25th Oct '16 5:08:39 PM Everdream
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** The BBC's website had a game that revolved around a ''allosaurus'' called "The Big Al game." It was pretty well made for a web game. You started as a baby and had the option of staying near your mother, who moved on her own but would protect you if you were on the same title, or venturing off. You moved one title at a time searching for food and avoiding predators, including bigger ''allosaurus,'' and even your own mother if you went against the game's advice and spent too long away from her. The game revolved around eating to get bigger. To eat, you find prey, then click to attack it and if the preys strength bar is lower than yours you eat them and if it is higher you get injured. You could find a pile of hidden eggs for lots of free food, but they attracted other small predators, which is actually a good thing if your big enough (more easy food). There is also a dead carcass, but you died if you got to close because of rushing water or something. The second to last level involved searching for some sort of sauropod migration grounds and forming a pack with other ''allosaurus'' to take one down, and if you succeeded, you spent the last level mating as many times as you could to add your score. To mate, you had to select the correct series of actions to woo the female, get it wrong and they attack, and if you selected a certain series of actions the female would ask you a random trivia question about ''allosaurus'' as a hidden joke, mate with you if you got it right, attack you if you didn't. It's unknown why this game was taken down, but now it's gone with few knowing it ever existed. Now you are one of them.
** There was also another BBC game called "Evolution" which would have been fun if it wasn't so brokenly hard. It was similar to "The Big Al game" in principle. You moved one title at a time to find food or avoid predators and in theory evolved over time into a human. In practice, no one could make it past the first 4-5 life stages without staving to death, which is probably why it got taken down.

to:

** The BBC's website had a game that revolved around a ''allosaurus'' called "The Big Al game." It was pretty well made very good for a web game. You started as a baby and had the option of staying near your mother, who moved on her own but would protect you if you were on the same title, tile, or venturing off. You moved one title tile at a time searching for food and avoiding predators, including bigger ''allosaurus,'' and even your own mother if you went against the game's advice and spent too long away from her. The game revolved around eating to get bigger. To eat, you find prey, then click to attack it and if the preys its strength bar is lower than yours you eat them and if it is higher you get injured. You could find a pile of hidden eggs for lots of free food, but they attracted other small predators, which is actually a good thing if your big enough to eat them (more easy food). There is also a dead carcass, but you died if you got to close because of rushing water or something. The second to last level involved searching for some sort of a sauropod migration grounds ground and forming a pack with other ''allosaurus'' to take one down, and if you succeeded, you spent the last level mating as many times as you could to add to your score. To mate, you had to select the correct series of actions to woo the female, get it wrong and they attack, and if you selected a certain series of actions the female would ask you a random trivia question about ''allosaurus'' as a hidden joke, mate with you if you got it right, and attack you if you didn't. It's unknown why this game was taken down, removed, but now it's gone with few knowing it ever existed. Now you are one of them.
** There was also another BBC game called "Evolution" "The Evolution Game" which would have been fun if it wasn't so brokenly hard. It was similar to "The Big Al game" in principle. You moved one title tile at a time to find food or avoid predators predators, and in theory evolved over time into a human. In practice, no one could it was impossible to make it past the first 4-5 3-4 life stages without staving to death, death or getting killed by a predator, which is probably why it eventually got taken down.
25th Oct '16 10:26:03 AM Everdream
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** The BBC's website had a game that revolved around a ''allosaurus'' called "The Big Al game." It pretty well made for a web game. You started as a baby and had the option of staying near your mother, who moved on her own but would protect you if you were on the same title, or venturing off. You moved one title at a time searching for food and avoiding predators, including bigger ''allosaurus,'' and even your own mother if you went against the game's advice and spent too long away from her. The game revolved around eating to get bigger. To eat, you find prey, then click to attack it and if the preys strength bar is lower than yours you eat them and if it is higher you get injured. You could find a pile of hidden eggs for lots of free food, but they attracted other small predators, which is actually a good thing if your big enough (more easy food). There is also a dead carcass, but you died if you got to close because of rushing water or something. The second to last level involved searching for some sort of sauropod migration grounds and forming a pack with other ''allosaurus'' to take one down, and if you succeeded, you spent the last level mating as many times as you could to add your score. To mate, you had to select the correct series of actions to woo the female, get it wrong and they attack, and if you selected a certain series of actions the female would ask you a random trivia question about ''allosaurus'' as a hidden joke, mate with you if you got it right, attack you if you didn't. It's unknown why this game was taken down, but now it's gone with few knowing it ever existed. Now you are one of them.

to:

** The BBC's website had a game that revolved around a ''allosaurus'' called "The Big Al game." It was pretty well made for a web game. You started as a baby and had the option of staying near your mother, who moved on her own but would protect you if you were on the same title, or venturing off. You moved one title at a time searching for food and avoiding predators, including bigger ''allosaurus,'' and even your own mother if you went against the game's advice and spent too long away from her. The game revolved around eating to get bigger. To eat, you find prey, then click to attack it and if the preys strength bar is lower than yours you eat them and if it is higher you get injured. You could find a pile of hidden eggs for lots of free food, but they attracted other small predators, which is actually a good thing if your big enough (more easy food). There is also a dead carcass, but you died if you got to close because of rushing water or something. The second to last level involved searching for some sort of sauropod migration grounds and forming a pack with other ''allosaurus'' to take one down, and if you succeeded, you spent the last level mating as many times as you could to add your score. To mate, you had to select the correct series of actions to woo the female, get it wrong and they attack, and if you selected a certain series of actions the female would ask you a random trivia question about ''allosaurus'' as a hidden joke, mate with you if you got it right, attack you if you didn't. It's unknown why this game was taken down, but now it's gone with few knowing it ever existed. Now you are one of them.
24th Oct '16 8:10:14 PM Everdream
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Added DiffLines:

** The BBC's website had a game that revolved around a ''allosaurus'' called "The Big Al game." It pretty well made for a web game. You started as a baby and had the option of staying near your mother, who moved on her own but would protect you if you were on the same title, or venturing off. You moved one title at a time searching for food and avoiding predators, including bigger ''allosaurus,'' and even your own mother if you went against the game's advice and spent too long away from her. The game revolved around eating to get bigger. To eat, you find prey, then click to attack it and if the preys strength bar is lower than yours you eat them and if it is higher you get injured. You could find a pile of hidden eggs for lots of free food, but they attracted other small predators, which is actually a good thing if your big enough (more easy food). There is also a dead carcass, but you died if you got to close because of rushing water or something. The second to last level involved searching for some sort of sauropod migration grounds and forming a pack with other ''allosaurus'' to take one down, and if you succeeded, you spent the last level mating as many times as you could to add your score. To mate, you had to select the correct series of actions to woo the female, get it wrong and they attack, and if you selected a certain series of actions the female would ask you a random trivia question about ''allosaurus'' as a hidden joke, mate with you if you got it right, attack you if you didn't. It's unknown why this game was taken down, but now it's gone with few knowing it ever existed. Now you are one of them.
** There was also another BBC game called "Evolution" which would have been fun if it wasn't so brokenly hard. It was similar to "The Big Al game" in principle. You moved one title at a time to find food or avoid predators and in theory evolved over time into a human. In practice, no one could make it past the first 4-5 life stages without staving to death, which is probably why it got taken down.
9th Oct '16 4:29:37 PM crazyrabbits
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* By virtue of it being a satellite broadcast system, most of the games offered on Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] Satellaview service haven't and will most likely never be re-released again. The service relied on broadcasting games and other pieces of media to those who ponied up the equivalent of an extra $140 or so to buy the peripheral in the first place. These games included unique versions of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' (with their own unique plots), a ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' GaidenGame styled after one of the minigames from the original title, a pseudo-sequel to ''VideoGame/FZero'' with new tracks and circuits, a variant of ''VideoGame/{{Excitebike}}'' with Mario as a playable character and much more. Due to the way the games were distributed, they could only be played if the person had a compatible memory pak and downloaded the title, meaning that once the service ended, very few copies of the games were left in existence. While some of the games (like the ''Zelda'' titles) have been preserved as ROM files and distributed online, plenty more have been lost in the ether.

to:

* By virtue of it being a satellite broadcast system, most of the games offered on Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] Satellaview UsefulNotes/{{Satellaview}} service haven't and will most likely never be re-released again. The service relied on broadcasting games and other pieces of media to those who ponied up the equivalent of an extra $140 or so to buy the peripheral in the first place. These games included unique versions of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' (with their own unique plots), a ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' GaidenGame styled after one of the minigames from the original title, a pseudo-sequel to ''VideoGame/FZero'' with new tracks and circuits, a variant of ''VideoGame/{{Excitebike}}'' with Mario as a playable character and much more. Due to the way the games were distributed, they could only be played if the person had a compatible memory pak and downloaded the title, meaning that once the service ended, very few copies of the games were left in existence. While some of the games (like the ''Zelda'' titles) have been preserved as ROM files and distributed online, plenty more have been lost in the ether.
9th Oct '16 4:27:33 PM crazyrabbits
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Added DiffLines:

* By virtue of it being a satellite broadcast system, most of the games offered on Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] Satellaview service haven't and will most likely never be re-released again. The service relied on broadcasting games and other pieces of media to those who ponied up the equivalent of an extra $140 or so to buy the peripheral in the first place. These games included unique versions of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' (with their own unique plots), a ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' GaidenGame styled after one of the minigames from the original title, a pseudo-sequel to ''VideoGame/FZero'' with new tracks and circuits, a variant of ''VideoGame/{{Excitebike}}'' with Mario as a playable character and much more. Due to the way the games were distributed, they could only be played if the person had a compatible memory pak and downloaded the title, meaning that once the service ended, very few copies of the games were left in existence. While some of the games (like the ''Zelda'' titles) have been preserved as ROM files and distributed online, plenty more have been lost in the ether.
14th Jul '16 10:15:40 AM Vir
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* Similar to the ''Panzer Dragoon Saga'' example above, the GameBoyAdvance version of ''Mega Man Anniversary Collection'' was cancelled because Capcom lost the original code for the original GameBoy Mega Man games and it proved too expensive to rebuild them.

to:

* Similar to the ''Panzer Dragoon Saga'' example above, the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Mega Man Anniversary Collection'' was cancelled because Capcom lost the original code for the original GameBoy UsefulNotes/GameBoy Mega Man games and it proved too expensive to rebuild them.
14th Jul '16 10:10:10 AM Vir
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* Back in the mid 90s, Sega had the digital distribution service known as Sega Channel. Players would receive games straight to their Genesis via a TV signal. Unfortunately, no means of storing them was provided, so the games would be lost after the system was shut down. As as result, any Sega Channel-exclusive game versions were never dumped and are now lost forever. Among them is the Sega Channel-exclusive game Garfield: The Lost Levels and the American version of Mega Man: The Wily Wars.

to:

* Back in the mid 90s, Sega had the digital distribution service known as Sega Channel. Players would receive games straight to their Genesis via a TV signal. Unfortunately, no means of storing them was provided, so the games would be lost after the system was shut down. As as result, any Sega Channel-exclusive game versions were never dumped and are now lost forever. Among them is the Sega Channel-exclusive game Garfield: ''Garfield: The Lost Levels Levels'' and the American version of Mega ''Mega Man: The Wily Wars.Wars''.
17th Jan '16 10:42:07 PM KamenRiderKrypton
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** WordOfGod has it that Al Lowe had intended to end the series with 3[[http://www.allowe.com/games/larry/inside-stories/is-lsl5-lsl4.html]] and thus once said that "There's not going to be a Larry 4! I'm stopping with three.". [[ExactWords Well... there isn't a 4]], but he didn't stop at 3.

to:

** WordOfGod has it that Al Lowe had intended to end the series with 3[[http://www.3 [[http://www.allowe.com/games/larry/inside-stories/is-lsl5-lsl4.html]] html and thus once said that "There's not going to be a Larry 4! I'm stopping with three.". ]] [[ExactWords Well... there isn't a 4]], but he didn't stop at 3.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=MissingEpisode.VideoGames