History MisaimedFandom / Literature

17th Jul '17 6:52:38 AM ropfa
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** In general, the novels were written with the theme that war is a horrible, bloody construct that hurts everybody involved, and especially the innocent. George R.R. Martin has been on record stating that he wished to create a dialogue with other fantasy writers, such as Tokien, who more or less glorified warfare and made it into a matter of "BlackAndWhiteMorality" versus mindlessly evil monsters or villains. In A Song of Ice and Fire, moral ambiguity abounds, with sympathetic characters committing atrocities, formerly unsympathetic characters receiving character development to make them more sympathetic, and yes, major players of all factions dying on a regular basis. The overall message is that nobody is safe in war. Meanwhile, due in part to the show's popularity, many people only know the series as one that [[KillEmAll kills off all the likable characters]] willy nilly just for shock effect and will tune in just to see the next big death.
10th Jul '17 8:24:07 AM Everlighte
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* ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'': Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy are often cited as the quintessential BelligerentSexualTension couple -- passionate dislike is just a mask for passionate love. But Elizabeth herself tells her first suitor Mr. Collins (whom she legitimately cannot stand) that [[TakeThat this is a ridiculous notion]] and sometimes, No means '''No'''; not every girl who claims to dislike a man is in denial (otherwise, she may just as well have feelings for Mr. Collins!). A paragraph comparing Elizabeth's changing feelings for Wickham and Darcy clearly shows that the initial conflict between the OfficialCouple was just supposed to show how feelings can evolve in the real world as opposed to the FairyTale LoveAtFirstSight. Dislike ''can'' evolve into love; nowhere does anyone imply dislike automatically equals love... except Mr. Collins.

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* ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'': Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy are often cited as the quintessential BelligerentSexualTension couple -- passionate dislike is just a mask for passionate love. But Elizabeth herself tells her first suitor Mr. Collins (whom she legitimately cannot stand) that [[TakeThat this is a ridiculous notion]] and sometimes, No means '''No'''; no; not every girl everyone who claims to dislike a man someone is in denial (otherwise, she may just as well have feelings for Mr. Collins!). A paragraph comparing Elizabeth's changing feelings for Wickham and Darcy clearly shows that the initial conflict between the OfficialCouple was just supposed to show how feelings can evolve in the real world as opposed to the FairyTale LoveAtFirstSight. Dislike ''can'' evolve into love; nowhere does anyone imply dislike automatically equals love... except Mr. Collins.
8th Jul '17 8:14:41 PM billybobfred
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** It should be noted, however, that Burns was a Scottish Nationalist. In another example of MisaimedFandom, Burns is commemorated by British Loyalists in Northern Ireland every year.
*** Loyalists who are also fiercely proud of their Scottish roots and who possibly disagree with the notion that to like a writer's work you have to agree with every single aspect of his philosophy and politics.
25th Jun '17 11:13:11 AM nombretomado
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* Creator/FriedrichNietzsche's writings were enthusiastically endorsed by Hitler's regime, particularly his concept of the Overman (''übermensch''), as a philosophical buttress for Nazism's ideals of "Aryan" supremacy and anti-Semitism. Nietzsche's Overman concept was an ideal for the ''individual'' to strive towards and had nothing to do with the pseudo-scientific "Aryan race" doctrines of his time. Furthermore, although Nietzsche wasn't ''pro''-Jewish, he hated German anti-Semitic groups with a passion. The MisaimedFandom was caused by Nietzsche's sister, who ''was'' an active anti-Semite, editing her brother's works to conform to her own views after he was too demented to know about it. It also didn't help that the best student of Nietzsche's philosophy, [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker Martin Heidegger]], actually ''was'' a card-carrying member of the NSDAP, and not just for the benefits; he never repented for having joined the party, although he did comment that he had joined under the mistaken assumption that Hitler would help in the program of "awakening" the German people to a better future (Hitler didn't) and that the Nazis stood for anything other than hating "non-Aryans" (Heidegger didn't, and actually had quite the case of MatzoFever). Sadly, during and for some time after WorldWarTwo, Nietzsche had an undeservedly bad reputation in much of the world as a proto-Nazi -- hence the existence of the NietzscheWannabe trope.

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* Creator/FriedrichNietzsche's writings were enthusiastically endorsed by Hitler's regime, particularly his concept of the Overman (''übermensch''), as a philosophical buttress for Nazism's ideals of "Aryan" supremacy and anti-Semitism. Nietzsche's Overman concept was an ideal for the ''individual'' to strive towards and had nothing to do with the pseudo-scientific "Aryan race" doctrines of his time. Furthermore, although Nietzsche wasn't ''pro''-Jewish, he hated German anti-Semitic groups with a passion. The MisaimedFandom was caused by Nietzsche's sister, who ''was'' an active anti-Semite, editing her brother's works to conform to her own views after he was too demented to know about it. It also didn't help that the best student of Nietzsche's philosophy, [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker Martin Heidegger]], actually ''was'' a card-carrying member of the NSDAP, and not just for the benefits; he never repented for having joined the party, although he did comment that he had joined under the mistaken assumption that Hitler would help in the program of "awakening" the German people to a better future (Hitler didn't) and that the Nazis stood for anything other than hating "non-Aryans" (Heidegger didn't, and actually had quite the case of MatzoFever). Sadly, during and for some time after WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Nietzsche had an undeservedly bad reputation in much of the world as a proto-Nazi -- hence the existence of the NietzscheWannabe trope.
14th Jun '17 2:30:07 PM AgentS7
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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' had a note from Creator/MarkTwain's note at the beginning which strongly disavowed didactic attempts to explain the story. It's used for exactly that purpose in many literature courses.

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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' had a note from Creator/MarkTwain's note Creator/MarkTwain at the beginning which strongly disavowed didactic attempts threatening to explain shoot any readers attempting to see real life subtext in the story. It's used for exactly that purpose in many literature courses. [[SubvertedTrope Probably subverted, however, as not falling in line with what powerful people want you to do is the main theme of the entire book.]]
20th May '17 1:27:09 PM wedekit
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*** In the first book, A Game of Thrones, her Dothraki husband and his army begin enslaving the pacifist Lhazareen people in order to sell them to slavers. The gold earned is to be used to fund her invasion of Westeros. Daenerys is praised for speaking out against the Dothraki raping the village girls and women and taking them under her protection. However, she still determines it to be acceptable (ends justify means) to sack defenseless peoples and convert them into property in order to fund a war to push her claim. She also does not speak out at the killing of children, elderly, or those that somehow displease the warriors.

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*** In the first book, A Game of Thrones, her Dothraki husband and his army begin enslaving sacking villages of the pacifist Lhazareen people in order to sell them to slavers.and enslaving them. The gold earned is to be used to fund her invasion of Westeros. Daenerys is praised for speaking out against the Dothraki raping the village girls and women and taking them under her protection. However, she still determines it to be acceptable (ends justify means) to sack defenseless peoples and convert them into property in order to fund a war to push her claim. She also does not speak out at the killing of children, elderly, or those that somehow displease the warriors.
20th May '17 1:24:52 PM wedekit
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** Daenerys Targaryen has several moments where her character takes a dramatic action that is [[MomentOfAwesome highly memorable]]. The impact and drama of these moments cause many people to focus on the innocents she saves rather than everyone else around her.
*** In the first book, A Game of Thrones, her Dothraki husband and his army begin enslaving the pacifist Lhazareen people in order to sell them to slavers. The gold earned is to be used to fund her invasion of Westeros. Daenerys is praised for speaking out against the Dothraki raping the village girls and women and taking them under her protection. However, she still determines it to be acceptable (ends justify means) to sack defenseless peoples and convert them into property in order to fund a war to push her claim. She also does not speak out at the killing of children, elderly, or those that somehow displease the warriors.
*** Later, in A Storm of Swords, she has a change in opinion about slavery and sparks a conquest on Slaver's Bay to liberate slaves. Her turning on the Wise Masters after she controls the army of unsullied is considering by many to be a highlight of her character as it marks her path as a slave liberator. Her motivation to do this is controversial: at best she was trying to save innocent people (which she states Queens and Kings are duty-bound to protect), and at worst she was taking an army of slaves that she could not afford by double crossing the slavers. The best case scenario, saving innocents being oppressed, tends to be the prominent view. However, moments later, she orders her newly-obtained army to kill all people of the city (save children 12 and under) that are Wise Masters (slave peddlers), carrying whips, soldiers, or wearing tokars (a robe-like garb of the aristocracy). Doubtless, in regards to the latter two groups, there are hundreds (if not thousands) of innocents that become victims of this order. She then spends most of the 5th book donning tokars regularly as a symbols of assimilating with the culture of Meereen.
20th Mar '17 12:52:28 AM Monsund
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** While Merope is a certified JerkassWoobie, some fans tend to sympathize with Merope too much. To the point of claiming her using a LovePotion on Tom Riddle was justified; even going so far as to claim Tom Riddle was the bad one, pointing to a few scenes where he's described as a snob (this is ignoring his PetTheDog moments like taking care of his elderly parents), and him leaving a pregnant Merope and never even bothering to find out what happened to his child, never mind the fact that he was mind-controlled and magically raped, and didn't consent to the relationship in the first place. [[DoubleStandard This would not exist if it were Tom who did this to Merope, mind you.]]



** While Merope is a JerkassWoobie, some fans tend to sympathize with Merope too much. To the point of claiming her using a LovePotion on Tom Riddle was justified; even going so far as to claim Tom Riddle was the bad one, pointing to a few scenes where he's described as a snob (this is ignoring his PetTheDog moments like taking care of his elderly parents), and him leaving a pregnant Merope and never even bothering to find out what happened to his child, never mind the fact that he was mind-controlled and magically raped, and didn't consent to the relationship in the first place. [[DoubleStandard This would not exist if it were Tom who did this to Merope, mind you.]]
20th Mar '17 12:51:27 AM Monsund
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** While Merope is a JerkassWoobie, some fans tend to sympathize with Merope too much. To the point of claiming her using a LovePotion on Tom Riddle was justified; even going so far as to claim Tom Riddle was the bad one, pointing to a few scenes where he's described as a snob (this is ignoring his PetTheDog moments like taking care of his elderly parents), and him leaving a pregnant Merope and never even bothering to find out what happened to his child, never mind the fact that he was mind-controlled and magically raped, and didn't consent to the relationship in the first place. [[DoubleStandard This would not exist if it were Tom who did this to Merope, mind you.]]
25th Jan '17 8:21:42 AM DrBB
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* Aside from all the uncertainties surrounding him, King Arthur can certainly be linked to two specific cultures, namely Breton/Welsh and Norman. Let's sum it up: there are five authors whose writings are considered the litterary basis of the Arthurian legend ; Geoffrey of Monmouth (a Welsh cleric), Wace (a Norman poet), Marie de France (a French poetess), Robert de Boron (a French(-Norman) poet) and last but not least Chrétien de Troyes (a French cleric). All of them wrote/compiled stories of Arthur and his court rooted in Breton/Welsh/Gallic legendary settings, stories all written in either Latin or a variation of Ancient French (Picard, Anglo-Norman). In those stories, apart from the fiefs of the knights being located in either Brittany, Wales or Cornwall, the authors made it crystal clear that Arthur and his realm is fighting a neverending war against ''Saxons'' trying to invade the British Isles. The first king to use thoses legends to promote himself? William the Conqueror, in order to legitimate the Norman reign (with Breton help) on Saxon subjects in England. Yet, to this day, you will still find Englishmen/Americans (Anglo-''Saxons'') talking about "our glorious semi-legendary king Arthur, protector of England".

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* Aside from all the uncertainties surrounding him, King Arthur can certainly be linked to two specific cultures, namely Breton/Welsh and Norman. Let's sum it up: there are five authors whose writings are considered the litterary literary basis of the Arthurian legend ; Geoffrey of Monmouth (a Welsh cleric), Wace (a Norman poet), Marie de France (a French poetess), Robert de Boron (a French(-Norman) poet) and last but not least Chrétien de Troyes (a French cleric). All of them wrote/compiled stories of Arthur and his court rooted in Breton/Welsh/Gallic legendary settings, stories all written in either Latin or a variation of Ancient French (Picard, Anglo-Norman). In those stories, apart from the fiefs of the knights being located in either Brittany, Wales or Cornwall, the authors made it crystal clear that Arthur and his realm is fighting a neverending war against ''Saxons'' trying to invade the British Isles. The first king to use thoses legends to promote himself? William the Conqueror, in order to legitimate the Norman reign (with Breton help) on Saxon subjects in England. Yet, to this day, you will still find Englishmen/Americans (Anglo-''Saxons'') talking about "our glorious semi-legendary king Arthur, protector of England".
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