History MisaimedFandom / ComicBooks

16th Oct '17 9:06:19 AM KrspaceT
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* ''Comicbook/{{Icon}}'' was written by the late great Dwayne McDuffie and had a massive big name fan in the form of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. The problem: Dwayne McDuffie ''did not like'' Clarence Thomas, calling him Scalia's Lapdog among other insults. It was to a point the fandom of Justice Thomas gave McDuffie ''writers block'' with the question of if he was just giving Scalia and the black neoconservative movement quotes (as Icon was written as a conservative hero to contrast with a younger, liberal partner in Rocket).
4th Sep '17 2:58:22 PM CantNotLookAtThisSite
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*** While we're on the subject, Fawkes was not an anarchist, as depicted in the novel, but a radical Catholic who disliked the Protestant king and wanted to wipe him and the rest of the Protestant government out in one fell swoop in order to restore the Pope as the authority in Britain. Yet, because of ''V for Vendetta'' and Alan Moore's probably-deliberately ironic use of Fawkes's image to depict an anarchist rebel rather than a Catholic nationalist, most Americans and even some British people think of him as one.
22nd Aug '17 6:33:41 AM SpukiKitty
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12th Aug '17 11:42:21 AM Doug86
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* ComicBook/{{Lobo}} started as a generic mercenary before being retooled by creator Keith Giffen as a parody of eighties "grim and gritty" heroes like ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher in a series of mini-series books. Needless to say, Lobo became a big hit with fans who took the satire at face value.

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* ComicBook/{{Lobo}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Lobo}} started as a generic mercenary before being retooled by creator Keith Giffen as a parody of eighties "grim and gritty" heroes like ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher in a series of mini-series books. Needless to say, Lobo became a big hit with fans who took the satire at face value.
24th Jul '17 7:03:37 PM MBG
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* This happens with a lot of "satire" characters where the author "exaggerates" them just by taking all the elements that people seem to like in other shows and lumping them together without actually exaggerating anything. We've seen this in reverse with films like ''Film/SuckerPunch'', intended to "parody" exploitation literature but garnering reactions as if they were genuine because, well, the creators forgot the part where they make the thing they're parodying more ridiculous or extreme than the source material.

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* This happens with a lot of "satire" characters where the author "exaggerates" them just by taking all the elements that people seem to like in other shows and lumping them together without actually exaggerating anything. We've seen this in reverse with films like ''Film/SuckerPunch'', intended to "parody" exploitation literature but garnering reactions as if they were genuine because, well, the creators forgot the part where they make the thing they're parodying more ridiculous or extreme than the source material. And even if they do make it more ridiculous or extreme, then, considering they operate in a genre based on impressive and bizarre events, all they really did was ''[[BeyondTheImpossible top]]'' the original.
22nd Jul '17 6:23:06 PM MBG
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* ''ComicBook/TheMultiversity'''s fifth chapter, ''[[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Thunderworld Adventures]]'', was intended to suggest the folly of the NostalgiaFilter belief that the way to "save comics" is to go back to the Silver Age, with the world depicted being a very subtle CrapSaccharineWorld with MonochromeCasting, ValuesDissonance, a few JerkAss bits, and [[MoodWhiplash several abruptly dark moments]]. The entire plot of the issue is also based on the villain stealing time to unnaturally create the story's events, implying that nostalgia-focused storytelling is something that can't last. However, these subtle moments and undercurrents were completely undercut by the fact that it happened to be the best-regarded ''Captain Marvel'' story in decades, and people were more than willing to overlook the occasional disturbing undertone if it meant having a Captain Marvel who's named Captain Marvel, has wacky fun clever adventures, and fights his actual nemesis, rather than being stuck in a DorkAge moping and doping while ComicBook/BlackAdam [[BreakoutVillain hogs the spotlight]].
21st Jun '17 5:39:03 AM Doug86
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* ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' in general isn't necessarily immune to this. Mark Waid's Justice League story ''Tower of Babel'' was designed to criticize the character's prep time paranoia tendencies by [[spoiler:showing that he'd secretly been thinking up ways to kill or incapacitate his Justice League allies for years, only to have them fall into the wrong hands, thus placing the entire world in jeopardy]], but unfortunately all some fans came away with was "BATMAN'S THE SMARTEST, MOST BAD ASS HERO EVER!!!"
** The emergence of comics like ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}, with its BewareTheSuperman concept, also tends to put Batman in a better light in this storyline, given just how dangerous a lot of heroes could be if they really wanted to be.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' in general isn't necessarily immune to this. Mark Waid's Justice League story ''Tower of Babel'' was designed to criticize the character's prep time paranoia tendencies by [[spoiler:showing that he'd secretly been thinking up ways to kill or incapacitate his Justice League allies for years, only to have them fall into the wrong hands, thus placing the entire world in jeopardy]], but unfortunately all some fans came away with was "BATMAN'S THE SMARTEST, MOST BAD ASS HERO EVER!!!"
EVER!!!"
** The emergence of comics like ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}, ''ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}'', with its BewareTheSuperman concept, also tends to put Batman in a better light in this storyline, given just how dangerous a lot of heroes could be if they really wanted to be.
19th Jun '17 6:36:41 AM system
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19th Jun '17 4:11:09 AM DeathToTVTropes
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** Furthermore, [[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bf/Dykes_to_Watch_Out_For_%28Bechdel_test_origin%29.jpg the original comic]] (which appeared in a collection called ''Dykes to Watch Out For'' and was described by the author as "a little lesbian joke") was more about compulsory heterosexuality in media - obviously, it's next to impossible to find a movie that depicts a romantic relationship between women if there's barely any movies that depict them in ''platonic'' relationships. That most people don't know this ''really'' speaks about the degree of mis-aiming that's occurred.

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** Furthermore, [[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bf/Dykes_to_Watch_Out_For_%28Bechdel_test_origin%29.jpg the original comic]] (which appeared in was part of a collection comic strip called ''Dykes to Watch Out For'' and was described by the author as "a little lesbian joke") was more about compulsory heterosexuality in media - obviously, it's next to impossible to find a movie that depicts a romantic relationship between women if there's barely any movies that depict them in ''platonic'' relationships. That most people don't know this ''really'' speaks about the degree of mis-aiming that's occurred.
19th Jun '17 4:08:17 AM DeathToTVTropes
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* This happens with a lot of "satire" characters where the author "exaggerates" them just by taking all the elements that people seem to like in other shows and lumping them together without actually exaggerating anything. We've seen this in reverse with films like ''Film/SuckerPunch'', intended to "parody" exploitation literature but garnering reactions as if they were genuine because, well, the creators forgot the part where they make the thing they're parodying more ridiculous or extreme than the source material.

to:

* This happens with a lot of "satire" characters where the author "exaggerates" them just by taking all the elements that people seem to like in other shows and lumping them together without actually exaggerating anything. We've seen this in reverse with films like ''Film/SuckerPunch'', intended to "parody" exploitation literature but garnering reactions as if they were genuine because, well, the creators forgot the part where they make the thing they're parodying more ridiculous or extreme than the source material.
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