History Manga / Area88

12th Dec '16 10:04:20 AM Nopperabo
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* {{Omniglot}}: Several characters speak multiple languages fluently.
** Shin speaks his native Japanese, French, and at Area 88, English. The original Japanese dub of the OVA features Shin calling out aerial commands in thickly-accented English.
** Saki speaks his native Arabic, English at Area 88, and French when he travels in Europe.
** Greg speaks his native Danish, English at Area 88, and presumably speaks to an Asranian child in Arabic.
5th Dec '16 7:45:33 PM Ominae
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* EliteMooks: The MiG-[=23=]s in the 2004 series.
* EvilCounterpart: In the 2004 series, the rebels began to recruit pro-rebel mercenaries of their own [[spoiler:including ex-US Navy pilot Patrick Reed]].
4th Nov '16 8:25:15 PM Arima
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* BattleshipRaid: The final boss of the arcade version is a huge battleship, fought in a way somewhat similar to the Cerberus from ''ThunderForce III''. On a smaller scale, there's the naval battleship Minks and that carrier in the desert.

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* BattleshipRaid: The final boss of the arcade version is a huge battleship, fought in a way somewhat similar to the Cerberus from ''ThunderForce III''. On a smaller scale, there's the naval battleship Minks and that land carrier in the desert.



* ForcedLevelGrinding: The game is rare shmup example; your chances of making it all the way through are highly dependent on how soon you can store up a million dollars for the F200 Efreet, so be prepared to kill a lot of convoys.

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* ForcedLevelGrinding: The game is rare shmup example; your chances of making it all the way through are highly dependent on how soon you can store up a million dollars for the F200 Efreet, so be prepared to kill a lot of convoys.convoys (the only infinite source of money).



* InfinityPlusOneSword: The [=F200=] in the SNES port. The most expensive ship, it can use any special weapon and gets more shots of them. Oh, and its main gun can be powered up to level seven, while almost every other plane is capped at level five.

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* InfinityPlusOneSword: The [=F200=] in the SNES port. The most expensive ship, aircraft, it can use any special weapon and gets more shots of them. Oh, and its main gun can be powered up to level seven, while almost every other plane is capped at level five.



* LifeMeter: The arcade version has a more traditional life meter. In the SNES version, taking damage will lower your life, but not before shortly putting you into "DANGER" mode in which taking a hit will destroy you instantly. If your life drops too low, you will permanently remain in DANGER mode until you die, clear the stage, or restore your life.

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* LifeMeter: The arcade version has a more traditional life meter. In the SNES version, taking damage will lower your life, but not before shortly putting you into "DANGER" mode in which taking a second hit during that time will destroy you instantly. If your life drops too low, you will permanently remain in DANGER mode until you die, clear the stage, or restore your life.



* RecursiveAmmo: The Seavet submarine launches missiles that release smaller projectiles when shot down. If not shot down, they detonate off-screen and the projectiles rain down across most of the screen.

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* NotTheIntendedUse: Bombs can be used to destroy the annoying AV-8 Harrier enemy which enters from the left edge of the screen and cannot be attacked normally until it starts flying into the middle of the screen.
* RecursiveAmmo: The Seavet nuclear missile submarine Seavet launches missiles that release smaller projectiles when shot down. If not shot down, they detonate off-screen and the projectiles rain down across most of the screen.
10th Oct '16 9:12:14 AM Nopperabo
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* NoodlePeople: Most noticeable in the manga, though some of it also carries over to the OVA. Shintani did start as an assistant to Creator/LeijiMatsumoto, after all.

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* NoodlePeople: Most noticeable in the manga, though some of it also carries over to the OVA. Most of the adult characters are tall, rail-thin, and long-legged, sometimes ridiculously so. Shintani did start as an assistant to Creator/LeijiMatsumoto, after all.



* RammingAlwaysWorks: Subverted in the manga when one pilot tries to ram the land carrier's elevator with his critically damaged plane. He misses.

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* RammingAlwaysWorks: RammingAlwaysWorks:
**
Subverted in the manga when one pilot Campbell tries to ram the land carrier's elevator with his critically damaged plane. He misses.
9th Oct '16 11:48:12 PM TechPriest90
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* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: Asran is a nation stuck in a CivilWar between a [[MajoredInWesternHypocrisy (mostly)]] western-style Monarchy which is selling oil to the West and is dead against the Soviets, against [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized an anti-government group]] which has a set of people - led by a spiritually-inclined member of the Asran Royal Family, no less - demanding a return to their roots and a more traditional and representative government based on the old ways, and hates the West. It's also set in and around TheSeventies. [[UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} Hmm...]]
13th Jul '16 9:20:26 AM Nopperabo
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* CriticalResearchFailure:
** Shintani appears to have done no research on the clothing or customs of various North African cultures, if his cartoonish depictions of Bedouins and Asranians are anything to go by.
** The pilots at Area 88 merely sign their names to a one-page contract in order to enlist as mercenaries. In real life, private contractors must go through a lengthy process before signing a ''very'' long contract.
** In the manga and OVA, the pilots only wear G-suits, harnesses, helmets, gloves, and boots during missions. In real life, pilots also wear survival vests (containing supplies they'll need if they crash), liners under their G-suits, and relief bags in front of their G-suits. The G-suits worn in the manga and OVA have few pockets and are skin-tight, whereas real-life G-suits have multiple pockets and are not tight.
13th Jul '16 9:20:06 AM Nopperabo
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* CriticalResearchFailure:
** Shintani appears to have done no research on the clothing or customs of various North African cultures, if his cartoonish depictions of Bedouins and Asranians are anything to go by.
** The pilots at Area 88 merely sign their names to a one-page contract in order to enlist as mercenaries. In real life, private contractors must go through a lengthy process before signing a ''very'' long contract.
** In the manga and OVA, the pilots only wear G-suits, harnesses, helmets, gloves, and boots during missions. In real life, pilots also wear survival vests (containing supplies they'll need if they crash), liners under their G-suits, and relief bags in front of their G-suits. The G-suits worn in the manga and OVA have few pockets and are skin-tight, whereas real-life G-suits have multiple pockets and are not tight.



** Averted with regard to other details of the manga. Shintani seems to have done little research on private contractors, military life, Islam, or Middle Eastern cultures.
11th Jul '16 8:12:07 AM Nopperabo
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* TheNotLoveInterest: Shin and Mickey have this dynamic in the manga. The two men are frequently in each other's company and confide in each other. Mickey protects Shin on several occasions, and when he hears that Shin has been shot down, he immediately rushes off to find him. Shin's relationship with Mickey seems much deeper than his relationship with Ryoko.
19th May '16 11:21:07 PM Eyeshield
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* DownerEnding: the OVA shows two, because one is not enough. Shin, free at last, is so unfit for civilian life that he forfeits his romantic plans on Ryoko and returns to Area 88 in his warplane...just as, after the war is lost, his companions charge into a last desperate battle. The tragedy of Ryoko, left alone against Kanzaki, remains implied.

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* DownerEnding: the The OVA shows two, because one is not enough. Shin, free at last, is so unfit for civilian life that he forfeits his romantic plans on Ryoko and returns to Area 88 in his warplane...just as, after the war is lost, his companions charge into a last desperate battle. The tragedy of Ryoko, left alone against Kanzaki, remains implied.


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* MidSeasonUpgrade: Shin originally pilots an F-8 Crusader, but eventually upgrades to the F-20A Tigershark.
3rd Apr '16 3:32:58 PM GrammarNavi
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A arcade ShootEmUp (HorizontalScrollingShooter) featuring Shin, Mickey, and Greg as playable pilots, and McCoy and Saki as support characters, was made by {{Capcom}} and later ported to the SNES. (In the US, both the arcade and SNES versions were given the name ''U.N. Squadron.'') The games share very little with the series (although it did use bounties as a way for the player to buy {{Power Up}}s between levels). The arcade version featured three different types of planes assigned for each character: Shin flew the F-20, Mickey the F-14, and Greg the A-10. The SNES version differentiated characters by how quickly they leveled up the main weapon and how quickly they recovered from damage; all characters started with the same plane (the F-8E Crusader, Shin's starting plane in the series). It also eschewed the arcade's linear stage progression with an expanding mission map, the ability to buy other planes (including the Tomcat and Thunderbolt), and moving stages such as supply convoy raids and bomber interceptions. It got an SpiritualSuccessor in the shape of ''VideoGame/CarrierAirwing'', when Capcom lost the rights of the manga along the way.

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A arcade ShootEmUp (HorizontalScrollingShooter) featuring Shin, Mickey, and Greg as playable pilots, and McCoy [=McCoy=] and Saki as support characters, was made by {{Capcom}} and later ported to the SNES. (In the US, both the arcade and SNES versions were given the name ''U.N. Squadron.'') The games share very little with the series (although it did use bounties as a way for the player to buy {{Power Up}}s between levels). The arcade version featured three different types of planes assigned for each character: Shin flew the F-20, Mickey the F-14, and Greg the A-10. The SNES version differentiated characters by how quickly they leveled up the main weapon and how quickly they recovered from damage; all characters started with the same plane (the F-8E Crusader, Shin's starting plane in the series). It also eschewed the arcade's linear stage progression with an expanding mission map, the ability to buy other planes (including the Tomcat and Thunderbolt), and moving stages such as supply convoy raids and bomber interceptions. It got an SpiritualSuccessor in the shape of ''VideoGame/CarrierAirwing'', when Capcom lost the rights of the manga along the way.
This list shows the last 10 events of 176. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Manga.Area88