History Main / ZooM

8th Apr '15 5:43:01 PM rodneyAnonymous
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Consider also the Zoom EstablishingShot, where a camera starts off showing a building (and the sign in front telling you what the building is) and then tilts, pans and zooms in on a window to indicate that the next shot you see is ''totally'' taking place in that room, and not on a set on a soundstage in a completely different city. Popular in the Seventies, it became something of a DeadHorseTrope once anyone with home video gear could do it (usually, it must be said, badly).

to:

Consider also the Zoom EstablishingShot, where a camera starts off showing a building (and the sign in front telling you what the building is) and then tilts, pans and zooms in on a window to indicate that the next shot you see is ''totally'' taking place in that room, and not on a set on a soundstage in a completely different city. Popular in the Seventies, it became something of a DeadHorseTrope once anyone with home video gear could do it (usually, it must be said, badly).
it.
17th Jun '13 9:28:01 AM MRAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Cinematographers, the kind that shoot on actual film, don't like the zoom lens. The increased amount of glass the light must pass through in order to reach the film causes distortion and increases the chance for LensFlare and other forms of glare. Also, the extensive planning that goes into each shot limits the need for on-the-fly focal length adjustments. The tube/CCD in a video camera has less resolution and contrast sensitivity than film, and thus is less vulnerable to these complaints.

to:

Cinematographers, the kind that shoot on actual film, don't like the zoom lens. The increased amount of glass the light must pass through in order to reach the film causes distortion and increases the chance for LensFlare and other forms of glare. Also, the extensive planning that goes into each shot limits the need for on-the-fly focal length adjustments. The tube/CCD in a video camera has less resolution and contrast sensitivity than film, and thus is less vulnerable to these complaints.
complaints, but over-use of zoom (particularly if the zoomed shot is not in focus, or if the zoom is jerky rather than smooth) is now fairly firmly ingrained in Western audiences as visual shorthand for "amateurish".

Consider also the Zoom EstablishingShot, where a camera starts off showing a building (and the sign in front telling you what the building is) and then tilts, pans and zooms in on a window to indicate that the next shot you see is ''totally'' taking place in that room, and not on a set on a soundstage in a completely different city. Popular in the Seventies, it became something of a DeadHorseTrope once anyone with home video gear could do it (usually, it must be said, badly).
This list shows the last 2 events of 2. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ZooM